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Vicky Rai, the son of a high-profile Minister, has been shot dead by one of the guests at his own party. They are a glitzy bunch, but among them the police find six strange, displaced characters with a gun in their possession. each of them steaming with a secret motive. India's wiliest investigative journalist, Arun Advani, makes it his mission to nail the murderer. In doin Vicky Rai, the son of a high-profile Minister, has been shot dead by one of the guests at his own party. They are a glitzy bunch, but among them the police find six strange, displaced characters with a gun in their possession. each of them steaming with a secret motive. India's wiliest investigative journalist, Arun Advani, makes it his mission to nail the murderer. In doing so, the amazing, tender and touching, techni-colour lives of six eccentric personalities unravel before our eyes. But can we trust Advani? Or does he have another agenda in mind...?


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Vicky Rai, the son of a high-profile Minister, has been shot dead by one of the guests at his own party. They are a glitzy bunch, but among them the police find six strange, displaced characters with a gun in their possession. each of them steaming with a secret motive. India's wiliest investigative journalist, Arun Advani, makes it his mission to nail the murderer. In doin Vicky Rai, the son of a high-profile Minister, has been shot dead by one of the guests at his own party. They are a glitzy bunch, but among them the police find six strange, displaced characters with a gun in their possession. each of them steaming with a secret motive. India's wiliest investigative journalist, Arun Advani, makes it his mission to nail the murderer. In doing so, the amazing, tender and touching, techni-colour lives of six eccentric personalities unravel before our eyes. But can we trust Advani? Or does he have another agenda in mind...?

30 review for Six Suspects: Detective Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    While I enjoyed Six Suspects (especially the characters of Eketi and Munna), the American character, Larry Page, did not ring true at all, primarily because of his speech. Attempts to make him an ordinary, "aw-shucks" Texas hick were admirable, but his "butter my butt and call me a biscuit" style got very old after awhile, and he really was just unbelievably stupid. I've met my share of stupid, uneducated people, but this was just too much, and for the only time in the book, I just really wanted While I enjoyed Six Suspects (especially the characters of Eketi and Munna), the American character, Larry Page, did not ring true at all, primarily because of his speech. Attempts to make him an ordinary, "aw-shucks" Texas hick were admirable, but his "butter my butt and call me a biscuit" style got very old after awhile, and he really was just unbelievably stupid. I've met my share of stupid, uneducated people, but this was just too much, and for the only time in the book, I just really wanted his "Mail-Order Bride" section to end as quickly as possible. His appearance seemed so random, and I'm still not really sure what he was doing there. Unfortunately, this uneducated, insanely stupid American uses very distinctively British English terms mixed in with crazy "down South" similes and metaphors, which made him even more unbelievable. I suspect Mr. Swarup's editor is a native British-English speaker who might not have noticed the following: 1. Page refers to the flight attendant on his first-ever plane trip as an "air hostess"; 2. He talks about the "queue" at passport control; 3. He refers to the restroom as the "WC"; 4. He calls a sidewalk a "pavement"; 5. He has never heard of Time magazine (not hasn't read it - hasn't HEARD of it); 6. Says that someone is "in hospital"; 7. Gives the dates in the wrong order in his speech (says "31 October instead of "October 31st"); 8. Refers to a two-week period as a "fortnight". I realize some of these things creep into American speech from time to time, but an uneducated, completely stupid person who seems to have never been out of Texas and apparently doesn't even know what the Constitution is? Highly doubtful. The rest of the book was great, though. Highly satisfying and I really wish Goodreads would let us give half-star ratings - I'd give it a 3.5 if I could.... Update 3/30/2011: I still think Page's use of British-isms was distracting, but I'm going to be a little more forgiving of the American idioms. I was thinking nobody really talks like that until I remembered educated Texan Dan Rather on election night 2000: http://politicalhumor.about.com/libra... my favorite is the one about the frogs.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kater Cheek

    There are a certain class of books in which nothing really happens for three hundred pages, but the reader enjoys the read because the characters are so friendly, the setting so cozy, and the writing so easy. This novel is the exact opposite. Everything happens, but the journey jars, the characters fail to charm, and occasional lapses in writing make the plot alone carry the reader along. I found myself skimming, irritated with the prose, but wanting to find out what happens next. And when I say There are a certain class of books in which nothing really happens for three hundred pages, but the reader enjoys the read because the characters are so friendly, the setting so cozy, and the writing so easy. This novel is the exact opposite. Everything happens, but the journey jars, the characters fail to charm, and occasional lapses in writing make the plot alone carry the reader along. I found myself skimming, irritated with the prose, but wanting to find out what happens next. And when I say everything happens, I mean EVERYTHING. Poor girls get mistaken for rich Bollywood stars, slum-dwellers become instantly rich and then lose it all. People fall in love with the relatives of people who killed their own relatives. Swarup inserts any connection between two people, no matter how contrived or far-fetched, which will set up the plot. It's as melodramatic as any opera. Never have villains been so villainous, nor girl-victims been quite so piteous. While I enjoy foreign settings, and am fond of India especially, Swarup's one American character was so ridiculously stereotyped (and stupid, and annoying, peppering his every sentence with aphorisms and simlies until I ground my teeth in irritation) that it made me doubt his other characters were any more realistically drawn. I don't know enough about India to know if the other five main characters are also caricatures, but I suspect that they are. The author this novel reminded me most of was Carl Hiassen. Hiassen also has over-the-top plots, each twist more ridiculous than the past, but Hiassen seems plausible compared to Swarup's tale. Any one single aspect of this book's plot could provide the core of a movie (poor boy finds briefcase full of cash, native comes to the big city to find a lost treasure, man must avenge his brother's death in order to marry his widowed sister-in-law) but in SIX SUSPECTS the plots are heaped one on top of the other. I could have dealt with the over-the-top melodrama more if the novel didn't take itself so seriously. I would have preferred, having spent 470 pages with cardboard characters, if they had over-the-top sappy happy endings to go with their oversized plots. I could also have done without the chapter which consisted almost entirely of a phone conversation. Since all the characters speak in the first person, and there are so many people to keep straight, it took me a while at the beginning of each chapter to figure out which one was speaking. I strongly suspect that I am not the ideal reader for this, that it has, in fact, been written for Indians rather than Americans (the cringe-worthy "Larry Page" character is my main proof) but it hit an uncomfortable middle. I found it too political and gruesome to be a comedy, but too ridiculously contrived to be taken seriously.

  3. 4 out of 5

    K.J. Charles

    I would like to applaud the publisher of this 400pp murder mystery for GIVING AWAY THE MURDERER ON THE BACK COVER OH MY GOD. (This is my pb edition, the Goodreads blurb has been altered as well you might hope. JFC.) Ahem. Other than that. Nice idea, patchy execution. The "India shown in a series of different lives of characters who turn out to intersect" thing isn't super original but there's plenty of space for good treatment of it. This wasn't really. In part because the stories all seemed to b I would like to applaud the publisher of this 400pp murder mystery for GIVING AWAY THE MURDERER ON THE BACK COVER OH MY GOD. (This is my pb edition, the Goodreads blurb has been altered as well you might hope. JFC.) Ahem. Other than that. Nice idea, patchy execution. The "India shown in a series of different lives of characters who turn out to intersect" thing isn't super original but there's plenty of space for good treatment of it. This wasn't really. In part because the stories all seemed to be from different books. There's a magical realist satire of a guy possessed by Gandhi, a gritty gangster type tale, a tragedy of dispossessed and discarded underclass, a Bollywood actress in a Bollywood plot, and a spectacularly poor effort at a caricature of the American Abroad. It didn't add up. It didn't really work for me as satire or as realism because I found the tone too uneven--I'm here for tragicomedy but I think once it's caricature you do lose the emotional weight. And it didn't really work as a murder mystery because DID I MENTION THE BACK COVER FFFFF.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    How I Came To Read This Book: It was a gift. The Plot: Vicky Rai is the playboy son of a corrupt Indian bureaucrat - he's also newly acquitted from a murder he was clearly guilty for, a verdict that has the entire country of India up in arms. When Vicky throws a party to celebrate his freedom, he's subsequently murdered - and a motley crue of 6 suspects are taken into custody for possessing guns. A deeply dedicated investigative journalist concedes he will do what it takes to uncover the murderer How I Came To Read This Book: It was a gift. The Plot: Vicky Rai is the playboy son of a corrupt Indian bureaucrat - he's also newly acquitted from a murder he was clearly guilty for, a verdict that has the entire country of India up in arms. When Vicky throws a party to celebrate his freedom, he's subsequently murdered - and a motley crue of 6 suspects are taken into custody for possessing guns. A deeply dedicated investigative journalist concedes he will do what it takes to uncover the murderer of Vicky - not because Vicky himself is particularly important or deserving (within the story and to the reader) but because Vicky Rai represents all that is wrong within the Indian justice system. From there, Swarup divides each section of his book (background, motives, evidence, aftermath) into six stories written in six unique styles surrounding the six suspects. The stories are as diverse as following a tribal man on a spirit quest to a Bollywood sex symbol to a backwoods American seeking his mail order bride, while the styles range from diary entries to omniscient third-person to written almost entirely in dialogue. The Good & The Bad: I liked this book quite a bit - a fair bit more than the last murder mystery I read, DB Shan's "Hell's Horizon" (which I also gave 4 stars). Its main strength lies in the focus on the murder suspects over the crime and victim, which are really incidental in the exploration of how someone can be driven to murder (or is really just in the wrong place at the wrong time). Indeed, as the book lays out in its first few pages and resolves in its conclusion, the story is never really about Vicky Rai so much as India as a whole and the corruption that runs rampant in all systems that exist there. It was also fun to get into these six different stories - some were more successful than others - and I learned to appreciate them all at one point or another. Knowing that they'd end up Vicky's party as murder suspects, you spent a lot of each story being like "How is this ever going to happen?" but Swarup successfully positions all 6 gun-wielding guests in a sense that they could indeed have pulled the trigger (conveniently) - but even then the suspect is not so easily fingered. I think some people might be turned off by some of the style variations in the book, but I felt it was fascinating to see the challenge laid before Swarup - this is an ambitious book and I felt like it mostly succeeded. The book often reminded me of the film Babel in its circular nature, and provided plenty of "Ah-ha!" moments of connections and links that were either previewed or revealed or surprising. I suppose others might be overwhelmed by the integration of Indian culture in this book - if you've never read a book set in India I can definitely see this story as more challenging to grasp...but I still liked it. A lot. The Bottom Line: A fun book on many levels - writing style, character development, guessing games - that ends with a surprisingly poignant message. Anything Memorable: Nope. 50-Book Challenge: Book #34 in 2009.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anissa

    You know you're in trouble when the murder mystery couldn't save it. The summary drew me in but sadly this did not ultimately deliver. There's a murder and six suspects who had motive and opportunity so the fun is in the teasing out the threads and following the leads to figure out whodunnit. I feel that the story lost its way at the suspects pov level and everything that sprang from that was tainted. To be fair, I did enjoy a few of the suspects' narration but cannot forgive the thoroughly unbe You know you're in trouble when the murder mystery couldn't save it. The summary drew me in but sadly this did not ultimately deliver. There's a murder and six suspects who had motive and opportunity so the fun is in the teasing out the threads and following the leads to figure out whodunnit. I feel that the story lost its way at the suspects pov level and everything that sprang from that was tainted. To be fair, I did enjoy a few of the suspects' narration but cannot forgive the thoroughly unbelievable mess that was the sole American. Even if everything else had been perfect, he was so glaringly off, his existence would have thrown me out of the story and cost this a couple of stars. As it happens, he wasn't the only problem and by the time I'd arrived at the end (which was both preachy and a let down), I didn't feel like I'd read the book I was told this was. At least it was over. I love books that can take me to a place and through a wide cast of characters either closely or tenuously connected to one another, provide an immersive, cohesive and satisfying story. I'm going to recommend Tash Aw's Five Star Billionaire here, in case that's your thing. Read that. Skip this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ken Hammond (kenzaz)

    Six suspects Vikas Swarup set in a funky contemporary India it's a murder mystery kind of built around seemingly random events. It has characters that are weird and over the top, self absorbed, pretentious, ignorant, mixedup, scheming liars, your just normal balanced citizens. So they have a chapter each and they are the movie star, cowboy, politician, thief, guru, bum ...it is a wonderful recipe off delicious ficticious characters just stirred and left to set and not to be taken serious. Oh wel Six suspects Vikas Swarup set in a funky contemporary India it's a murder mystery kind of built around seemingly random events. It has characters that are weird and over the top, self absorbed, pretentious, ignorant, mixedup, scheming liars, your just normal balanced citizens. So they have a chapter each and they are the movie star, cowboy, politician, thief, guru, bum ...it is a wonderful recipe off delicious ficticious characters just stirred and left to set and not to be taken serious. Oh well they all like moths to light end up at the same extravagant party of the victim a very wealthy dangerous murderer. Our six suspects all have motive they all have guns and all seriously are the would be culprits this was absorbing a lot of fun working it all out. The giggle factor is very high in this. An alluded to statement of society well maybe. Portrays Indian society some of its nitty gritty ins and out of Indian street life weirdly enjoyable....wait theres more...no there isn't.?.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aryn

    Oh Dear Gods, why did I finish this book? My biggest problem with Vikas Swarup's first book was that the characters were underdeveloped and it felt like I was reading the novel adaptation of Slumdog Millionaire rather than the book that spawned the movie. My problem with this book was almost the exact opposite. The characters were over developed, but not in a good way. The description of them felt repetitive. The entire first section of the novel was completely unnecessary to any of the story line Oh Dear Gods, why did I finish this book? My biggest problem with Vikas Swarup's first book was that the characters were underdeveloped and it felt like I was reading the novel adaptation of Slumdog Millionaire rather than the book that spawned the movie. My problem with this book was almost the exact opposite. The characters were over developed, but not in a good way. The description of them felt repetitive. The entire first section of the novel was completely unnecessary to any of the story lines. Damn, Vikas, find yourself a better bloody editor. I cared about exactly zero of these character. I cared exactly zero percent who killed the politician's son. It was bad, and it never fucking ended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Vivek 'Vicky' Rai is a crook, a businessman and the son of the Home Minister of Uttar Pradesh - he is labelled the "poster boy for sleaze" by journalist Arun Advani and his crimes range from fraud to murder. When Rai is aquitted on a high profile murder charge, he decides to have a big party to celebrate. During the evening he is murdered and there are a whole host of people who would have been happy to see him dead. Six suspects are arrested who have all come to the party with a gun and this cl Vivek 'Vicky' Rai is a crook, a businessman and the son of the Home Minister of Uttar Pradesh - he is labelled the "poster boy for sleaze" by journalist Arun Advani and his crimes range from fraud to murder. When Rai is aquitted on a high profile murder charge, he decides to have a big party to celebrate. During the evening he is murdered and there are a whole host of people who would have been happy to see him dead. Six suspects are arrested who have all come to the party with a gun and this clever and entertaining novel interweaves their stories, their motives and the evidence against them. The characters include a bureaucrat whose body is invaded by a spirit, a Bollywood actress, a member of an ancient tribe attempting to locate a sacred object stolen from them, a mobile phone thief, a politician, and a hapless American. Although this novel has much that will make you think and feel, it is also extremely funny. Larry Page, the American who arrives in India hoping for a mail order bride and is then kidnapped by some terrorists only slightly less useless than he is, brings humour to situations that you feel few other authors have been brave enough to tackle. All have their reasons for wanting the unlikeable Vicky Rai dead - but who pulled the trigger? I have to say, the story is in the journey and this is a very entertaining and thought provoking read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Audrey (Warped Shelves)

    No words can really explain how much I adore the writing of Vikas Swarup. He is undoubtedly one of my top favorite authors and truly a master of words. There is no question that this is a fantastic story and a superb work of prose, as well as a gripping whodunnit. My favorite aspect of this book is really in the narrative and the way that Swarup shows off his prowess in writing. So many unique characters, strange points of view, and personal interests converge in this tale to write an altogether No words can really explain how much I adore the writing of Vikas Swarup. He is undoubtedly one of my top favorite authors and truly a master of words. There is no question that this is a fantastic story and a superb work of prose, as well as a gripping whodunnit. My favorite aspect of this book is really in the narrative and the way that Swarup shows off his prowess in writing. So many unique characters, strange points of view, and personal interests converge in this tale to write an altogether captivating modern Indian drama. The one reason why I don't give Six Suspects a full five stars is the character of Larry Page. I really did not like his character, and his knack for idioms and similies got to be a bit infuriating after a while. I get the idea for this persona and what Swarup was going for, but Larry really came off as more a caricature than a character. (view spoiler)[(Also note in Larry's chapter the racist American guy who called to the call center from San Francisco lol yeah right nice try.) (hide spoiler)] Overall I definitely recommend this book to anyone who likes either mysteries or Indian culture. (Or books, in general. It's a great read!) Popsugar Reading Challenge 2018: A book about or involving a heist

  10. 4 out of 5

    Manu

    The second novel by Vikas Swarup, after Q&A, the book that now has a life of its own. Six Suspects worked essentially as a superb suspense thriller for me, but it is also a commentary on everything that happens in India - from militancy and racism to reality TV and call centres. Through six of the most stereotyped characters that you could ever find (okay, five), the author manages not only to create a gripping tale that shakes up the mix every time you think you have cracked the mystery in your The second novel by Vikas Swarup, after Q&A, the book that now has a life of its own. Six Suspects worked essentially as a superb suspense thriller for me, but it is also a commentary on everything that happens in India - from militancy and racism to reality TV and call centres. Through six of the most stereotyped characters that you could ever find (okay, five), the author manages not only to create a gripping tale that shakes up the mix every time you think you have cracked the mystery in your head, but also manages to share a perspective on many of the things that makes news and even the probable behind-the-scenes machinations. All delivered not in a preachy tone that one would expect when such topics are involved, but the most amazing wit and sense of humour I have read in recent times. Right from the time the author shares a brief history of Vicky Rai, the 'victim', and in three paragraphs narrates the deeds that brought India's sense of justice into the spotlight, I was hooked. He then proceeds to set up the suspects - the bureaucrat who is yet to get over his loss of power, the actress who tries hard to maintain her image and reputation and not mention Nietzsche in conversations, the tribal who seemed to be the only non-stereotype and displays a sense of deep rooted compassion and understanding that humanity seems to have lost, the mobile thief who lives out the Bollywood cliche, the politician who will go to any lengths for power, and the American, whose tale - right from his name, Larry Page - is such a bizarre laugh riot that it deserves a sequel! The story lines develop independently, but with clear connections that add to the intrigue. The politician's spiritual advisor, the actress' man Friday, the underworld's ransom kidnaps, the honest cop, the Bhopal gas tragedy and its victims, Pakistani militants, naked sadhus in Prayag, and even the Indian American university grad, all cliches that add volumes to the narrative. But the real craft and genius is in how the stories and backstories are connected, and all the details are tallied. From the motive to the execution, every character, primary and secondary, and his/her action is accounted for, all while making us believe, for instance, that Gandhi's spirit has entered a corrupt official! After all of this, the author takes us through the night itself and just as I thought that the climax itself was an anti, it turned out to be the setup for a riveting series of events that provides a deserving end to a fantastically written work of fiction. Must read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mikko Peralta

    Just a few days after getting away with murdering a bartender, Vivek “Vicky” Rai was himself murdered in his own celebration party. Six suspects were detained and were brought to the authorities after having the scene of the crime fenced and the guests frisked. The suspects range from the most ordinary to the very popular and influential – all of whom has stories to tell and all of whom has enough motives to kill Vicky Rai. A huge portion of the book itself delves into the motives, where each lif Just a few days after getting away with murdering a bartender, Vivek “Vicky” Rai was himself murdered in his own celebration party. Six suspects were detained and were brought to the authorities after having the scene of the crime fenced and the guests frisked. The suspects range from the most ordinary to the very popular and influential – all of whom has stories to tell and all of whom has enough motives to kill Vicky Rai. A huge portion of the book itself delves into the motives, where each life is taken into account and where each character is discussed in great detail – a part of the book serves as the books sturdy foundation that builds in momentum ending in Vicky’s murder. It was extraordinary in a way that the writer himself has drawn a picture of a real India, or should I say a real modern world – where one tricks another and where each and every individual runs around with one trick or another, ready to pounce on the innocent and the vulnerable; as shown in a society where most law breakers get to be law makers. And I think what happened in the book just goes to show the possible outcome when a society’s tolerance for injustice is pushed to its limits. It was well written; with my expectations of a known writer who have concocted a tale loved by Oscars, met. Most of the characters had been described into great detail they seem to have lived or are living somewhere. I say “most of the characters” mainly because I think the American character in the book is badly drawn and ill-fitting, which brings me to say that I have this firm belief of Mr Swarup needing much introduction to America and its culture. All else aside from the American character is great. I could read it over again, minus the part of the American character. In a nutshell, I believe the book aims to let us understand the hidden reasons behind every societal issue the world is facing today. It’s a good read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Neha

    Vikas Swarup is one of the best thriller writers in recent times. His first book Q&A has become world popular & six Suspects follows the same style of revealing the outcome & then running the events in flashback. But in his usual style the outcome also changes after the flashback. He can think in the most impossible way and link it in the story in most reasonable style. His characters are a mix of very dramatic & most simple. Th emost unexpected characters turn out to be exceptional. His experie Vikas Swarup is one of the best thriller writers in recent times. His first book Q&A has become world popular & six Suspects follows the same style of revealing the outcome & then running the events in flashback. But in his usual style the outcome also changes after the flashback. He can think in the most impossible way and link it in the story in most reasonable style. His characters are a mix of very dramatic & most simple. Th emost unexpected characters turn out to be exceptional. His experience of studying the slums of India shows clearly in his second book where he takes you through the intricate & less known slums of mehrauli. His characters emerge from these slums & become the heroes. Indeed his stories are very inspiring for poor & lower middle class, whereas the rich are mean & selfish mainly involved with politicians, goons, big corrupt officers & businessmen. If you like a racy & dramatic read which can be turned into a typical bollywood masala movie then 6 suspects is your take. But don't expect it to be as original as Q&A. It is like any murder mystery with various suspects and the hidden motives and unexpected events.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Neenee

    3.5 stars and a night of no sleep. I 'accidentally' picked this up as I was dusting my bookshelf and noticed that I have this book for ages but haven't read. I thought of just flipping through a few pages for a quick break. The rest's history and so too my vacuuming. So cliche... I'm not good in doing reviews and I think with 400plus people discussing about this book are enough to give any new guy what to expect. I just want to put here my reaction to the book. It was fun and engaging, sometimes d 3.5 stars and a night of no sleep. I 'accidentally' picked this up as I was dusting my bookshelf and noticed that I have this book for ages but haven't read. I thought of just flipping through a few pages for a quick break. The rest's history and so too my vacuuming. So cliche... I'm not good in doing reviews and I think with 400plus people discussing about this book are enough to give any new guy what to expect. I just want to put here my reaction to the book. It was fun and engaging, sometimes depressing with a tint of hopelessness. It was mysterious enough for my mind to keep going but not too complicated that would make me want to continue with my other unfinished books. The highlight suspect was that poor Page guy from Waco. He was soo 'stereotypical stupid American' that made me cringe everytime he's on. But kudos to Swarup- You scored one against all those corny and cheesy Asians we got from some western authors.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cathleen

    Though some reviews complain that the structure is gimmicky, in my opinion it works well. Most of the characters are distinct and well-voiced -- the exceptions being the father (who too easily blends with other corrupt characters) and the unbelievably stupid American (beyond caricature to just cringe-inducing). The end is where I felt most let down: too many false climaxes and strange narrative choices. Yes, there is a message, but it loses punch when the reader has lost investment in the charac Though some reviews complain that the structure is gimmicky, in my opinion it works well. Most of the characters are distinct and well-voiced -- the exceptions being the father (who too easily blends with other corrupt characters) and the unbelievably stupid American (beyond caricature to just cringe-inducing). The end is where I felt most let down: too many false climaxes and strange narrative choices. Yes, there is a message, but it loses punch when the reader has lost investment in the characters. Will I recommend this? Yes, it's an interesting story. I just won't be as effusive as I was with Q&A.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Meena Arivananthan

    Nice romp that explores life in India but in a lighthearted manner that does not detract from the story. It is a murder whodunit that satisfies the mind and the heart. For an Agatha Christie fan, this was a treat I relished. His writing style is simple and to-the-point, yet the characters occasionally stay on your mind long after they've been written out of the story. He does not sugar-coat the class, caste and racist undertones, makes no excuses, and no judgement...so the story does not get pre Nice romp that explores life in India but in a lighthearted manner that does not detract from the story. It is a murder whodunit that satisfies the mind and the heart. For an Agatha Christie fan, this was a treat I relished. His writing style is simple and to-the-point, yet the characters occasionally stay on your mind long after they've been written out of the story. He does not sugar-coat the class, caste and racist undertones, makes no excuses, and no judgement...so the story does not get preachy or pedestrian. Loved it!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katy Noyes

    I really enjoyed both Q&A and The Accidental Apprentice. This for me was a 'light' read - not short, no, but content-wise it's the kind of book where you can just float along and see where it takes you. But it IS a murder mystery. You forget that after a while. The introduction, by an investigative journalist, tells us that rich, corrupt industrialist Vicky Rai has been murdered at a party at his home (celebrating his acquital for murder). Six suspects are in custody, each in possession of a gun I really enjoyed both Q&A and The Accidental Apprentice. This for me was a 'light' read - not short, no, but content-wise it's the kind of book where you can just float along and see where it takes you. But it IS a murder mystery. You forget that after a while. The introduction, by an investigative journalist, tells us that rich, corrupt industrialist Vicky Rai has been murdered at a party at his home (celebrating his acquital for murder). Six suspects are in custody, each in possession of a gun that could have fired the fatal bullet. We are then taken back one by one through each of the suspects' stories and backgrounds, back up to the date of the party. Each is completely different - a Bollywood megastar, a village tribal, a mobile phone thief, a politician, an American and Vicky's own father. It takes 400 pages but eventually we see how each tale takes the suspect to the murder site, and how some are connected. It's not overly involved, though at the end names and accusations fly thick and fast and your guess is bound to be wrong. I guessed the final twist just before it was revealed .... (to avoid spoiler, skip down a line) *SPOILER* and then was annoyed as I felt the synopsis on the back cover needed a rewording *END SPOILER* It's a really enjoyable read, though a few phrases of English jarred. I liked Shabnam's narration the best I think, the Bollywood story, though all had their moments, especially the slightly dumb American, over in India to meet the 'fiancee' he's been sending money to. Another book with a good feel for India (at least to this Western reader!) and a read to while away a few days.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Qube

    Page 80: I've started the book with the hope of discovering a good Indian crime fiction writer. Liked the first few pages; it had promise. Now, having just read the back stories of the six suspects, I am not so sure. It seems to be another novel where all characters are disgusting people. Page 150: Now, this is getting ridiculous. Should I bail out? ---------------- For a book from a celebrated author, I found it rather mediocre. I continue to look for good Indian crime fiction, and found the title Page 80: I've started the book with the hope of discovering a good Indian crime fiction writer. Liked the first few pages; it had promise. Now, having just read the back stories of the six suspects, I am not so sure. It seems to be another novel where all characters are disgusting people. Page 150: Now, this is getting ridiculous. Should I bail out? ---------------- For a book from a celebrated author, I found it rather mediocre. I continue to look for good Indian crime fiction, and found the title ‘Six Suspects’ promising. The first few pages were good, but it went downhill thereafter. Firstly, a whole bunch of real events have been taken, had names changes and dumped into the storyline as if the unoriginal characters did them. Not only was it lazy, it is also insensitive. I wonder how the families of the real victims feel. The trick may work with NRIs and foreigners, but it didn’t work for me. Secondly, all characters are filthy and sordid. As I read the book, I continuously felt like washing my hands. Thirdly, large parts of the book were ranged between silly and ridiculous. Even if a reader doesn’t take offence at how MK Gandhi’s spirit is treated, he may find many of the events rather puerile. After the first 150 pages or so, I skipped liberally, and found that I was not missing much. The book could have been far shorter and better edited. It is not often in crime fiction that the story puts you off so much that you no longer care who the killer was. This book managed it. Overall, I found it a yucky book. I am shelving plans of reading more books from this author.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Ahh!! It was a cute gimmick but the guy that was killed was such a bastard that I was happy he was dead no matter who did it. As for the list of "suspects" all six of them were incredibly dull so if one of them did actually kill the guy (and I can't help but feel there is some sort of "gotcha" ending in store here but don't care enough to slog through it to find out) it would be the most exciting thing they did. Ahh!! I actually gave this book almost 200 pages hoping it would get better since so Ahh!! It was a cute gimmick but the guy that was killed was such a bastard that I was happy he was dead no matter who did it. As for the list of "suspects" all six of them were incredibly dull so if one of them did actually kill the guy (and I can't help but feel there is some sort of "gotcha" ending in store here but don't care enough to slog through it to find out) it would be the most exciting thing they did. Ahh!! I actually gave this book almost 200 pages hoping it would get better since so many people like it (about 150 more than I normally do) but no hope!! Makes me want to go back and read Q&A even less!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Hisyam

    I started the book thinking it will be about a tout murder mystery case with six suspects. So at first I was really interested with the novel, with the author's choice of writing style. When I almost reached the end, I know I was somehow mislead. Maybe the problem was the book title. The book is, besides the murder case, includes a lot of social commentary of what happening in India. It tells it through the perspective and surroundings of the six suspects. It was really interesting though. In the I started the book thinking it will be about a tout murder mystery case with six suspects. So at first I was really interested with the novel, with the author's choice of writing style. When I almost reached the end, I know I was somehow mislead. Maybe the problem was the book title. The book is, besides the murder case, includes a lot of social commentary of what happening in India. It tells it through the perspective and surroundings of the six suspects. It was really interesting though. In the end, I still enjoy the book, although sometimes I find it too long (I rarely read books more than 400 pages). I like the book but was kinda disappointed by it because I expect something else.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Layla

    Really, the end saved this book. To be honest, it started well. The pace was great, the writing as well. And then, after the chapters about each suspects, I'm not sure what happened but this book felt long. After that, I couldn't care less about any of the characters and I thought the plot was a mess. Everything felt too unnecessarily detailed. Still, the plot twist at the end was worth it for me. I also liked the message of the book : the denunciation of the corruption and all that is wrong with t Really, the end saved this book. To be honest, it started well. The pace was great, the writing as well. And then, after the chapters about each suspects, I'm not sure what happened but this book felt long. After that, I couldn't care less about any of the characters and I thought the plot was a mess. Everything felt too unnecessarily detailed. Still, the plot twist at the end was worth it for me. I also liked the message of the book : the denunciation of the corruption and all that is wrong with this society.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Teena

    Loved "Slumdog Millionaire" but must confess I haven't read "Q & A". Not enjoying Six Suspects so far but will persevere. Well, persevere is the right word. I did finish it just from sheer pigheadedness not because I enjoyed it. Very long book with quite a little story. I didn't like many of the characters - the native was a funny character and the American "stalker" was entertaining as well, especially with the descriptions of Indian call-centres. Loved "Slumdog Millionaire" but must confess I haven't read "Q & A". Not enjoying Six Suspects so far but will persevere. Well, persevere is the right word. I did finish it just from sheer pigheadedness not because I enjoyed it. Very long book with quite a little story. I didn't like many of the characters - the native was a funny character and the American "stalker" was entertaining as well, especially with the descriptions of Indian call-centres.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Good, but not quite as good as his first book, Q & A. This book had some humor, which was a nice change, and I really liked the way it was set up--Murder, suspects, motives, resolution. I think it would have benefited from a bit more editing down of the stories of the individual suspects. The twists at the end were a bit--too twisted. But overall, a good read and I look forward to more by this author.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sree

    Even when being predictable, this book turned out to be a good read, stressing upon some major atrocities and illegal activities in the country. But I can't erase the thought in my mind that this book was written with a intention to make it to the big screen and not with an intention to satisfy the literary thirst of the readers and hence the three stars. Even when being predictable, this book turned out to be a good read, stressing upon some major atrocities and illegal activities in the country. But I can't erase the thought in my mind that this book was written with a intention to make it to the big screen and not with an intention to satisfy the literary thirst of the readers and hence the three stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lani

    I liked the different characters and perspectives the book was written in. I can respect anyone who can write in different voices. Overall it was a good book and good story, just not as memorable as other books I've read. I liked the different characters and perspectives the book was written in. I can respect anyone who can write in different voices. Overall it was a good book and good story, just not as memorable as other books I've read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mila

    Very well done, Mr. Swarup! Not quite the typical mystery novel that many often see. Still not up to Agatha Christie's level yet I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was quite a thrill reading it! Very well done, Mr. Swarup! Not quite the typical mystery novel that many often see. Still not up to Agatha Christie's level yet I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was quite a thrill reading it!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rajan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 'Hello?' 'Pranam, Guruji.' 'Jai Shambhu.' 'When are you returning from Allahabad to Mathura?' 'As soon as the Magh Mela ends. Why?' 'Guruji, I need your blessings.' 'What for?' 'For the greatest battle of my life.' 'I thought you had already won that. Vicky has been acquitted. My coral ring proved to be very potent.' 'Despite that, the Chief Minister is intent on dismissing me. So I have decided to enter the arena. It will be a fight to the finish. Either he will remain standing or I will.' 'You 'Hello?' 'Pranam, Guruji.' 'Jai Shambhu.' 'When are you returning from Allahabad to Mathura?' 'As soon as the Magh Mela ends. Why?' 'Guruji, I need your blessings.' 'What for?' 'For the greatest battle of my life.' 'I thought you had already won that. Vicky has been acquitted. My coral ring proved to be very potent.' 'Despite that, the Chief Minister is intent on dismissing me. So I have decided to enter the arena. It will be a fight to the finish. Either he will remain standing or I will.' 'You have my blessings, Jagannath. I have recently seen the Chief Minister's horoscope. His stars are in decline and yours are on the way up.' 'Thank you, Guruji. With you on my side, I can take on anyone, even the Chief Minister.' 'Jai Shambhu, Jagannath. May victory be yours!' 'Jai Shambhu, Guruji.' * 'Hello, Tripurari. Are you still in Hardoi?' 'Yes, but this is called telepathy, Bhaiyyaji. I was just about to call you to congratulate you on your performance in the Assembly today. The attack on the Chief Minister was marvellous. So subtle. This is called killing with kindness.' 'Now the gloves are off, Tripurari. He wants to dismiss me as Home Minister. Says the High Command is worried about the negative publicity regarding Vicky's acquittal.' 'How dare he? We will dismantle his government brick by brick if he so much as thinks about dismissing you.' 'That is what I need your help for. If by tomorrow I am no longer Home Minister, then by the end of the week the Chief Minister should also lose his chair. We need to plot his downfall. How many MLAs do you think will be willing to come with me?' Our great epics tell us that when evil becomes all-pervasive, God comes down to restore goodness. With all due respect, that's nonsense. No one comes down from heaven to sort out the mess on earth. You have to clean up the shit yourselves. You have to take off your shoes, hitch up your trousers and wade into the sodden muddy pit. That is what I did. My conscience left me no other choice. The middle class is supposed to act as the conscience of the nation, an ethical beacon guarding against the excesses of the upper class and the defeatism of the underclass. It is the middle class which challenges the status quo, which brought about the great revolutions of the world –in France, China and Russia, in Mexico, Algeria and Vietnam. But not in India. Our middle class believes firmly in the preservation of the status quo. Unconcerned with the declining standards in public life, apathetic about the plight of the poor, it indulges in rampant consumerism. We have become a nation of voyeurs, hooked on inane soap operas about scheming mothers-in-law and suffering housewives, feeding on the carcass of others' misfortunes, salivating at the break-up of a celebrity marriage, mesmerized by flickering TV images of politicians caught accepting bribes on camera. ...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Vikas Swarup is the writer who created Q&A, the book on which the blockbuster film Slumdog Millionaire was based. I enjoyed Q&A so I was excited when I learned his second book, Six Suspects, was available. Vicky Rai is the son of an influential politician and is a thoroughly nasty piece of work. With his corrupt and violent playboy lifestyle, he has left such a trail of havoc and destruction that his politician father has had to spend a fortune bailing him out of trouble and buying off (or killin Vikas Swarup is the writer who created Q&A, the book on which the blockbuster film Slumdog Millionaire was based. I enjoyed Q&A so I was excited when I learned his second book, Six Suspects, was available. Vicky Rai is the son of an influential politician and is a thoroughly nasty piece of work. With his corrupt and violent playboy lifestyle, he has left such a trail of havoc and destruction that his politician father has had to spend a fortune bailing him out of trouble and buying off (or killing off) those he has harmed. When Rai is shot dead at his own party nobody is really very surprised that his young and dirty little life has been brought to an abrupt halt. The party is a prime example of Rai’s lack of subtlety. He threw it to celebrate his acquittal for a murder that everybody knows he committed. When your old man has good contacts, intimidating thugs on the payroll and deep pockets to buy influence, what’s a dead waitress between friends? When the police arrive at the party and check out the guests and staff they find six very different people, each in possession of guns. These form the six suspects of Vikas Swarup’s second novel. The six suspects are labelled as the Bureaucrat, the Actress, the Tribal, the Thief, the Politician and the American. Every character is a cartoon of exaggerated proportions. Mohan Kumar is the Bureaucrat – a corrupt official but then that seems to be the only type you’ll find in Indian novels. As the result of being in the wrong place at the wrong time, he develops a split personality, swinging between the hard-drinking womaniser his friends and family know and a man possessed by the reincarnated spirit of Mahatma Gandhi. Try to suspend your disbelief as we watch him swing between the two personalities. The Actress is Shabnam Saxena, a vain and lazy woman who’s heading for the age at which the romantic leads start drying up and get replaced with so-called ‘character’ roles. When she receives a letter from a girl who appears to be her ‘double’ it’s so tempting to train her doppelganger to do all the dull and boring work that she can’t be bothered to do herself. You just know it’s going to all go horribly wrong. The so-called Tribal is Jiba Korwa, a little jet-black man from the Andaman Islands, who fulfils the role of the book’s ‘noble savage’. He’s the contrast to the other less honourable suspects. He’s been roped in by an anthropologist to try to steal back a precious and very holy relic stolen from his island. He and the anthropologist spend the book bouncing around India following the trail of disasters wrought by the cursed relic. The Thief is a small-scale slum-dwelling crook known as ‘Munna Mobile’. He scrapes a living for himself, his mother and his adopted sister by stealing and fencing mobile phones. When he steals a mobile from a man in a fancy car it leads to him finding a suitcase full of money with which he decides to change his life. Passing himself off as a wealthy young man about town, he falls in love with a poor little rich girl without either of them knowing who the other really is. The Politician is Home Minister Jagganath Rai – Vicky Rai’s father. There’s only so much a father can take before the accumulated sins of the son become more than just an embarrassment. But would a father really commit the ultimate sin of killing his own child? And finally, there’s the American, Larry Page, a fork-lift truck-driver from hicksville who is repeatedly confused with the inventor of Google, leading to plenty of mix-ups, some more preposterous than others. Larry has travelled to India in search of love with his online pen-pal. The google-inventor mix up leads to a bizarre kidnap plot and an outcome that will have you not so much gasping with surprise as shaking your head and murmuring ‘yeah, like that’s going to happen?’ Whodunnit? Who Cares? As the book progresses you could be forgiven to think that there can’t be too many of India’s billion plus population who don’t have a motive to kill the despicable victim and that’s part of the problem. It’s not easy to give a damn who did it when they appear to have done society a big favour. Of course, a whodunnit needs a sleuth to solve the clues and enlighten the reader. In this case, it’s investigative journalist Arun Advani. He writes in a turgid and ultra-dated style that will baffle most readers but is actually a pretty good parody of how Indian journalists use the English language. Even knowing that and finding the style amusing when I read Indian newspapers, in this setting of a novel the pseudo-news reports made me cringe every time. Six Suspects contains about 250 pages of a compelling good read which would be pretty good if the book wasn’t 558 pages long. Seldom have I read a book that was more in need of savage editing. My greatest bug-bear with Six Suspects is the contrived and clumsy structure. It cuts back and forth between newspaper articles, television transcripts and letters interleaved between over-long chapters. Swarup sets the scene of the murder with a newspaper article then moves into the second phase called ‘Suspects’ in which he introduces the potential killers one by one. The next phase is called ‘Motives’ and lasts 370 long and often dull pages. The third phase is called ‘Evidence’ and is followed by a section called ‘Solution’ before we finally limp to the revelation of who actually did it. I can’t remember if I was more frustrated or disappointed when I got to the end and decided that it had all been rather a big waste of time. I’m obviously not going to tell you who did it, only that I felt cheated by the ending. This formulaic approach is stifling especially during the ‘Motives’ section. In a sharper, better edited book I’d have expected to see the author swing back and forth between the characters, interweaving the six stories instead of dishing out indigestible lumps of text. Instead, we get overlong chapters on each character. By the time you’ve got through each character’s motives you’ll probably be struggling to remember who the other people were. The differing styles and degrees of believability get in the way of continuity. Is this supposed to be gritty real-life drama or second rate magic-realism? Your guess is as good as mine. The man possessed by Mahatma Gandhi just doesn’t fit with the more down-to-earth tales of the other suspects. The contrived girlie diary style of the actress is too cheesy to bear and the kidnapped American plot-line is just plain ridiculous. At times it feels as if Swarup tried to write a screenplay rather than a novel and got so constrained by his self-imposed structure that he lost touch with what he was trying to do. He appears to have started out trying to link his second book to events of the first by throwing in obscure references to characters that he created in Q&A but he never develops those plotlines.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rae

    Sometimes when I read a book I'm stumped as to what to rate it. Six Suspects is a tricky one to rate because there is so much that is done well and yet so much that is done badly. This is not a "Meh" three stars, it is a "I liked a lot of it, but not all of it" three stars. In fact, I've changed my mind, it can have four just for being memorable and compelling. What I liked: 1) There are six distinct stories here, interwoven to give the reader a tour of the crappier side of India. The different st Sometimes when I read a book I'm stumped as to what to rate it. Six Suspects is a tricky one to rate because there is so much that is done well and yet so much that is done badly. This is not a "Meh" three stars, it is a "I liked a lot of it, but not all of it" three stars. In fact, I've changed my mind, it can have four just for being memorable and compelling. What I liked: 1) There are six distinct stories here, interwoven to give the reader a tour of the crappier side of India. The different stories were all interesting in their own ways. 2) There was a lot of plotting that converged nicely at the end. 3) I loved Eketi, the tribal character. He was such a sweetheart. 4) I found the story of 'The Possession of Mohan Kumar' to be funny, original and very readable. What I didn't like: 1) It all got a bit silly. As in ridiculous, unlikely, eyebrow-raisingly daft. 2) God, Larry Page was annoying. 3) The middle chapter narratives were far too long. They needed snipping down in order to maintain interest. In particular, Larry and Eketi's stories dragged on for too long. 4) The ending drags on for far too long too. It tries to be too clever and over-plots itself. Altogether, there was a lot to enjoy here. The author was committed to keeping us readers interested by cramming lots and lots of ideas and action in every step of the way. The first half of the book was definitely more compelling than the second half and more vigorous editing would have paid off. The other issue is the title. It promises a murder mystery, but the formula doesn't lend itself to that sort of genre. I can think of other structures that could have turned this book into a gem of a locked room murder mystery, however, the presentation and structure doesn't allow it to read like a true "mystery" novel. It's more a series of character pieces that come together in a way that almost works, but not quite.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Deepa

    Vicky Rai is a business man and the playboy son of the Home Minister of Uttar Pradesh. Vicky has just been cleared from court in the murder trial of a bartender and is now celebrating this victory in his farm house. He is suddenly killed and the police have rounded up Six Suspects. The book then continues to give us the stories of each of the Six Suspects and their stories – in the format of their background, motive and finally the act itself. The Six Suspects had guns in their possession and Vi Vicky Rai is a business man and the playboy son of the Home Minister of Uttar Pradesh. Vicky has just been cleared from court in the murder trial of a bartender and is now celebrating this victory in his farm house. He is suddenly killed and the police have rounded up Six Suspects. The book then continues to give us the stories of each of the Six Suspects and their stories – in the format of their background, motive and finally the act itself. The Six Suspects had guns in their possession and Vicky Rai died from a gunshot. 1. Munna Mobile- a rogue slum boy who used to steal mobiles and then turns into a house help. But having been caught in a compromising position with the lady of the house and surviving a near death situation, he goes back to stealing mobiles 2. The Home Minister – the Home Minister of UP and the father of Vicky Rai is also a suspect. He has to make sure his name is clear within his political party and Vicky and his eccentricities are going way out of control. 3. Shabnam Saxena- the most sought after Hot Bollywood actress. She has been approached by Vicky Rai many times but has been very tactfully avoiding his sexual advances 4. Larry Page- an American Forklift driver. Larry Page comes to India to get married to an Indian girl who has been writing to him regularly and also has taken USD 5000 from him for the wedding. Once he boards the plane he understands that the girl he was going to marry has cheated on him and the photos shared with him were that of Shabnam Saxena 5. Mohankumar/Gandhi – a retired IAS official who sits on the board of many companies. Mohan was leading a posh and rich lifestyle with his wife and mistress until he suddenly has a life changing situation and becomes Mahatma Gandhi 6. Eketi – the tribal from Andaman Islands. Eketi is a tribal lad who has come to India to retrieve a precious thing which was stolen from his island and hence has brought misery and illness to the islanders. Who among these six suspects had the strongest motive to kill Vicky Rai and who had the best chance and finally who killed Vicky Rai? This is what the whole 550 + page book is about. All the characters and their stories are interwoven. The story was sometimes silly and totally a waste of time. The character of Larry Page was so annoying and I had to really scan through those pages to see the end. Eketi was different and I liked his character and ofcourse his love interest- Champi (Munna’s sister). Shabnam Saxena and Munna Mobile had walked in right from some Bollywood movie and wasn’t quite impressive. Mohankumar was unbelievable and I felt the Home Minister’s character was made a suspect because the author wanted 6 suspects! A lot of events which happened in India makes its way into the story . From the murder of the bartender, the BMW hit and run case, Taliban, bomb blasts, call centre- outsourcing, films and many such events have been stuffed in. I would not call this per se a great thriller mystery but just a plain okay novel.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Moushine Zahr

    When reading the title and the back cover description, a reader might think this book is a crime novel, but he/she'll be disappointed because this novel resembles more a Bollywood and Hollywood movie script too difficult to produce as a movie. This novel contains everything like the Bollywood movies I've seen recently except the dancing: violence, action, romance, drama, and comedy. The readers used to reading crime/police thriller will not follow an inspector conducting a complete police invest When reading the title and the back cover description, a reader might think this book is a crime novel, but he/she'll be disappointed because this novel resembles more a Bollywood and Hollywood movie script too difficult to produce as a movie. This novel contains everything like the Bollywood movies I've seen recently except the dancing: violence, action, romance, drama, and comedy. The readers used to reading crime/police thriller will not follow an inspector conducting a complete police investigation leading from one clue to the next until catching the criminal. This novel's purpose is to denounce the inequality of the corrupt justice system in Today's India through the victim's story and the six suspects' lives. The best part of this novel is that it gives a general picture of what it is like to be an Indian living in India today whether you're a man or a woman, famous or unknown, poor or rich, religious or not. After the crime is committed and the victim presented to the readers, the novel introduces the six suspects caught, their lives prior to the murder committed, and their relationships to the victim and how they came to the party at the time of the crime near the victim. Although there are two lengthy chapters on each one of the six suspects, I felt like the characters weren't described in depth, but only superficially. Very unlikely for crime novels, this one contains comedy as mentioned above. Two suspects brings the fun to reading this novel. First, there is the retired corrupt and wealthy government bureaucrat living a life of vices until suffering from a multiple personality disorder and his other self is in total contrast with his real self leading to funny situations for the character. The second funny character is the American, probably the clueless Average American from Waco, Texas, who traveled for the first time ever in his life in India and lived diverse experiences in India with contrasting outcomes. The character, least developed and was a bore to read, was the politician and father of the victim, whose chapters are filled with almost only dialogues, one after the other. It was exasperating to read him. However the best character to read is the Aboriginal whose quest through India opens his eyes about the country, his hometown, and himself. The stories of two other characters resembles very much the story seen in a Bollywood movie and of not much interest. To conclude, those interested in a typical crime novel set in India will be disappointed. On the contrary, those intersted in learning generally about what's it like to be living in India will be satisfied. One last thing, due to the mutliplicity of the suspects, I didn't know who really shot the victim until the very last chapter and page. The suspense is kept throughout the novel and dare you to find a clue within the novel.

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