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Roastbeef's Promise: When Your Dad's Dying Wish Is to Have His Ashes Sprinkled in Each State, What's a Son to Do?

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In this, his first novel, David Jerome combines two of his passions: travel and comedy writing, into one warm, and funny, travel-adventure. A Promise, An Urn, And An Atlas is loosely based on the author's experiences while visiting the 48 contiguous United States during the mid-1990s. In this, his first novel, David Jerome combines two of his passions: travel and comedy writing, into one warm, and funny, travel-adventure. A Promise, An Urn, And An Atlas is loosely based on the author's experiences while visiting the 48 contiguous United States during the mid-1990s.


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In this, his first novel, David Jerome combines two of his passions: travel and comedy writing, into one warm, and funny, travel-adventure. A Promise, An Urn, And An Atlas is loosely based on the author's experiences while visiting the 48 contiguous United States during the mid-1990s. In this, his first novel, David Jerome combines two of his passions: travel and comedy writing, into one warm, and funny, travel-adventure. A Promise, An Urn, And An Atlas is loosely based on the author's experiences while visiting the 48 contiguous United States during the mid-1990s.

30 review for Roastbeef's Promise: When Your Dad's Dying Wish Is to Have His Ashes Sprinkled in Each State, What's a Son to Do?

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marvin

    David Jerome's novel about an affable loser who sprinkles his father's ashes in 49 states is very funny and quite alarmingly compassionate. The author claims that some, though not all of the events, were taken from his own travels which leads me to wonder which ones are for real and which ones aren't. Some critics have complained that many of the events are unbelievable but, having traveled throughout the states extensively myself, I could believe about 75 percent could be based on actual experi David Jerome's novel about an affable loser who sprinkles his father's ashes in 49 states is very funny and quite alarmingly compassionate. The author claims that some, though not all of the events, were taken from his own travels which leads me to wonder which ones are for real and which ones aren't. Some critics have complained that many of the events are unbelievable but, having traveled throughout the states extensively myself, I could believe about 75 percent could be based on actual experiences. But since this is a novel, it's a moot point. The main thing is that it is humorous and entertaining and it fits that bill nicely. My only minor complaint is that the thread of the tale moves alone a little haphazardly at points and meanders but this is a travel novel and travels never go how you plan them. I could think of worse ways to spend a summer weekend than lounging around and reading this book. Three and a half stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Celia

    To hear him tell it, in this rollicking account of the most disaster-prone road trip ever, if it weren’t for bad luck, poor young Jim “Roastbeef” Hume would have had no luck at all. He has embarked on a marathon journey through all 48 continental US states, in obedience to his adoptive father’s deathbed wish to scatter his ashes in every one of them. With not very much in his pocket, or a particular itinerary in mind, he drops out of college and sets out bravely, with 3/5ths of his father’s ashe To hear him tell it, in this rollicking account of the most disaster-prone road trip ever, if it weren’t for bad luck, poor young Jim “Roastbeef” Hume would have had no luck at all. He has embarked on a marathon journey through all 48 continental US states, in obedience to his adoptive father’s deathbed wish to scatter his ashes in every one of them. With not very much in his pocket, or a particular itinerary in mind, he drops out of college and sets out bravely, with 3/5ths of his father’s ashes in a silver urn that looks like a tea-pot without the spout (this is a compromise, as two of his sibs agreed with his plan, and the other two wanted a more conventional solution.) He starts out in his own car, which barely lasts through the first couple of states, thereafter advancing in fits and starts via other cars, hitchhiking, biking, moped, and intercity bus, and one hysterically comic interlude of hopping rail-cars under the guidance of an old man with emphysema who recalls the most fun he ever had in his life, riding the rails as a hobo … and who wishes to recapture some of that, if Jim will only carry along the oxygen bottle that he is tethered to. The scene where Jim must throw the oxygen bottle into a moving rail-car and beans a pig with it is laugh-out-loud, tears-down-your-face funny. In between time, in the mean time, he encounters a wonderfully assorted collection of characters – small town law enforcement, frat boys and sorority girls, Canadian dentists on a road trip disguised as bad-ass bikers, a lesbian who hires him to pretend to be her boyfriend for the duration of a family reunion, a young Marine and his very pregnant bride-to-be who are going to Las Vegas to be married by a Boy George look-alike, a conniving young man who gets his fun crashing wedding receptions, and a philosopher/launderette attendant … and many, many more. Jim winds up being arrested mistakenly in a drug bust, working in a family souvenir shop at Mount Rushmore, is dragged off to Tijuana by his father’s army buddy, AKA Uncle Spud, and finds Elvis’toenail-clipping in the deep shag rug in a room at Graceland. The overall tone is wry, deadpan and very, very dry – a Candide with more self-awareness. The narrator is an engaging character; as noted, he has consistently awful luck, but bounces back with verve and creativity, never loosing sight of his mission and ready to try anything once, or for as long as it will take to get him back on the road. Some of the situations are comic set-pieces, which have turned up before, but they are well-told here … and anyone who has been on a long road trip across the United States – by any means – will recognize not only the places, but the assortment of people inhabiting them. In several ways, this book reminded me of Bill Bryson’s Lost Continent – much the same dry, comic tone, but with a much sweeter understanding of and liking for people.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Emi Bevacqua

    Quirky, quick read about an adopted son named Roastbeef who decides to honor his beloved father's dying request that his ashes be strewn throughout the contiguous United States. At the time this promise is made Alzheimers has the dad believing he's FDR, but nevertheless Roastbeef is a 21 year old of his word, and doesn't have any apparent other commitments so off he goes on a crazy adventure. There were a couple egregious editing errors in the beginning, for example on page 16 "we road the numbe Quirky, quick read about an adopted son named Roastbeef who decides to honor his beloved father's dying request that his ashes be strewn throughout the contiguous United States. At the time this promise is made Alzheimers has the dad believing he's FDR, but nevertheless Roastbeef is a 21 year old of his word, and doesn't have any apparent other commitments so off he goes on a crazy adventure. There were a couple egregious editing errors in the beginning, for example on page 16 "we road the number one subway train"; also I don't normally go in for slapstick-y wackiness, and there were a few over-the-top instances that I found utterly sickening rather than humourous: when busking in Louisiana, an elderly woman challenges him to a juggle off and her grand finale ends in an epic fail with the grandmother shattering her dental prosthetic all over the street... when line dancing in Myrtle Beach Roastbeef twirls another unfortunate elderly woman, this one ends up on the floor with a broken hip, "with one leg in front of her and the other pointed off at an angle no leg should ever point in." I do have to admit there were plenty of bits that did have me laughing out loud, like when the dad's obituary described him as a "retarded nutpacker" instead of a retired walnut factory owner. The story is basically an opportunity for a former Jay Leno joke writer to poke fun at Americans literally all over the country, it's no literary work of art and I'm not interested in reading the sequel: Roastbeef Sprinkles.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    What a marvelously funny novel. Since I’m usually not a fan of “Road Stories” I was not particularly drawn to this book but I’m really glad I made the effort to read it. It’s the story of Jim “Roastbeef” Hume who promised his dying father that when the time came he would scatter his ashes in every state of the contiguous lower forty eight. His adventures in pursuit of this mission are not only unpredictable but outrageously hilarious. The author has worked as a joke writer on various TV shows as What a marvelously funny novel. Since I’m usually not a fan of “Road Stories” I was not particularly drawn to this book but I’m really glad I made the effort to read it. It’s the story of Jim “Roastbeef” Hume who promised his dying father that when the time came he would scatter his ashes in every state of the contiguous lower forty eight. His adventures in pursuit of this mission are not only unpredictable but outrageously hilarious. The author has worked as a joke writer on various TV shows as well as doing some stand-up and that has undoubtedly honed his timing skills but the characters are warm, believable and sometimes, people you’ve known.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

    Quirky, fun, good times. Easy read. Did I mention fun?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ownsbey

    i thought the cover was good the book was great it made nme laugh so hard i cried great book i won this book on good reads

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    What do you want your loved ones to do with your body when you die? I’ve actually had this conversation with my family; both my parents want to be cremated. I also want to be cremated, and though I’m not entirely certain what I want to do with my ashes, I hate the thought of them sitting in an urn on someone’s mantle. So I liked the premise behind Roastbeef’s Promise: Roastbeef’s father has died and he wants his son to sprinkle his ashes in each of the contiguous 48 states. One helluva road trip What do you want your loved ones to do with your body when you die? I’ve actually had this conversation with my family; both my parents want to be cremated. I also want to be cremated, and though I’m not entirely certain what I want to do with my ashes, I hate the thought of them sitting in an urn on someone’s mantle. So I liked the premise behind Roastbeef’s Promise: Roastbeef’s father has died and he wants his son to sprinkle his ashes in each of the contiguous 48 states. One helluva road trip, with Dad’s urn in tow. The rest of the family is not entirely down with this idea, but Roastbeef (born Jim) decides to drop out of college, take his beat-up car and hit the road. In theory, hilarity will ensue. Roastbeef eventually hits every state. He also gets injured, arrested, his vehicle stolen, his dignity dented. He sleeps in the car, he sleeps in a frat house, he plays boyfriend for a closeted lesbian headed home for a visit with her family. He plays the King of International Week, has his story is told over the loudspeaker at a stock car race, and he gives away a pregnant bride in a classic Las Vegas wedding. At the end, he finds that he has wandered into a new and lucrative career. This isn’t a true story, by the way. It sounded to me like the sort of thing that would make a great memoir, but in a memoir, you’re stuck with what actually happened. You can forgive the author if their life doesn’t strike exactly the right balance between hilarity and seriousness. This book has no such excuse. Everything is over the top. When Roastbeef is hitchhiking, he doesn’t just get a ride from some drunken frat boys. He gets a ride, they take him home, he stays for a week, sleeping on the couch and helping them get ready for International Night. They make him the King of International Night — which is quite the wild, drunken revel — he jumps off a second floor balcony and ends up leaving with a van full of sorority girls who promptly get him arrested. It’s too exhausting to be any fun. One thing that bothered me was that Roastbeef never really seems to spend much time thinking about his dad. I’d like to think that if I was travelling the country, sprinkling my father’s ashes, fulfilling his final request, I’d have some moments of introspection — I’d think about him a little. It’s like a National Lampoon Road Trip movie, with a crematory urn. Not my sense of humor at all. I guess I expected a little less slapstick and a little more thoughtfulness.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    As Jim "Roastbeef" Hume's father lay dying he extracted a promise from his son that after cremation Roastbeef would sprinkle some of his ashes in the 48 contiguous states. Roastbeef, being a rather uninvolved college student in Maryland at the time, decided it sounded like a great idea and set off on his road trip shortly after his father's passing. The journey would take hime 15 months and by the time he returned home to Maryland he had used just about every mode of transportation available inc As Jim "Roastbeef" Hume's father lay dying he extracted a promise from his son that after cremation Roastbeef would sprinkle some of his ashes in the 48 contiguous states. Roastbeef, being a rather uninvolved college student in Maryland at the time, decided it sounded like a great idea and set off on his road trip shortly after his father's passing. The journey would take hime 15 months and by the time he returned home to Maryland he had used just about every mode of transportation available including cars, trains (both as a legal passenger and as a stowaway), airplane, bicycle, moped, boat and feet. Along the way he made new friends and had some incredible adventures including a few hospital stays and also came into possession of the ashes of 2 more deceased people. Jerome is a humorist who, aside from his love of comedy, enthusiastically embraces all forms of travel. I enjoyed the quirkiness of the book and Roastbeef is a charming young guy who rarely sees the bad in any situation and can easily 'go with the flow'. At times I thought the story bordered on the irreverent and the endless succession of states was a bit tedious but it was a fun ride for the most part.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Kilgore

    Tough book to rate... The writing is competent for the most part, and many times the humor made me smile. But if you're looking for character development, this is not the place. A son promises to sprinkle his dad's ashes in all 48 contiguous states... and we travel along with him. We meet some quirky characters, we have car trouble, we have money issues. Travel stories can obviously work--just think of all the road trip movies you like. The difference, of course, is that most hand you a couple o Tough book to rate... The writing is competent for the most part, and many times the humor made me smile. But if you're looking for character development, this is not the place. A son promises to sprinkle his dad's ashes in all 48 contiguous states... and we travel along with him. We meet some quirky characters, we have car trouble, we have money issues. Travel stories can obviously work--just think of all the road trip movies you like. The difference, of course, is that most hand you a couple of characters to bounce off each other throughout, slowly developing a relationship. Here we have a pleasant young man who strikes up acquaintances easily, but then moves along. I found myself frequently bored, often wishing we'd just get there already... but that can certainly be true of certain kinds of travel. Car trips can be enjoyable if you have some great conversation, but there's not much of that here. My advice would be to start this book and read as long as you're entertained, then dip into it briefly now and then as though you're getting an update on how your nephew is progressing. That might push the stars to four. I received this book for free from Goodreads.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Guimont

    The plot of this book grabbed me from the start; an adopted son makes a promise to drive across the 48 states and scatter his dad's ashes in each one. It's nice to see a different idea for a fiction title for a change. I didn't know if it would be as funny as the book jacket described, but it was very much so. The main character, Roastbeef, drives a borrowed car that gets stolen, rides a moped and gets pulled over multiple times, hitchhikes a lot until he encounters his first weirdo, rides a bik The plot of this book grabbed me from the start; an adopted son makes a promise to drive across the 48 states and scatter his dad's ashes in each one. It's nice to see a different idea for a fiction title for a change. I didn't know if it would be as funny as the book jacket described, but it was very much so. The main character, Roastbeef, drives a borrowed car that gets stolen, rides a moped and gets pulled over multiple times, hitchhikes a lot until he encounters his first weirdo, rides a bike with an environmental group, and even ends up flying in a crop duster to scatter his dad's ashes. I was amazed at his relaxed attitude and the easy-going vibe he had throughout this trip. He never once seemed to give up after the endless challenges he faced. All the while, he found the humor and positive in each experience. He got arrested, ended up in the hospital and managed to get himself several jobs along the way. He met some wonderful people and some real jerks, but each encounter was something to learn from. I enjoyed this book thoroughly and look forward to more from this author.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Soory, Mr. Jerome. I wanted to like your book, but I couldn't get past how absurdly ridiculous it is. The premise itself is a winner, but it just isn't plausible to have something incredible and wacky happen in every single state. This much wackiness just doesn't happen to people in real life. Example for readers who don't understand what I mean: in one sequence, the narrator's brakes fail as he's careening down a mountain. Okay. we're still good. Things like this happen all the time. BUT then th Soory, Mr. Jerome. I wanted to like your book, but I couldn't get past how absurdly ridiculous it is. The premise itself is a winner, but it just isn't plausible to have something incredible and wacky happen in every single state. This much wackiness just doesn't happen to people in real life. Example for readers who don't understand what I mean: in one sequence, the narrator's brakes fail as he's careening down a mountain. Okay. we're still good. Things like this happen all the time. BUT then the narrator accidentally pops open the hood instead of pulling his emergency brake (which in a Hyundai seems remarkably difficult to do), so he's careening down a mountain with no brakes and can't see the road! The next day after spending most of his budget on fixing his car, he hits a deer that totals it for good. Ultimately, this novel is a promising premise written by a man who used to write jokes for late night television. Like most late night television, it isn't nearly as funny as it thinks it is.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    I like to buy the occasional book published by independent publishers for the library. I thought this one looked good - but then I also thought it was non-fiction. First there were the grammar errors, your instead of you're, and extra quotations, "Like this," he said." Then there was the narrative style. It was very "and then, and then, and then, and then..." And then (he he) the most ridiculous things happened to this guy in EVERY STATE. I can understand one or two things, but this was just too m I like to buy the occasional book published by independent publishers for the library. I thought this one looked good - but then I also thought it was non-fiction. First there were the grammar errors, your instead of you're, and extra quotations, "Like this," he said." Then there was the narrative style. It was very "and then, and then, and then, and then..." And then (he he) the most ridiculous things happened to this guy in EVERY STATE. I can understand one or two things, but this was just too much. Not to mention some of the things that happen to him would have had major legal repercussions that just never surfaced. Then there was his general disrespect for his father's ashes. But on top of all that, he called GT Georgia Tech University. It is an Institute people, not a university. Do your research. And while you're at it, there is no physical therapy major at GT. FAIL. And in the last page of his book, he tacks on that he's started an ash scattering business, a way too obvious sequel setup. Nope, nope, nope.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Delaware

    A completely entertaining book from start to finish. I won my copy of this book from a Goodreads contest, and the story interested me from the start. The story is a humorous account of one man who decides to fulfill his father's dying request to have his ashes scattered in all 48 continuous states in the U.S. I do not want to spoil the story by giving too many details, but I will say that every chapter seemed to bring to new levels the outrageous situations that the main character got himself in A completely entertaining book from start to finish. I won my copy of this book from a Goodreads contest, and the story interested me from the start. The story is a humorous account of one man who decides to fulfill his father's dying request to have his ashes scattered in all 48 continuous states in the U.S. I do not want to spoil the story by giving too many details, but I will say that every chapter seemed to bring to new levels the outrageous situations that the main character got himself into as he traveled around the country. He experiences criminals, crazy people and sincerely wonderfully kind people as his adventure rolls forth. There are very few books I have read that make me laugh out loud while reading them, and Roastbeef's Promise was one of the new one's I can now add to that list. Other books that have had this effect on me include Catch 22 by Joseph Heller and The Water Method Man by John Irving. This book is simply a must read if you enjoy good humor and need a good laugh.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    A great debut! After a co-worker discovered this, I just knew I had to read it. Unfortunately, we do not own this so I had to borrow it from another library. A big thanks to the Ashland, OH Public Library for sharing! John "Roastbeef" Hume is a 21-year old college student. All his life, his dad has always been a staunch republican, but things quickly change and "towards the end", he thinks he is FDR! The subtitle of this book is "When your dad's dying wish is to have his ashes sprinkled in each st A great debut! After a co-worker discovered this, I just knew I had to read it. Unfortunately, we do not own this so I had to borrow it from another library. A big thanks to the Ashland, OH Public Library for sharing! John "Roastbeef" Hume is a 21-year old college student. All his life, his dad has always been a staunch republican, but things quickly change and "towards the end", he thinks he is FDR! The subtitle of this book is "When your dad's dying wish is to have his ashes sprinkled in each state, what's a son to do? This son keeps his promise and heads out (from Kensington, MD) on a 15-month journey that takes him across the country and back again. Along the way, he meets some very interesting characters ... This book has the same flavor as William Least Heat-Moon's "Blue Highways" except that in general, it's much funnier. First time novelist, David Jerome, is a former joke writer for Jay Leno on The Tonight Show.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Ketelsen

    I won this book on GoodReads. David Jerome's first book, Roastbeef's Promise is a funny and oddly compelling road adventure that follows Jim "Roastbeef" Hume on his quest to spread his father's ashes across the lower 48 states. As you might expect, few things go right for young Roastbeef and that's what makes the story work and contributes to the amusing quality of the plot. Across the span of a year and a half Roastbeef Hume spreads the remains of both his father and one of his father's military I won this book on GoodReads. David Jerome's first book, Roastbeef's Promise is a funny and oddly compelling road adventure that follows Jim "Roastbeef" Hume on his quest to spread his father's ashes across the lower 48 states. As you might expect, few things go right for young Roastbeef and that's what makes the story work and contributes to the amusing quality of the plot. Across the span of a year and a half Roastbeef Hume spreads the remains of both his father and one of his father's military friends--who died of a romantic tryst in Mexico---around the nation, rarely having more than a few bucks to his name. The journey moves forward in a stuttering fashion as Jim's misadventures often involve brief pauses to generate more funds to continue the quest. The people that he meet are what makes this book work so well. A lot of nice people, a good many quirky ones, and a few bad apples comprise one very entertaining journey.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Estep

    Roastbeef's Promise by David Jerome was a fun enjoyable read. I was glad to win my copy through Goodreads. When Jim Hume's adopted Dad is diagnosed with Alzheimers, the most aggressive case the doctor's had ever seen, his time on earth and his mind in fact, is limited. He asks his son to promise him that he will have his body cremated and that he will scatter his ashes in the lower 48. Jim, who wasn't doing well in college and was quick to decide he must keep this promise and takes a leave to Roastbeef's Promise by David Jerome was a fun enjoyable read. I was glad to win my copy through Goodreads. When Jim Hume's adopted Dad is diagnosed with Alzheimers, the most aggressive case the doctor's had ever seen, his time on earth and his mind in fact, is limited. He asks his son to promise him that he will have his body cremated and that he will scatter his ashes in the lower 48. Jim, who wasn't doing well in college and was quick to decide he must keep this promise and takes a leave to do just that. This begins a journey across the nation, just Jim and his Dad's ashes. The car is not the best and Jim has little money but he is determined to keep his promise. Jim's travels and the people he meets is such a good read, with a lot of laughs. A coming of age that you cannot help but like.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie

    Given To Me For An Honest Review If you want to laugh, cry and hope you have to read this book. It is about a son's promise to sprinkle his father's ashes in all 48 continuous states. It begins easy enough but before long trouble with a capital T comes along. This story takes you along with his car problems. He before too long has no car. Staying in a hostel Smelly is not the word for it. No money. On and On and On. But along the way he runs into those who are so kind as to help him along his way Given To Me For An Honest Review If you want to laugh, cry and hope you have to read this book. It is about a son's promise to sprinkle his father's ashes in all 48 continuous states. It begins easy enough but before long trouble with a capital T comes along. This story takes you along with his car problems. He before too long has no car. Staying in a hostel Smelly is not the word for it. No money. On and On and On. But along the way he runs into those who are so kind as to help him along his way and he can spread his dad's ashes. This book is fantastic. Once I began to read it I couldn't put it down. It is such a fun read and I just wish I could give it 10+ stars for it. I just love this book. David Jerome hit a home run with it. I highly recommend it to all.

  18. 4 out of 5

    DWGibb

    Not a compelling read but a pleasant and amusing one. This guy who's spreading his dad's ashes across the Lower 48 has just about every obstacle you can imagine placed in his path, but somehow keeps on going. And he does it in good spirits, meeting a variety of characters along the way. His varied means of transportation and his methods of generating enough cash to keep going are ingenious and very entertaining. This method of interment sure beats a dreary funeral and a hole in the ground. The p Not a compelling read but a pleasant and amusing one. This guy who's spreading his dad's ashes across the Lower 48 has just about every obstacle you can imagine placed in his path, but somehow keeps on going. And he does it in good spirits, meeting a variety of characters along the way. His varied means of transportation and his methods of generating enough cash to keep going are ingenious and very entertaining. This method of interment sure beats a dreary funeral and a hole in the ground. The problem, of course, is finding someone who's willing to put up with what Roastbeef does to pull it off.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    The book Roastbeef's Promise is the story of a young man who takes the ultimate road trip to fulfill his adoptive father's dying wish--to sprinkle his ashes in the 48 contiguous states. Although some of the situations are over-the-top and laugh-out-loud, I just could not find myself liking the main character and I was frankly put off with many of his exploits. Maybe I am just a little too old to appreciate this book--Roastbeef and my son are about the same age. I received this book in a Goodread The book Roastbeef's Promise is the story of a young man who takes the ultimate road trip to fulfill his adoptive father's dying wish--to sprinkle his ashes in the 48 contiguous states. Although some of the situations are over-the-top and laugh-out-loud, I just could not find myself liking the main character and I was frankly put off with many of his exploits. Maybe I am just a little too old to appreciate this book--Roastbeef and my son are about the same age. I received this book in a Goodreads giveaway in return for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    This book will entertain you, but how it entertains you depends on your age. For young people, it will be an adventure. For the middle age, it will make you ponder life. And for the elderly, it will make you wonder how far your family will go to fulfill your wishes, even after you're gone. On the last few pages of the book there are directions, for those interested, to send pictures of the places mentioned where Roastbeef traveled. I am definitely going to do this as I am about on hour away from This book will entertain you, but how it entertains you depends on your age. For young people, it will be an adventure. For the middle age, it will make you ponder life. And for the elderly, it will make you wonder how far your family will go to fulfill your wishes, even after you're gone. On the last few pages of the book there are directions, for those interested, to send pictures of the places mentioned where Roastbeef traveled. I am definitely going to do this as I am about on hour away from one of the more remote places he visited.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    david jerome gave me his book, “Roastbeef’s Promise” (now available in stores) this year at my tender age of 32 and man did it hit home. every action-packed chapter, every hair-raising sub story within the already-stimulating story, every dramatic character encounter harmoniously strung every string in my vangabondaged heart. if you can’t already tell, i highly recommend it. for more information on this awesome book visit smackbooks.com/roastbeef david jerome gave me his book, “Roastbeef’s Promise” (now available in stores) this year at my tender age of 32 and man did it hit home. every action-packed chapter, every hair-raising sub story within the already-stimulating story, every dramatic character encounter harmoniously strung every string in my vangabondaged heart. if you can’t already tell, i highly recommend it. for more information on this awesome book visit smackbooks.com/roastbeef

  22. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    I won this book in a First reads giveaway. I would give the story 3.5 stars. A dying father asks his (adopted) son to spread his ashes throughout the 48 contiguous states. I enjoyed the adventure, it kept me interested right up to the end. I thought the book was well written and the words flowed smoothly. My only reservation would be that some of the things that happened to Roastbeef were a little over the top. Overall the book was satisfying and I would recommend this to my friends.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robert Keck

    Sure, the road trip story has been done to death. But this road trip is about what happens after death. I love gallows humor and this book is really, really funny. Wait until you meet Uncle Spud. Hop in the back seat, don't spill the urn and be ready to pass yourself off as a lesbian's boyfriend. Sure, the road trip story has been done to death. But this road trip is about what happens after death. I love gallows humor and this book is really, really funny. Wait until you meet Uncle Spud. Hop in the back seat, don't spill the urn and be ready to pass yourself off as a lesbian's boyfriend.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Oates

    Sometimes we read thinking novels, sometimes we read what are often referred to as candy bars. Jerome's novel Roastbeef's Promise is simply sweet humor that's good for the tummy but bad for the teeth. Nothing more. Try to read into it further than that and you'll spoil your appetite. So eat your James Joyce and your Faulkner and when you've finished your Hemingway you can have Roastbeef. Sometimes we read thinking novels, sometimes we read what are often referred to as candy bars. Jerome's novel Roastbeef's Promise is simply sweet humor that's good for the tummy but bad for the teeth. Nothing more. Try to read into it further than that and you'll spoil your appetite. So eat your James Joyce and your Faulkner and when you've finished your Hemingway you can have Roastbeef.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    The premise is fascinating, but the author doesn't develop the narrator into an individual. The attempts at humor seem cliched and a little cold at some points and the main character's gradual development also too predictable. The premise is fascinating, but the author doesn't develop the narrator into an individual. The attempts at humor seem cliched and a little cold at some points and the main character's gradual development also too predictable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suzan Jackson

    A funny road trip novel (read during my recent road trip!) about a young man who fulfill's his father's last wish to have his ashes sprinkled in every state. Read my full review at: http://bookbybook.blogspot.com/2010/0... A funny road trip novel (read during my recent road trip!) about a young man who fulfill's his father's last wish to have his ashes sprinkled in every state. Read my full review at: http://bookbybook.blogspot.com/2010/0...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    I found the main character a little difficult to relate to, but the pace and flow of the book kept me engaged and interested to see what would happen next. Overall I found the book to be an enjoyable read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Connie Stewart

    I am still reading this and I love it! I can't wait to finish so I can loan it to my friends. I have been reading it in the break room at work and have been telling co workers about it. I love the characters that he meets. I just can't put it down. It is a very fun read. I am still reading this and I love it! I can't wait to finish so I can loan it to my friends. I have been reading it in the break room at work and have been telling co workers about it. I love the characters that he meets. I just can't put it down. It is a very fun read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Roastbeef's Promise is continuous fun from cover to cover. I never knew where the story was going to go, which is an accomplishment for me. It is probably one of the few books that so excellently mimics life, in all of its humor and drama. I will always highly recommend this book to anyone. Roastbeef's Promise is continuous fun from cover to cover. I never knew where the story was going to go, which is an accomplishment for me. It is probably one of the few books that so excellently mimics life, in all of its humor and drama. I will always highly recommend this book to anyone.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Reading this book is like listening to someone with a very monotone voice tell a good story. The basic story is interesting, but the storytelling is boring and flat.

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