web site hit counter Changes for Rebecca - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Changes for Rebecca

Availability: Ready to download

Rebecca thinks it's a grand idea to make a movie with her cousin Ana, but when gentle Ana plays the role of a cruel factory boss, the fun turns sour. Later Rebecca goes to the factory where Ana's brother and father work, and she's horrified at the terrible conditions-but she knows the workers desperately need their jobs. There's got to be a way to make things better at the Rebecca thinks it's a grand idea to make a movie with her cousin Ana, but when gentle Ana plays the role of a cruel factory boss, the fun turns sour. Later Rebecca goes to the factory where Ana's brother and father work, and she's horrified at the terrible conditions-but she knows the workers desperately need their jobs. There's got to be a way to make things better at the factory, and Rebecca is determined to do her part--even if it means marching straight into danger. Includes an illustrated "Looking Back" section about the labor movement in Rebecca's time.


Compare

Rebecca thinks it's a grand idea to make a movie with her cousin Ana, but when gentle Ana plays the role of a cruel factory boss, the fun turns sour. Later Rebecca goes to the factory where Ana's brother and father work, and she's horrified at the terrible conditions-but she knows the workers desperately need their jobs. There's got to be a way to make things better at the Rebecca thinks it's a grand idea to make a movie with her cousin Ana, but when gentle Ana plays the role of a cruel factory boss, the fun turns sour. Later Rebecca goes to the factory where Ana's brother and father work, and she's horrified at the terrible conditions-but she knows the workers desperately need their jobs. There's got to be a way to make things better at the factory, and Rebecca is determined to do her part--even if it means marching straight into danger. Includes an illustrated "Looking Back" section about the labor movement in Rebecca's time.

30 review for Changes for Rebecca

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carolynne

    Another in the series featuring Rebecca Rubin, child of Jewish immigrants in the last century, this story once again features Ana, the cousin who has just fled Europe with her family. Now Ana's father and brother work under horrendous conditions in a coat factory, and when they decide to strike, Rebecca impulsively speaks publicly on behalf of the workers and is injured. Naturally, everything works out in the end and Rebecca is not punished further for disobeying her parents. The book does not s Another in the series featuring Rebecca Rubin, child of Jewish immigrants in the last century, this story once again features Ana, the cousin who has just fled Europe with her family. Now Ana's father and brother work under horrendous conditions in a coat factory, and when they decide to strike, Rebecca impulsively speaks publicly on behalf of the workers and is injured. Naturally, everything works out in the end and Rebecca is not punished further for disobeying her parents. The book does not sugarcoat working conditions, but as with Rebecca and the Movies the plot is contrived and implausible. I was glad to see more about Ana and her family, whose lives may be more representative of Jewish immigrants in the early twentieth century. Although Rebecca's family is clearly middle-class and not poor, her clothing is always too fashionable and immaculate (the better to match the available doll clothing, I guess) and Rebecca herself always looks a bit too pretty and well-groomed. However, the book does present some historical labor and immigration issues in an accessible and interesting way, which gives it some merit for classroom use. As usual, the most useful part is the historical note at the end, which has some period photographs of workers and a note about the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist fire, which does not figure in the story. Compare to Dreams in the Golden Country: The Diary of Zipporah Feldman, a Jewish Immigrant Girl, New York City, 1903, by Kathryn Lasky. Lexile measure 750L.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This was a really different book. I like how this series sheds light on a totally different time or place than any of the other AG characters. And this book especially helped me better understand what it was like to be a less profitable member of society during this time. School history classes never really focused on this time and this is an important thing for people in this country to know about and understand.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amber M. McCarter

    This was certainly the most meaningful and inspiring of the set.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ciara

    dude. this book? ruled! okay, so the set up is this: rebecca's cousin ana & her family just emigrated to the states from russia. as new struggling immigrants, they live in tenement on the lower east side & ana's father & oldest brother work long hours in a coat factory/sweatshop. rebecca gets permission to stay the night at ana's apartment, & they sleep out on the fire escape because it's so hot & stuffy inside. during his off hourse, ana's father, who is a skilled cabinet maker, makes wooden sh dude. this book? ruled! okay, so the set up is this: rebecca's cousin ana & her family just emigrated to the states from russia. as new struggling immigrants, they live in tenement on the lower east side & ana's father & oldest brother work long hours in a coat factory/sweatshop. rebecca gets permission to stay the night at ana's apartment, & they sleep out on the fire escape because it's so hot & stuffy inside. during his off hourse, ana's father, who is a skilled cabinet maker, makes wooden shelves to sell to the neighbors, & ana's second oldest brother paints them pretty colors. rebecca is sad that ana's family members have to work so hard for extra money & she wonders if the shelves are going to be enough to get them better housing than a tenement. ana & rebecca get permission to bring ana's father & brother their lunches at the factory. they have to be delivered, rather than brought in in the morning, because the factory is so hot, the food would spoil during the wait until lunch break. rebecca has heard that the factories are bleak, but she was not prepared for the horrible reality. rebecca & ana aren't even allowed in the room where ana's father works because the foreman says it's "unsafe". rebecca wonders hot it can be unsafe for them to go in to deliver the lunches, but safe for people to work there. she sees her cousing struggling under a load of heavy coats & thinks that her uncle is such a skilled cabinetmaker, he should be doing something other than cutting cloth for coats. rebecca had been confused & frustrated earlier when she & ana played that they worked in a factory, & ana was really mean as the boss. rebecca felt that she couldn't say anything to reason with ana's interpretation of a factory boss. but she realized that ana's acting was pretty spot on & this makes rebecca sad. the newspapers are full of letters about the conditions of the factories & demands for shorter hours, better pay, cleaner facilities, safer conditions, etc. there is some talk that workers at the coat factory might go on strike. ana & rebecca are impressed by a young female worker who has written to the newspapers about the possibility of a strike. rebecca thinks a strike might be the only way to help the workers. when rebecca is at ana's apartment after their sleepover, the call comes in that the coat factory workers are on strike. ana's mother rushes off to help on the picket line, bringing two hat pins & an umbrella. she tells the kids to stay home & be safe. but they decide to go to the picket line as well. they're excited at first...until thugs attack the picket line & start kitting people with sticks & brutalizing them. rebecca sees the young female worker she admired in the papers get up to give a speech, only to be knocked down by thugs. rebecca climbs up on the discarded soapbox to give a speech & someone whacks her in the head with a rock! pretty awesome that american girl went so far as to dramatize the plight of the american worker by having their star ten-year-old clubbed with a rock. also tragically ironic, considering that american girl products are made pretty much exclusively in chinese factories-cum-sweatshops. but moving on... rebecca is more or less okay, but she & her cousins go home after seeing ana's father & brother loaded into a police wagon. they learn later that the strike worked in certain ways--the bosses are making some concessions. but everyone who was arrested is fired, including ana's father & brother. everyone attends a labor day picnic. rebecca sees the prop master from the film she worked on, roddy. he says he heard about her speech at the picket line. he puts in the word to the bandmaster, who invites rebecca up to give her speech to the picnic. rebecca lost it in the crowd at the picket line, so instead she says what's in her heart, about the importance of treating workers fairly & the eight-hour day & children getting an education & not having to work in sweatshops. everyone applauds. roddy says he needs a good cabinetmaker to help him in the new construction business he's starting in brooklyn. rebecca introduces him to her uncle & boom! her uncle has a far better-paying job & will be able to re-locate his family to brooklyn, where the air is cleaner & rents are cheaper. then uncle max announces that he's moving with his movie studio to hollywood, & marrying his co-star lily. happy endings all around! i was just so psyched that american girl had the balls to portray a ten-year-old being clocked on the head with a rock by capitalist swine, even if the book was your pretty standard child lit fare. full points!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bree

    This review is from teh perspective of a mother. I am reading the Rebecca series to evaluate when they will be appropriate to share with my daughter. Here's another one that requires suspension of disbelief at the way they integrated Rebecca into the issues of the time, but I'm sure it provides enough adventure for the target audience! The opening of the book, with its emphasis on the conditions of factory life, was very realistic without glossing anything over. Rebecca really gets the rose-colo This review is from teh perspective of a mother. I am reading the Rebecca series to evaluate when they will be appropriate to share with my daughter. Here's another one that requires suspension of disbelief at the way they integrated Rebecca into the issues of the time, but I'm sure it provides enough adventure for the target audience! The opening of the book, with its emphasis on the conditions of factory life, was very realistic without glossing anything over. Rebecca really gets the rose-colored glasses removed as she begins to understand the condition her uncle and cousin live with everyday. Where I found it hard to believe is that she was able to assimilate all that into a passioned speech in just hours or days. 9 year olds don't generally shift that quickly, but it makes for a dramatic story. Overall, this book seemed like a retread of one of Samantha's books, with a bit more gritty realism. The Looking Back section was particularly interesting, as it forecast what Rebecca's life would have been like. My one complaint is that World War I isn't really addressed directly in this series, although it is hinted at when discussing Ana's escape from Russia. While I haven't rated any one particular book of Rebecca's very high, I think the stories as a whole are timeless and relevant to the target audience - they deal with teasing, accepting someone who is different, judging others, celebrating your heritage/faith/traditions, and I think Rebecca grows throughout the series. I like the emphasis on Rebecca's emotions as she grapples with issues - this is a well-rounded series, and even exceeds some of the earlier AG historical series.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lea Grover

    I. Loved. This. Book. While I'm fond of most of the American Girl series, this book, in particular, blew me away. It might as well be called, "Let's Radicalize your Daughter into a Social Justice and Labor Advocate." While many of the American Girl characters face terrifying and real historical circumstances (Kaya's abduction, Molly's father being away at war), few do so as casually as this book, and the casualness of it, the simplicity with which Rebecca is put in danger and suffers injury, is b I. Loved. This. Book. While I'm fond of most of the American Girl series, this book, in particular, blew me away. It might as well be called, "Let's Radicalize your Daughter into a Social Justice and Labor Advocate." While many of the American Girl characters face terrifying and real historical circumstances (Kaya's abduction, Molly's father being away at war), few do so as casually as this book, and the casualness of it, the simplicity with which Rebecca is put in danger and suffers injury, is both disarming and effective. At the end of the book my daughters and I read the historical notes about the early labor movement, including the story of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire, which are ever more important in our current world. At the time this book was published, at the start of the Obama presidency, many of the issues Rebecca faced seemed long gone. But now, they are all horribly relevant. Antisemitism, immigrant labor abuses, immigration fears, unaffordable housing, and the changing expectations for children in a post-recession economy make this book fodder for many, many illuminating conversations. My daughters and I spent almost an hour discussing the book when it was over, and in the days since it has come up many times in conversation. If you have a child in your life from an immigrant family, a Jewish family, or a Union family, you could not ask for a better story. And even if you don't, this book will serve to increase empathy towards all kinds of vulnerable populations. Well done, American Girl!!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kati

    The final book in the primary Rebecca Rubin series, we see Rebecca facing down an angry mob of strikers with clothing company that employs her Uncle and Cousin. When conditions on the job get so dangerous, and the manager so determined to make the lives of his employees miserable, the factory-workers strike. Rebecca decides that she wants to help, she wants to lend her voice to raising awareness to the awful conditions those employees, including her family, are facing every day. She is hurt in t The final book in the primary Rebecca Rubin series, we see Rebecca facing down an angry mob of strikers with clothing company that employs her Uncle and Cousin. When conditions on the job get so dangerous, and the manager so determined to make the lives of his employees miserable, the factory-workers strike. Rebecca decides that she wants to help, she wants to lend her voice to raising awareness to the awful conditions those employees, including her family, are facing every day. She is hurt in the process, but doesn't let that stop her. Once Rebecca finds her voice, she finds the strength to face up to some of the restrictions her family wants to place on her in regards to her interest in being an actress in moving pictures. I felt like there should be a continuation. This story didn't feel like it finished out the series, just like a chapter. I wish there had been more. Throughout this series I've enjoyed seeing snippets of family life in a Jewish home, learning more about Judaism. I've also appreciated the glimpses into the life of those who lived in the early parts of the 20th century on the East coast. It gives me some idea about the world my own grandparents were born into. Over all, I've enjoyed this series. These last two books were actually my least favorite of the series, but over all the series has been lovely.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth N. | ThePennilessBooknerd

    In this book Rebecca sees the unfairness in factories and wants to make a change. I really loved the Rebecca series. I didn't think I was going to like it as much as I did. Its written in a way that really pulls in the reader. I liked all the characters presented throughout the series. Rating all the American Girl Historical Characters 1. Caroline 2. Felicity 3. Marie - Grace 4. Samantha 5. Rebecca 6. Josefina 7. Addy 8. Cécile 9. Kirsten 10. Kaya In this book Rebecca sees the unfairness in factories and wants to make a change. I really loved the Rebecca series. I didn't think I was going to like it as much as I did. Its written in a way that really pulls in the reader. I liked all the characters presented throughout the series. Rating all the American Girl Historical Characters 1. Caroline 2. Felicity 3. Marie - Grace 4. Samantha 5. Rebecca 6. Josefina 7. Addy 8. Cécile 9. Kirsten 10. Kaya

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I read this series with my 10 year old daughter. We enjoyed the series and learned a few things about being a young immigrant child in the early 1900’s. This series isn’t as deep as the other American girl books but they are entertaining. My issue with this book as well as #5 is Rebecca disobeys her parents (or law enforcement) but yet still becomes the hero. My daughter and i have had some conversations about this. Not my favorite AG series, but worth the read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Danielle T

    3.5, rounded up. Conditions are awful in the coat factory that Rebecca's uncle and cousin work in, so the workers are planning to strike. Like several other Changes books, Rebecca makes a speech though realistically, am not sure people would listen to a ten year old implore them about improving labor conditions. Still, things work out neatly in the end, and both the book and Looking Back are a good introduction for kids to labor movements. 3.5, rounded up. Conditions are awful in the coat factory that Rebecca's uncle and cousin work in, so the workers are planning to strike. Like several other Changes books, Rebecca makes a speech though realistically, am not sure people would listen to a ten year old implore them about improving labor conditions. Still, things work out neatly in the end, and both the book and Looking Back are a good introduction for kids to labor movements.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    3.5 This was the most unrealistic of the Rebecca series. I definitely enjoyed it but the kids acted a lot more 21st century in this book than early 20th century. I do however really appreciate the history presented in the story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    juliette

    i honestly don’t know what to say about this besides the fact that in the back of this book in the “looking back” section american girl decided to commission an american girl style illustration of young immigrant worker girls burning to death in the triangle shirtwaist factory fire.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Gatzlaff

    2.5 stars. This is a kids book. It has a good idea about the history. I just didn't like the main character of the story. 2.5 stars. This is a kids book. It has a good idea about the history. I just didn't like the main character of the story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I liked the "Looking Back" section better than the actual book I liked the "Looking Back" section better than the actual book

  15. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    For the third book in a row, Rebecca blatantly disobeys the authorities in her life. This time, she disobeys her aunt, running off to witness a strike with her cousins despite explicit instructions to stay away from the danger. (view spoiler)[She then takes it upon herself, at nine years old, to go up to a soapbox that a young woman was just dragged away from so that she can read aloud a letter to the editor that she had recently written about factory conditions. In the midst of the chaos and ru For the third book in a row, Rebecca blatantly disobeys the authorities in her life. This time, she disobeys her aunt, running off to witness a strike with her cousins despite explicit instructions to stay away from the danger. (view spoiler)[She then takes it upon herself, at nine years old, to go up to a soapbox that a young woman was just dragged away from so that she can read aloud a letter to the editor that she had recently written about factory conditions. In the midst of the chaos and ruckus, someone throws a rock that hits her in the head. Throughout the rest of the book, people hail her as a hero, rather than as a foolish child who disobeyed authority and deliberately put herself into a dangerous position. There are ways to accomplish meaningful advocacy, but this is not it. (hide spoiler)] Rebecca never faces significant consequences for her actions, and the whole thing is glamorized. The book does share a significant amount of historical information about factories, and is very realistic and accurate in its depiction of inhumane conditions, strikes, strikebreakers, and law enforcement's complicity in upholding the status quo and attacking strikers. However, even though this book presents historical information in an accurate and educational way, I disliked Rebecca's wish fulfillment role in it when I read this eleven years ago, and I still do not like it now. Rebecca's involvement works for the drama of the story, but it is unrealistic and does not fit with the time period. Her behavior, and an older friend's "follow your heart" advice from afterwards, reflect twenty-first century norms and ideals, shrugging away Rebecca's reckless disobedience and foolish belief that she could change the world by jumping into a violent fray. This book does not realistically portray how a girl would have experienced a strike in 1914, much less how her family and friends would have responded when she endangered herself.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maria Celis

    Green, Jacqueline Dembar. Changes for Rebecca. Characters: Rebecca Rubin, 10 year old Jewish-American; Ana, Rebecca’s ten year old cousin and and a Russian immigrant; Uncle Jacob and Josef, Ana’s father and brother who are factory workers; Lily and Max, Rebecca’s movie actor friends Setting: New York Theme: juvenile perspective; 20th century New York; immigrant life; social justice and work reform Genre: historical fiction; children’s literature; Jewish literature Summary: Rebecca uncovers the real Green, Jacqueline Dembar. Changes for Rebecca. Characters: Rebecca Rubin, 10 year old Jewish-American; Ana, Rebecca’s ten year old cousin and and a Russian immigrant; Uncle Jacob and Josef, Ana’s father and brother who are factory workers; Lily and Max, Rebecca’s movie actor friends Setting: New York Theme: juvenile perspective; 20th century New York; immigrant life; social justice and work reform Genre: historical fiction; children’s literature; Jewish literature Summary: Rebecca uncovers the real truth and struggle behind factory work and its unbearable conditions as she and her cousin, Ana, go to investigate and later participate in a dangerous factory strike involving Ana’s father and brother and other workers in their community. Target Audience: young readers, elementary grade and early middle school; Ages 8-12 Critical Response: Rebecca finds herself rising to the occasion and speaks out for the workers on strike, understanding that “complaining wouldn’t change anything. Something had to be done”. This short story, accompanied by illustrations by Robert Hunt, outline a great historical experience of 20th century immigrant life in New York factory districts through the young eyes of Rebecca. Young readers can easily understand the simply text and illustrations of what it might be like to grow up in New York during the year 1914. The Looking Back section at the end of the book also provides a great addition for reader to better understand the environment of 1914 factory life, unions, and social advocacy. This story, part of the American Girl series, can be used as a supplement to history or social justice curriculum for young readers, especially young girls.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Where some of the previous books in this series were mostly for fun, this book was far more serious. Rebecca's uncle and cousin work in a factory where they are treated poorly. When the workers strike, Rebecca decides to make a stand for the workers. This, since it's the last book in the series ties up all the dangling ends. (view spoiler)[Although Josef and Jacob lose their jobs as a result of the strike, the owner of the factory agrees to sit down with the organizers. The other workers will hav Where some of the previous books in this series were mostly for fun, this book was far more serious. Rebecca's uncle and cousin work in a factory where they are treated poorly. When the workers strike, Rebecca decides to make a stand for the workers. This, since it's the last book in the series ties up all the dangling ends. (view spoiler)[Although Josef and Jacob lose their jobs as a result of the strike, the owner of the factory agrees to sit down with the organizers. The other workers will have a better job. Max and Lily announce that they'll be moving to California - and getting married. Rebecca finally tells her father that she doesn't want to be a teacher - she'd like to be an actress. She also tells the family that she's been in a movie already. Uncle Jacob gets a job that fits his skill-set: a carpenter building cabinets in Brooklyn. Ana and her family will be moving out of the tenement. (hide spoiler)] Basically, the book ends with exactly the sort of happy ending that is appropriate for the age group. It teaches girls that they can make a difference and, even if it's scary, they should stand up for what's right. Overall, I loved the series and the characters.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marian

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'd like this book better if it didn't require me to suspend my disbelief yet again in this series. Usually your average AG character has a moment, maybe two, where you tell yourself that for the good of the story, you just have to go with it. Previously Rebecca is cast in an actual movie, and while she doesn't get a screen credit, she is in a real movie as more than a blink-and-you-miss-her character. So when I'm asked to believe that she then meets one of the important people in the factory wor I'd like this book better if it didn't require me to suspend my disbelief yet again in this series. Usually your average AG character has a moment, maybe two, where you tell yourself that for the good of the story, you just have to go with it. Previously Rebecca is cast in an actual movie, and while she doesn't get a screen credit, she is in a real movie as more than a blink-and-you-miss-her character. So when I'm asked to believe that she then meets one of the important people in the factory worker's movement, and then gives a speech (at least until someone throws a rock and knocks her unconscious), and then gives another speech at the picnic being thrown by the movie studio, as well as the traditional Book 6 Happy Ending for Ana... it's all a little much.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    The entire story centers around Rebecca's relatives working at a sweatshop, and how terrible the conditions are there. Rebecca's relationship to this problem becomes very serious when the workers at the shop go on strike, and she sees just how much power the big fat-cat owners have as they bring in hired goons to physically attack the strikers. The police arrive and they, also, support the owners, arresting the strikers. Rebecca herself becomes directly involved and is injured for her effort. Al The entire story centers around Rebecca's relatives working at a sweatshop, and how terrible the conditions are there. Rebecca's relationship to this problem becomes very serious when the workers at the shop go on strike, and she sees just how much power the big fat-cat owners have as they bring in hired goons to physically attack the strikers. The police arrive and they, also, support the owners, arresting the strikers. Rebecca herself becomes directly involved and is injured for her effort. Also, a secret she had been hiding from her parents becomes a secret no longer. This is a very, very serious story about the inhuman working conditions that many people, especially immigrants, had to suffer under. The historical section of the book has more on this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Rebecca stands up to unfair working conditions. She also gets brave enough to finally tell her family that she secretly starred in a movie and announce her career aspirations to be an actress. Everything tied up/worked out pretty nicely for Rebecca and her extended family in this last book in her series: cousin Max announces his engagement to Lily and their relocation to a movie studio in Hollywood, Rebecca's uncle lands a job in carpentry, and at the Labor Day picnic Rebecca stands in the spotl Rebecca stands up to unfair working conditions. She also gets brave enough to finally tell her family that she secretly starred in a movie and announce her career aspirations to be an actress. Everything tied up/worked out pretty nicely for Rebecca and her extended family in this last book in her series: cousin Max announces his engagement to Lily and their relocation to a movie studio in Hollywood, Rebecca's uncle lands a job in carpentry, and at the Labor Day picnic Rebecca stands in the spotlight again when she is asked to speak her mind about labor rights. Recommended for girls grades 3-5.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Here Rebecca learns about the terrible conditions in the factory where her uncle and cousin work. She wants to help, and she does get involved in a perilous situation. I actually liked this book the best of the series; the focus on workers' rights and activism for change is appropriately geared toward an older-elementary audience. Unfortunately, my kindergarten kid was pretty bored. I hope she'll read this again on her own in a few years and get more out of it. Rebecca is still my favorite Americ Here Rebecca learns about the terrible conditions in the factory where her uncle and cousin work. She wants to help, and she does get involved in a perilous situation. I actually liked this book the best of the series; the focus on workers' rights and activism for change is appropriately geared toward an older-elementary audience. Unfortunately, my kindergarten kid was pretty bored. I hope she'll read this again on her own in a few years and get more out of it. Rebecca is still my favorite American Girl! This book wrapped up all the loose ends of story rather unrealistically, but I have to admit that that's exactly the kind of ending I wanted when I was a child.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marya

    This series ended up covering the same awful labor conditions of the early 20th century as the Samantha books. There's even the same distance from the problem (it is Samantha's best friend who is forced into child labor, while Rebecca's uncle and cousin face sweatshops). And yet, Rebecca manages to tie that labor struggle in with the lot of immigrants, the emerging film industry, and struggle to find identity. By contrast, Samantha's attempts at class consciousness and women's rights seem too me This series ended up covering the same awful labor conditions of the early 20th century as the Samantha books. There's even the same distance from the problem (it is Samantha's best friend who is forced into child labor, while Rebecca's uncle and cousin face sweatshops). And yet, Rebecca manages to tie that labor struggle in with the lot of immigrants, the emerging film industry, and struggle to find identity. By contrast, Samantha's attempts at class consciousness and women's rights seem too melodramatic. Not that there isn't always room for some melodrama...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This book was one of my lest and must favets in the Rebecca secer's I don't like it that in 1914 that if work's went on strik that the bos of the fatere could just call in men to beet them up and the just comeing in and arteing the striker's I mean they went the one's doing enthing ron and treing a rok at a ten year old gril I mean how low could a persen senk. This book was one of my lest and must favets in the Rebecca secer's I don't like it that in 1914 that if work's went on strik that the bos of the fatere could just call in men to beet them up and the just comeing in and arteing the striker's I mean they went the one's doing enthing ron and treing a rok at a ten year old gril I mean how low could a persen senk.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    We really liked the Rebecca series. They were very well-written and addressed topics like silent films and better conditions for factory workers while weaving in Jewish traditions and practices. Abby liked how Rebecca speaks up in the end to her family about her desire to become an actress. Rebecca is brave and knows what she wants to do--a good message for young girls.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Miri

    Rebecca's uncle and cousin work at a factory and are treated horribly, the factory workers are all going on strike. Uncle Jacob is afraid of losing his job and their home, but there are few choices, they work such long hours at such little pay. As Rebecca learns about the conditions in the factories, she's determined to do something to help. Rebecca's uncle and cousin work at a factory and are treated horribly, the factory workers are all going on strike. Uncle Jacob is afraid of losing his job and their home, but there are few choices, they work such long hours at such little pay. As Rebecca learns about the conditions in the factories, she's determined to do something to help.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    At first when I started to read this book, I thought that she and her cousin Ana would get into a fight, but then I found out that they didn't. I read this book on the trip to NE I read most of it at the motel. But then read the rest of it in the van on the way home. I really enjoyed reading it. At first when I started to read this book, I thought that she and her cousin Ana would get into a fight, but then I found out that they didn't. I read this book on the trip to NE I read most of it at the motel. But then read the rest of it in the van on the way home. I really enjoyed reading it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I think girls would be inspired by Rebecca's bravery. And having recently visited a home sweatshop on the Lower East Side in a tenement building this book brought to life what I'd already seen in person. I think girls would be inspired by Rebecca's bravery. And having recently visited a home sweatshop on the Lower East Side in a tenement building this book brought to life what I'd already seen in person.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    age range 10-13 girls. Rebecca tries to help make factores a better place to work after she vists her uncles work to bring him supper. It's a wonderful ending to the series. Here are the first 5 books. age range 10-13 girls. Rebecca tries to help make factores a better place to work after she vists her uncles work to bring him supper. It's a wonderful ending to the series. Here are the first 5 books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This book treats seriously the idea of unfair working conditions in factories and about speaking up for fairness.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Last in the American Girl series about Rebecca Rubin. Rebecca becomes a spokesperson for unionization of garment workers.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.