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Gnosticism was a wide-ranging religious movement of the first millennium C.E. whose adherents sought salvation through knowledge and mystical experience. Sample the gnostics in their own words with this unique book-and-audio set. The book, The Gnostics and Their Scriptures, provides a brief yet thorough introduction to gnostic philosophy, while the audio program allows you Gnosticism was a wide-ranging religious movement of the first millennium C.E. whose adherents sought salvation through knowledge and mystical experience. Sample the gnostics in their own words with this unique book-and-audio set. The book, The Gnostics and Their Scriptures, provides a brief yet thorough introduction to gnostic philosophy, while the audio program allows you to encounter the gnostic scriptures as the living oral tradition they were intended to be. The selections are taken from among the most important—and most poetically beautiful—of all gnostic texts, including the Gospels of Thomas, Judas, and Mary Magdalene. Includes 3 CDs.


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Gnosticism was a wide-ranging religious movement of the first millennium C.E. whose adherents sought salvation through knowledge and mystical experience. Sample the gnostics in their own words with this unique book-and-audio set. The book, The Gnostics and Their Scriptures, provides a brief yet thorough introduction to gnostic philosophy, while the audio program allows you Gnosticism was a wide-ranging religious movement of the first millennium C.E. whose adherents sought salvation through knowledge and mystical experience. Sample the gnostics in their own words with this unique book-and-audio set. The book, The Gnostics and Their Scriptures, provides a brief yet thorough introduction to gnostic philosophy, while the audio program allows you to encounter the gnostic scriptures as the living oral tradition they were intended to be. The selections are taken from among the most important—and most poetically beautiful—of all gnostic texts, including the Gospels of Thomas, Judas, and Mary Magdalene. Includes 3 CDs.

30 review for The Gnostic Bible (Book and Audio-CD Set)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wade Duvall

    "To know [the] principles of Gnostic Christianity is to court disaster." --Philip K Dick Before I get too deep into this, I will present my "must read" list for anybody interested but without the mental fortitude to get through 850 pages of this stuff. * Gospel of Thomas (probably the best of the wisdom books) * Gospel of John (I'm recommending this for 2 reasons: 1. because it's translated by Willis Barnstone, not by a religious committee allowing him to explore the poetic beauty of the Bible that "To know [the] principles of Gnostic Christianity is to court disaster." --Philip K Dick Before I get too deep into this, I will present my "must read" list for anybody interested but without the mental fortitude to get through 850 pages of this stuff. * Gospel of Thomas (probably the best of the wisdom books) * Gospel of John (I'm recommending this for 2 reasons: 1. because it's translated by Willis Barnstone, not by a religious committee allowing him to explore the poetic beauty of the Bible that so often suffers at the hands of approved translations and 2. because it's important in the context of gnosticism) * Gospel of Judas * Secret Book of John (most satisfying cosmogony) * Thunder, Perfect Mind (If you have to only read one, make it this one, its short) * Gospel of Truth * Gospel of Philip * The Round Dance of the Cross * The Prayer of the Messenger Paul * The Songs of Solomon * The Song of the Pearl * The Gospel of Mary * Poimandres * Songs from the Mandaean Liturgy * Parthian Songs * A Nun's Sermon (This may seem like a lot but many of these are pretty short. Of the major periods discussed by the book, only Islam is not represented here; if you're curious you could check Mother of Books. Its the only Islamic gnostic work included and is quite long.) To put this review in perspective let me say that I am nonreligious, and I read this in much the same way I would read The Iliad or Beowulf. As alluded to above, I am reading this now as part of my epic post 2-3-78 Philip K Dick writings. The Gnostic Bible attempts to bring together a corpus of major gnostic works drawing on many sources (many from the Nag Hammadi library). It does a wonderful job of drawing from many sources and selecting the most important and well preserved texts. The introductory texts and notes do a very good job of explaining the general ideas of the writing, showing similarities and differences between other works, and giving historical context. In some cases, I will probably revisit some of these works with a more critical edition. The translations by Myers and Barnstone are really quite good. In the introduction, Barstone discusses how important translating the spirit of the work is in the introduction, and it really comes through (for more details I highly recommend reading Barnstone's translators introduction). In a few cases (generally when neither Myers nor Barnstone understood the language in question) another translation was used. Who translated and the primary sources consulted are well discussed in the notes. A few of the text's, however, have been poorly translated, edited, or transcribed when the initially translation from Greek to Coptic. This comes through strongly a few times and the translators refer to these works as challenging. Still they can be interesting and are generally worth reading. Overall, Myers and Barstone have done an wonderful job with this collection. Gnosticism is something I've been curious since high school (Pope Innocent III would be crushed if he know a Catholic school invoked an interest in gnosis) and recently my Philip K Dick addiction^Winterest has rekindled my curiosity in ancient writing (my interest goes beyond just gnosticism and into other esoteric religion). Gnosticism is also an inspiration for many great authors I love including William Blake, Jorge Luis Borges, etc. I'm really glad I finally got around to reading this. It's not for everyone though. Some closing thoughts on the body of works themselves. Many of the works, while having the same overall themes, vary in their cosmogony, roles of various biblical and extra-biblical characters. This can make it a little confusing at times. Most of the works are either cosmogonies (often revealed in a platonic dialog-cum-gospel) or wisdom sayings. Many of the wisdom sayings present an almost Zen Jesus, much different from the Jesus of the synoptic gospels.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Bello

    This is a wonderful reference library to give the reader a taste of the different Gnostic literatures existing in the Christian world. I especially liked how the compilers delineated the different gnostic groups and then gave a sampling of that particular group's literatures, from the Sethians to the Valentinians, to the Cathars and the Mandaeans. I found their section on Manichaeism and Mandaeism particularly interesting, being that Manichaeism was one of the competing religions of the day, rela This is a wonderful reference library to give the reader a taste of the different Gnostic literatures existing in the Christian world. I especially liked how the compilers delineated the different gnostic groups and then gave a sampling of that particular group's literatures, from the Sethians to the Valentinians, to the Cathars and the Mandaeans. I found their section on Manichaeism and Mandaeism particularly interesting, being that Manichaeism was one of the competing religions of the day, relative to how Appolonius was a contending contemporary of Jesus. Mandaeism is just exciting in itself, called the "Christianity of John the Baptizer" where Jesus Christ is seen as a false messiah to John the Baptizer. I highly recommend this to Christians votaries of all walks of life, whether it be of the laity or of the clergy. It definitely breaks with the modern, Trinitarian Christian organisation and gives ponderance upon an alternative Christianity that was once, and still is, considered blasphemous.

  3. 4 out of 5

    April

    This is a more readable translation of the Nag Hammadi gospels of Jesus Christ, translated into language that is easier for most to understand. It is also edited by Marvin Meyer whose translations and writings I greatly respect. Its an excellent place to start for beginners. Each gospel contains a preface by known writers in the field describing the time period the book was first discovered, where and how its meaning was discerned. This is a book many gnostics like myself have waited on. Thank Y This is a more readable translation of the Nag Hammadi gospels of Jesus Christ, translated into language that is easier for most to understand. It is also edited by Marvin Meyer whose translations and writings I greatly respect. Its an excellent place to start for beginners. Each gospel contains a preface by known writers in the field describing the time period the book was first discovered, where and how its meaning was discerned. This is a book many gnostics like myself have waited on. Thank You!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trever

    Wow! Everyone should read: 1) The Gospel of Thomas 2) The Gospel of Judas 3) The Gospel of Philip 4) Thunder: Perfect Mind (double WOW) 5) The Prayer of the Messenger Paul 6) The Round Dance of the Cross 7) The Gospel of Mary

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Michael

    This book is a fascinating collection of so-called Gnostic texts, ranging from the Nag Hammadi library to Sethian to a diverse array of scripture, poems and other writings thought to be related in some way to Gnostic philosophy and theology. Some of the writings feel disparate and questionable, but that weakness is what makes this book a much more thorough and open-ended examination of Gnosticism, from pre-Christian times through to today.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Quake

    There isn't much I can say other than you really can't do without this one if you are interested in Gnosticism. It is a 'must have' reference, and Meyer is one of the best. I imagine most people would be happy with the translations and descriptions offered here. There isn't much I can say other than you really can't do without this one if you are interested in Gnosticism. It is a 'must have' reference, and Meyer is one of the best. I imagine most people would be happy with the translations and descriptions offered here.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    Introduction My reading has become so wide and diversified that I suppose, at this point, many of my friends may be referring to me as some sort of heresiologist. Regardless, the study of diversified religions is not only fascinating but also serves to grow one’s faith in God in a deep and profound way. This work consists of a wide collection of writings associated with Gnosticism, many of which are deeply steeped in myth and most of which were repressed by the Catholic Church. Much extant Gnosti Introduction My reading has become so wide and diversified that I suppose, at this point, many of my friends may be referring to me as some sort of heresiologist. Regardless, the study of diversified religions is not only fascinating but also serves to grow one’s faith in God in a deep and profound way. This work consists of a wide collection of writings associated with Gnosticism, many of which are deeply steeped in myth and most of which were repressed by the Catholic Church. Much extant Gnostic writing exists in mere fragments because the Catholics destroyed and stamped out every occurrence of Gnostic writing they could find. In fact, most of what is known about Gnosticism is gleaned from the writings of Catholic heresiologists that sought to refute it, like Irenaeus of Lyon (130 AD -202 AD). Irenaeus was a disciple of Polycarp who in turn was a disciple of the Apostle John. Although the diversified mythologies of Gnosticism are quite elaborate, it is enlightening for a reader to gain enhanced understanding of the sort of contentious debate that preceded the eventual domination of orthodoxy. The Gnostics proclaimed “gnosis”, or “knowledge”, as the way of salvation. This did not mean merely “book learning” but a mystical knowledge involving an examination of one’s self, i.e. who you are, where you are from, how you exist and where you are going, essentially the soul’s journey. What Did the Gnostics Believe? The Gnostics long preceded the Protestant notion that men and women may know God directly, without any need for the mediation of rabbis, priests, bishops, imams or other religious officials. The Gnostics were declared heretics because this belief naturally subverted the power of the orthodox church’s hierarchy of priests and bishops. Ironically, however, it was this process of refuting Gnosticism that generated much of the theology that eventually gained domination as orthodoxy. Gnostics were not afraid to read and study diverse religions and philosophies, often developing innovative variations from other mythologies. Because they observed so much evil, pain, and death in the world, the Gnostics couldn’t attribute it to a good creator, so they envisioned a lessor creator, which they referred to as the demiurge. Because the Gnostics saw the creation as flawed, they envisioned this lesser creator as an imperfect being. Alternatively, the Gnostics refer to the larger, transcendent deity as: the Good, the One, the Father, the True God, the Good God, the Exalted King, etc. The Gnostics perceived human spirits as imprisoned within bodies that are asleep, drunken or ignorant, from which they must be awakened, freed, and made enlightened through knowledge. The Gnostic gospels quote Jesus as referring to his body as “the man who bears me” and in popular scripture Jesus often refers to Himself as “the Son of Man”. Jesus called men to awaken to a greater awareness. Gnosticism is a gospel of wisdom rather than a gospel of the cross and proclaims that Jesus saves us, not by dying, but by disclosing the light of knowledge, i.e. “unveiling the God who operates inside you”. The Gnostics perceived the dawning of awareness as a call to knowledge. Awareness is the human ability to perceive and act beyond the mere instinctual programming pertinent to animals. Awareness embodies afterthought and conscience. The Gnostics asserted that we must become “aware” of the Kingdom of God in order for it to be discerned and realized. The Word as Wisdom, Logos, Jesus For Gnostics, wisdom plays a key role in the process of salvation and is experienced as the divine Logos, or Word, such as is portrayed in the Gospel of John, which is considered a Gnostic text. Clearly, the Gospel of John differs extraordinarily from the other, synoptic New Testament gospels. In the Gospel of John, Jesus is identified as the divine word or reason of God; or as the logos who descends in human form so that the Word may become manifest in flesh: “In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God -John 1”. For some Gnostics, the world is but soil from which we blossom into transcendent oneness with God. We utter but meager attempts to describe this Godly oneness (ineffable, limitless, unfathomable, immeasurable, invisible, eternal, unutterable, unnamable, holy, immaculate, incorruptible) because it is so far beyond us that it is impossible for us to say. Godliness transcends us and is only faintly represented by our most profound utterances such as: life that gives life, blessedness, awareness, knowledge, goodness, mercy, redemption and grace. A name implies equivalence with other names or comparisons thereto but the ineffable is above all names declaring: “I am that I am”. Jesus did not leave writings because the Word is beyond reduction to mere human scribbling. God is beyond the merely human concept of existence. Jesus encourages humans to understand who their Father is, as the precursor of the light within, from which awareness grows, and as that which one must come to recognize and nurture. Growing this awareness is the purpose of our existence: to grow the light within, to become sufficiently illuminated and thus enabled to endure beyond the demise of the flesh. Some Gnostic Teachings Some of the diverse teachings that arise from various Gnostic sects are synthesized from gospel stories as follows: Water to Wine: The meaning of Jesus turning water into wine is the illustration of Jesus as the vine, the Father as the Gardener and enlightened people as branches. As the water becomes wine, so the flesh becomes spirit. Without the mechanism of Jesus, the water remains unchanged. As we consume wine, so we ingest the Word (the Logos, Jesus) to instigate formation of the Spirit, which then gains aptitude to survive beyond merely the physical realm. We must ask ourselves: Are we growing better with age? Are we fermenting a change within ourselves? The Spiritual Nature: Upon what have you focused your life energies: upon amassing material wealth, gaining social prominence, stoking your personal ego? Can you discern an alternative focus for your spiritual energy? Our energy must be expended with focus upon spiritual integrity or materiality will fully encase us. Awareness involves awakening that part of you that is not material. Not recognizing the resurrected Jesus: Orthodox religion largely ignores the portions of scripture that inform us that those to whom the resurrected Jesus appeared did not at first recognize Him. For Jesus returned in a much different form than the resurrected Lazarus, not as a physical zombie, but as a spiritual being, capable of adapting various physical forms. That the Biblical witnesses did not first recognize the resurrected Jesus is profound and incites us to wonder if we ourselves might fail to recognize Jesus in the person of others we encounter today. The seed of Jesus’ Spirit is multiplied among many and manifests broadly in the world. Incident with the Money Changers: The incident of Jesus overturning the tables of the money changers in the temple is indicative of understanding that the body is the temple that houses the light of God and the temple must not be corrupted with mercantilism or a pathological fetish for commerce. Instead, we must find repose to purify ourselves with meditation, exercise, proper nourishment and love. We must love to be loved and we must enjoy creation instead of sacrificing our lives for trinkets of ostentatiousness. Those that remain entranced by the things of the dust remain of the dust, untransformed and spiritually destitute. The hunger and possessiveness of the ego must relent so that the interior temple may be filled. The story of Lazarus: We see the fruitlessness in physical resurrection because Lazarus returns in zombie-like form only to die again. Physical resurrection only returns one to the dust of the world. Like a plant rising out of the dirt of the earth from a single seed , our spirits must bloom forth and allow the dead husk of the body to drop away. Physical resurrection occurred when we took on flesh and entered the world; spiritual resurrection begins when we come to consider what we are and initiate the forming of our inner self. Pharisaic Corruption: Not only did the Romans crucify Jesus, they adulterated the Message. The ensuing Catholic edifice has subsequently contorted and augmented the Message for political expediency. The Gnostics were harassed as heretics and much of their Message was censored away. As with the Pharisees of ancient times, the Catholic Church has systematically persecuted and denigrated all who fail to conform to their doctrines, which are clearly designed to empower and elevate a small ruling hierarchy. The evil of the Catholic Church is most clear by its activities of censorship, murder, burnings at the stake, persecution of Jews, initiation of crusading wars, paganistic deification of Mary, child abuse, pedophilia, magic-like rituals, ostentatious attire, the pantheon of Saint worship, the selling of indulgences and the cult-like way in which the Church endeavors to dominate the minds of its adherents and force familial conformance. Spiritual Intercourse: Masturbation is seen as a means of copulation with spiritual beings and bears into the world certain lustful entities that seek existence through focus of one’s attention upon an imagined entity instead of a loving human partner. Alternatively, an androgynous lust for one’s own body may impregnate one by self-desire and so birth forth egotistical spiritual beings. Imaginative lust brings forth things produced out of ego such as a subconscious desire to be the creator or to render things outside the realm of goodness. Jesus encourages us to be careful about what we allow ourselves to imagine and what we choose to harbor within ourselves. Carrying around contaminated spiritual contents will weigh us down, thwart our rise, repel us from the truth, and fog our perception. Self-generated spirits can easily lead us astray and quickly infect us with attributes of jealousy, anger, wrath, bitterness, lust, greed, terror, servility, anguish, shame, envy, pain, trouble, distress, hardheartedness, anxiety, evil, vain conceit and the like. These are the very things we must learn to jettison during this life, in order to grow a less corrupt nature. Imitating the procreative act of God: Mankind lacks the ability to simply dwell in appreciation of the creation and instead persists in modifying it, augmenting it to facilitate hoarding, and instigating unceasing labor. Such practices persist in modernity in the form of genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, robotics, cloning, etc. Humankind seems to be rushing headlong into the same sort of blunder the Gnostics attributed to the demiurge, i.e. creating something that will ultimately be flawed and misshapen. The Kingdom: Must we imagine a heaven in the décor of bling, coated with gold and diamonds? Can we instead envision a kingdom available to us even now, wherein our greatest joy derives from outfitting others sufficiently, such that the seed of their personal growth may begin to blossom? Connection with the Ineffable involves a refusal to be mesmerized by the bling, trinkets, gold , silver, gifts and material sorts of things that blind us. The Trinity: Much debate and even violence has occurred over attempts to define the three manifestations of the One. Mankind’s never ceasing attempts to put the Ineffable in a box can seem quite silly. Jesus is demonstrable of humanity infused with God. The Spirit is transmittable goodness, a medium of Spiritual exchange that permeates existence when Goodness becomes communicable among humans. When fully experienced, the Spirit consists of a bliss that one would never trade for a mere trinket. Jesus: The Gnostic’s saw Jesus as the revealer of the knowledge of the Father. This Gnostic perspective refutes the biblical notion that knowledge is sin, as suggested by the banishment of Adam and Eve for achieving self-awareness. The Gnostics connect Jesus nailed to a tree with the tree of the knowledge of good and evil as referenced in Genesis. For Gnostics, Jesus does not punish those who eat of the tree of knowledge but instead encourages their awareness. The fundamentalist’s perspective that God would somehow have preferred to forever retain Adam and Eve as pets within the cage of Eden is overturned by Jesus, who replaces the fruit with the Word. From this emerges the notion of transubstantiation, wherein the Word (Jesus) is consumed to gain awareness. Conclusion The genocides, inquisitions, crusades, censorships, and narrow-mindedness historically imposed by the cult of Catholicism against alternative forms of spiritual thought has accomplished nothing less than spiritual retardation in humanity. However, great difficulties lie in displacing Catholicism because of the extent to which it is firmly rooted within the indoctrinated minds of vast numbers of people. While indoctrinated people can quickly recognize the obvious superstitions, it is more difficult for them to jettison the deep-rooted psychological fears which have been ingrained into them since childhood. The historically violent actions of the Catholic church have exterminated many forms of spiritual thought. These religious exterminations are no less tragic than the contemporary extinctions of living species resulting from exploitation by modern human industrialism. Knowledge and awareness are key to our survival.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Miess

    The Gnostic Bible Contains a wide range of Gnostic texts from various religious traditions, Pagan, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, Mandean and Manichean. Personally, I think the compilers of this edition took some liberties. For instance, they included the Gospel of Saint John in this collection when I personally feel that it doesn’t qualify as a “Gnostic Text.” Also, I didn’t particularly like the fact that instead of opting to use Jesus, they used Yeshua instead. I understand that they were tryin The Gnostic Bible Contains a wide range of Gnostic texts from various religious traditions, Pagan, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, Mandean and Manichean. Personally, I think the compilers of this edition took some liberties. For instance, they included the Gospel of Saint John in this collection when I personally feel that it doesn’t qualify as a “Gnostic Text.” Also, I didn’t particularly like the fact that instead of opting to use Jesus, they used Yeshua instead. I understand that they were trying to emphasize that in the very beginnings that Christianity was a branch of Judaism. With that said, it contains some beautiful pieces of writing which should be placed among the classics of sacred literature. For instance, the Gospel of Thomas says according to saying 2, “Seek and do not stop seeking until you find. When you find, you will be troubled. When you are troubled, you will marvel and rule over all.” Often, my religious tradition (Christianity) focuses on a heavenly future so much that it fails to see the reign of God in every moment. Regardless of your religious tradition, if you are a person of faith, I highly recommend it. It reminds us that faith is always evolving and that by reaching deep into the past, we can revive elements that have long since been silenced.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fred Kohn

    In the excellent epilogue, Barnstone writes, "[G]nosticism was a new, alluring alternative to the normative religion that locked ideas into dogma, bureaucracy, and worldly power to defeat infidels and banish creative solitude." What was true then is true now. Though these writings rarely rise to the sublime heights of the Bible or the Qur'an, the latter two have been so colored by centuries of fundamentalist interpretations bent on retaining religious authority that it requires a tremendous effo In the excellent epilogue, Barnstone writes, "[G]nosticism was a new, alluring alternative to the normative religion that locked ideas into dogma, bureaucracy, and worldly power to defeat infidels and banish creative solitude." What was true then is true now. Though these writings rarely rise to the sublime heights of the Bible or the Qur'an, the latter two have been so colored by centuries of fundamentalist interpretations bent on retaining religious authority that it requires a tremendous effort for a contemporary reader to recover their original beauty. Is it any wonder that people are turning elsewhere for spiritual inspiration? The poetic rendering of these early writings in the present volume will certainly serve that purpose, and is a definite improvement on the dry prose of other translations I have read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Davis

    This isn't a book as much as it is an anthology. That said, it was still very good. It contains a collection of Gnostic gospels from various traditions, and presents them translated to English. There is also a brief opening section at the beginning of each translation describing the background and some important aspects of the different gospels. Furthermore, there's a nice introduction to Gnosticism as a whole. I would recommend this book for anyone who wants to read Gnostic texts in English, but This isn't a book as much as it is an anthology. That said, it was still very good. It contains a collection of Gnostic gospels from various traditions, and presents them translated to English. There is also a brief opening section at the beginning of each translation describing the background and some important aspects of the different gospels. Furthermore, there's a nice introduction to Gnosticism as a whole. I would recommend this book for anyone who wants to read Gnostic texts in English, but it's certainly not for a person just looking at starting to learn about Gnosticism.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Justin Renquist

    very interesting and insightful. Too bad these documents were not what helped form the Christian Church, because then it would be much more humanist and almost Buddhist like.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    A treasure trove of mystical texts A lot of the texts contained herein are shared with the Nag Hammadi Library (and, in fact, come directly from those translations). However, what distinguishes this collection is the wider scope and, in my opinion, better contextualization of its contents. Rather than being rigidly scholarly, it attempts to bring Gnostic thought down to the understanding of a layperson. Ultimately, though, the same problems with these texts exist, in that they still remain laugha A treasure trove of mystical texts A lot of the texts contained herein are shared with the Nag Hammadi Library (and, in fact, come directly from those translations). However, what distinguishes this collection is the wider scope and, in my opinion, better contextualization of its contents. Rather than being rigidly scholarly, it attempts to bring Gnostic thought down to the understanding of a layperson. Ultimately, though, the same problems with these texts exist, in that they still remain laughably complex and often boring as a result. A few notable inclusions are a portion of the Sufi Islamic text "The Mother of All Books" and a few Cathar texts, bringing Gnostic thought into the medieval period. For the enthusiast, I would recommend this over the Nag Hammadi Library as an entry point into this kind of literature.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Strong Extraordinary Dreams

    Disclaimer: I only listened to the CDs. A few good bits, lots and lots of waffle. Like with canonical Christianity, I am much more interested in the ideas and realities surrounding the religion than with its poorly written rambling texts. I think these CDs would be better for someone who already had a great familiarity with the material and some of its 'hidden' (i.e. invented) meanings. Disclaimer: I only listened to the CDs. A few good bits, lots and lots of waffle. Like with canonical Christianity, I am much more interested in the ideas and realities surrounding the religion than with its poorly written rambling texts. I think these CDs would be better for someone who already had a great familiarity with the material and some of its 'hidden' (i.e. invented) meanings.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Haven

    A very good and well put together book that contains the gnostic books of the bible. Before each book is a well thought out introduction that explains the origin of the book and the belief of the gnostic author. This book is perfect for students of religion and anyone interested in the "hidden" books that were left out of the bible for whatever reason. A very good and well put together book that contains the gnostic books of the bible. Before each book is a well thought out introduction that explains the origin of the book and the belief of the gnostic author. This book is perfect for students of religion and anyone interested in the "hidden" books that were left out of the bible for whatever reason.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Momo Bradham

    This book (more properly an anthology) was and is priceless. I'm so glad I found it and will be revisiting it often for both spiritual feeding and for research into religion. The collection features many obscure or mystical texts from a variety of religious experience and culture. It was interesting for me to watch them all fall under central themes. This book (more properly an anthology) was and is priceless. I'm so glad I found it and will be revisiting it often for both spiritual feeding and for research into religion. The collection features many obscure or mystical texts from a variety of religious experience and culture. It was interesting for me to watch them all fall under central themes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    A great translation of the Nag Hammadi library. While ultimately, reading these texts for the most part repudiated my interest in Gnosticism as I found most of the literature to be bizarre (excluding the Gospel of Thomas), you can't get any better than the actual texts themselves. A great translation of the Nag Hammadi library. While ultimately, reading these texts for the most part repudiated my interest in Gnosticism as I found most of the literature to be bizarre (excluding the Gospel of Thomas), you can't get any better than the actual texts themselves.

  17. 5 out of 5

    JOANNE NUTTER

    Reads like someone's theory based paper. Not at all what I thought it would be. Did not keep me interested this might be what others are looking for but I was expecting something different altogether. Reads like someone's theory based paper. Not at all what I thought it would be. Did not keep me interested this might be what others are looking for but I was expecting something different altogether.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Meyer went to great lengths to include copious and detailed footnotes and citations. An eclectic mix of gospels but worth a read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Literally a gnostic bible filled with scriptures and discussions thereof

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Halterman

    If you've read the Bible and enjoy it or took anything from it. Then this is a must read that will bring you encouragement and understanding. If you've read the Bible and enjoy it or took anything from it. Then this is a must read that will bring you encouragement and understanding.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Good translation. Hit and miss insofar as contents but interesting and some fun extras.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Whenever someone in power tries to silence someone or something, it is always important to find out why.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Orgadena

    Book, Of Baruch Angry Ladies. Quadratic: Pishon, Gihon, Tigris, and Euphrates. ~

  24. 5 out of 5

    Louise Annetta

    It was a good source for discussion. I read it, found it interesting and did not understand it all. I am glad we read it for a book group, as the other gals filled in the gaps of my understanding.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Having only skimmed through it at a bookshop, I was pleased at the breadth of "The Gnostic Bible", and also by the brief historical background given to each book (or part of a book? - I don't know if whole translations were given or not). I will see how I like it if and when I eventually purchase/read it in whole. Having only skimmed through it at a bookshop, I was pleased at the breadth of "The Gnostic Bible", and also by the brief historical background given to each book (or part of a book? - I don't know if whole translations were given or not). I will see how I like it if and when I eventually purchase/read it in whole.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is not a 'book' to read through. I bought it 2 years ago & am still not finished. I come back to it here & there. Sometimes I go back to certain chapters. It is a spiritual reading that is, at times, difficult to 'get'. I recommend having a partner(s) to read with & exchange thoughts about certain texts & their meaning. This is not a 'book' to read through. I bought it 2 years ago & am still not finished. I come back to it here & there. Sometimes I go back to certain chapters. It is a spiritual reading that is, at times, difficult to 'get'. I recommend having a partner(s) to read with & exchange thoughts about certain texts & their meaning.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    A great translation of the Nag Hammadi library. While ultimately, reading these texts for the most part repudiated my interest in Gnosticism as I found most of the literature to be bizarre (excluding the Gospel of Thomas), you can't get any better than the actual texts themselves. A great translation of the Nag Hammadi library. While ultimately, reading these texts for the most part repudiated my interest in Gnosticism as I found most of the literature to be bizarre (excluding the Gospel of Thomas), you can't get any better than the actual texts themselves.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    It took me the better part of a decade to make my way through this book, and every moment is worth it. The selection of works is impressive, and the critical apparatus formidable. Fascinating and revelatory.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I have this, but haven't read it yet. However, I have thumbed thru it, and I know a little bit about the subject matter, so I have high hopes for the book. If nothing else its a good reference book. I have this, but haven't read it yet. However, I have thumbed thru it, and I know a little bit about the subject matter, so I have high hopes for the book. If nothing else its a good reference book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    Read in 2008 Re-Read Jan 21, 2015 Good overview of the various versions of gnosticism. Also contains the more complete form of Thunder: Perfect Mind.

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