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Every Human Has Rights: A Photographic Declaration for Kids

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The 30 rights set down in 1948 by the United Nations are incredibly powerful. According to the U.N., every human–just by virtue of being human–is entitled to freedom, a fair government, a decent standard of living, work, play, and education, freedom to come and go as we please and to associate with anyone we please, and the right to express ourselves freely. Every Human Ha The 30 rights set down in 1948 by the United Nations are incredibly powerful. According to the U.N., every human–just by virtue of being human–is entitled to freedom, a fair government, a decent standard of living, work, play, and education, freedom to come and go as we please and to associate with anyone we please, and the right to express ourselves freely. Every Human Has Rights offers kids an accessibly written list of these rights, commentary–much of it deeply emotional–by other kids, and richly evocative photography illustrating each right. At the end of this deceptively simple book, kids will know–and feel–that regardless of individual differences and circumstances, each person is valuable and worthy of respect.


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The 30 rights set down in 1948 by the United Nations are incredibly powerful. According to the U.N., every human–just by virtue of being human–is entitled to freedom, a fair government, a decent standard of living, work, play, and education, freedom to come and go as we please and to associate with anyone we please, and the right to express ourselves freely. Every Human Ha The 30 rights set down in 1948 by the United Nations are incredibly powerful. According to the U.N., every human–just by virtue of being human–is entitled to freedom, a fair government, a decent standard of living, work, play, and education, freedom to come and go as we please and to associate with anyone we please, and the right to express ourselves freely. Every Human Has Rights offers kids an accessibly written list of these rights, commentary–much of it deeply emotional–by other kids, and richly evocative photography illustrating each right. At the end of this deceptively simple book, kids will know–and feel–that regardless of individual differences and circumstances, each person is valuable and worthy of respect.

30 review for Every Human Has Rights: A Photographic Declaration for Kids

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Parker

    “Every Human Has Rights: A photographic declaration for kids” belongs on the table of every waiting room in every school, public agency, and health care provider. It is a book that can be browsed, read page-by page, or meditated upon by young and old. The United Nations’ “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” has been simplified and amplified by the team of National Geographic and the ePals Global Learning Community. The full and rather sophisticated text of the “Declaration” is included in the “Every Human Has Rights: A photographic declaration for kids” belongs on the table of every waiting room in every school, public agency, and health care provider. It is a book that can be browsed, read page-by page, or meditated upon by young and old. The United Nations’ “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” has been simplified and amplified by the team of National Geographic and the ePals Global Learning Community. The full and rather sophisticated text of the “Declaration” is included in the appendix, but it is the enumerated and simplified captions that make this particular edition valuable. The pictures and the writing of kids from around the world only enhance the value of expressions such as, “You have the right to a free and safe LIFE.” Also included is valuable information that can help everyone take the ideas beyond the page and into the world. Former President of Ireland and member of The Elders, Mary Robinson, contributes a foreword that is truly inspirational. Order this book for your children and pass it along to the neighbors, or make it a gift to your school and take an active part in changing the world one reader at a time. 5 out of 5 John Parker Media Coordinator Andrews High School 50 HS Drive Andrews, NC 28901 www.slamguy.wordpress.com

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne Morgan

    Mary Robinson, with help from National Geographic, does an unbelievable job at reaching out to the most important people in our world today and voicing the importance of standing up as an individual. Giving people more and more reasons to fight for what they believe in is only benefitting our world. The pictures show people who are celebrating the fact that they are free and proud. At the end of this deceptively simple book, kids will know and feel that regardless of individual differences and c Mary Robinson, with help from National Geographic, does an unbelievable job at reaching out to the most important people in our world today and voicing the importance of standing up as an individual. Giving people more and more reasons to fight for what they believe in is only benefitting our world. The pictures show people who are celebrating the fact that they are free and proud. At the end of this deceptively simple book, kids will know and feel that regardless of individual differences and circumstances, each person is valuable and worthy of respect. This picture book would be especially beneficial to me as a teacher because my target grade level is K-2. However, this is an excellent book to use with children of any age. Introducing this book would allow students to get an idea of what is going on in our world today. It helps to begin discussions about what we see as fair and safe for all of us. It gives children a great way to express themselves and see how other kids are thinking and feeling about what is going on in the world today. As a teacher, it forces adults to pause and think about the way we see the world as well. Every Human Has Rights is a great book to use for constitution day lessons. It could also be a good beginning of the year discussion and an easier way to get to know the students.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jen King

    Annotated Bibliography Entry: Every Human Has Rights by: National Geographic Society Text Set: Kindness Genre: Non-fiction Summary: This is a photographic guide based off the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights except it is simplified so it is accessible and kid-friendly. It is arranged by sub-headings that represent the "big idea" of what that particular page is saying. For example there sub headings about freedom, assembly, privacy and many others. As well as stating the right in Annotated Bibliography Entry: Every Human Has Rights by: National Geographic Society Text Set: Kindness Genre: Non-fiction Summary: This is a photographic guide based off the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights except it is simplified so it is accessible and kid-friendly. It is arranged by sub-headings that represent the "big idea" of what that particular page is saying. For example there sub headings about freedom, assembly, privacy and many others. As well as stating the right in kid-friendly language it also includes realistic photos to accompany what is being said as well as poetry and other written pieces written by children of various ages. Basically, this is a book that illustrates and states what rights every human is entitled to have as well as mentioning that we, as a society has some work to do as not every country extends these rights to their citizens. Personal Response: This is definitely a book more suited for older children due to the themes that is discussed. While it is a book more suited for upper elementary grades, it is a book that every child should either read or it should be displayed in the classroom library where children are free to access it and read it. I think this book is that important. There are children in this world that believe they do not have any rights. As this book eloquently puts it with the pictures they incorporated, there are some children in the world that do not have the same freedoms that kids in the U.S. (and other democratic countries) possess. It is important for kids to learn these rights because it what every child is entitled to. I am a big history and social studies person (was actually originally going to be a history teacher) so having books, such as this one is going to be important to me. Descriptions of Illustrations: The illustrations in this book are not like your typical drawings found in children's books. The illustrations are all photographs as this is a photographic guide. The pictures that were incorporated were striking and definitely evokes emotion in the reader. There are also captions for all the photos further explaining them. The subjects included in the pictures are diverse and are from various countries. I think these photos are perfectly representative of what this book was aiming for. The pictures kept my interest and really evoked emotion. They were very powerful! Classroom Connections: Teachers can use this book as a discussion piece for older students. Teacher and students could talk as a group about what these rights mean to them. This is a question that should promote deeper level thinking and lead into a pretty good discussion. Students could even write responses to these questions in their journals. Another thing teachers could use this book for is having children either write their own poems about these topics, much like the poems that were included in every page or they could have children paint pictures and create artwork on these topics. This reminds me of an activity that I watched on the teaching channel where a teacher had her students create paintings on democracy. She had her students use their hand prints as the foundation for the drawing and the students incorporated words that resembled or represented democracy. This was done in a Canadian classroom when they were discussing an article about democracy, but I think this book would be a good replacement for an article. Basically, I am saying that with this book students could do a similar activity. Link to video: https://www.teachingchannel.org/video...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Hamill

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Recommended Grade Levels: K-3 Themes: Friendship, Equality, and Freedom Summary: This is a photographic pronouncement stating over many pages that all humans are valuable and have many undeniable rights, no matter how much governments or other people may say otherwise. From the rights to freedom and respect to the rights to participation and a future, this book covers the core, essential truths that come with being human. This book points out that these rights have not always been respected by eve Recommended Grade Levels: K-3 Themes: Friendship, Equality, and Freedom Summary: This is a photographic pronouncement stating over many pages that all humans are valuable and have many undeniable rights, no matter how much governments or other people may say otherwise. From the rights to freedom and respect to the rights to participation and a future, this book covers the core, essential truths that come with being human. This book points out that these rights have not always been respected by everyone at all times, and it encourages readers to stand up and fight for these rights when they are not being allowed in one way or another. Personal Response: I found this book to be inspirational for myself as an adult. I then realized that it would serve as a positive, eye-opening text for children as well. This book helped me to see how privileged I am as so many of my rights are being granted while other people do not always have this luxury. I can think of many people whom I have met over the years who have not been given a fair opportunity or the respect that they deserved. Because of this book, I am ever so encouraged to stand up against acts of injustice now. I want to promote the rights of all people in a real and plausible way. Note about illustrations: The pictures for this book are vivid photographs taken by various photographers for National Geographic. These photographs depict serious and penetrating events throughout history that show either the right being described or the lack thereof. These pictures are honest and straightforward. They are often framed with a bold, black line. The text works with the pictures, bold and black to introduce the right on each page and describe it. In faded gray text, there are captions for the pictures and poems from the ePals Community. Each right is printed in white capital letters on top of a swirled, scribbled ink blot. Each right is numbered in white numbers against a crimson, rectangular background that looks like it was colored in with a pen. Reader Response/Classroom Connections: This book can be used as a platform to hold an open and honest discussion with my students on civil rights. We can talk about what is ok and what is not ok. We can also talk about when these human rights have been met, and when they have not. I will encourage students to illustrate two pictures: one of a right being met, and one when a right is not met. They can post these pieces of art around the room and host a human rights art gallery for other students to peruse and learn from. After reading this book, I would like to encourage my students to write a play that champions for one of the rights in the book. They must choose one of the rights as a class, and then work together to create a script, select roles, and practice the play. They can choose an art director to help organize the props and backgrounds. When the time comes for the students to perform the play, I will record it with a video camera so that the rest of the school can benefit from its morals and overarching themes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    24 March 2009 EVERY HUMAN HAS RIGHTS: A PHOTOGRAPHIC DECLARATION FOR KIDS National Geographic, 2009, 48p., ISBN: 978-1-4263-0510-8 "I'm free -- I'm free, And freedom tastes of reality! I'm free -- I'm free, And I'm waiting for you to follow me." -- The Who THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS lists the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the Most Translated Document in the world. I have certainly heard about it before, but it is a document that I don't recall having ever read. "1. All humans are 24 March 2009 EVERY HUMAN HAS RIGHTS: A PHOTOGRAPHIC DECLARATION FOR KIDS National Geographic, 2009, 48p., ISBN: 978-1-4263-0510-8 "I'm free -- I'm free, And freedom tastes of reality! I'm free -- I'm free, And I'm waiting for you to follow me." -- The Who THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS lists the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the Most Translated Document in the world. I have certainly heard about it before, but it is a document that I don't recall having ever read. "1. All humans are born free with the same dignity and rights." Drawing on the somber lessons of World War II, a United Nations Commission on Human Rights chaired by Eleanor Roosevelt worked to draft a Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In honor of the 60th anniversary of the United Nation's adoption of the Declaration, National Geographic has crafted a beautiful photograph-filled book that introduces readers to this set of human entitlements. In it, they have restated/summarized each of the thirty Articles that make up the Declaration in a manner that provides the essence of each and can be far more easily digested by readers. In my first read through the book, I simply read these boldly-printed restatements and noted the single-word concepts and the photographs that accompany each one. The brevity achieved by the restatements/summarizations result in a set of rights that read as fresh, relevant, progressive, and commonsensical. "5. Nobody has the right to torture you, bully you, or punish you too severely." "22. You have the right to get help from your government if you are out of work, sick, disabled, old, or can't make enough money to live on for any other reason." Reading through the book for the second time, I absorbed the captions (in lighter print) for each illustration. The captions provide facts about the rights that are enjoyed by or withheld from people in various nations around the world (including, in some instances, my own). For instance, a stark photo of a crudely-built, empty swing is accompanied by the caption, "All over the world, unfair arrests break up families." Also incorporated into the book are a number of topical poems that come from the ePals community; an introduction by Mary Robinson, the former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights; and a two-page, full-text spread of the complete Declaration as adopted. "And there but for fortune, may go you or I." --Phil Ochs Whether one reads every poem and caption or simply wanders through this eye-catching photographic declaration to consider and savor the rights that are our birthright as members of the human community, EVERY HUMAN HAS RIGHTS will leave a lasting impression on readers of all ages. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.com [email protected] Moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/middle_... http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/people/facult...

  6. 4 out of 5

    K

    After World War II, humanity sat down and wrote an incredible document detailing exactly what it means to be free. Yet, the words don't live unless people know them. I know I never even heard the term "human rights" until Jimmy Carter was President and by then, I was already an adult. Even today, the number of people who follow human rights issues is pretty small in the world. Americans probably aren't taught much about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights because America views almost every After World War II, humanity sat down and wrote an incredible document detailing exactly what it means to be free. Yet, the words don't live unless people know them. I know I never even heard the term "human rights" until Jimmy Carter was President and by then, I was already an adult. Even today, the number of people who follow human rights issues is pretty small in the world. Americans probably aren't taught much about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights because America views almost everything related to the United Nations as a threat to sovereignty. rather than as the best global problem-solving mechanism that we have at the moment. So, American kids, especially, just aren't learning enough about The United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. What better time for them to learn the 30 different declarations of humanity's rights than as a young person? A book like this gives young people food for thought about not only how to be free but how to help others live free. This would make a profound gift for any young person from a thoughtful and caring adult.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Leitschuh

    A beautiful collection of photographs and poetry celebrating the Declaration of Human Rights. A great choice for November--National Picture Book Month!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kerrie Barton

    This is a wonderful book that puts the Universal Declaration for Human Rights, adopted by the UN General Assembly in December of 1948, into language that is accessible to all of us - children and adults. For each of the declarations, there are photographs representing the heart of the ideas. In addition, the book is laced with original writings from young people that reveal their thoughts and feelings about the concepts advocated by the Declaration. I think this would be a beautiful book to shar This is a wonderful book that puts the Universal Declaration for Human Rights, adopted by the UN General Assembly in December of 1948, into language that is accessible to all of us - children and adults. For each of the declarations, there are photographs representing the heart of the ideas. In addition, the book is laced with original writings from young people that reveal their thoughts and feelings about the concepts advocated by the Declaration. I think this would be a beautiful book to share with young people to, first, make them aware that the Universal Declaration for Human Rights exists, but also to engage them with critical and artistic thinking about the ideas it represents. Are the rights still relevant? What are examples of people/governments/organizations honoring or disregarding these rights today? Are there rights you would add? How would you represent some of these rights creatively? These questions have the power to elicit higher-level thinking.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Erskine

    Every Human Has Rights is a book that should be in all classrooms. The book is based on the United Nations Universal declaration of human rights, many of which run parallel to our constitution. It’s important for every person and every child to know their rights so they can point out and fight against rules and policies that infringe on these rights. Along with the text Every Human Has Rights includes photographs from all around the world, showcasing many different cultures and ethnicity’s. Thes Every Human Has Rights is a book that should be in all classrooms. The book is based on the United Nations Universal declaration of human rights, many of which run parallel to our constitution. It’s important for every person and every child to know their rights so they can point out and fight against rules and policies that infringe on these rights. Along with the text Every Human Has Rights includes photographs from all around the world, showcasing many different cultures and ethnicity’s. These pictures are all well captioned and provide examples of what happens when one’s rights are ignored. The book also includes a variety of inspiring quotes by well-known people as well as normal humans like you and me. Again, every classroom should have copy of this book because human rights are very important and one can’t know if there rights are being violated if they don’t know what they are.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Campana

    This non-fiction picture book is a combination photo essay, social studies text, and poetry collection that simplifies each of the thirty primary rights outlined in the United Nations' 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights into language easily understandable by children. Each page features a simplified summary one of the rights (or a group of several related rights) along with one or more photographs of people around the world, shown in a context that illustrates that specific right or righ This non-fiction picture book is a combination photo essay, social studies text, and poetry collection that simplifies each of the thirty primary rights outlined in the United Nations' 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights into language easily understandable by children. Each page features a simplified summary one of the rights (or a group of several related rights) along with one or more photographs of people around the world, shown in a context that illustrates that specific right or rights or demonstrates the need to address that particular right, and many pages also include poems written by children about that particular right. The full text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is included at the end of the book for reference, and a helpful keyword index is included.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

    3.75 The ideals in this book are 5* and it will probably find a use in my classroom, but it could have been put together a little better. It is designed for young audiences, but it still needed a little more depth.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    Beautiful pictures. The wording for each right make it very accessible for young people.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Molly Senour

    Title: Every Human Has Rights Author: Based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Poetry from the ePals community, Foreword by Mary Robinson Illustrator: Photographs from National Geographic Genre: Photographic Essay, Informational Text Theme(s): Human Rights, Equality Opening line/sentence: “All humans are born free with the same dignity and rights” Brief Book Summary: This photographic essay lists the thirty rights that fall under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Title: Every Human Has Rights Author: Based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Poetry from the ePals community, Foreword by Mary Robinson Illustrator: Photographs from National Geographic Genre: Photographic Essay, Informational Text Theme(s): Human Rights, Equality Opening line/sentence: “All humans are born free with the same dignity and rights” Brief Book Summary: This photographic essay lists the thirty rights that fall under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The thirty individual statements are accompanied by different pictures and poems that portray the rights, or in some cases a violation of the rights. Everything from privacy, to property, to marriage, to education and more are addressed in the photographic representation of the Declaration. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: Midwest Book Review (Children's Bookwatch, January 2009) Every Human Has Rights: A Photographic Declaration for Kids is a picturebook for young people based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, illustrated with powerful color photography and enhanced with poetry from the ePals community. A foreword by Mary Robinson, former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, enhances this meaningful introduction to a profound and fundamental concept of social issues. A welcome addition to public and school library children's collections. "Every adult has the right to marry and have a family, but nobody can force you to get married. In marriage, both partners are equal." Professional Recommendation/Review #2: Anita Barnes Lowen (Children's Literature) All human beings are born free with the same dignity and rights. You have the right to belong to a country. You have the right to go to school. These are just three of the thirty human rights that make up the Universal Declarations of Humans Rights adopted by the United Nations in 1948. In this book, each right has been rewritten in simple language easily understood by younger readers and illustrated with one or more color photographs, many of which are full or double-page spreads. Also includes are poems and brief commentaries written by student members of ePals, an online global learning community which allows students from around the world to safely connect and exchange ideas. Former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson introduces the book by recognizing that the rights celebrated in this book are not yet protected for all people. She encourages young readers to become involved in working for human rights close to home and around the world. The book closes with the actual text of the declaration, as well as on information about the young poets whose works are included and a list of organizations and websites readers can turn to for further information. The youngest readers will most likely need adult guidance to help them understand the meaning of each right. Certainly, this book can be a catalyst for discussion about the human condition around the world and what can be done to make it better. Some photos (e.g., a woman with a black eye, concentration camp survivors) may be disturbing to sensitive readers. Response to Two Professional Reviews: Both of these reviews acknowledge that this book is a great way for children to learn about what human rights are and how that applies to them, and this is very true. The simplified statements make it very easy for children to understand and the accompanying pictures are helpful as well. I do agree that some of the pictures could be considered more on the disturbing side, but I think that it is important for children to have the choice of learning about these things. Evaluation of Literary Elements: I think that this book overall effectively got the idea of human rights across. The simplified statements were very easy to understand, however the poems may have been a little trickier. I, as an adult could read and understand them but I am not sure that the same could be said for younger children. The photographs had a huge contribution to the intensity and seriousness of the book. Consideration of Instructional Application: I think that this book is a good one to share with kids who are in a bit higher grades. I am not sure that very young children will completely get the idea of human rights, and I wonder if these pictures would be a little disturbing to them. However, I would still have it in my classroom because it is important that my students have this available to them if they are interested in it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    The combination of the pictures, the words from young adults, the National Geographic depictions of each right- to equal justice, to not be a slave, to be treated fairly not judged by race, color, religion or gender, etc- really get to the heart of what people are marching and demanding at this time. There is an emotional pull to feel the rights- given or challenged in the pictures and thoughts, to note that we are all people of the world and that we have to work towards a more just world togeth The combination of the pictures, the words from young adults, the National Geographic depictions of each right- to equal justice, to not be a slave, to be treated fairly not judged by race, color, religion or gender, etc- really get to the heart of what people are marching and demanding at this time. There is an emotional pull to feel the rights- given or challenged in the pictures and thoughts, to note that we are all people of the world and that we have to work towards a more just world together.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Wesner

    National Geographic. Every Human Has Rights. National Geographic Society, 2009. 48 p. Gr. 3-4. A universal declaration of human rights fill these pages of this book, describing how we, as humans, have rights. These rights consist of dignity, equality, life, freedom, respect, justice, protection, privacy, refuge, nationality, marriage, property, religion, expression, assembly, democracy, social security, health, education, participation, responsibility, and a future. As children around the world t National Geographic. Every Human Has Rights. National Geographic Society, 2009. 48 p. Gr. 3-4. A universal declaration of human rights fill these pages of this book, describing how we, as humans, have rights. These rights consist of dignity, equality, life, freedom, respect, justice, protection, privacy, refuge, nationality, marriage, property, religion, expression, assembly, democracy, social security, health, education, participation, responsibility, and a future. As children around the world talk about human rights, they have written poems and words that include their own experiences with freedom and peace. The book is summed up in a quote from Nelson Mandela: The truth is that we are not yet free: we have merely achieved the freedom to be free, the right not to be oppressed. We have not taken the final step of our journey, but the first step on a longer and even more difficult road. For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. This multicultural non-fiction photo documentary takes us on a journey across the United Nations talking to children about what it means to have peace, love, freedom, and friendships. This book needs to be included in a multi-cultural set that speaks to young children about human rights, freedom, peace, love, and kindness. As children can identify with differences, the teacher should ask the class to come up with ways in which we are all different. Then the teacher needs to have the children come up with ways in which we are all the same. As students can write their own stories about experiences they have had, they should also write important words and/or phrases that would be added to the classroom bulletin board that describes peace, love, kindness, and friendships. Students could also write their own poems that could be displayed within the classroom or they could be put together to form a classroom book of their own. Multi-Cultural Set: A Little Peace The Other Side Each Kindness Every Human Has Rights Peaceful Pieces

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julia Breidt

    This book discusses the rights we have as human beings. I love that is uses various poems from K-8 aged students about issues of Justice, Protection, Privacy, Freedom, and so many more. It also uses a variety of photographs of people from all over the world. Information.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Arvey

    Title: Every Human Has Rights Formed by: Mary Robinson Genre: Non-Fiction Themes: Non-Fiction, Picture Book, Respect, National Geographic, Notable Books for Global Society list Plot Summary: In this National Geographic book Mary Robinson has taken the ideas of rights and how to respect those rights in different aspects. She has then formed quotes about them with a realistic picture to go with it. For example, her one quote is “Nobody has the right to torture you, bully you, or punish you too severe Title: Every Human Has Rights Formed by: Mary Robinson Genre: Non-Fiction Themes: Non-Fiction, Picture Book, Respect, National Geographic, Notable Books for Global Society list Plot Summary: In this National Geographic book Mary Robinson has taken the ideas of rights and how to respect those rights in different aspects. She has then formed quotes about them with a realistic picture to go with it. For example, her one quote is “Nobody has the right to torture you, bully you, or punish you too severely.” She is showing us that we need to respect others and that even includes yourself. The photographs seem to be accurate on the information the is provided. The author did do a great job of being unbiased throughout the story. This book is based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human rights. Literary Merit: Theme: Mary Robinson’s theme in this book I believe is mainly respecting yourself and others. This is a very important to children and many of these ideas of respect should be taught to children at a young age. It does not avoid morals since the theme is respect it can be argued that some of the quotes are morals. Overall the author uses the symbols and pictures in her collection of quotes to help get the point of theme across. Reader Response / Classroom Connections: Since I believe that all students should learn respect and how to respect one another there is a wide variety of activities I would have the students do. One activity is I could create a caterpillar and each day we take down one part of the caterpillar and it would have a students name on it and all students would write a compliment for that student and we would do one each day. In addition to this since it does talk about social issues it would be a great book to have a discussion on human rights. This is part of the Text Set on Respect

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Crowley

    National Geographic Society, Mary Robinson. Every Human Has Rights. National Geographic Children’s Books, 2008. In 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Every Human Has Rights is a child friendly version of the thirty rights in which every person is entitled to. These rights are presented in a way that is easy to understand and also provides an emotional response from a child who has directly be affected in some way in relation to the specific National Geographic Society, Mary Robinson. Every Human Has Rights. National Geographic Children’s Books, 2008. In 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Every Human Has Rights is a child friendly version of the thirty rights in which every person is entitled to. These rights are presented in a way that is easy to understand and also provides an emotional response from a child who has directly be affected in some way in relation to the specific right. It shows the importance and relevance for kids to understand their basic rights and to understand the history context in which not everyone received these basic rights at one point or another in time. The text is set in a way that draws the readers’ eyes and key words jump out pushing their importance even more so. After reading this book, children will know and feel due to personal stories the importance and value of these rights and that every person is worthy of both kindness and respect. Classroom Connection: This book would go along perfectly with my text-set as it brings forth the rights that each individual has just due to being human. All of these rights are given to us and mandated by the government. It is important for each student to realize that they are entitled to each and every one of these thirty rights and no one has the ability to take that away from them. I would push my students further to realize that each one of these rights is routed in kindness to one another and if we are given these rights that no one has the right to take them away making it important to realize and embody that within the classroom. This story, along with the rest of the text-set, will help to shape the classroom environment around kindness, friendship, and peace.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Title: Every Human Has Rights: A Photographic Declaration for Kids Author/Illustrator: National Geographic Society, Mary Robinson (Foreword) Genre: Informational Nonfiction, Picturebook Theme: Respect, Social Justice Plot Summary: This book provides readers with information regarding the many rights each and every human has. Such rights pertain to dignity, equality, life, freedom, safety, respect, justice, protection, privacy, movement, refuge, nationality, marriage, property, religion, expression, Title: Every Human Has Rights: A Photographic Declaration for Kids Author/Illustrator: National Geographic Society, Mary Robinson (Foreword) Genre: Informational Nonfiction, Picturebook Theme: Respect, Social Justice Plot Summary: This book provides readers with information regarding the many rights each and every human has. Such rights pertain to dignity, equality, life, freedom, safety, respect, justice, protection, privacy, movement, refuge, nationality, marriage, property, religion, expression, assembly, democracy, social security, work and leisure, health, education, peace, participation, responsibility, and a future. Criteria: Style is best emulated throughout this book. The book goes through the many different rights a person has and examples of each one. In addition, real photographs are included on every page, as well as real stories from those who have a personal experience with a specific human right. Reader Response/Classroom Connections: For a classroom connection, the teacher could have students choose which human right they feel is important to them and why that is. Then, students can provide an example of themselves participating in this human right that they are given. Additional Notes: *Part of Text Set on Respect

  20. 5 out of 5

    Allison Willier

    Plot: This book goes through the basic rights that each human has. It covers thirty specific rights that should be available to every human no matter what. These rights include dignity, nationality, health, religion, equality, life, freedom, safety, respect, justice, protection, privacy, refuge, property, assembly, democracy, social security, work and leisure, education, participation, peace, responsibility, and a future. Criteria: I chose style for this book. This book is very simply laid out, w Plot: This book goes through the basic rights that each human has. It covers thirty specific rights that should be available to every human no matter what. These rights include dignity, nationality, health, religion, equality, life, freedom, safety, respect, justice, protection, privacy, refuge, property, assembly, democracy, social security, work and leisure, education, participation, peace, responsibility, and a future. Criteria: I chose style for this book. This book is very simply laid out, with the category of the right listed on the margin, and the actual right on the page. Each right is simply put, as a short phrase. This communicates how simple the rights are and how every person should have them. Response: I would use this book in a Social Studies lesson. Because it goes through the basic rights of every human, it would be a good nonfiction book to use. Before reading the book, I would have the class come up with as many human rights as they can think of, and I would write them on the board. As we read the book, we would check off the ones we had come up with to see how many we got correct. I would then segue into the Bill of Rights where we would go over the original rights each human has. Additional Notes: Text set – Respect

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    In classic National Geographic style, this book is filled with incredible photographs of people from around the world. Each photo tells a story, which brings the text of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights to life. Powerful and gripping, this book gives readers glimpses of the horrors around the world but also the strength and resilience of its peoples. Each line of the Declaration is accompanied by photographs with captions as well as a poem or statement by a young person that goes wit In classic National Geographic style, this book is filled with incredible photographs of people from around the world. Each photo tells a story, which brings the text of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights to life. Powerful and gripping, this book gives readers glimpses of the horrors around the world but also the strength and resilience of its peoples. Each line of the Declaration is accompanied by photographs with captions as well as a poem or statement by a young person that goes with that part of the Declaration. Readers can modify it depending on their age. Teens will enjoy the poems and statements while younger children may find them too intense. Each line of the Declaration is simple and strong. The accompanying photographs are fascinating and one lingers over them, looking into the eyes and faces and finding kinship there. When I shared this book with my 7-year-old and 12-year-old we got to talk at length about tough issues like torture, the Holocaust and human rights in general. Any book that offers me that opportunity is worth reading and sharing. Appropriate for a wide range of ages depending on how it is used: 7-14.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Brill

    “Every Human Has Rights: A photographic declaration for kids” depicts the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights in kid friendly way. Each page has a right on it accompanied by beautiful photographs of people from many cultures and a poem written by one of 16 young poetry contest winners. Each of the thirty rights is written in text that makes the important pieces stand out, such as bolding the words that hold the most importance. Many of the pictures that accompany the rights are “Every Human Has Rights: A photographic declaration for kids” depicts the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights in kid friendly way. Each page has a right on it accompanied by beautiful photographs of people from many cultures and a poem written by one of 16 young poetry contest winners. Each of the thirty rights is written in text that makes the important pieces stand out, such as bolding the words that hold the most importance. Many of the pictures that accompany the rights are of difficult subjects such as Holocaust survivors and homeless children. These pictures strengthen the importance of these rights and make the reader appreciate their own rights. The poems from the poetry winners are by children from all over the world, giving their opinion and experiences with equal rights, humanity, and society. The combination of the text, poems, and photographs makes this book incredibly moving for people of all ages.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    One cannot stress how impactful and necessary this book is for all children to read. This deep and humbling photographic declaration is perfect for spreading cultural sensitivity and awareness. Every Human has Rights teaches the reader about all the basic human rights that we are all born with through pictures of people who were not able to exercise those rights. This book opens the eyes of its reader and shows them how lucky they are to have the rights they hold and educated them on the rights One cannot stress how impactful and necessary this book is for all children to read. This deep and humbling photographic declaration is perfect for spreading cultural sensitivity and awareness. Every Human has Rights teaches the reader about all the basic human rights that we are all born with through pictures of people who were not able to exercise those rights. This book opens the eyes of its reader and shows them how lucky they are to have the rights they hold and educated them on the rights they didn’t realize they held. Many people in the world have no indication of these basic human rights, and that included American citizens. It is crucial that students are taught about the basic human rights so they are able to defend themselves from anyone trying to violate their rights and so that they understand that although you are different from someone else, you have the same rights in life.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    I wanted to give this 5 stars because it was an excellent introduction to the concept of human rights, not just for kids but for all people. However, the print that accompanied many of the illustrations was in such a pale gray that it was difficult to read, and I didn't like the layout of the book, or the scribbles behind the chapter headings, or the font that the larger words were in. I did appreciate the presence of the complete text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at the end. Des I wanted to give this 5 stars because it was an excellent introduction to the concept of human rights, not just for kids but for all people. However, the print that accompanied many of the illustrations was in such a pale gray that it was difficult to read, and I didn't like the layout of the book, or the scribbles behind the chapter headings, or the font that the larger words were in. I did appreciate the presence of the complete text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at the end. Despite the negatives, I would still recommend this for classroom use or for any child (or adult!) interested in the subject.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Xisa Dove

    The book is a photographic declaration for kids based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Each page contains a human right people should have. It then shows pictures of children and people from different countries and how they live. Each page includes poems from children about human rights. The book is a great tool for a teacher to use in the classroom. Teachers can use this for upper elementary students to teach human rights. Sense the book is made for kids, it makes th The book is a photographic declaration for kids based on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Each page contains a human right people should have. It then shows pictures of children and people from different countries and how they live. Each page includes poems from children about human rights. The book is a great tool for a teacher to use in the classroom. Teachers can use this for upper elementary students to teach human rights. Sense the book is made for kids, it makes the book easy for children to relate to. Children can also get an insight from different people around the world and their culture through the pictures and captions.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    National Geographic. (2008). Every human has rights. Washington D.C.: National Geographic Society. Each of the human rights, simply stated, highlighted with amazing photographs and poetry written by 16 young poetry contest winners. Emotionally, this book filled me up. Each human right stated so clearly, so obviously, so beautifully. It must be shared with students and adults. Passed on and on so the message fills us all and we remember and act accordingly. I will definitely recommend this book to r National Geographic. (2008). Every human has rights. Washington D.C.: National Geographic Society. Each of the human rights, simply stated, highlighted with amazing photographs and poetry written by 16 young poetry contest winners. Emotionally, this book filled me up. Each human right stated so clearly, so obviously, so beautifully. It must be shared with students and adults. Passed on and on so the message fills us all and we remember and act accordingly. I will definitely recommend this book to read aloud and discuss, for classroom work to connect to curriculum and to read all by yourself and ponder for grades two and up.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Yezak

    This is an excellent book to use with children of any age. It helps to begin discussions about what we see as fair and safe for all of us. It gives children a great way to express themselves and see how other kids are thinking and feeling about what is going on in th eworld today. It also forces adults to pause and think about the way we see the world. I recommend this book for anyone who is trying to get a grip on what is going on in the world. Sometimes "out of the mouths of babes" is what wor This is an excellent book to use with children of any age. It helps to begin discussions about what we see as fair and safe for all of us. It gives children a great way to express themselves and see how other kids are thinking and feeling about what is going on in th eworld today. It also forces adults to pause and think about the way we see the world. I recommend this book for anyone who is trying to get a grip on what is going on in the world. Sometimes "out of the mouths of babes" is what works to make adults face up to their responsibilities.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tim Snell

    Genre: Poetry/Non-fiction Copyright: 2009 "Every Human Has Rights" is beautifully put together. The blend of "in-your-face" poetry and text intertwined with deep, rich photography makes this book a must-read. This book describes the 30 rights we as humans are given according to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These 30 rights are described through short verses and poetry submitted by children of many ages. Alongside the text are some amazing photographs, which portray the beauty and dive Genre: Poetry/Non-fiction Copyright: 2009 "Every Human Has Rights" is beautifully put together. The blend of "in-your-face" poetry and text intertwined with deep, rich photography makes this book a must-read. This book describes the 30 rights we as humans are given according to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These 30 rights are described through short verses and poetry submitted by children of many ages. Alongside the text are some amazing photographs, which portray the beauty and diversity the World's population brings.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    maryann at st jacobs asked me to help with books for a team of teachers who are working this summer are producing new units for grade two with a big picture idea for me and my family me and my school me and the comunity me and the global community looking at social role healthy role food safety exercise student role homeless compaing global communities...ie japan privledge or a right to education etc... environment laws... bully safety helping within the community how to be a good global citizen what can yo maryann at st jacobs asked me to help with books for a team of teachers who are working this summer are producing new units for grade two with a big picture idea for me and my family me and my school me and the comunity me and the global community looking at social role healthy role food safety exercise student role homeless compaing global communities...ie japan privledge or a right to education etc... environment laws... bully safety helping within the community how to be a good global citizen what can you do... pull picture books, nonfiction and online sites....

  30. 5 out of 5

    babyhippoface

    The United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights from 1948 is stated in terms simple enough for children to understand. Children’s poetry, in lighter type, expresses their individual feelings about human rights. The striking photographs from the National Geographic Society make manifest the rights the declaration exists to protect. This would be a nice addition to the sociology section of elementary libraries.

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