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Capture the fantasy, thrills, and far-flung adventure of the first three novels in Terry Brooks’s enchanting Magic Kingdom of Landover series–now for the first time in one gripping volume. Chicago lawyer Ben Holiday can’t fathom what lies ahead when he purchases Landover–a magical kingdom of chivalry and sorcery–from Meeks, the mysterious seller who placed the ad. Weary and Capture the fantasy, thrills, and far-flung adventure of the first three novels in Terry Brooks’s enchanting Magic Kingdom of Landover series–now for the first time in one gripping volume. Chicago lawyer Ben Holiday can’t fathom what lies ahead when he purchases Landover–a magical kingdom of chivalry and sorcery–from Meeks, the mysterious seller who placed the ad. Weary and jaded, Ben clings to the ad’s promise: “Escape into your dreams.” But Landover is not the enchanted idyll he expected. The kingdom is in ruin. The barons refuse to recognize Ben as King, a dragon is decimating the countryside, and a demon lord has challenged any prospective ruler to a fatal duel. To make matters worse, the Paladin, renowned champion of the Kings of Landover, seems to be merely a legend. Ben’s only allies are a bumbling court magician, a talking dog turned court scribe, and the beautiful Willow, who is part girl, part tree. With his friends in tow, Ben sets out to claim the throne. But when Meeks decides he wants Landover back, Ben will face supernatural foes of every stripe to prove himself worthy of the kingship. The question is: Can he survive?


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Capture the fantasy, thrills, and far-flung adventure of the first three novels in Terry Brooks’s enchanting Magic Kingdom of Landover series–now for the first time in one gripping volume. Chicago lawyer Ben Holiday can’t fathom what lies ahead when he purchases Landover–a magical kingdom of chivalry and sorcery–from Meeks, the mysterious seller who placed the ad. Weary and Capture the fantasy, thrills, and far-flung adventure of the first three novels in Terry Brooks’s enchanting Magic Kingdom of Landover series–now for the first time in one gripping volume. Chicago lawyer Ben Holiday can’t fathom what lies ahead when he purchases Landover–a magical kingdom of chivalry and sorcery–from Meeks, the mysterious seller who placed the ad. Weary and jaded, Ben clings to the ad’s promise: “Escape into your dreams.” But Landover is not the enchanted idyll he expected. The kingdom is in ruin. The barons refuse to recognize Ben as King, a dragon is decimating the countryside, and a demon lord has challenged any prospective ruler to a fatal duel. To make matters worse, the Paladin, renowned champion of the Kings of Landover, seems to be merely a legend. Ben’s only allies are a bumbling court magician, a talking dog turned court scribe, and the beautiful Willow, who is part girl, part tree. With his friends in tow, Ben sets out to claim the throne. But when Meeks decides he wants Landover back, Ben will face supernatural foes of every stripe to prove himself worthy of the kingship. The question is: Can he survive?

30 review for The Magic Kingdom of Landover, Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    An Odd1

    "The Magic Kingdom of Landover" (V1: #1-3) by Terry Brooks all build up to bangup fight finales. I don't find humor in the gnomes eating dogs, cats, or trying to. Middle-aged male wish fulfillment night, bathing in a warm spring and meeting a lovely green fae who says "I am yours" (both in birthday suits) gives me a bad taste in #1, so I prefer #3 where he's more committed to all his friends. "Magic Kingdom for Sale" #1 For $1M, Ben Holliday, 39, recently widowed lawyer, buys the crown of Lando "The Magic Kingdom of Landover" (V1: #1-3) by Terry Brooks all build up to bangup fight finales. I don't find humor in the gnomes eating dogs, cats, or trying to. Middle-aged male wish fulfillment night, bathing in a warm spring and meeting a lovely green fae who says "I am yours" (both in birthday suits) gives me a bad taste in #1, so I prefer #3 where he's more committed to all his friends. "Magic Kingdom for Sale" #1 For $1M, Ben Holliday, 39, recently widowed lawyer, buys the crown of Landover, neighbor to the fairy world, but deteriorating since the old king died, and the mighty Paladin protector simultaneously vanished. I must have read some of the series before, because I seem to know scribe Abernathy, yet do not like Ben. I could have identified with the loyal, bespectacled skeptic with silky fine blonde hair (part Wheaten Terrier), victim of incompetent spell-caster Questor. I struggle to see hero in a morbid middle-aged millionaire who lusts for faithful sylph Willow, yet rejects her innate tree-ness, despises and lies to small myopic lowest-caste poor gnomes dressed in Salvation Army cast-offs, representatives Fillip and Sot (also sympatico to me). The castle Sterling Silver ails, provides less food. Vegetation wilts and dies, even Bonnie Blue trees, whose leaves taste like fruit and stalks give milk (complete human nutrients - too easy). Resistant subjects refuse to swear fealty to their new sovereign, or unite against the encroaching evil invaders: spreading sickness Tarnish, witch Nightshade, dragon Strabo (either Brooks or editor waffle between he and it p419+), and demon horde led by the Mark. Fierce kobolds Bunion and Parsnip have sharp teeth and claws to vanquish timberwolf, cave-wight and bog-wump (once, off-screen). At least Willow plays an active rescue role, not just passive waiting. "Black Unicorn" #2 is either trapped and pleading, or evil and tempting, first in dreams, beckoning, then for real. Bad ex-court sorcerer Meeks sends vivid nightmares and manipulates Ben, Questor, and Willow, to separately bring him lost items of power. He takes on the royal identity, the spell only clear to know-all prism (controls light) cat Dirk, who sees Ben beneath tatters and grime. Ben doesn't even try to wash clean a finger or scrap. I find #1 & 2 predictable, because (I read them before? or) Dirk repeatedly gives Ben the solution. "Wizard at Large" #3 Questor (consistently owlish-faced) sneezes in the middle of transforming Abernathy back into human form and instead transports him wearing the King's magic Paladin-calling medallion. The scribe exchanges places with a nasty Darkling demon in a bottle who grants the user cimmerian (dark) cravings, intensied by the holder's cruelty, makes the rounds of Landover, causing increasing trouble. Michel Ard Rhi, former prince convinced to abdicate by Meeks, now lives in west coast Seattle, and imprisons Abernathy, who refuses to give up the medallion willingly. Questor can send Ben and Willow to Vegas, but only the medallion can bring them back to Landover. Willow's father the River Master, witch Nightshade, and dragon Strabo play their parts here too. I liked #3 better because characters seemed less predictable, more grownup, take responsibility for their actions, less wishy-washy, whining, and moping. Preview "Princess of Landover" Mistaya (#3 ended with a royal wedding) returns from school in the mundane world. Recaps of an unusual birth, 11 years, and battle in Nightshade's domain, suggest other adventures intervened. Now Strabo welcomes her, and warns that she should not have made a frightening image of him, without his express permission. I may read more, or not.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Telthor

    The worst part about this series? The fact that I would have *loved* it as a kid, but I can't go back and do that. I'm reading it as an adult, and all I can see are the flaws, and they make me want to scream. It's pulpy genre fantasy, the sort of really basic stuff that might have been hot stuff back in the 80s and the origin days of Dungeons and Dragons and Ultima and King's Quest and Ladyhawke and Legend and whatever else was happening back then (with pounds of glitter everywhere, if I remembe The worst part about this series? The fact that I would have *loved* it as a kid, but I can't go back and do that. I'm reading it as an adult, and all I can see are the flaws, and they make me want to scream. It's pulpy genre fantasy, the sort of really basic stuff that might have been hot stuff back in the 80s and the origin days of Dungeons and Dragons and Ultima and King's Quest and Ladyhawke and Legend and whatever else was happening back then (with pounds of glitter everywhere, if I remember Legend correctly), but nowadays is trite and exhausting. This book didn't age well. It's a gross boy's story with gross themes and underdeveloped characters who repeat themselves every few paragraphs and whine about everything imaginable. Not a single person in this series is particularly likable except maybe the talking dog, and even then his insufferable fussiness (full on Cogsworth-style) grates. Especially unlikable is Ben, who kicks his horse and seems to hate his friends because he's always mocking them down (tho never to their faces, just in the privacy of his own head--he can maintain the illusion of being a good king that way). It's very episodic. Bad thing happens, they try to fix it, worse thing happens, they try to fix it, even WORSE thing happens, Ben transforms into a knight for some reason that doesn't ever seem to be explained unless I zoned out during one of the exposition dumps, they fix the problem in a few quick paragraphs, they give the aforementioned exposition dumps wherein the author explains how clever he was in case you didn't notice it in the text, and...that's about it. The end, next book. Characters loop back on the same dilemmas, the same crucial character flaws, without ever really resolving themselves. Ben constantly laments his choices, his dead wife, his abilities, whatever, but never really seems to improve. None of his lessons learned in these three stories were particularly impacting or memorable; they were just stepping blocks to buck up plot. And they repeat themselves so often, I must wonder if this was published serially in magazines. The repetition might have been a way to keep readers informed if they missed a week, because if it was published this way initially then someone needed to take an editing pen to it. The premise sounds cool until it's put into effect. Suddenly a rich lawyer buying a place and naming himself king feels skeevy. Worse when he starts parading around refusing to listen to the land's culture and trying to boss everyone around. Tho, to be fair, he DOES start to take lessons after his colonialism backfires and he starts being...um...I guess an okay king? It seems to be working out, so I don't know; it's never really discussed much, just mentioned in passing. I guess people tolerate him? There are really only four people other than his main groupies: the dragon, who hates him, the evil witch, who REALLY Hates him, the river guy who is an even creepier ball of near-rape-fantasies, and I guess that knight guy who....um....shows up sometimes but is still an untrusting villain who locks Questor up so........good ally there. But worse than the skeevy premise...man, you know it's Willow. The fact that Willow has a child's innocent face but a hot woman's body and does NOTHING for herself and only acts for Ben, tells him she "belongs" to him repeatedly and apparently threatens him that he can never let her leave, follows him constantly, never has a conversation with any other female character except Elizabeth in Wizard at Large (and even then it's really about Abernathy, so it STILL doesn't pass the Bechdel test which I once thought was the easiest test in the world to pass, what the heck, Brooks), and gets her "period" one day every 20 days which makes her "repulsive" to look at according to Ben and makes her dead weight to drag around when she's suffering from its effects.......? The hell, Brooks? What sort of fantasy am I reading? Is it one about dragons, or it is your personal fascinations? Why is Questor kinda good at magic now? Did I skim something without absorbing it? And YET. Despite all my hate. I'm giving it two stars, because once I finally succumbed to the fever dream fantasy nightmare somewhere toward the end of Magic Kingdom for Sale, I found myself kind of sort of enjoying it. It's not creative or well written (why did Ben see his unborn daughter's ghost?? what was that meant to achieve?!) or well paced or anything of the sort, but it's got action, adventure, close scrapes, peril, building action, dragons, sarcastic cats, magic necklaces, evil wizards, Schmendricks, trolls, and that wistful sort of longing for a magic world just beyond our real life boring one. I don't like Ben at all, and yet being forced to follow him for three books gave him something off an irksome fascination? It's weird. I don't know. I can't explain it. It was sort of like the proverbial "staring at a train wreck" thing where you can't look away. By the end of Wizard at Large I was actually having fun and kinda wondering if I should get the next omnibus before I sat up in horror and realized what I was thinking. Third one is easily the least bad, is what I'm saying. Less back-stabby and contrived and stupid. They almost kinda like each other and work together sometimes and the dragon is cool and Willow isn't Completely Vapidly Useless until she gets her tree period. I read all three despite being sure I was going to DNF halfway through the first one. I don't...know why. I guess I wanted to know why these situations kept happening, and what nonsense could possibly happen next. So many issues could have been resolved in like, maybe three minutes. But they never were. We walked in circles for a while, ran into the same villains, argued, did the paladin thing, and bam. I guess Abernathy bit Meeks's ankle in one fight. That was kinda cool. Good job, Cogsworth-dog-thing. Still. It feels derivative and juvenile, the early attempts of an author's career that are a bit too self-fulfilling-fantasy-feeling. I'm told events and emotions and character growth without ever being shown it (and even then they backtrack on that character growth thing). I would have loved it as a kid, but now....the flaws are too abundant and gross for me to ever give it anything more than a really uncomfortable shrug.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brent Brubaker

    The Magic Kingdom of Landover Volume 1 is an omnibus containing the first three novels in the Magic Kingdom of Landover series. The individual books that make up volume 1 are: Magic Kingdom For Sale-Sold, The Black Unicorn and Wizard at Large. The book starts out really strong...a middle-aged lawer who lost his wife three years ago is searching for something in his life. He is tired of the day to day stress of a world without meaning and adventure. That is when he decides to buy a magical kingdom The Magic Kingdom of Landover Volume 1 is an omnibus containing the first three novels in the Magic Kingdom of Landover series. The individual books that make up volume 1 are: Magic Kingdom For Sale-Sold, The Black Unicorn and Wizard at Large. The book starts out really strong...a middle-aged lawer who lost his wife three years ago is searching for something in his life. He is tired of the day to day stress of a world without meaning and adventure. That is when he decides to buy a magical kingdom and when the fun begins... I really, really, really wanted to be someone giving this book a 5 star rating. I thought the whole idea of a man buying a magical kingdom and being made king to rule over Landover was really creative. However, I found that it ended up as a mediocre fantasy novel. The beginning and the end of this book were good enough to keep my interest. The middle of the book which is the Black Unicorn was completly uninteresting an unnecessary. I already bought the second volume which completes the series so I guess I will finish it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Total pulp fantasy. Nice and simple formula. Something bad happens. Things go from bad to worse. Something bad happens. (Again?) Things keep getting worse, (Really? They can’t be that dumb, and there’s only 20 pages left.) Dues ex Machina. All problems solved. Falling action. Happy Ending. -The End. First story was ok. Second, not event that good. Third was the best of the three. The third almost makes me want to keep reading the Landover stories. Almost. This is not necessarily a bad writing. I Total pulp fantasy. Nice and simple formula. Something bad happens. Things go from bad to worse. Something bad happens. (Again?) Things keep getting worse, (Really? They can’t be that dumb, and there’s only 20 pages left.) Dues ex Machina. All problems solved. Falling action. Happy Ending. -The End. First story was ok. Second, not event that good. Third was the best of the three. The third almost makes me want to keep reading the Landover stories. Almost. This is not necessarily a bad writing. It won’t keep you up at night, that’s for sure. Maybe add it to your, “I need a break from deep, dense or disturbing ” pile.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tatra

    Confession, I didn’t actually read much of this book, because I read all three books separately. I got the first book from my uncle’s personal library and then this omnibus came a week or two after that. So I honestly planned on reading books 2 and 3 in this edition. But then I realized that I had a copy of the second book that my mom had given me ages ago and I had to dig it out of my bookcase. And it turns out that my grandma on my dad and uncle’s side had given my mom that book for Christmas. Confession, I didn’t actually read much of this book, because I read all three books separately. I got the first book from my uncle’s personal library and then this omnibus came a week or two after that. So I honestly planned on reading books 2 and 3 in this edition. But then I realized that I had a copy of the second book that my mom had given me ages ago and I had to dig it out of my bookcase. And it turns out that my grandma on my dad and uncle’s side had given my mom that book for Christmas. So, because the book was in hand and lighter than all three in one even if it was a hardback, I read that edition rather than in this book. Now, the third one. I honestly do like bringing the smaller boos to work, so I was about to get a copy of the third one from the used bookstore, only I forgot about it the last time I was there. But then my dad brought home a whole bunch of books (book-pocolypse) that had belonged to my uncle and the third book was one of those. So I took the smaller book to work. And so it passed that I didn’t actually read this book, but I will still add it to my goodreads collection.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The Magic Kingdom of Landover: Volume 1 contains the first 3 books of a currently 5 book series. I am going to give a general description of the main characters, then summarize my experience with each of the three books in this volume. Ben Holiday: Usually the main protagonist, Ben is a trial lawyer from Chicago who, having lost his wife and unborn child to a car accident, and having seen an ad in a Christmas wish catalog, decided to purchase a magic kingdom called Landover for the sum of one mil The Magic Kingdom of Landover: Volume 1 contains the first 3 books of a currently 5 book series. I am going to give a general description of the main characters, then summarize my experience with each of the three books in this volume. Ben Holiday: Usually the main protagonist, Ben is a trial lawyer from Chicago who, having lost his wife and unborn child to a car accident, and having seen an ad in a Christmas wish catalog, decided to purchase a magic kingdom called Landover for the sum of one million dollars. Questor Thews: Landover's misguided court magician. His magic is well-intentioned but, often backfires. Abernathy: The court scribe, turned into a dog by Questor's magic in order to save him from an enemy. He can still talk, walks on his hind legs and has fingers instead of standard paws. Abernathy seems to be the realist of the bunch. Meeks: The not-so-nice half-brother of Questor who escaped from Landover with the heir to the throne, in order to "sell" the kingdom to wealthy buyers. We was the former court wizard. Nightshade: An evil witch living in Landover, who causes lots of trouble. Strabo: Landover's last dragon. He is often short-tempered and is not willing to help much. Willow: A slyph, born of a wood nymph and an ex-elemental. She has pale green skin, waist-length emerald hair and has tufts of silky green hair running down her calves and arms. She believes she is destined to be with Ben forever. She also has to turn into a tree, a willow, every 20 days. Her description, minus the green skin, green hair and the hair on the back of her legs and arms kind of reminds me of my wife when I met her. There are other characters but, these are the ones which I feel bear describing. Magic Kingdom For Sale: SOLD! Synopsis: Ben Holiday purchases a Magic Kingdom called Landover for the sum of a million dollars from a strange man called Meeks. He arrives in the kingdom only to find that the place is in ruin, having not had a "real" king for 20 years. Ben must prove himself to the inhabitants of this world, find his new identity and face the Demon Mark. I felt that Magic Kingdom For Sale: SOLD! was a bit slow to start but, this was necessary. A lot of exposition is done in order to truly give the reader a lot of background on Ben Holiday, his life and his character. While not as riveting of a read as parts of the second and third books, this book sets the stage for many future adventures in Landover. It does a great job of describing the magical land, its inhabitants and its flora and fauna. While there is some great action at the end of the story, much of the book seems focused on giving the reader a lot of necessary information into the characters who will play a bigger part in future tales. So, it is a bit slow, but gets really exciting later on. The Black Unicorn: Synopsis: Meeks comes back to Landover and makes himself appear to be Ben, while Ben appears as a peasant. Meanwhile, a black unicorn of incredible magical power roams the land, its purpose is unknown. Will Ben be able to recover his real self before Meeks captures the Black Unicorn? The Black Unicorn was a non-stop read for me. The action started at the very first chapter and continued throughout every one after it. I think I figured out the solution to Ben's problem much too soon in the book, but, that is dramatic irony for you. The only negative thing I can say about this book is that there was a lot of re-visiting of the locations from the first book, in almost the same order. While the events which took place were different, the locations for those events remained the same. This bugged me a bit. Other than that, it was an absolute non-stop read with plenty of action, mystery and adventure. Wizard at Large: Synopsis: Questor Thews, in an attempt to change Abernathy back into a man, accidentally sends him, and the king's medallion into our world and brings and unspeakable evil back into Landover. Ben and company must find a way to rescue Abernathy from our world and the clutches of Michel Ard Rhi, the late king's son and heir to the throne, who is a not so nice guy... This book was even more interesting than book two. Imagine, all these fairy and magical creatures, entering our world. It makes for a mix of the best and the worst of humanity and also has some real emotional moments of worry, fear and awe. I won't give anything away but, one of the later chapters in the book had one of the most amazing action sequences resulting in an extreme melding between our world and that of Landover. I really have not a single complaint about this book and loved every minute of it. For those who are antsy about this kind of thing, yes, there is magic used and spoken about in this book. There are fairies, slyphs, witches, nymphs, dragons and a whole manner of other creatures. However, many of the messages within the book hold fast to good Christian themes. Good vs. Evil, self sacrifice, love, responsibility for one's actions and many other themes are present that make these books a great read. There are no extreme descriptions of violence, no sexual content, (but there is nudity mentioned) and very little unfavorable language. However, that being said, these would probably not fit the attention span of the average child or young adult. I remember reading Magic Kingdom For Sale: SOLD! at some point in high school and had a hard time getting through it because I just lacked the focus necessary to read it and retain the story. So, this is probably best for studious late High School students and older. Overall this is a great series and I look forward to reading volume 2 sometime in the future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Great read from a great writer. I particularly enjoy how grounded in reality it is (in that I could see a bit of myself in Ben Holiday, the idealism mixed with the cynicism and world weariness). This Kindle edition had all three of the first three books. The subsequent books are sequels and are set in the same world, but, if you haven’t read this sort of edition before, you might find the transition between books a little jarring. Personally, I prefer these types of bundles, as it means I get a Great read from a great writer. I particularly enjoy how grounded in reality it is (in that I could see a bit of myself in Ben Holiday, the idealism mixed with the cynicism and world weariness). This Kindle edition had all three of the first three books. The subsequent books are sequels and are set in the same world, but, if you haven’t read this sort of edition before, you might find the transition between books a little jarring. Personally, I prefer these types of bundles, as it means I get a number of books for a good price. These bundles are part of what I enjoy about my Kindle. Thanks to them, I have a solid library of technical, reference, and literary material that I can easily pull out of my bag on the subway.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    I loved the series as a youth. I always wished there had been more. Then there were and it took me forever to get around to reading the rest of them. By that, I mean I still haven't read "A Princess of Landover" but this is the first step in getting me there. I had re-read the first book a few years ago so I just looked at a Wiki to refresh my knowledge. I found the Black Unicorn hard to read. I kept skimming. Ben seemed irritatingly dense in this book and when the reader knows what needs to go I loved the series as a youth. I always wished there had been more. Then there were and it took me forever to get around to reading the rest of them. By that, I mean I still haven't read "A Princess of Landover" but this is the first step in getting me there. I had re-read the first book a few years ago so I just looked at a Wiki to refresh my knowledge. I found the Black Unicorn hard to read. I kept skimming. Ben seemed irritatingly dense in this book and when the reader knows what needs to go on so far ahead of the characters it makes it hard to keep reading. Wizard at Large was a much more enjoyable read. It might have been because the threat seemed so much larger than it had been in the Black Unicorn.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dj

    So this is the first three Landover books. All of them are pretty good, still, the best of them is the first. Magic Kingdom for Sale/Sold. This book brings you to a new world and it is all fresh and unexpected. A man on Modern day Earth decides that his life has to change and he finds a catalog of Xmas wish products that are one of a kind and it has the Magic Kingdom in it for a large amount of money. He decides to take the chance and everything flows from that decision. The next two books, Blac So this is the first three Landover books. All of them are pretty good, still, the best of them is the first. Magic Kingdom for Sale/Sold. This book brings you to a new world and it is all fresh and unexpected. A man on Modern day Earth decides that his life has to change and he finds a catalog of Xmas wish products that are one of a kind and it has the Magic Kingdom in it for a large amount of money. He decides to take the chance and everything flows from that decision. The next two books, Black Unicorn and Wizard at Large are still good, but somehow feel a little like afterthoughts. Some of the situations feel a little forced. But they are good follow up pieces. Will have to see what the rest of it is like.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Megan Volk

    Loved the story line.... Absolutely loved the supporting characters.... The main character however was dumb as a box of rocks. I figured out on chapter 2 what took him and additional 10 to get his simple mind around. Hard to read when your waiting on the main character to through his internal dialogue and figure it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I did not know this was three books when I picked it up on Kindle (dang long titles getting cut off). The first book was recommended by a podcast. I enjoyed it. It still holds up, but it does kind of feel like a study in the history of the genre then a book that really pulled me. I look forward to reading the other two in this collection.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mikki

    This was a great book. I found myself getting a little lost sometimes due to the over descriptive nature of parts, but that was probably just my own focus issue. I can not wait to read more from Terry Brooks.

  13. 5 out of 5

    ALLYN JOSEPH FITZSIMMONS

    It a lifetime fave I really like this storyline growing up and enjoyed reading it as and adult for different reasons. I like a good story of self discovery especially with wizards and dragons

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Diaz

    Great for young readers This was one of those books that you start to read and don’t want to but down. I have been aTerry Brooks fan for many years and I am glad I picked this up out if a whim

  15. 5 out of 5

    Greg Herman

    This series is one of my all time favorites. If you're looking for a great fantasy read than you should give this a try. This series is one of my all time favorites. If you're looking for a great fantasy read than you should give this a try.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Rowe

    A nice trilogy While this trilogy doesn't compare to the scope and depth of Brooks other work, Shannara, this was a compelling and entertaining read. A nice trilogy While this trilogy doesn't compare to the scope and depth of Brooks other work, Shannara, this was a compelling and entertaining read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rizwana Groover

    It was ok for me. Was a bit slow

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    The 3rd book started out a little slow. I couldn't face the gnomes again, so I stopped for a quick read of something else. Luckily when I went back. I truly enjoyed the end of this book. The 3rd book started out a little slow. I couldn't face the gnomes again, so I stopped for a quick read of something else. Luckily when I went back. I truly enjoyed the end of this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Franz

    Great fun. The last book in this omnibus, "Wizard At Large" was possibly my favorite On to volume 2 Great fun. The last book in this omnibus, "Wizard At Large" was possibly my favorite On to volume 2

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paxton Holley

    Surprised how much I liked this series. Omnibus contains the first three books, I read them each separately.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Zeitvogel

    A Fun and Entertaining Read The Landover series is a fun read. If you like both fantasy and comedy, you will enjoy this light hearted series. I look forward to Volume 2.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Polson

    It's not a Lord of the Rings knockoff like his Shannara series and it's less of a slog, but it is still slow. It's not a Lord of the Rings knockoff like his Shannara series and it's less of a slog, but it is still slow.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Davidus1

    Very much enjoyed this book. It was a fun read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vitaliy Hristyuk

    Very good! If you broke through somewhat stiff wording of this book, it could be pretty good. I've quite enjoyed this fantastic adventure. Very good! If you broke through somewhat stiff wording of this book, it could be pretty good. I've quite enjoyed this fantastic adventure.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Gentilini

    I absolutely love this series I've read it over and over again. If you want a world to escape to with all the things you know in epic fantasy this is the one to read. I absolutely love this series I've read it over and over again. If you want a world to escape to with all the things you know in epic fantasy this is the one to read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Fun reread I had forgotten enough of this set of books to inspire the need for a reread. These first three books were a fun romp.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    I read all three of these books shortly after they first came out. I enjoyed them then and I enjoyed reading them again now. Terry Brooks has the ability to create a character and a world with its own rules that are very different from his Shannara series. The books are enjoyable have humor in some places and tell an enjoyable story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bookwormdragon

    Uggh. Boring and not my style at all. Characters were boring, situations were boring, and so much inner dialogue - also boring. I really wanted to like this book, but I finally had to give up.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    An altogether mediocre book, which I purchased only because it came packaged 3-books-in-1 The premise is great - a jaded lawyer, unable to overcome his sorrow over his late wife's untimely death, comes across an ad selling a magical kingdom for ONE MILLION DOLLARS (fufufufu). Skeptical, he nevertheless decides he has nothing else to lose. He purchases it and finds that, indeed, there is a magical kingdom called Landover, full of unicorns and lions and tigers and bears oh my! Unfortunately for Ben An altogether mediocre book, which I purchased only because it came packaged 3-books-in-1 The premise is great - a jaded lawyer, unable to overcome his sorrow over his late wife's untimely death, comes across an ad selling a magical kingdom for ONE MILLION DOLLARS (fufufufu). Skeptical, he nevertheless decides he has nothing else to lose. He purchases it and finds that, indeed, there is a magical kingdom called Landover, full of unicorns and lions and tigers and bears oh my! Unfortunately for Ben Holiday (said jaded lawyer and protagonist), the kingdom he has inherited is quite run down and quite in need of his help. Ensue typical fantasy adventure. It's hard to put my finger quite on why this book isn't very good, but for the sake of posterity, I am going to do my darndest! Could it be the stereotypical characters, such as... The bumbling court wizard whose magic never seems to work the way its intended (but will work AT A CRUCIAL MOMENT?! OMG DIDNT SEE THAT ONE COMING LOLOLOLO) The protectors of Ben! two strong silent stoic kobolds, whose sole description seems to be that they have very sharp and shiny teeth The evil witch who is tricksy and cares only about herself The manipulative nobles who are tricksy and care only about themselves The tree dryad/naied who is exceedingly lovely and beautiful and instantly falls in love with Ben upon first sight and constantly tells him that they are fated to be together (queue eye rolling) The evil demon villain Mark who utters 0 words Or could it be the writing, which is decent enough, except that it is constantly interrupted with long "tell" sections where Ben needs to tell us his doubts and his thoughts. Like two or three times a chapter, there'll be this section that's like, "Ben suddenly realized wow it was all real. And he might die. And he missed his wife. But he was going to be strong. Yes, he was going to take his lawyer/trial experience and show these fantasized fools whos who and whats up." Or could it be the overly simplified conflicts - there's never really any doubt which way Ben is going to choose or any of the other characters. There's always the good-but-hard choice and the easy-but-apathetic choice. Drama, good drama that is, just doesn't work that way. At least I don't think so. Or could it be the empty world that he has created? Landover feels very... well... boring. It really does. As a pure creation, it's quite generic. I never got a good sense of politics, of the population, of the types of beasts. And I could go on, but at that point, I'd just be soapboxin' it. MK for Sale is not a bad book. It's just kinda boring. It feels like a totally generic fantasy. Unfortunately, I'm stuck with the next 2 books of this combined volume AND the next volume, so I suppose we'll have to see if it improves.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dusty Craine

    How do you review an omnibus of three books without giving away any spoilers? I don’t know so I’m not going to try. These are the first three books in the Landover series of fantasy novels by Terry Brooks. It is a story that is continually crossing over between our real-world Chicago and a magical Kingdom named Landover. Book one opens with Ben Holiday, a successful lawyer and partner in a law firm who still grieves the loss of his wife, Annie. He opens a holiday catalog that is exclusive to peop How do you review an omnibus of three books without giving away any spoilers? I don’t know so I’m not going to try. These are the first three books in the Landover series of fantasy novels by Terry Brooks. It is a story that is continually crossing over between our real-world Chicago and a magical Kingdom named Landover. Book one opens with Ben Holiday, a successful lawyer and partner in a law firm who still grieves the loss of his wife, Annie. He opens a holiday catalog that is exclusive to people of affluence and finds an ad to purchase a magical kingdom. He debates but ultimately buys the throne of Landover. Upon entry into Landover he finds things are not quite what he expected. The kingdom is rotting away as a result of Landover not having a king in so long. The magic of the land is tied to the magic found in having a king on the throne that commands the mysterious Paladin. The mystery of the Paladin permeates the first book and the conclusion is ultimately satisfying and if I’m being honest, I think it’s pretty bad ass. Ben pretty quickly encounters his most loyal followers who play a prominent part in the remainder of the three books. The court wizard, Questor Thews, the court scribe, Abernathy, who is actually a dog who talks and walks upright on account of a spell gone wrong that turned him from a man to a dog. He also has two kobolds in his service, Bunion and Parsnip. The latter of those also serves as the royal chef. If I have any complaint at all it is that the Kingdom of Landover has a very claustrophobic feel. Ben sets off on a mission to visit all of the different peoples of his Kingdom and it seems to last only three or four stops. In fact a quick look over at a Landover Wiki reveals only five particular locations of note within Landover and one is not visited in the first three books, if it ever is. Of course the list of major characters is only 13 people deep with most of them having already been introduced. This doesn’t necessarily mean that you form a close bond with them; instead I seem to be more fascinated in what happens next rather than who might live or die. In conclusion, I think Terry Brooks has created a likeable story and universe in which I’ll love to visit, though not as eagerly as Shannara. These books are quick, enjoyable reads that have a more YA feel to them than their Shannara or Word & the Void counterparts. Again, I wish there were half-star options because I’d love to give it a 3.5 out of 5 or something. But I definitely couldn’t justify a 4. If you like Terry Brooks, you’ll very likely enjoy Landover as well.

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