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Understanding Grammar for Powerful Communication (The Modern Scholar: Way with Words, Vol. 3)

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30 review for Understanding Grammar for Powerful Communication (The Modern Scholar: Way with Words, Vol. 3)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne Hawn Smith

    This is so good! I've read it before and finally got my own copy. It's interesting and entertaining. I used it with my 13 year old granddaughter whom I am homeschooling. She enjoyed the humor and the fast pace of the lectures and it helped her get a good overview of the subject. This is so good! I've read it before and finally got my own copy. It's interesting and entertaining. I used it with my 13 year old granddaughter whom I am homeschooling. She enjoyed the humor and the fast pace of the lectures and it helped her get a good overview of the subject.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter Bradley

    Please give a helpful vote to my review on Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-re... I had been putting off listening to this course because although I had purchased it with the idea that learning more about grammar might be useful, I felt certain that it would be a long slog. Totally wrong. Professor Drout is an engaging and informative educator. He is, to be honest, extremely funny. I found myself eager to listen to the lectures, and along the way I found myself learning quite a bit, suc Please give a helpful vote to my review on Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-re... I had been putting off listening to this course because although I had purchased it with the idea that learning more about grammar might be useful, I felt certain that it would be a long slog. Totally wrong. Professor Drout is an engaging and informative educator. He is, to be honest, extremely funny. I found myself eager to listen to the lectures, and along the way I found myself learning quite a bit, such as how to avoid the dreaded comma splice in this sentence by putting a comma before the "and." I've listened to Drout's courses on Anglo-Saxon history and the history of the English language. Both were equally entertaining and informative. Drout puts his ample knowledge of the history of language to good use by using history to explain why seemingly arbitrary rules of English grammar exist. For example, I remember being a young lawyer and spending some time puzzling over the expression "If I were you." Every logical circuit in my brain said that it should obviously be "if I was you," and, yet. I knew that was somehow wrong. Eventually, I discovered that this was an example of the "subjunctive mood." However, it wasn't until Drout that I learned that the "were" of this sentence is a fossil from the Old English subjunctive system and represents a word that language used to express a conditional state. Everything else is gone, but this one word remains. Fascinating. Likewise, I finally know what a dangling participle is. Drout offers much information and lots of good advice. Besides, he's really funny. If you have any interest in language or writing, this is a great lecture series to listen to.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lucas Michael

    Buy the book! Professor will never disappoint you!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Johnson

    This audio course is for anyone who has ever suffered from grammar anxiety. Prof. Drout gives special dispensation to place prepositions at the end of sentences, to use split infinitives, and conjunctions at the beginning of sentences. He also gives you a solid defense against those grammar sticklers that make others fret over syntax: “keep your imported Latin grammar rules to yourself!” Thanks to Prof. Drout I now understand how to correctly use “I” and “me,” “that” and “which,” “who” and “whom. This audio course is for anyone who has ever suffered from grammar anxiety. Prof. Drout gives special dispensation to place prepositions at the end of sentences, to use split infinitives, and conjunctions at the beginning of sentences. He also gives you a solid defense against those grammar sticklers that make others fret over syntax: “keep your imported Latin grammar rules to yourself!” Thanks to Prof. Drout I now understand how to correctly use “I” and “me,” “that” and “which,” “who” and “whom.” With generous references to the history of our exquisite language and a delightful sense of humor, Prof. Drout makes all the grammar worries go away. You’ll understand why parts of our language are strange and confusing, and gain a new appreciation for those trying to learn English as a second language. Prof. Drout reads excerpts from Beowulf and Chaucer, so you’ll hear the musical roots of our wonderful language. He explains that the evolution of English is more about conquerors, and less about scholarly progression. He discusses past scholars who have declared Latin the perfect language and, therefore, tried to force English to conform to Latin grammar. This has resulted is some of the most frustrating aspects of English. He explains that English grammar is an art, not a science. For this reason, he rails against grammar checkers, “let those Seattle trolls keep their green squiggly lines to themselves.” I highly recommend this course. You’ll actually understand what a participle is and why it shouldn’t dangle. You’ll comprehend gerunds, infinitives, and modals. Not only will you gain a solid command of English, but it happens in just 7 hours; that’s amazing!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robert Delikat

    I have always given top ratings to Michael D.C. Drout's entries in the Modern Scholar series. Not this one. Before reading it, I wondered exactly how much grammar could be packed into 8 hours of lecture. The answer is more than I expected and less. Drout includes a lot of history of the English language in a number of the early chapters. He defines many English constructs that do not need defining or clarification and glosses over parts of speech that could have received more attention. It is obv I have always given top ratings to Michael D.C. Drout's entries in the Modern Scholar series. Not this one. Before reading it, I wondered exactly how much grammar could be packed into 8 hours of lecture. The answer is more than I expected and less. Drout includes a lot of history of the English language in a number of the early chapters. He defines many English constructs that do not need defining or clarification and glosses over parts of speech that could have received more attention. It is obvious that he took much of the content of these lectures from other lectures on other subjects. Having read a fair amount of Drout, I have found that he does this a lot. It's almost like filler that he could have taken the time and space to use more prudently. Drout is on an ego trip and totally taken up by himself in these lectures. The botom line is that I would not recommend this book. If you are interested in English grammar, get Mignon Fogarty's Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing. It is fun and a masterpiece in writing. Or, if you are a podcast kind of person, subscribe to Grammar Girl's: Grammar Girl Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing on iTunes. It doesn't get any better than this. I'd give Grammar Girl 10 stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David “Skip” Everling

    More interesting than it might look at first glance, particularly for students like myself who learned grammar and all the intimidating terminology (e.g. dangling participles, comma splicing) while I was still too young to know why I should care, or how to put that knowledge into a meaningful context. Hearing the same material directed at a ready & able adult audience makes a substantial difference, away from rote memorization into comprehension and everyday utility. There are some lectures that More interesting than it might look at first glance, particularly for students like myself who learned grammar and all the intimidating terminology (e.g. dangling participles, comma splicing) while I was still too young to know why I should care, or how to put that knowledge into a meaningful context. Hearing the same material directed at a ready & able adult audience makes a substantial difference, away from rote memorization into comprehension and everyday utility. There are some lectures that get somewhat dry because they're necessarily diving into the formal foundation of English grammar, but after listening to the entire course you can see how that material is meaningful for a robust higher-level analysis. I liked the sociological commentary on English as a cross-cultural language in the final lecture, on accents & identity and cultural communication. Not least this course is a good English refresher, probably especially useful for non-native English speakers, but likely to be informative for even highly educated speakers.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Audio book (lectures) I would like to understand the actual rules and terms for the grammar that I do know and employ successfully and would like to learn more about grammar rules that I don't use successfully. Also, I'm listening to this in the hope that I will get any, even small, piece of information that might help my own writing and the quest to write great sentences. Because even something small in that regard would make the eight hours of listening worthwhile. An hour in and I can say that Audio book (lectures) I would like to understand the actual rules and terms for the grammar that I do know and employ successfully and would like to learn more about grammar rules that I don't use successfully. Also, I'm listening to this in the hope that I will get any, even small, piece of information that might help my own writing and the quest to write great sentences. Because even something small in that regard would make the eight hours of listening worthwhile. An hour in and I can say that its relatively enjoyable and interesting. Upon finishing this I can say that I did learn some useful things and overall it was an engaging and interesting listen. His method was such that he wanted the listener to understand the why behind grammar rules and as such there was much history of the English language here. I would recommend this to anyone who thinks grammar is interesting but who is not already expert.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I enjoyed a lot of the lecture that covers the origins of current English language and grammar as it's spoken and written from middle English. This is more of an understanding the underlying rules of English and an explanation of the changes and options. Some of the lectures points and emphasis are: jokes on the red panda's representation, Lynn Truss's opinions on grammar usage, Oxford Grammarians, seemingly trivial rules such as ending a sentence in a preposition was allowed in the English langu I enjoyed a lot of the lecture that covers the origins of current English language and grammar as it's spoken and written from middle English. This is more of an understanding the underlying rules of English and an explanation of the changes and options. Some of the lectures points and emphasis are: jokes on the red panda's representation, Lynn Truss's opinions on grammar usage, Oxford Grammarians, seemingly trivial rules such as ending a sentence in a preposition was allowed in the English language, but it is incorrect in Latin, a semicolon is equal to a comma plus an and, passive voice can be used unless you're a grammar maven, and much discussion on why fish could be written as G-H-O-S-H-I, by representing the phonetic sounds of "f" written as "gh"(like its use in laugh), "i" written as "o"(like it's use in women), sh(standard), and "i"(silent).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Wait a sec...did he just make an Airplane joke in the middle of a grammar lecture? How on earth is he making me laugh out loud while I'm by myself during a fricking grammar lecture? Also, the sound producer gets major bonus points for a well timed bleep (whether it was actually censoring a curse word or not). The opening sections are great. I'm now interested in hearing the whole history of the English language lecture. But it really starts to drag during the second half when it gets down to the Wait a sec...did he just make an Airplane joke in the middle of a grammar lecture? How on earth is he making me laugh out loud while I'm by myself during a fricking grammar lecture? Also, the sound producer gets major bonus points for a well timed bleep (whether it was actually censoring a curse word or not). The opening sections are great. I'm now interested in hearing the whole history of the English language lecture. But it really starts to drag during the second half when it gets down to the nuts and bolts of grammar. Four for the first half and two for the second half averages to three.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Edwin B

    This is yet another audiobook on grammar, but different; it tells how the conventions on syntax and punctuation came to be, and how arbitrary some of the rules are. And so you learn from Drout that it's OK to break some of them, such as, you can split your infinitive ("To boldy go where..."), and you can end your sentence with a preposition ("To be or not to be..."). Words, phrases, clauses and sentences, and how you string them together with punctuation to make sense, these are what Drout teach This is yet another audiobook on grammar, but different; it tells how the conventions on syntax and punctuation came to be, and how arbitrary some of the rules are. And so you learn from Drout that it's OK to break some of them, such as, you can split your infinitive ("To boldy go where..."), and you can end your sentence with a preposition ("To be or not to be..."). Words, phrases, clauses and sentences, and how you string them together with punctuation to make sense, these are what Drout teaches in these lectures.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Payam

    Take a break and improve your English! Professor Drout's book digs deep into the English language to explain its nuances that have accumulated over time. He provides theories and analysis to explain how language evolves and why certain grammatical structures are required. You may seldom worry about grammar or how you write, but it can definitely be worthwhile to listen and learn a bit about English, which you use all the time but spend little time mastering. Take a break and improve your English! Professor Drout's book digs deep into the English language to explain its nuances that have accumulated over time. He provides theories and analysis to explain how language evolves and why certain grammatical structures are required. You may seldom worry about grammar or how you write, but it can definitely be worthwhile to listen and learn a bit about English, which you use all the time but spend little time mastering.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steve Coughlan

    I learned that my obsession with commas in a list (particularly before the last element) is trivial, and more a matter of house style than formal rules (apparently, I'm an Oxfordian). I learned why the past tense of "is" is "was". I learned that transformational grammar isn't too intimidating, and appears to have much in common with what I learned about describing programming languages many years ago. I learned tons, and it was great fun to boot. I learned that my obsession with commas in a list (particularly before the last element) is trivial, and more a matter of house style than formal rules (apparently, I'm an Oxfordian). I learned why the past tense of "is" is "was". I learned that transformational grammar isn't too intimidating, and appears to have much in common with what I learned about describing programming languages many years ago. I learned tons, and it was great fun to boot.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    I really like Professor Drout's other lectures, but this was my least favorite. He does give some interesting historical background on how we got some of our grammar rules, and why some of them don't make sense, but as a method for learning grammar I didn't find his transformational grammar to be helpful. I really like Professor Drout's other lectures, but this was my least favorite. He does give some interesting historical background on how we got some of our grammar rules, and why some of them don't make sense, but as a method for learning grammar I didn't find his transformational grammar to be helpful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kendel Christensen

    Professor Drout is amazing! The history of the English language and parts of the verb section were a little boring, but the ENTIRE rest of the book was COMPLETELY ENGAGING! I learned SO much about the English language (even the politics involved in language change). Highly recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    I realize that few people likely have a grammar hero, but I do and Doctor Drout is my hero. My family thinks that I was trying to kill them while listening to this in the car, but I assure it it was for their own good and I really loved it!

  16. 4 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    Highly irreverent and entertaining! The explanations of WHY we do what we do in grammar are worth hunting this down for a listen.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shin

    This book is incredibly boring, I can't get anything out of it. This book is incredibly boring, I can't get anything out of it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

    If you ever wanted to understand why we talk/write the way we do, this is for you. He not only throws out grammar rules, but he explains how things ended up that way. Fascinating.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    This books explains the reasons behind the rules of English grammar. Professor Drout makes the material interesting and engaging; it helps that he's hilarious. This books explains the reasons behind the rules of English grammar. Professor Drout makes the material interesting and engaging; it helps that he's hilarious.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robert Sterbal

    Just a note. The book gave me the concept of prestige grammar and accent and the concept of prestige in a fascinating one

  21. 5 out of 5

    Zeli

    When you manage to get through a whole book on grammar in less than 4 days then it's probably testimony to how good it is. Enough said! When you manage to get through a whole book on grammar in less than 4 days then it's probably testimony to how good it is. Enough said!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather Edick

    Funny, in a geeky grammarian sort of way. :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The best specific grammar course on English for Adults who don’t remember the stuff from school.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    Who knew grammar could be so much fun?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eliza

  26. 4 out of 5

    TASHA

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Sullivan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bugabuu

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shipperx

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