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"David Gemmell tells a tale of very real adventure, the stuff of true epic fantasy." --R.A. Salvatore, New York Times Bestselling author While the Earth quaked, a deadly power burst forth from ancient Atlantis. For the gate of time had been torn open, freeing a cataclysmic evil. Only the last guardian, Jon Shannow, the legendary pistoleer, could shut the deadly portal. But to "David Gemmell tells a tale of very real adventure, the stuff of true epic fantasy." --R.A. Salvatore, New York Times Bestselling author While the Earth quaked, a deadly power burst forth from ancient Atlantis. For the gate of time had been torn open, freeing a cataclysmic evil. Only the last guardian, Jon Shannow, the legendary pistoleer, could shut the deadly portal. But to accomplish this he would have to find the shining Sword of God, said to be floating among the clouds in the perilous lands beyond the wall, where beasts walked like men and worship a dark goddess. As Shannow embarked on his impossible quest, demons gathered in wait. And--somewhere--a golden-haired woman was dreaming of blood . . .


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"David Gemmell tells a tale of very real adventure, the stuff of true epic fantasy." --R.A. Salvatore, New York Times Bestselling author While the Earth quaked, a deadly power burst forth from ancient Atlantis. For the gate of time had been torn open, freeing a cataclysmic evil. Only the last guardian, Jon Shannow, the legendary pistoleer, could shut the deadly portal. But to "David Gemmell tells a tale of very real adventure, the stuff of true epic fantasy." --R.A. Salvatore, New York Times Bestselling author While the Earth quaked, a deadly power burst forth from ancient Atlantis. For the gate of time had been torn open, freeing a cataclysmic evil. Only the last guardian, Jon Shannow, the legendary pistoleer, could shut the deadly portal. But to accomplish this he would have to find the shining Sword of God, said to be floating among the clouds in the perilous lands beyond the wall, where beasts walked like men and worship a dark goddess. As Shannow embarked on his impossible quest, demons gathered in wait. And--somewhere--a golden-haired woman was dreaming of blood . . .

30 review for The Last Guardian

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Last Guardian (Jon Shannow #2), David Gemmell The Last Guardian is set in the same world as Wolf in Shadow, but aged by two years. The Hellborn are no longer a threat, and all but two of the Guardians are dead. Additionally the largest source of Sipstrassi has been destroyed making the stones much harder to come by. Additional details of the world are also revealed as we learn by the end of the first novel that the city of Atlantis did exist, and sank in the first "fall", the story of which t The Last Guardian (Jon Shannow #2), David Gemmell The Last Guardian is set in the same world as Wolf in Shadow, but aged by two years. The Hellborn are no longer a threat, and all but two of the Guardians are dead. Additionally the largest source of Sipstrassi has been destroyed making the stones much harder to come by. Additional details of the world are also revealed as we learn by the end of the first novel that the city of Atlantis did exist, and sank in the first "fall", the story of which time has been passed on as the story of Noah's ark. Same as in the previous novel Wolf in Shadow The Last Guardian's magic system is also based on Sipstrassi or stones of power, which are golden meteors which allow one to heal oneself, create food, and who are supposedly limited only by ones imagination, although each stone only has a certain amount of power, and as they are used black veins will appear upon the stone and grow, until eventually the Sipstrassi is coal black, and powerless. However by feeding Sipstrassi blood one can refill them, although Sipstrassi refilled in this manner become blood red, incapable of healing or producing feed, good only for combat. Additionally blood Sipstrassi inspire darker feelings such as lust, greed, and rage in their wielders. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و هشتم ماه فوریه سال 2019 میلادی عنوان: آخرین محافظ؛ نویسنده: دیوید گمل؛ مترجم: سیدسجاد حامدحیدری؛ تهران: کتابسرای تندیس‏‫، 1397؛ در 383 ص؛ شابک: 9786001823312؛ فروست: جان شانو؛ کتاب دوم؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان بریتانیایی - سده 20 م‬ دیوید گمل در مورد داستان «آخرین محافظ» میگویند: «در ذهنم هیچ شکی نداشتم پس از اینکه «شانو»، زخمی و تنها به کوهستان راند چه اتفاقی برایش افتاد. او در حال مرگ بود. و اورشلیم در انتظارش بود. پس از آنکه رمان منتشر شد، خوانشگران بسیاری به سرعت واکنش نشان دادند و خواستار ادامه داستان شدند. ولی «جان شانو» مرده بود. از سوی یکی از خوانشگران نامه ای به دستم رسید، که شوکه ام کرد: «نه، او نمرده! امکان نداره!» و این پیام کوتاه مرا ترغیب کرد به نگارش ادامه ی داستان که با نوشتن این کلمات آغاز کردم: «اما او نمرد.»؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    I'm just going to say right off that I'm really digging the Jon Shannow books. The Last Guardian is even better than the first volume, Wolf in Shadow. Jon Shannow, while on his endless search for Jerusalem, encounters a young single mother of two, a young gunfighter who wants a reputation at Shannow's expense, reptilian warriors, Atlanteans, a fiery preacher called The Parson, and the Sword of God. Much more background is given to Shannow's post apocalyptic world, fleshing it out, as well as giv I'm just going to say right off that I'm really digging the Jon Shannow books. The Last Guardian is even better than the first volume, Wolf in Shadow. Jon Shannow, while on his endless search for Jerusalem, encounters a young single mother of two, a young gunfighter who wants a reputation at Shannow's expense, reptilian warriors, Atlanteans, a fiery preacher called The Parson, and the Sword of God. Much more background is given to Shannow's post apocalyptic world, fleshing it out, as well as giving more of Shannow's background. Well worth a read but only if you've read the first volume.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ned Lud

    One of the finest writers ever. The excessive bible scripture ruined this series for me. I am not saying the writing was not exceptional. Just not my cup of tea. I refuse to rate this because I have MAD RESPECT for Mr.Gemmell's work. One of the finest writers ever. The excessive bible scripture ruined this series for me. I am not saying the writing was not exceptional. Just not my cup of tea. I refuse to rate this because I have MAD RESPECT for Mr.Gemmell's work.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike Moak

    I just have to say, I have really enjoyed Gemmell's books. I've read most of them now and have enjoyed them all. The characters he writes are so vivid and often humorous in a dry and clever way. I'm not a huge fantasy fan, but I just love the way this author uses bits and pieces of our cultural legends and stories in his work. The Jon Shannow series does this with the Bible, weaving the classic stories children learn in Sunday school into the story. Mr. Gemmell doesn't strike me as a Christian i I just have to say, I have really enjoyed Gemmell's books. I've read most of them now and have enjoyed them all. The characters he writes are so vivid and often humorous in a dry and clever way. I'm not a huge fantasy fan, but I just love the way this author uses bits and pieces of our cultural legends and stories in his work. The Jon Shannow series does this with the Bible, weaving the classic stories children learn in Sunday school into the story. Mr. Gemmell doesn't strike me as a Christian in the traditional sense, but he has obviously read through the Bible and displays a greater understanding of the flawed nature of humanity than some preachers. I'm looking forward to the the final Shannow novel.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    I don’t know what it is about this series that I enjoy so much. It’s sort of like King’s Dark Tower, but much more concise. It’s got the apocalyptic shit going on with a rough main character in search for a mythical city who is quick on the draw. It’s got portals to other worlds, fucked up villains, and tons of action. And it doesn’t take any prisoners. Doesn’t hurt that each book has been fast paced and short

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Wheeler

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What a mind-bending plot! Magic, time travel, ancient civilizations - all colliding with what’s left of the new post-apocalyptic world. A bit typical, in that the “big bad” of the storyline actually brings about his own downfall in his pursuit to stop it from happening. Nevertheless, the storyline is well thought out and unique in the details.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pooneh

    What can I say, expect that I love Gemmell's books? This book reminds me of John wick. Was a great reading. Thanks David, R.I.P. What can I say, expect that I love Gemmell's books? This book reminds me of John wick. Was a great reading. Thanks David, R.I.P.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jason Wilson

    3.5 Stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    One and a half stars. I should have stopped with Wolf in Shadow. It had its own ending that I found mostly satisfying, there was no real reason to continue. But I did, and this is the result. The Last Guardian has all the regular Gemmell hallmarks, and if you like them, you'll probably like this. I'll admit there are certain aspects of his storytelling that I still find compelling, but they grower fewer with each of his books that I read. It doesn't help that much of the post-apocalyptic nature of One and a half stars. I should have stopped with Wolf in Shadow. It had its own ending that I found mostly satisfying, there was no real reason to continue. But I did, and this is the result. The Last Guardian has all the regular Gemmell hallmarks, and if you like them, you'll probably like this. I'll admit there are certain aspects of his storytelling that I still find compelling, but they grower fewer with each of his books that I read. It doesn't help that much of the post-apocalyptic nature of this world, when explained, comes across as profoundly silly. It's probably for the best that I abandon Gemmell here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Zenodotus

    Clint Eastwood's The Man With No Name takes on the time-travelling warrior-wizards of Atlantis with Bible and six-shooter in a post-apocalyptic world. Fun, but lacks the pace and engaging supporting casts found in Gemmell's best work. Also includes an ENTIRELY PLAUSIBLE explanation for the Bermuda Triangle. Yes, really. *Coughs* Clint Eastwood's The Man With No Name takes on the time-travelling warrior-wizards of Atlantis with Bible and six-shooter in a post-apocalyptic world. Fun, but lacks the pace and engaging supporting casts found in Gemmell's best work. Also includes an ENTIRELY PLAUSIBLE explanation for the Bermuda Triangle. Yes, really. *Coughs*

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    I wish that there were more books by you to read!! It will be a sad day for me once I come upon the very last book that you have ever written!! Mr. David, they aren't enough words in the English language to express what an amazing writer you are!! I wish that you were still alive to this day, to write some more amazing novels!! I wish that there were more books by you to read!! It will be a sad day for me once I come upon the very last book that you have ever written!! Mr. David, they aren't enough words in the English language to express what an amazing writer you are!! I wish that you were still alive to this day, to write some more amazing novels!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Jewell

    Ahhhhh I love this series!!! It only gets better!! The story does not fizzle at all the poor reviews couldn't be farther from the truth! Although I enjoyed the sadness of the first book and how lonely and depressing it ended for Jon Shannow, I didn't mind the feel good ending of book two! Ahhhhh I love this series!!! It only gets better!! The story does not fizzle at all the poor reviews couldn't be farther from the truth! Although I enjoyed the sadness of the first book and how lonely and depressing it ended for Jon Shannow, I didn't mind the feel good ending of book two!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Helena

    You can read my review here: http://embracingmybooks.blogspot.be/2... You can read my review here: http://embracingmybooks.blogspot.be/2...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ceri Sambrook

    Fast paced heroic fantasy adventure series set in a faintly wild-west flavoured post apocalyptic future. Gemmel sticks to his formula of tortured heros, redemptive antagonists and feisty women within a swift, nuanced-but-not-complex narrative and mix in frequent gutsy action. Why not? It works, this is a good read. Just don't read too many of his books to closely together other they become all too similar. Fast paced heroic fantasy adventure series set in a faintly wild-west flavoured post apocalyptic future. Gemmel sticks to his formula of tortured heros, redemptive antagonists and feisty women within a swift, nuanced-but-not-complex narrative and mix in frequent gutsy action. Why not? It works, this is a good read. Just don't read too many of his books to closely together other they become all too similar.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

    I unfortunately didn't connect with this book at all. I only made it 20% of the way through. I was really forcing myself to keep going. The style of writing and the characters did not grab me in the slightest. It's widely acknowledged to be good so who knows what happened there but it's a hard pass from me. I unfortunately didn't connect with this book at all. I only made it 20% of the way through. I was really forcing myself to keep going. The style of writing and the characters did not grab me in the slightest. It's widely acknowledged to be good so who knows what happened there but it's a hard pass from me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leo

    The preachiness in this book wasn’t as bad, still there, but significantly less than Wolf in the Shadow. I really liked how Gemmell snatched intertwined various mystical stories into surprisingly cohesive and more important, coherent story arch. Curious to read how the trilogy ends.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wallace

    Not the best - gets a bit silly but love the Jon Shannow character

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    Really enjoyed Wolf in the Shadow, but I found this story to be even more entertaining. I've started reading the last book and I'm curious to see what happens next. Really enjoyed Wolf in the Shadow, but I found this story to be even more entertaining. I've started reading the last book and I'm curious to see what happens next.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Not quite as fun as the first Shannow book, but still a rousing weird western adventure.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    Interesting theory on Atlantis's demise, and an explanation of the Bermuda Triangle. Interesting theory on Atlantis's demise, and an explanation of the Bermuda Triangle.

  21. 5 out of 5

    James Widdall

    Good follow up to the first Shannow book. A bit slower but it opens up an amazing mythos for the series

  22. 4 out of 5

    Riccardo Druss

    Really well thought dialogue from the author. The story comes together amazingly at the end.

  23. 4 out of 5

    David

    "But he did not die." Gripping words in David Gemmell's so-called Jon Shannow trilogy of novels (and about the fourth in the Sipstrassi - or Stones of Power - series), that are required after the ending of Wolf in Shadow: reading this, I often wonder did Gemmell not realise that Jon Shannow aka The Jerusalem Man would be such a popular character when he first wrote that book, and had initially intended it to be a one-off (quick Google search: yes). This particular series, however, is essentially a "But he did not die." Gripping words in David Gemmell's so-called Jon Shannow trilogy of novels (and about the fourth in the Sipstrassi - or Stones of Power - series), that are required after the ending of Wolf in Shadow: reading this, I often wonder did Gemmell not realise that Jon Shannow aka The Jerusalem Man would be such a popular character when he first wrote that book, and had initially intended it to be a one-off (quick Google search: yes). This particular series, however, is essentially a post-Apocalyptic Western, with it hard not to imagine the character as Clint Eastwood appears in Unforgiven. On a more literary front, I also wonder whether Stephen King The Dark Tower series was either inspired or provided the inspiration for this, with both sharing a few (superficial, at least) similarities. Freed from most of the heavy-lifting of the world building done in the previous entry, this particular work instead is more able to concentrate on the character of Jon Shannow, providing a bit more flesh (as it were) to the world he inhabits, while still also calling back to those previous events in passing. I'm not entirely sold on the Lizard enemies that appear roughly about half-way, thinking it might have been better to stick with more traditional (if I can use that word in this context) heroic fantasy enemies, but even they are given more of a character than you would normally expect from supporting characters. Talking of supporting characters: this one also has Nu-Khasistra (an Atlantean from before the Fall - trust me, it makes sense once you read it!) and the Parson to provide counter-balance to Shannow himself: the former a ship-builder whose faith has much in common with that of Shannow and who provides some sage words of advice; the latter showing what can happen when a man believes in absolutes. As with most of Gemmell's works, well worth a read

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

    Though this is billed as a Stones of Power Novel, the first two novels in this series is set in one era and these are set in another. There is some crossover, but the only thing the reader really needs to know is the stones of power's history etc. and that is covered adequately in book three and four. In other words, Goodreads marks these books properly by identifying them as Jon Shanow # 1 and # 2. Perhaps in later books, a reason to have read the first two books (set in ancient times) but for Though this is billed as a Stones of Power Novel, the first two novels in this series is set in one era and these are set in another. There is some crossover, but the only thing the reader really needs to know is the stones of power's history etc. and that is covered adequately in book three and four. In other words, Goodreads marks these books properly by identifying them as Jon Shanow # 1 and # 2. Perhaps in later books, a reason to have read the first two books (set in ancient times) but for now the Shannow books have only the stones of power in common with the first two books in this series. This is a post-apocalyptic fantasy world. The technology (ignoring the weapons) is pretty much 1800's level. Therefore, this is pretty much a western novel and it reads like a western novel with fantasy elements. Gateways to other dimensions are opened and reptile-like warriors are sent against the humans. Shannow meets a young man who want to beat "the Jerusalem" man in a shootout, very much a western idea--- A lot of the books are about characters receiving redemption and transformation. Bad guys get wounded and become converted to good guys. Nobody is purely good or purely evil, except the big bad villains... Even the lizard-like warriors are simply pawns of the evil king and his consort--- rather than being pure evil-- though the humans think of them as demons.. and some of their practices add credence to that type of thinking. This series is interesting because of its blend of fantasy and western-type writing. The story is quite interesting--Shannow's dilemas are the traditional gunslinger's dilema about finding a place to settle down... but like the title of the old western novel my parents had when I was a kid "Gunfighters can't Quit!" he keeps finding reasons to strap on the guns and to kill evil men. Gemmell writes well enough, but the climax of his books always seemed rushed. However, this one sets the stage for a whole new world. as a group of airplanes get realeased from the Bermuda Triangle (an odd explanation) and land near the settlement.. So, now I have to read the next one to see how this is going to affect the future of this post apocalyptic low tech world. Once again, an interesting blend of western, Science Fiction, and fantasy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    The first paragraph is more of a general overview of the author. Feel free to skip to the second paragraph for a bit about the book itself. I first read David Gemmell in 1989, spotting a copy of his first book, Legend and deciding to try it. I wasn't a huge fantasy fan but a favourite author of mine is Robert E. Howard, the creator of the sword & sorcery genre so I was interested in finding new fantasy authors. Or more specifically new heroic fantasy authors. There is a distinction between the t The first paragraph is more of a general overview of the author. Feel free to skip to the second paragraph for a bit about the book itself. I first read David Gemmell in 1989, spotting a copy of his first book, Legend and deciding to try it. I wasn't a huge fantasy fan but a favourite author of mine is Robert E. Howard, the creator of the sword & sorcery genre so I was interested in finding new fantasy authors. Or more specifically new heroic fantasy authors. There is a distinction between the two. Put simply in heroic fantasy if you see an elf - kill it! I always struggled with the more twee fantasy authors so Howard's work was a gods' send (multiple gods being a common factor in heroic fantasy.) David gemmell ticked the boxes for me. His work is very well written. His characters compelling, flawed, dangerous and not always destined to live. The stories are told slowly building up from violent incident to violent incident but with a wealth of characterisation along the way. Magic play a huge role in his books with sorcerers and witches weaved throughout the plots. Not all of the books follow this format. Some are set in a future world, some in a distant almost recognisable past. Some take historic characters and weave fantasy into their lives. His final trilogy, the Troy series takes a more pure historical approach, giving us a "what was the reality behind the myth" story. Recently two books were released, one unpublished work and another first published under another name. The first has a fantasy element the other is a pure gritty novel of crime. I have enjoyed his books over the many years they were published. Some I enjoyed more than others, which is to be expected but all were well crafted stories. His characters live on harsh, unforgiving worlds. Violent death is a constant companion. But death walks on one side and honour on the other. Unexpected characters become heroes as honour is reborn. Gemmell is an author I continue to reread to this day and I still find his as work enthralling as I did when I first read him thirty years ago. The second gun slinger take is better than the first for me. Well written as usual, I warmed more to this book than the first, probably as I knew what to expect from this series after the first. Must read again though.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ian Banks

    Another incredibly fast-paced adventure featuring Jon Shannow. This time, Mr Gemmell takes the Hancock/Von Daniken ideas, a fairly large presence in the last book, and turns it all the way up to 11. However, he also includes the Bermuda Triangle, a race of lizardmen, men turning into lions, mid-life crises, nuclear war, some timey-wimey-ness, more stuff about Atlantis, Biblical legends, as well as a primer on how to control a community through fear and gunplay. Frankly, it should be a mess, but i Another incredibly fast-paced adventure featuring Jon Shannow. This time, Mr Gemmell takes the Hancock/Von Daniken ideas, a fairly large presence in the last book, and turns it all the way up to 11. However, he also includes the Bermuda Triangle, a race of lizardmen, men turning into lions, mid-life crises, nuclear war, some timey-wimey-ness, more stuff about Atlantis, Biblical legends, as well as a primer on how to control a community through fear and gunplay. Frankly, it should be a mess, but it's tightly controlled and you barely raise an eyebrow at each preposterous development as it comes into play because you're too damn busy wondering just how Shannow and his cohorts are going to get out out of their next mess. The setting feels a lot more realistically constructed this time around, possibly because it builds sensibly on what was revealed in the last book, possibly also because Gemmell appears to have a tighter rein on his creativity and is becoming a much more disciplined writer: unlike several of his previous books, there are fewer storylines that feel underdeveloped (I wanted to read more about the lizardmen, but that's a different thing entirely). I did think that Sharazad was a little two-dimensional as a villain, but I had little else to complain about. Gemmell commits a series author's sin in that he assumes that the reader has read the previous books and doesn't need more than a couple of sentences reference to get up to speed: explaining Shannow and Pendarric's relationship as "He saved me when I was trapped on the Titanic in the middle of a desert by sending me a magic sword" sounds really cool but stretches credulity a little - hell, I've read the previous book and it sounds a little bit silly! Great fun.

  27. 5 out of 5

    John B.

    The Last Guardian comes across as a sequel to a book that wasn't expected to be as popular as it was. Wolf in Shadow had its own ending that was mostly satisfying, there was no real reason to continue. About two-thirds of the way through this book the reader gets a sense that the author has grown tired of guns because they don't fuel action story telling the way a sword fight might. Szshark, the leader of the reptilian warriors known as the Daggers, comments on guns: "Gunss! Loud noisses. Kill ve The Last Guardian comes across as a sequel to a book that wasn't expected to be as popular as it was. Wolf in Shadow had its own ending that was mostly satisfying, there was no real reason to continue. About two-thirds of the way through this book the reader gets a sense that the author has grown tired of guns because they don't fuel action story telling the way a sword fight might. Szshark, the leader of the reptilian warriors known as the Daggers, comments on guns: "Gunss! Loud noisses. Kill very far. No honour!" A bit further on, Szshark has more to say and his comments resonated 'Very much bad, thiss war, and these,' he added, patting the pistol at his hip, 'no good. Battle should be fought close, daggerss and swordss. No win souls from sso far. I, Szshark, kill twenty-six enemies with dagger, face close, touch their eyess with my tongue. Now...bang...enemy fall. Very much very bad.' This story didn't have much humor, taking itself way too seriously. (view spoiler)[When Bull and Szshark meet and discuss a possible truce there is some humor that is short lived. (hide spoiler)] The story is more like a 'B' movie you might watch on a Saturday afternoon where cowboys, dinosaurs, and the builders of the pyramids are mashed together for a popcorn fueled romp.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Graham

    THE LAST GUARDIAN is the second of the Jon Shannow trilogy, following on from WOLF IN SHADOW. These novels are actually set in a post-apocalyptic world rather than a fantasy one, which means they're a rare foray into science fiction for the author. However, Gemmells fans will soon see plenty of recognisable elements in the narrative, from ruthless killers to initially stereotypical character types who grow and surprise you throughout. There are plenty of western tropes here and the author has gre THE LAST GUARDIAN is the second of the Jon Shannow trilogy, following on from WOLF IN SHADOW. These novels are actually set in a post-apocalyptic world rather than a fantasy one, which means they're a rare foray into science fiction for the author. However, Gemmells fans will soon see plenty of recognisable elements in the narrative, from ruthless killers to initially stereotypical character types who grow and surprise you throughout. There are plenty of western tropes here and the author has great fun with them, and the narrative is as action-packed as ever. You can imagine Shannow as Eastwood's Man with No Name, gradually working his way through an unforgiving world in search of redemption. The back story is a little complex but all becomes clear as the story progresses, and it incorporates the fall of Atlantis, warfare, Biblical passages, and at least two different time zones. THE LAST GUARDIAN is moving, tragic, exciting, and dramatic in equal parts, and on top of that a very quick read. I look forward to completing the trilogy with BLOODSTONE.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    David Gemmell is my favorite fantasy writer. Every time I'm in UK I try to pick up some of his stories that I haven't read. So on my trip to Scotland a week ago I picked up this. The last Guardian is the second book about John Shannow. This is a story that happens in a world that is recovering from an apocalypse. This book has lots of the tropes that are present in all of David Gemmell's work: this has the lone, older stubborn warrior, in this case it is even a gunslinger, it has the beautiful, i David Gemmell is my favorite fantasy writer. Every time I'm in UK I try to pick up some of his stories that I haven't read. So on my trip to Scotland a week ago I picked up this. The last Guardian is the second book about John Shannow. This is a story that happens in a world that is recovering from an apocalypse. This book has lots of the tropes that are present in all of David Gemmell's work: this has the lone, older stubborn warrior, in this case it is even a gunslinger, it has the beautiful, independent women, it has lots of musings on religion. it has human/ animal hybrids, it has time travel and events happening just because people are trying to avoid them, it has highly capable warriors who care more about honor then their live, some macho behaviour and it has lots of action. I must say that after having read lot's of his books, and some of them several times, I still really like David Gemmell's writing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paul,

    While Jon Shannow's character changes a lot in this book, there is still a lot to like about him. And the book continues to deal with the complexities of good and evil. Quotes: Neither the voice nor the implied threat worried him unduly. A man lived, a man died. What could frighten a man who understood these truths? In my own time there were wild tribes bordering our lands; they would raid and kill. Pendarric destroyed them, and we all slept easier in our beds. As long as Man remains the hunter-kil While Jon Shannow's character changes a lot in this book, there is still a lot to like about him. And the book continues to deal with the complexities of good and evil. Quotes: Neither the voice nor the implied threat worried him unduly. A man lived, a man died. What could frighten a man who understood these truths? In my own time there were wild tribes bordering our lands; they would raid and kill. Pendarric destroyed them, and we all slept easier in our beds. As long as Man remains the hunter-killer, there will be a need for warriors like you. I can wear my white robes and pray in peace. The evil can dress in black. But there must always be the grey riders to patrol the border between good and evil.'

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