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Inside the Walls of Troy: A Novel of the Women Who Lived the Trojan War

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Two women, one war. Helen, at age twelve, is not prepared to deal with her famous beauty: to have the face that will launch a thousand ships, kill fifty thousand men, and cause the fall of the world's greatest city. But when she is kidnapped by Theseus of Athens, she begins her journey into womanhood and finds passion strong enough to start the Trojan War. Cassandra has Two women, one war. Helen, at age twelve, is not prepared to deal with her famous beauty: to have the face that will launch a thousand ships, kill fifty thousand men, and cause the fall of the world's greatest city. But when she is kidnapped by Theseus of Athens, she begins her journey into womanhood and finds passion strong enough to start the Trojan War. Cassandra has the gift, or curse, to predict the future. When she forsees the ruin of her family and city that Helen's arrival in Troy will cause, she is outraged. Yet she cannot help being drawn to Helen. As the war rages around them, Helen, the woman who started the conflict, and Cassandra, the one who foresaw it, develop a deep friendship. And through their eyes we see the Trojan War in a fascinating new way.


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Two women, one war. Helen, at age twelve, is not prepared to deal with her famous beauty: to have the face that will launch a thousand ships, kill fifty thousand men, and cause the fall of the world's greatest city. But when she is kidnapped by Theseus of Athens, she begins her journey into womanhood and finds passion strong enough to start the Trojan War. Cassandra has Two women, one war. Helen, at age twelve, is not prepared to deal with her famous beauty: to have the face that will launch a thousand ships, kill fifty thousand men, and cause the fall of the world's greatest city. But when she is kidnapped by Theseus of Athens, she begins her journey into womanhood and finds passion strong enough to start the Trojan War. Cassandra has the gift, or curse, to predict the future. When she forsees the ruin of her family and city that Helen's arrival in Troy will cause, she is outraged. Yet she cannot help being drawn to Helen. As the war rages around them, Helen, the woman who started the conflict, and Cassandra, the one who foresaw it, develop a deep friendship. And through their eyes we see the Trojan War in a fascinating new way.

30 review for Inside the Walls of Troy: A Novel of the Women Who Lived the Trojan War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Definitely one of the books that shaped my 10 year old self. Cassandra and I just vibed man. Looking at the GR reviews, this book is pretty controversial: love it or hate it. But I’m sorry to everyone who hates this book, because (to quote Eugene Lee Yang): Definitely one of the books that shaped my 10 year old self. Cassandra and I just vibed man. Looking at the GR reviews, this book is pretty controversial: love it or hate it. But I’m sorry to everyone who hates this book, because (to quote Eugene Lee Yang):

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Vomit. Unfortunately I have to teach this book to 7th graders this upcoming school year and I'm NOT a fan! I don't know if it's because I really don't appreciate Greek mythology and all that or if it really is the book but it was told from Helen and Cassandra's point of views (which I suppose is a nice change of pace from the usual Trojan war battle book) and the plot encompassed a decade or two which forced it to speed along so quickly (in just 190 pages) that it left no room for character deve Vomit. Unfortunately I have to teach this book to 7th graders this upcoming school year and I'm NOT a fan! I don't know if it's because I really don't appreciate Greek mythology and all that or if it really is the book but it was told from Helen and Cassandra's point of views (which I suppose is a nice change of pace from the usual Trojan war battle book) and the plot encompassed a decade or two which forced it to speed along so quickly (in just 190 pages) that it left no room for character development or any of the things that make most books worth reading. It really read as more of a summary, and not a very good one at that. Additionally, I'm now frightened of teaching this book to my male students because there was entirely too much 'lovey dovey' stuff (short tunics, muscular thighs, golden haired god-like men) and no 'boy stuff' until the last ten pages when someone finally gets dragged behind a chariot and by that point you're so bored by the book you practically cheer. Why am I giving it two stars? In the hopes that in teaching it it will grow on me but somehow I doubt it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marybeth

    This book was like my favorite book when I was younger. I'm almost scared to go back and read it because I don't want to tarnish what enjoyment I have of it. Obviously there are some pitfalls, like cramming 10 years into ~200 pages. However, I really think this book is fascinating because it focuses on two characters who, despite the fact that one of them is sort of the primary cause of the war, rarely get to exercise their own voice within the canon. I think there are more similarities between This book was like my favorite book when I was younger. I'm almost scared to go back and read it because I don't want to tarnish what enjoyment I have of it. Obviously there are some pitfalls, like cramming 10 years into ~200 pages. However, I really think this book is fascinating because it focuses on two characters who, despite the fact that one of them is sort of the primary cause of the war, rarely get to exercise their own voice within the canon. I think there are more similarities between Cassandra and Helen than perhaps first apparent. I did love this book as a kid so I'm interested in seeing what I would think of it upon a re-read. Edit: so upon reread I'm basically of the estimation that you can read better novelizations of the Trojan war but as far as YA retellings go this one is pretty decent. It's pretty simplistic though but it doesn't do anything too strange and for the most part the characterization is consistent (even if I personally don't agree with it).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I loved this book as a kid. Looking back on it now I think it gave me some serious sapphic vibes before I even recognized that as a thing??? I’d love to reread it as an adult and see what I feel.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    I'd give it a 3.5 if I could. It was neat to read while teaching the Iliad and Odyssey. However, I think the scope was a bit much for a book that was less than 200 pages. I liked digging into Helen and Cassandra's characters a bit more, but it was rather rushed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    It’s good. 😎

  7. 4 out of 5

    J

    This was one book that I came across by accident and I was intrigued by the fact that it offered to give what could have been a female point-of-view for a time of history where women didn't have point-of-views. And when I read it I did fall in love with the story of the book more than the accuracy or the timeframe that it is represents. The characters were given more personality than we actually meet in the actual Greek mythoi but although Helen started off to being someone that you wanted to k This was one book that I came across by accident and I was intrigued by the fact that it offered to give what could have been a female point-of-view for a time of history where women didn't have point-of-views. And when I read it I did fall in love with the story of the book more than the accuracy or the timeframe that it is represents. The characters were given more personality than we actually meet in the actual Greek mythoi but although Helen started off to being someone that you wanted to know more about it was in the second part of the book, Cassandra's point-of-view, where Helen actually ended up as she did in the tales of the mythoi - almost with no personality, bland and hard to really get a hold of. Instead I am pleased with the way that Cassandra turned out for she was always the one that seemed to have need of her story being told but in the original tales she was the one that just like any other outcast of society gets shoved to the side even as she struggles to make her presence known. The author also did a good job to go into some of the particulars and customs of the timeframe but since it isn't a historical book I wouldn't use it as a basis of research for the study. Furthermore she gave a general idea of the beliefs while I loved how she wove the stories of what the Ancients thought about their deities into the story without the actual deities entering and taking over the story thus leaving the story human. All in all this is a beautiful book to read about what may have been for the lesser known gender in an event of time where the world didn't think twice about them and the powerful force that love can lead to. It is also a story of how women have had to gather as friends and allies so that they may survive in a world where a choice wasn't given them but a demand that they conform.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Arianna

    No, I just can't. Ugh. I got this book from my local bookstore (Thank god, it only cost 50 cents.)I gave this book a review of 2/5 stars. The only thing that kept this book from receiving a 1, was because at some points of the story drew me in. The reasons why i didn't like this book was because things were left UNANSWERED. The author would talk about how someone ended up dead but not told by whom. Believe me, i reread parts trying to figure out who killed who. It only happened about 1 time towa No, I just can't. Ugh. I got this book from my local bookstore (Thank god, it only cost 50 cents.)I gave this book a review of 2/5 stars. The only thing that kept this book from receiving a 1, was because at some points of the story drew me in. The reasons why i didn't like this book was because things were left UNANSWERED. The author would talk about how someone ended up dead but not told by whom. Believe me, i reread parts trying to figure out who killed who. It only happened about 1 time towards the end of the book but still it drove me crazy. Also, the book wasn't very descriptive. I wanted to know what everything looks like and the landscape. But no! Next, i am a grammar Nazi and if you are like me, THIS BOOK ISN'T FOR YOU! OMG! I had such a hard time contrasting who was being compared because there were NO COMMAS. Lastly, the thing that drove me the most insane. I couldn't tell who was talking or when the girl would snap out of her visions. I thought she was still in her dream when she called Helen a whore, but when i reread it a few times, she said it right in front of Helen. That was a first impression. Me: Hey you! Yeah you right there! You're a whore! Them: ... Me: Lets be friends! Them: OK! Lets forget that you called me a whore the first time you saw me! Thats basically what the books about. Just say yourself the time and effort. Don't get this book but if you really want to get the book, go to a used bookstore because its not worth all the money it would cost you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Finlay

    This book brings the reader face to face with the harsh reality of life in the exciting, heroic, mythical time of the ancient Greeks: women were excluded. They did not make their own decisions or decide their own fate. In this book, the choices that men do not make for Helen or Cassandra, the heroes, are decreed by the gods. This is the best example I've seen of an author trying to breathe life into the silent women of antiquity and imagining what they would have attempted to do to control their This book brings the reader face to face with the harsh reality of life in the exciting, heroic, mythical time of the ancient Greeks: women were excluded. They did not make their own decisions or decide their own fate. In this book, the choices that men do not make for Helen or Cassandra, the heroes, are decreed by the gods. This is the best example I've seen of an author trying to breathe life into the silent women of antiquity and imagining what they would have attempted to do to control their own lives, within the extremely narrow limits set by their society. Helen and Cassandra are very different from each other, but you end up respecting them both for doing their best to find happiness and protect their families. This book would make an excellent counterpoint to a study of the Greek myths or epics, or to a history unit to remind students that yes, women DID exist in ancient times, we just don't hear about them.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Zoe T

    100% one of the most influential books of my early childhood. I had an illustrated children's book of the Iliad as a wee child, but as might be expected, it glossed lightly over Helen and barely touched on Cassandra, much like my later Greek mythology book which did get a little into what happened Cassandra post-war. But this book gave me a Helen who was thoroughly understandable, a girl whose beauty turned her into an object instead of a person in the eyes of many, and it gave me a Cassandra wh 100% one of the most influential books of my early childhood. I had an illustrated children's book of the Iliad as a wee child, but as might be expected, it glossed lightly over Helen and barely touched on Cassandra, much like my later Greek mythology book which did get a little into what happened Cassandra post-war. But this book gave me a Helen who was thoroughly understandable, a girl whose beauty turned her into an object instead of a person in the eyes of many, and it gave me a Cassandra who was angry but sympathetic and a friendship between them that is deeply important to me even now. It also gave me a way to hope for Cassandra's happy ending, and was definitely the book that kick-started my Cassandra-obsession.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Naveen Mina

    I am a fan of mythology and I had a huge crush on Achilles back in high school when he was first introduced to us. Brad Pitt killed that fantasy for me... I didn't like this book much. It was good to read and was well-written... but I guess I was just looking for more mud slinging from the women... but then again... that must have been the man in me. I should know that women would rather keep their silence than make a fist and end a fight.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    I bought this book when I was probably 9 years old and I fell in love with it. I think I've read it more than 10 times and it's also one of the books with the most worn out cover in my book shelf. It's a great take on the Trojan war and it has a lot of romance. I really recommend it to the people who love Greek mythology as much as I do!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I picked this up at the library as a young teen. I've always been interested in mythology and Ancient Greece in particular. Though it was quite a long time ago now, I remember being completely pulled in by the stories. To see such an epic event from the perspective of young women, not much older than myself at the time, was enthralling. I knew the summary of this story and knew of Helen and Cassandra. But this book gave me another side of it. My impression of Helen and Cassandra shifted as a res I picked this up at the library as a young teen. I've always been interested in mythology and Ancient Greece in particular. Though it was quite a long time ago now, I remember being completely pulled in by the stories. To see such an epic event from the perspective of young women, not much older than myself at the time, was enthralling. I knew the summary of this story and knew of Helen and Cassandra. But this book gave me another side of it. My impression of Helen and Cassandra shifted as a result. This was an interesting experience for me as a young person because it allowed me to see how viewing a story through another's eyes changed my understanding. That's a good lesson to learn! I'm sure if I read it now, with all that I've learned since, I would have a different experience. That's life! But Inside the Walls of Troy did make an impression on me and fanned the flame of my interest in all things Ancient Greece.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marlee

    Ickkkkk. When I put this on my TBR some five years ago, I thought it was YA. I didn't realize it was elementary/middle grade until it showed up in the mail a few weeks ago. I have no problem reading well-written middle grade fic, but this is...not. And the worst part is, it would've been SO MUCH BETTER if it was aimed at a slightly higher age range. It's just the story of the Trojan War. That's it. I was hoping the unique POV would add a more entertaining perspective, but it didn't. In fact, hav Ickkkkk. When I put this on my TBR some five years ago, I thought it was YA. I didn't realize it was elementary/middle grade until it showed up in the mail a few weeks ago. I have no problem reading well-written middle grade fic, but this is...not. And the worst part is, it would've been SO MUCH BETTER if it was aimed at a slightly higher age range. It's just the story of the Trojan War. That's it. I was hoping the unique POV would add a more entertaining perspective, but it didn't. In fact, having the characters removed from the action and simply report back on the literally age-old plot developments made it boring as hell. Plus, none of the characters were developed enough for interesting things to happen to them. And I could live with that just fine. It's not even 200 pages. I've stuck with boring books longer than that. It was a good idea, poorly executed. Except... that wasn't the awkward part. Oh no. The awkward part was the constant PG13 sex talk. I've never read anything like this in my life. It was simultaneously overt bedroom talk and veiled innuendos. I have no idea what the author was going for here. It was already uncomfortable enough marrying off a twelve-year-old to a man in his 30's (I know, I know, historical accuracy, but the beginning of my reading challenge is curiously riddled with pedophilia), why do you have to throw in all this "how to please your husband in bed" nonsense? It's got to raise questions with the 10-12 year olds this was aimed for, and it makes it painful for any adults who happen upon it. Again, if this was YA, where the sexual and violent overtones could be properly explored, and the characters were old enough to actually HAVE sex, this would be a much better book. As it currently stands, it's embarrassing, messy, and unbelievably boring.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Webajeb

    YA book about Helen of Troy as a young girl (12) and the events of the next few years. It was ok. I'd like it to have had more details about the battles and the way they lived then. It was from Helen's perspective (and later, Cassandra) so they only watched battles from the tops of the walls. Women were not privy to much info in those days either so there was a lot of rumor and speculation going on in the women's quarters.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Graciella

    This book was summer reading for a sixth grade history class and I absolutely LOVED it. I reread it multiple times in middle school, and it helped develop my interest in Greek mythology. Looking back on it now, I appreciate its portrayal of women's perspectives during this story which is so frequently male-centered to an extreme degree. When I read each in middle school, I liked this one a lot better than Waiting for Odysseus, the The Odyssey adaptation paired with this The Iliad adaptation, and This book was summer reading for a sixth grade history class and I absolutely LOVED it. I reread it multiple times in middle school, and it helped develop my interest in Greek mythology. Looking back on it now, I appreciate its portrayal of women's perspectives during this story which is so frequently male-centered to an extreme degree. When I read each in middle school, I liked this one a lot better than Waiting for Odysseus, the The Odyssey adaptation paired with this The Iliad adaptation, and I don't think I even finished Waiting for Odysseus even though it was effectively the sequel to a book I loved so much. Highly recommend for middle schoolers! I would say that based on the reading difficulty it could also be good for slightly younger children, but if I remember there is some slight (very, very slight - a fifth/sixth grade level) mention of sex. But I recommend it for middle schoolers, and I think it would be extra interesting for children who like Greek mythology or adaptations of it geared towards children, like The Lightning Thief or the Disney Hercules movie.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bailey

    A very accessible (especially younger teens) version of the Trojan cycle through the lens of Helen and Cassandra. It cuts out the sex which is refreshing, as most depictions of Helen and Paris is based on sex. Unfortunately, another version of the Trojan War stories that cousin-zones Patroclus and Achilles.(They weren't the focus, only mentioned in passing, but still.)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chanel Sharp

    What can mom and I say? It was good. Someone of the historical elements were interesting. Epsically since mom took Ancient Greece in High School. It was a nice blast from the past, but the story was not one that completely absorbed mom in. It just was not her complete cup of tea. Give it a try if interested, but it is not a must.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Martin

    Not a memorable book. Not at all! UGH!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    An easy read and nice retelling of this story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scarlet Guy

    - omophobic! Patroclus is not Achilles’ cousin smh - Also why is Polyxena going to the Greek camp - BRUH ACHILLES’ HEEL THING IS POST HOMERIC AND THIS IS SET IN THE ILIAD? NAH - this ain’t it

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gipsey

    I had to read this book for school. It was entertaining enough for me to not be bored the entire time however it did not make me want to pick up another book by this author.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Helen was a beutiful princess of Sparta who was known for being the most beutiful girl in the worl and for her father been the most powerful Greek God named Zeus. She had been kidnapped at the age of twelve by the Athenian legendary warrior Theseus that had defeated the half man half bull from Crete. When she was rescued she was to be married right away for fear that she would be kidnapped again. So twelve princes were gathered from all around Greece. The father of Helen and king of all of Spar Helen was a beutiful princess of Sparta who was known for being the most beutiful girl in the worl and for her father been the most powerful Greek God named Zeus. She had been kidnapped at the age of twelve by the Athenian legendary warrior Theseus that had defeated the half man half bull from Crete. When she was rescued she was to be married right away for fear that she would be kidnapped again. So twelve princes were gathered from all around Greece. The father of Helen and king of all of Sparta was afraid that if he chose one that war would rage on Sparta because of his daughters beuty. So he made the twelve princes swear an oath that they would support the prince that would be chosen. After, Menalous a important prince was chosen. Menalous was rich because his brother Agamemnon was king of most of Greece. The years passed and Helen had a girl with Menelaus and they both became king and queen of allof Sparta. Although Helen didn't love Menelous she did as he pleased because she loved her daughter and didn't want to dishonor her kingdom. One day Menalous had invited a handsome prince from Troy to his kingdom. The princes name was Paris. Helen had fallen in love with him and so had he. So they ran way to Troy. When Menalous found out that his wife was missing he summoned a war against Troy with the help of his brother and the princes that had sworn the oath a long time ago. To support the husband of the Great Helen of Sparta. A great war began and a great warrior that was said to be son of the God of War participated in the war. His name was Achelles. But then he had refused to serve his king for not showing mercy on young me as he did. Paris brother Hector air to the thrown of Troy fought Achelles or atleast he thought he did. Achelles couzin Patroclus had taken his armor and fought in the way Achelles taught him. Making it look like he was Achelles. Achelles avenged his couzins death by killing Hector and Hector was avenged by being killed by a arrow that Paris had shot. But Achelles death was avenged by Menalaus that killed Paris. Thats when the city of Troy was weak and was in conquered by the Greeks. I think that this book is interesting because it is about a important war in history. I also think thats it's interesting because it tells us the great warriors that were in Greece and Troy and what they believed in. I give this book five stars and recommened this book to anyone and hope that they read it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A sympathetic view of Helen! And a sympathetic view of Menelaus too, come to that. I liked the idea that Helen taking Hermione with her when she ran away was what broke Menelaus's heart and really triggered the war. I mean, obviously he had to go after Helen, but turning him into a devoted father was a nice touch, because otherwise he comes across as this burly oppressive husband who goes storming after his woman when she dares to stray. All the characters were slightly different to how they're A sympathetic view of Helen! And a sympathetic view of Menelaus too, come to that. I liked the idea that Helen taking Hermione with her when she ran away was what broke Menelaus's heart and really triggered the war. I mean, obviously he had to go after Helen, but turning him into a devoted father was a nice touch, because otherwise he comes across as this burly oppressive husband who goes storming after his woman when she dares to stray. All the characters were slightly different to how they're normally portrayed, I thought? Like Andromache being a snob because she thinks being Hector's wife makes her better than all the other women. Yet you still feel sympathy for her by the end. Paris will always be a cad, however. I also liked that Helen and Cassandra became friends despite being so different, and that the focus of this story was obviously the women. The one thing I simply couldn't get my head around was Odysseus being described as short, broad-shouldered, and sandy-haired. My imagine of him is based on the illustrated novels of The Iliad and The Odyssey by Tony Robinson. So he's small, yes, but he doesn't have broad shoulders because he's a weed compared to all the big muscley men like Ajax and Menelaus who compete for Helen's hand. And he has dark curls. This is way off the point, I know, but I just get so irrationally bothered by this! It's not MY Odysseus. (But as the story is about Helen and Cassandra, not Odysseus, I guess I can live with it.)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bennett

    "Inside the Walls of Troy" by Clemence McLaren tells the story of the Trojan War and the events leading up to the war. Helen is kidnapped by Theseus, the ruler of Athens, because of her beauty, but through Theseus, Helen learns that her only value lies in her beauty and her only goal in life should be to be a good wife. Theseus tells Helen she must transform herself into exactly what her husband wants her to be, giving up her own identity in the process. Eventually Helen is given to Menelaus, br "Inside the Walls of Troy" by Clemence McLaren tells the story of the Trojan War and the events leading up to the war. Helen is kidnapped by Theseus, the ruler of Athens, because of her beauty, but through Theseus, Helen learns that her only value lies in her beauty and her only goal in life should be to be a good wife. Theseus tells Helen she must transform herself into exactly what her husband wants her to be, giving up her own identity in the process. Eventually Helen is given to Menelaus, brother to the great King Agamemnon, because he is the wealthiest and most powerful of her suitors. Helen has come to look at her beauty is a burden because it prevents her from being allowed to make her own decisions and choose the path of her own life, but Helen begins to appreciate her life with Menelaus because she realizes that he really does love her. Although, she falls in love with Paris of Troy which starts a war with her two suitors. This book is suspenseful when Helen was kidnapped by Theseus because I wasn’t sure if she was going to be okay, and you didn’t know if Theseus’s intentions were to marry her without his consent. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a teenager and who likes realistic fiction because it is a mature book, and it is nice to imagine if the story could happen.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Juke

    I would've given it 2 1/2 stars, but I'm not sure how. In the book, they describe Helen of Troy as being beautiful on the inside and out. However, she ends up being very unattractive on the outside, based on the front cover, to the point where it's like they'd make fun of characters that look like that for being ugly on the outside. She's not exactly completely pretty on the inside, either. While she's pretty for the MOST part, a decision she makes isn't exactly very pretty, which is how the who I would've given it 2 1/2 stars, but I'm not sure how. In the book, they describe Helen of Troy as being beautiful on the inside and out. However, she ends up being very unattractive on the outside, based on the front cover, to the point where it's like they'd make fun of characters that look like that for being ugly on the outside. She's not exactly completely pretty on the inside, either. While she's pretty for the MOST part, a decision she makes isn't exactly very pretty, which is how the whole plot of the book forms. The way she causes the war in this book is a little different in a trashy sort of way than it is in the normal stories of the Trojan War. The character she's chosen to marry in the beginning seems like a very unlikable idiot that gets drunk off his rear, is arrogant, is spoiled, and is a big baby about things. The 2nd part of the book features a character that's supposed to be able to predict the future, along with her twin, which is interesting. She also makes a humorous point in a satirical way (satirical today, anyways) about Mount Olympus and the Greek mythological gods, goddesses, and demi-gods, along with the demi-goddesses. The end is a little different than expected, which is interesting, but, at the same time, makes you wish it was different. This book also seems a little like it was written by a feminist author, which is annoying.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily Akelaitis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I feel that this book took a long time to get started. The beginning of the book is about the most beautiful girl in all the world:Helen. Many men wanted her as their wife. At the age of 13, Helen was married off to a Greek prince named Menelaus. She then runs off with a man named Paris as Aphrodite had promised him. This was all in part one of the book. I would have liked to have read more from Helen's point of view. The next 2/3 of the book shift to a young lady named Cassandra. Legend says th I feel that this book took a long time to get started. The beginning of the book is about the most beautiful girl in all the world:Helen. Many men wanted her as their wife. At the age of 13, Helen was married off to a Greek prince named Menelaus. She then runs off with a man named Paris as Aphrodite had promised him. This was all in part one of the book. I would have liked to have read more from Helen's point of view. The next 2/3 of the book shift to a young lady named Cassandra. Legend says that Cassandra and her brother, Helenus, were licked by Apollo's serpents as young children. This cursed them with Apollos gift of seeing into the future. She and her brother are living in Troy when Helen and Paris arrive. Helen's leaving of her husband sparked the Trojan War. I personally am not sure if this is how the war really started off, but I like it! Unfortunately, the famous Trojan horse doesn't come into the story uniil the last four chapters of the book, and we all know how the war ends.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristyn

    This book lke Goddess of Yesterday, talks about the Trojan war and how it started. But this book is told from the point of view of Helen. It is her life story starting from when she was only a little girl at the age of 12 and how she was kidnapped to the end of the Trojan war. This book was also very good because it was interestng to learn what a woman's lfe was like during that time. This book portrays Helen differently form the book before. In this book Helen is a child who is scared and who b This book lke Goddess of Yesterday, talks about the Trojan war and how it started. But this book is told from the point of view of Helen. It is her life story starting from when she was only a little girl at the age of 12 and how she was kidnapped to the end of the Trojan war. This book was also very good because it was interestng to learn what a woman's lfe was like during that time. This book portrays Helen differently form the book before. In this book Helen is a child who is scared and who becomes a beautiful and wise queen. Helen is seen as a great person and she is loved by everyone becuase she is so kind and generous. All of these books show her as a different person. These books made me wonder what she was really like. Again this book is a great book to read if you want to learn about the Trojan war.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Short & Sweet: I've always loved reading about the Trojan War, so I was excited to read this older title. We start the book off with Helen who doesn't want to be blessed with the beauty she has and tries to be content until Paris shows up. Paris confides that he won a wager for her love, but she cannot help herself and leaves both her husband and daughter behind to be with him. Which is how the Trojan War begins. Cassandra tries her best to hate Helen, who she has forseen to ruin their lives and Short & Sweet: I've always loved reading about the Trojan War, so I was excited to read this older title. We start the book off with Helen who doesn't want to be blessed with the beauty she has and tries to be content until Paris shows up. Paris confides that he won a wager for her love, but she cannot help herself and leaves both her husband and daughter behind to be with him. Which is how the Trojan War begins. Cassandra tries her best to hate Helen, who she has forseen to ruin their lives and the reason behind which most of her brothers will perish. But Helen has a beautiful heart along with a her own beauty and the two women find themselves as friends in the end. This was quite an enjoyable read and I loved the romance of the novel and how it was written. Final Verdict: Highly suggested for those who love mythology and tales of the Trojan War.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tori

    2004- We've heard the male version of the Trojan War for centuries. What about the women involved? How did Helen feel? What would it have been like to be Cassandra and have to watch your brothers head off into battle? The author takes you there. While personally I believe she could have included even more viewpoints of other women, and switched back and forth between Helen and Cassandra, the author opted to start with Helen's life as a child and switch to Cassandra's viewpoint after Helen arrive 2004- We've heard the male version of the Trojan War for centuries. What about the women involved? How did Helen feel? What would it have been like to be Cassandra and have to watch your brothers head off into battle? The author takes you there. While personally I believe she could have included even more viewpoints of other women, and switched back and forth between Helen and Cassandra, the author opted to start with Helen's life as a child and switch to Cassandra's viewpoint after Helen arrives in Troy. While many would think this would make the book a bit unbalanced, it actually works quite well, as we see Cassandra's feelings towards Helen greatly change over the many years Troy is under siege. Overall, a pretty enjoyable read.

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