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Uncanny X-Men: Manifest Destiny

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Witness the biggest shake-up in X-Men history. With the mansion in Westchester destroyed, the X-Men are moving to San Francisco. But it's not just a change in the zip code. Come see what the momentous change in status quo means to the X-Men. Collects Uncanny X-Men #500-503, X-Men Free Comic Book Day, and Manifest Destiny #1-5.


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Witness the biggest shake-up in X-Men history. With the mansion in Westchester destroyed, the X-Men are moving to San Francisco. But it's not just a change in the zip code. Come see what the momentous change in status quo means to the X-Men. Collects Uncanny X-Men #500-503, X-Men Free Comic Book Day, and Manifest Destiny #1-5.

30 review for Uncanny X-Men: Manifest Destiny

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I enjoyed this one. It basically tells the story of the X-Men relocating to San Francisco after the destruction of the old Westchester Mansion and it has a nice feeling of fresh starts and hope to it, despite the fact that there are fair number of setbacks along the way. To be honest, I'd have given this four stars if it weren't for some of the artwork being below par.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Kind of a weird, mixed collection, but pretty decent overall. The book starts with a Comic Book Day freebie, starring Pixie, which is a rather good Monster of the Week type thing. The "main" storyline is... Well, it's weird. There's some very strange BDSM overlays that seem forced. It's got a great kicker of an ending, though. (view spoiler)[Maddie Pryor's return. You know, I always felt bad for her. Scott calls her his "dead ex-wife", but I was pretty sure he'd never divorced her, just run off Kind of a weird, mixed collection, but pretty decent overall. The book starts with a Comic Book Day freebie, starring Pixie, which is a rather good Monster of the Week type thing. The "main" storyline is... Well, it's weird. There's some very strange BDSM overlays that seem forced. It's got a great kicker of an ending, though. (view spoiler)[Maddie Pryor's return. You know, I always felt bad for her. Scott calls her his "dead ex-wife", but I was pretty sure he'd never divorced her, just run off with Jean without ever telling her he was going. Does anybody wonder why she turned evil? (hide spoiler)] Roughly half the book is the Manifest Destiny miniseries, basically short, character centered pieces about the move to San Francisco. These vary quite a bit in quality. There are some really good ones, like the Cyclops and Emma focused stories, or the one titled Abomination. Some of them are blah, like the Dazzler one. And then there was the tiresome Juggernaut story. Oh, and one with a mutant apparently called Mercury having a conversation with... somebody. I'm honestly not sure who. Like I said, it's a mixed bag, but mostly decent. Probably not the splashy opening to the San Francisco X-Men that many readers would have hoped for.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed

    Someone, please, shoot Greg Land!

  4. 4 out of 5

    James

    3.25 stars. The main part of the book, issues #500-503 was pretty good. The X-men have set up shop in San Francisco. However, this city has its own group of mutant hating folk that needs to be dealt with. But it’s really all about who was leading them. The free comic book day issue was pretty cool too. A nice little story focusing on Pixie. The back half of the book, X-men manifest destiny #1-5 wasn’t really all that great.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Arturo

    X-Men move to San Francisco and just have a fun time with the changes. Magneto attacks also using the Sentinels, as what seems a precursor to a later story. Seems outta place but i guess cuz its issue 500. Pixie has a bad time thanks to a Hellfire Cult. And Empath causes trouble. And Dazzler returns. Also included short stories..

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elin the Lightship

    I actually love Pixie so I enjoyed the Uncanny-issues. But not as much as I thought I would. And nothing of real importance occurred and it almost felt like a waste of time. But the Pixie and Emma Frost-parts made it worth it somewhat. Could have been so much more though.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    Almost a feel good arc, as the X-Men leave the utterly gutted mansion and go west... to inclusive, tolerant San Francisco... all a bit meh, great intention, but it all feels like to have come out of nowhere, like a number of the returning X-Men in the Brubaker arcs. 6 out of 12, max I'm afraid.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    The beginning of Matt Fraction's run for real. He's still sharing duties with Brubaker, but they obviously work well together (their work on Iron Fist was great too). I like the story, the beginning of their time in San Fran. Scott and Emma are great. Pixie's arc throughout this books is young X-man stuff. All the side stories in this book are great too. The only flaw is that most of the main books drawn by Greg Land. Ugh. He's constantly drawing weird uncanny valley almost photorealistic people The beginning of Matt Fraction's run for real. He's still sharing duties with Brubaker, but they obviously work well together (their work on Iron Fist was great too). I like the story, the beginning of their time in San Fran. Scott and Emma are great. Pixie's arc throughout this books is young X-man stuff. All the side stories in this book are great too. The only flaw is that most of the main books drawn by Greg Land. Ugh. He's constantly drawing weird uncanny valley almost photorealistic people in unnatural poses. I know he's going for sexy, but he can't even pull that off. There's a sequence where Emma Frost gets up in the middle of the night and is naked talking to Cyclops, and it's not hot at all, she's just one step up from a Rob Liefeld drawing. Terrible. That said, most of the characters are not as terribly done as Emma, thank god. Matt is definitely getting his feel for the characters and the X-world, setting up his plots. A good beginning.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Liana

    Just a (non-comprehensive) idea of what was going on in my head while I was reading this: - when the fuck was the last time I read a comic book and why on Earth did I ever stop? - I've missed the X-fam so much - I WOULD DIE FOR EMMA FROST -Emma/Scott still own my heart, when will I get the movie version I deserve - DAZZLER !!!!!! - "These are two hundred dollar Italian cashmere Kiki de Montparnasse stockings, Kurt. I'll only kneel in them if absolutely necessary" - Emma Frost when asked if she prays Just a (non-comprehensive) idea of what was going on in my head while I was reading this: - when the fuck was the last time I read a comic book and why on Earth did I ever stop? - I've missed the X-fam so much - I WOULD DIE FOR EMMA FROST -Emma/Scott still own my heart, when will I get the movie version I deserve - DAZZLER !!!!!! - "These are two hundred dollar Italian cashmere Kiki de Montparnasse stockings, Kurt. I'll only kneel in them if absolutely necessary" - Emma Frost when asked if she prays -Why did the illustration style have to change, the first one was so. much. better. - That Logan/Emma scene? TEARS -I loved the Uncanny X-Men arc, but the Manifest Destiny arc was a bit strange, not sure I'm a fan of the overall structure.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    The Matt Fraction UXM stuff was great. The actual Manifest Destiny stuff was meh. I guess I just don’t really love those “events” where it’s just a bunch of little looks at the characters. They just did this with Divided We Stand. Do we really need another one? It gets old. All that aside, nothing here was bad, although the art in a couple of the Manifest Destiny vignettes left much to be desired. Another thing; I take back some of the shit I’ve talked about Greg Land. The stuff he does with Fract The Matt Fraction UXM stuff was great. The actual Manifest Destiny stuff was meh. I guess I just don’t really love those “events” where it’s just a bunch of little looks at the characters. They just did this with Divided We Stand. Do we really need another one? It gets old. All that aside, nothing here was bad, although the art in a couple of the Manifest Destiny vignettes left much to be desired. Another thing; I take back some of the shit I’ve talked about Greg Land. The stuff he does with Fraction looks really good. Maybe he’s decided to stop tracing magazines! All in all, this is a decent collection. I already have all the Fraction stuff in a separate trade, so I can’t factor that too highly here. Just based on the title arc, this is a solid 3.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Terry Murphy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Brubaker has this keen ability to take the fantastic, and ground it within something more tangible, and more relatable. I enjoyed this new direction for the series, and it felt like it was laying the groundwork for something more inpressive, but the landmark issue was somewhat underwhelming and the overall cohesion between the titles still isn't completely felt (Wasn't Forge a nutter just across the way in Astonishing X-Men, guys...?) Still enjoyable, and the pencils are crisp and clean (even if Brubaker has this keen ability to take the fantastic, and ground it within something more tangible, and more relatable. I enjoyed this new direction for the series, and it felt like it was laying the groundwork for something more inpressive, but the landmark issue was somewhat underwhelming and the overall cohesion between the titles still isn't completely felt (Wasn't Forge a nutter just across the way in Astonishing X-Men, guys...?) Still enjoyable, and the pencils are crisp and clean (even if Land's idolatry of women is a little unsettling at times...).

  12. 4 out of 5

    C

    Continuing the great x-read of 2017/18.... This one is slightly hard to rate as it is more a collection of short stories than anything else. That said, it is one of the more enjoyable x-books that I have read for awhile. There are some pretty deep character dives and most of them are quite well done. Also, I freaking love Pixie.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    This whole "the X-Men are moving to San Francisco" thing seems like such an arbitrary, random decision. The reasoning seems to be that, since mutants are a hated race that is continually prejudiced against, the natural place for them to move is the open, accepting San Francisco. Fine, I guess, except moving to SF has done nothing to change their situation? Right away after moving they are set upon by a gang of mutant-hating skinheads lead by the Hellfire Club, who I guess is out west, too. So, m This whole "the X-Men are moving to San Francisco" thing seems like such an arbitrary, random decision. The reasoning seems to be that, since mutants are a hated race that is continually prejudiced against, the natural place for them to move is the open, accepting San Francisco. Fine, I guess, except moving to SF has done nothing to change their situation? Right away after moving they are set upon by a gang of mutant-hating skinheads lead by the Hellfire Club, who I guess is out west, too. So, moving to this progressive city didn't seem to do anything to drive away the threat of hate and violence, since that only lasted about 2 days. There are no actual changes to the the way the X-Men operate except that they're in a different time zone. Beyond this, the storyline with Magneto showing up is some of the dumbest, most wasteful storytelling I've seen in a long time in X-Men. We've been seeing Magneto in fleeting glimpses since House of M, still powerless, trying to regain the foothold he once had in the mutant community. So in this one he just shows up and starts fighting the X-Men for no apparent reason, and is soundly defeated pretty quickly. The implication is that he has other plans, but we're given absolutely no idea what they are, so it just kind of slips past as a massive anti-climax. The rest of the book, while not really fitting the whole San Francisco thing, is decent. The X-Men have to fight a powerful empath who is committing hate crimes against his own people. The story's really straightforward, but it's got some classic X-Men team action that's plenty fun to see, so I'll give it a pass. The remaining short stories culled from the central Manifest Destiny series range from lackluster to terrible, but luckily they only make up the very tail end of the book, and feel more like a bonus than anything else. So, skipping those is a definite option. Overall, I just feel like Brubaker had no idea what to do with the X-Men. This book is the final one of his run, which never really did anything interesting outside of the massive crossover Messiah Complex. He's not a soap-opera guy, he's an espionage, black ops, and crime guy. He felt very out of his element for this run, which is very disappointing. I'm interested to see what Matt Fraction does with it from here on out.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    The central story of the X-Men's relocation to San Francisco and battles against guys in old Hellfire masks is weighed down by supporting character-based stories that are not as fun, hopeful, or engaging. Ed Brubaker and now Matt Fraction seem like the only writers able to tell a decent, not-depressing X-Men story these days. Fraction's captions for the X-Men do more than just set up the dramatis personae (as Chris Claremont used to write it)--they deliver humor and obviously-telegraphed emotion The central story of the X-Men's relocation to San Francisco and battles against guys in old Hellfire masks is weighed down by supporting character-based stories that are not as fun, hopeful, or engaging. Ed Brubaker and now Matt Fraction seem like the only writers able to tell a decent, not-depressing X-Men story these days. Fraction's captions for the X-Men do more than just set up the dramatis personae (as Chris Claremont used to write it)--they deliver humor and obviously-telegraphed emotional insight into the droves of characters sloshing around the book. It's a bit frustrating that the main villain of Uncanny X-Men #500--the first issue in the Brubaker/Fraction story--doesn't show up again, but he'll no doubt be back soon. The writers make the team's move to Bay Area headquarters seem so obvious and organic, though at times it reads like a travel brochure for San Francisco's many tolerant neighborhoods. Greg Land and Terry Dodson's art is also beautiful. Their styles don't make the most sense together, but Land seems to have abandoned his more obvious photo-referencing, and Dodson's going for less cartoonish art. Unfortunately, this book is padded with less compelling stories about supporting X-Men (namely, Pixie, Karma, Juggernaut, Emma Frost, Graymalkin, Colossus, Mercury, and Dazzler.) Almost all the characters are struggling with their own version of ennui. It's a moroseness that's plagued the X-Men since the end of House of M. I'd hoped the team abandoned it with the move out west, but I guess not. And, actually, the Dazzler story is pretty fun. It's nice to see her back as a side character. There should be room for a disco-pop X-Man.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Davy

    Sorry, I didn't get it. This is supposed to be a "big" event, the X-men moving to SF. Probably is, but the comic sure isn't. I'm not a intensive X-men reader so I just wanted to pick up some main story events between House of M and Avengers vs. X-men. This comic starts with the X-men in SF, ok, but why did they move ? What happened ? Seems to be something with Emma Frost and Cassandra Wilson ? Why is everyone talking about the dissapearence of Kitty Pryde ? In SF they meet their same old enemies Sorry, I didn't get it. This is supposed to be a "big" event, the X-men moving to SF. Probably is, but the comic sure isn't. I'm not a intensive X-men reader so I just wanted to pick up some main story events between House of M and Avengers vs. X-men. This comic starts with the X-men in SF, ok, but why did they move ? What happened ? Seems to be something with Emma Frost and Cassandra Wilson ? Why is everyone talking about the dissapearence of Kitty Pryde ? In SF they meet their same old enemies (not so original): first Magneto (working on some big plan) and the Hellfire Club (with a very 'kinky' Red Queen). But then the story stops. Right in the middle. Then the second part are some small stories about individual X-men and how they experience the move to SF (most of them I don't even know by name). But the quality of the stories and the art work are far from good, the final one (Dazzler) I didn't even read the two last pages. If your completely into the X-men and you can get a hold on the following issues of Uncanny X-men (nr. 504 etc) it's probably good, but if you just want to read some X-men comics, don't buy this one.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    This was a great kick off to a new chapter in the X-Men story. After basing their operations out of NYC almost exclusively for decades, the X-Men are moving to the west coast after the destruction of the mansion, and are setting up shop in San Francisco. They build themselves a new home there in abandoned military outposts around the city, and open their doors to all mutants, both active and former, who seek refuge there. Magneto shows up, mysteriously re-powered, and helps the High Evolutionary This was a great kick off to a new chapter in the X-Men story. After basing their operations out of NYC almost exclusively for decades, the X-Men are moving to the west coast after the destruction of the mansion, and are setting up shop in San Francisco. They build themselves a new home there in abandoned military outposts around the city, and open their doors to all mutants, both active and former, who seek refuge there. Magneto shows up, mysteriously re-powered, and helps the High Evolutionary collect technology from the Dreaming Celestial, to a purpose that as yet seems to be a mystery. Greg Land and Terry Dodson's art is amazing; both artists have such a dynamic style each to their own, and their storytelling is really good. Sometimes it's hard to follow what an artist is trying to illustrate, but not with these two. They are two of the best artists working on the X-Men in a while. I'm anxious to see where Matt Fraction is going to take these characters in the future.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Russell Mark Olson

    It's probably been over ten years since I've read an X-Men comic (I followed the X-Statix series with Allred, so I suppose technically...) and I was pretty impressed with the writing and art. There are of course some cliches and there are pages where one artist or another blatantly draws a female character a la pin-up muting the intended dialogue, but I suppose there is still a demographic which reads comics for the lycra... Overall, I did enjoy the book. I'm not sure of the complete narrative f It's probably been over ten years since I've read an X-Men comic (I followed the X-Statix series with Allred, so I suppose technically...) and I was pretty impressed with the writing and art. There are of course some cliches and there are pages where one artist or another blatantly draws a female character a la pin-up muting the intended dialogue, but I suppose there is still a demographic which reads comics for the lycra... Overall, I did enjoy the book. I'm not sure of the complete narrative from the early and mid-nineties to the present books, but for the most part the story was followable. I would have to say, however, that this collection does seem incomplete, there seems to be a few arcs that are dropped which I can only assume are picked up later on (and having not been a reader for some time, I'm uncertain over which titles bleed into each other). Go X-Men! Oh, and I'm really glad that they've brought Colossus back.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    The X-Men begin to set up shop in San Francisco, but they (like usual) have to deal with a group of hater mongers, this time known as the Hellfire Club. They are seemingly led by a mutant, Empath, who can cripple people by controlling their emotions. However, he is being controlled by the Red Queen, who is Madelyne Prior returned to life. The best parts of this story are about Pixie, but even that feels a little convenient and forced. Nice to see a minor character step up and save the day though. The X-Men begin to set up shop in San Francisco, but they (like usual) have to deal with a group of hater mongers, this time known as the Hellfire Club. They are seemingly led by a mutant, Empath, who can cripple people by controlling their emotions. However, he is being controlled by the Red Queen, who is Madelyne Prior returned to life. The best parts of this story are about Pixie, but even that feels a little convenient and forced. Nice to see a minor character step up and save the day though. Overall, still not much here. Lots of little short stories about individuals and how they are reacting to their new surroundings and life post M-Day, loss of Kitty Pryde, and the mutant messiah gone off to the future with Cable. Overarching (overtly male) bonus? Emma Frost.... LOL Recommend, but slightly. Hoping the X-Books get better with the next cycle I'm reading: Utopia, X-Nation, and Necrosha.

  19. 4 out of 5

    William Thomas

    A return to form in some respects, Manifest Destiny refocuses the X-Men's struggles and brings it back to the era of Sentinels and Marauders. An era of intolerance and hatred. It recreates the X-Men for a new generation but brings in old themes of bigotry and race hatred. In that respect, Manifest Destiny wins. The four issues of Uncanny X-Men (500-503) are the only real reason to read this collection, as most everything else is separate from the main story and tries to form a piecemeal, patchwo A return to form in some respects, Manifest Destiny refocuses the X-Men's struggles and brings it back to the era of Sentinels and Marauders. An era of intolerance and hatred. It recreates the X-Men for a new generation but brings in old themes of bigotry and race hatred. In that respect, Manifest Destiny wins. The four issues of Uncanny X-Men (500-503) are the only real reason to read this collection, as most everything else is separate from the main story and tries to form a piecemeal, patchwork story of individual mutants struggling in their new surroundings on the West Coast. I would have given the book 5 stars just for showcasing Pixie in the Uncanny books the way it did. Far and away my new favorite of the team- a mix of Kitty Pryde, Jubilee and Magick, only with a darker edge, and a personality that I hope the writers take the time to develop more in-depth.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Russio

    500 editions in and the X Men is basically the same beast it has been almost all along. Mutants are having a tough time at the hands of unsympathetic homo inferiors, idiots keep resurrecting the sentinels, baddies turn good and agonise about having been bad, Scott Summers shows that a one-ply cardboard character can go through many editions without getting soggy, Wolverine smokes, someone dies for a bit, new X Men wonder about whether they should get into all of this - in this case Pixie - I'll 500 editions in and the X Men is basically the same beast it has been almost all along. Mutants are having a tough time at the hands of unsympathetic homo inferiors, idiots keep resurrecting the sentinels, baddies turn good and agonise about having been bad, Scott Summers shows that a one-ply cardboard character can go through many editions without getting soggy, Wolverine smokes, someone dies for a bit, new X Men wonder about whether they should get into all of this - in this case Pixie - I'll give her 2 years. Same as it ever was, if pleasing to see how many of the Classic line up and the "New Muties" are still around. The frame where they show they are still agonised about Doug is the best in the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    Among the many idiotic things that Marvel Comics has done ... publishing TWO books at around the same time and calling them BOTH "X-Men: Manifest Destiny" has got to be among the most bizarre! This was mostly really good until it descended into short story filler land. ~ LAME! And as for Greg Land's illustrations I noticed two things. He can draw hot women, and can draw people with smiles suitable for advertising campaigns. Now I don't mind mutants looking sexy but they seem a little too happy! Among the many idiotic things that Marvel Comics has done ... publishing TWO books at around the same time and calling them BOTH "X-Men: Manifest Destiny" has got to be among the most bizarre! This was mostly really good until it descended into short story filler land. ~ LAME! And as for Greg Land's illustrations I noticed two things. He can draw hot women, and can draw people with smiles suitable for advertising campaigns. Now I don't mind mutants looking sexy but they seem a little too happy! :) They are an oppressed minority for crying out loud!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    With the events of Messiah Complex and M-Day behind them the X-Men venture west to San Francisco and I think Matt Fraction and Ed Brubaker pull it off. Their contribution to this trade along with Mike Carey was very good. Pixie is a good mix with the regular team and Scott & Emma's banter is fantastic. There is an actual villain (or two) that is evil and a threat. The art is somewhat hit or miss. I can tolerate Greg Land covers but his interiors get too repetitive because everyone has the same f With the events of Messiah Complex and M-Day behind them the X-Men venture west to San Francisco and I think Matt Fraction and Ed Brubaker pull it off. Their contribution to this trade along with Mike Carey was very good. Pixie is a good mix with the regular team and Scott & Emma's banter is fantastic. There is an actual villain (or two) that is evil and a threat. The art is somewhat hit or miss. I can tolerate Greg Land covers but his interiors get too repetitive because everyone has the same face. The rest of the trade is straight filler material and doesn't add much to the book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Randi (The Artist Formerly known as Guitar Chick)

    Meh. The day that we stop Drawing Emma Frost wearing next to nothing (or nothing in the case of a few select pages) is the day that X-Men will move up higher in my ranks. But this is a pretty mediocre excuse for a big event in my book. Moving to San Fran is a pretty big deal, but I still just feel like this was the Cyclops/Emma show with some Wolverine thrown in for fan service. Also, Kitty. I need some more Kitty. And is Professor X the only character that Marvel is truly never going to bring b Meh. The day that we stop Drawing Emma Frost wearing next to nothing (or nothing in the case of a few select pages) is the day that X-Men will move up higher in my ranks. But this is a pretty mediocre excuse for a big event in my book. Moving to San Fran is a pretty big deal, but I still just feel like this was the Cyclops/Emma show with some Wolverine thrown in for fan service. Also, Kitty. I need some more Kitty. And is Professor X the only character that Marvel is truly never going to bring back?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Ledrew

    As with any book thats a mix of different stories by different authors, this is a mixed bag. I LOVED the Pixie / Hellfire Cult storyline in Uncanny X-Men, and HATED the mishmash of short stories from the X-Men: Manifest Destiny 5-issue miniseries. I actually dislike the "bunch of short stories / Marvel Comics Presents" miniseries style in general. It seems the X-Franchise pulls this out around every major event and its just horrendous. Split the rating. 5 for one, 1 for the other, we'll call it As with any book thats a mix of different stories by different authors, this is a mixed bag. I LOVED the Pixie / Hellfire Cult storyline in Uncanny X-Men, and HATED the mishmash of short stories from the X-Men: Manifest Destiny 5-issue miniseries. I actually dislike the "bunch of short stories / Marvel Comics Presents" miniseries style in general. It seems the X-Franchise pulls this out around every major event and its just horrendous. Split the rating. 5 for one, 1 for the other, we'll call it a 3.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maya Senen

    This collects the stories which find the X-Men moved to San Francisco and the characters in transition to starting new chapters. Lots of great stuff as a collection, w a variety of writers and artists contributing. Of course Brubaker and Fraction are draws for me, but I was also won over by Ramos and Dodson at times. It's a nice set of reads, important for the X canon, but not your mindblowing favorites by any means.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Frank Taranto

    The X-Men in San Francisco. The main story in the book (X-men 500-503) seems to be introducing the return of Madelyne Pryor, Scott's ex-wife, as well as the story of Pixy. The art in this section was uniformally good. The Manifest destiny part shows how certain X-Men came to be waht they individually are.

  27. 5 out of 5

    J.

    The main story is OK, but it leaves a lot of issues hanging. Hopefully these will be wrapped up in a later volume (?). But the art makes up for it--I just have a soft spot for Land's work. And the back half is just full of beautiful character-driven shorts, exactly the kind of stuff you'd find in old Classic X-Men issues. Nice stuff.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David

    This predominantly introspective collection (following on from the events of Messiah CompleX), sees the X-Men relocating to San Francisco. All the Brubaker/Fraction stuff is great, as is the Skottie Young-written 'Good With The Bad', Chris Yost's writing on'Flaw' and Humberto Ramos' art for 'Uncheerable'. However, some of the other shorts felt a little too much like filler!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I read most of this in one sitting, and then the book sat next to my toilet for a few months until I got through the rest, which means I don't remember when I actually got through it all. Nor do I really remember what it was about. But it's a really pretty book, and there's a lot of X-Men in it. Sometimes that's all you need.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ross Kitson

    Enjoyed this one more than the prior collection. The Pixie story was surprisingly good, and the issues as the X-men get established in San Francisco were enjoyable. The Sentinels, always fun; the mutant bashing by the Hellfire Cult, and the villain from the Hellion days. Much more coherent a narrative, and more Xmen as a team.

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