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Poetry for Young People: Emily Dickinson

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Features more than 35 of Dickinson's best loved poems, including "I'm nobody, who are you?" and "I started early, took my dog." "The choice of...Emily Dickinson is a good one....Chi Chung's illustrations...are precise and sometimes whimsical....Attractive and inviting....will give young readers something special."--Quill & Quire. "Bolin's four-page introduction describes a Features more than 35 of Dickinson's best loved poems, including "I'm nobody, who are you?" and "I started early, took my dog." "The choice of...Emily Dickinson is a good one....Chi Chung's illustrations...are precise and sometimes whimsical....Attractive and inviting....will give young readers something special."--Quill & Quire. "Bolin's four-page introduction describes and explains Emily Dickinson's odd life style and creative productivity....prettily colored watercolors."--LJ. "...footnotes glossing antiquated diction are well-handled and the precis on Dickinson's church-hymnal metric is a model of its kind."--Washington Post. ". . . shot through with magical charm and graceful beauty . . ."--Buzz Weekly. 48 pages (all in color), 8 1/2 x 10.


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Features more than 35 of Dickinson's best loved poems, including "I'm nobody, who are you?" and "I started early, took my dog." "The choice of...Emily Dickinson is a good one....Chi Chung's illustrations...are precise and sometimes whimsical....Attractive and inviting....will give young readers something special."--Quill & Quire. "Bolin's four-page introduction describes a Features more than 35 of Dickinson's best loved poems, including "I'm nobody, who are you?" and "I started early, took my dog." "The choice of...Emily Dickinson is a good one....Chi Chung's illustrations...are precise and sometimes whimsical....Attractive and inviting....will give young readers something special."--Quill & Quire. "Bolin's four-page introduction describes and explains Emily Dickinson's odd life style and creative productivity....prettily colored watercolors."--LJ. "...footnotes glossing antiquated diction are well-handled and the precis on Dickinson's church-hymnal metric is a model of its kind."--Washington Post. ". . . shot through with magical charm and graceful beauty . . ."--Buzz Weekly. 48 pages (all in color), 8 1/2 x 10.

30 review for Poetry for Young People: Emily Dickinson

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Elmer

    This is another excellent book in the Poetry for Young People series. I love that this series does not “dumb down” poetry for young people, but offers excellent poems from some great poets. The usual suspects are here, such as “Hope is the thing with feathers,” “A narrow fellow in the grass,” and “There is no frigate like a book.” There are several poems that are riddles, which can be fun for children to try to guess. These are a couple poems I especially liked: “I never saw a moor, I never saw th This is another excellent book in the Poetry for Young People series. I love that this series does not “dumb down” poetry for young people, but offers excellent poems from some great poets. The usual suspects are here, such as “Hope is the thing with feathers,” “A narrow fellow in the grass,” and “There is no frigate like a book.” There are several poems that are riddles, which can be fun for children to try to guess. These are a couple poems I especially liked: “I never saw a moor, I never saw the sea, Yet know I how the heather looks, And what a wave must be. I never spoke with God, Nor visited in heaven, Yet certain am I of the spot As if the chart were given.” And this short poem that ends the book: “In this short life That only lasts an hour, How much, how little, Is within our power!”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Valuable, as is the entire series. The pictures are unfortunately, imo, *too* pretty: suitable for nursery decor, they trivialize the poetry. Also unfortunate is that the poems described as riddles are illustrated by the answers.... No mention is made of her (supposed?) reluctance to publish the poems. The dash at the end of each line is omitted, making for a smoother read, no explanation given for why it sometimes included. In this volume the introduction serves; each poem stands alone except for Valuable, as is the entire series. The pictures are unfortunately, imo, *too* pretty: suitable for nursery decor, they trivialize the poetry. Also unfortunate is that the poems described as riddles are illustrated by the answers.... No mention is made of her (supposed?) reluctance to publish the poems. The dash at the end of each line is omitted, making for a smoother read, no explanation given for why it sometimes included. In this volume the introduction serves; each poem stands alone except for the illustrations. Not my favorite Dickinson collection, nor my favorite of this series, by far.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Meyer

    Another nice little collection of Emily Dickinson poems. I enjoyed the illustrations and liked how they explained some of the more difficult words at the bottom of the page. Great for younger children.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica LeBaron

    Poetry for Young People: Emily Dickinson Frances Schoonmaker Bolin This book is a collection of poetry written by the poet Emily Dickinson. It includes a total of thirty-six poems, an introduction, a bibliography, and an index. I found the introduction to be very useful and insightful because it discussed Emily Dickinson's life. In this way, this made me feel like I was more connected to her poetry, and I felt that I could understand the poetry more than I would if I had not read the introduction. Poetry for Young People: Emily Dickinson Frances Schoonmaker Bolin This book is a collection of poetry written by the poet Emily Dickinson. It includes a total of thirty-six poems, an introduction, a bibliography, and an index. I found the introduction to be very useful and insightful because it discussed Emily Dickinson's life. In this way, this made me feel like I was more connected to her poetry, and I felt that I could understand the poetry more than I would if I had not read the introduction. At the end of many of Dickinson's poems, there are definitions for certain words that are available. For example, in her poem titled "Hope is the Thing with Feathers" the words gale, abash, and extremity are used and are included again at the end with their individual definitions listed next to them. I would use this book in a classroom with older kids--most likely students in the fifth grade and higher, because there are a lot of serious tones throughout the poems. The illustrations are somewhat useful in relation to the poems, but I feel like they are just used to spruce up the pages instead of actually trying to mean something in relation to the poetry.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen GoatKeeper

    Emily Dickinson wrote hundreds of poems over her lifetime. They show up tucked into anthologies or books for adults with page after page to read. This book of poetry is so nice to sit down with. The poems reflect nature and farm life. The illustrations are lovely. The book is large and beautifully arranged. Being for children, some of the words are defined as they are old words unfamiliar to many people today. I found this a wonderful introduction to Dickinson's poetry. All of the poems were a deli Emily Dickinson wrote hundreds of poems over her lifetime. They show up tucked into anthologies or books for adults with page after page to read. This book of poetry is so nice to sit down with. The poems reflect nature and farm life. The illustrations are lovely. The book is large and beautifully arranged. Being for children, some of the words are defined as they are old words unfamiliar to many people today. I found this a wonderful introduction to Dickinson's poetry. All of the poems were a delight to read and reread. One is most appropriate for those who love to read. "There is no frigate like a book To take us lands away, Nor any coursers like a page Of prancing poetry. This traverse may the poorest take Without oppress of toll: How frugal is the chariot That bears a human soul!"

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mona Bomgaars

    A birthday gift for my grandniece, Ava, who will be 8 years old and demonstrates some poetry writing skills. This is a lovely book with a selection of Emily Dickinson poems

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    A collection of some of Emily's greatest poems. The illustrations are pretty and help you understand the poem- my two year old likes to sit and listen to me read them and look at the pictures.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Annawade Stevenson

    Emily Dickinson, a poet that many of us are familiar with, has written many poems that are appropriate and relatable to children. The "Poetry for Young People" series features a collection of her poems that children may enjoy. The poems are beautifully written about nature, from the meadows to the sea, animals including birds and dogs, people, insects, the weather and changing seasons and death. One poem is actually about poetry itself. The illustrations are done by Chi Chung, where many of the Emily Dickinson, a poet that many of us are familiar with, has written many poems that are appropriate and relatable to children. The "Poetry for Young People" series features a collection of her poems that children may enjoy. The poems are beautifully written about nature, from the meadows to the sea, animals including birds and dogs, people, insects, the weather and changing seasons and death. One poem is actually about poetry itself. The illustrations are done by Chi Chung, where many of the images take up an entire page illustrating one point in each poem. Almost on every page in the book there is an illustration, while some are small and only enhance the poetry, and other larger, more detailed images provide deeper meaning and understanding. The images are truly artistic and elegant, with a rich variety of colors and free flowing lines that reflect Dickinson's poetry and aesthetic. I particularly like this series of her poems because it includes interesting introduction about the author. For example, I learned that Emily Dickinson mostly stayed in her home as she got older, and wrote about the ordinary things in life making them seem amazing. I also learned that she planted flowers in her garden in Amherst, Massachusetts so nature inspired her, and her poems were light and witty, which differed from the more common dark and serious poetry of her time period. This collection of poems includes insightful commentary and definitions of words that adults and children may not know. I definitely recommend this book and rate it five stars because we can use Emily Dickinson's poetry as a standard for which other poetry can be compared too. Emily Dickinson's Poetry for Young People is comprised of high quality literary and artistic elements and memorable poems because of rhythm, compactness and surprise, figurative language, sound patterns and emotional intensity. Dickinson's poems are written in a rhythm called iambic, which shows that she strives her poems to be spoken similar to the rhythm one speaks naturally. She wrote her poems in a patterned and structured way, where lines one and three of her poems have eight syllables and lines two and four have six syllables. Every line usually starts with an unaccented syllable and then is followed by an accented syllable. For example, "To tell your name the livelong day" is one line in her poems that has eight syllables and starts with a pattern of unaccented to accented syllables. Most of Emily's poems have more unaccented syllables and the rhythm moves quickly because of the very short lines often connected by dashes. This could mean her poems are lighthearted and the speaker of the poem is cheerful. Her poems are very compact and surprising, and are written in four line stanzas. Her longest poem in the whole collection is only about six stanzas long. Yet, Dickinson manages to say and express a lot within a few short words. For example, in her short poem with no title, she writes "An Everywhere of Silver / With Ropes of Sand/ To keep it from effacing / The Track called Land. First, this surprises the reader because it is challenging the reader to guess what she is writing about because this is a unique description. Here, Emily writes about the ocean, and perhaps the ocean is so abundant and easily accessible that "it is everywhere". The sand is erasing the marks that the ocean leaves or the sand is keeping or avoiding the ocean from effacing the land. She also writes about the track called land, as if land is unfamiliar to the reader, and land may easily appear and disappear, which we see as one watches the waves on the beach. This example shows how compact Dickinson's poems are, in that one word has many meanings. It clearly took me a lot more words to even try to explain part of the meaning of the poem than the poem itself. With only one stanza of her poems, Dickinson is able to create an entire image that the reader can visualize. Dickinson's poems contain a lot of figurative language that contributes to the imagery and meaning of her poems. For example, in her poem that starts with the line "The moon was but a chin of gold" she compares the moon to a girl, who's "forehead is of amplest blonde" and her eyes are like the "summer dew" while the universe is her shoe. Dickinson is personifying the moon as a girl who watches over the whole universe. She uses synesthesia to help the reader see concrete images from her abstract ideas. In this poem, the moon is privileged to be the "remotest star" but she might pass by your "twinkling door". This comparison is creative because most people know the moon is far away and remote but because she might pass by your door one day. Dickinson is taking the abstract idea of a distant moon and bringing that moon closer to the reader so that the moon will be just as likely to come by your door as your neighbor is. Her figurative language she includes in her poems makes the reader use of their five senses, from remembering smells and sounds. Dickinson also uses a lot of sound patterns so certain words are stressed and remembered and her poems flow well. In most of her last stanzas of every poem, line two and four rhyme. Usually, the rhymes are perfect as she rhymes words such as "toll" and "soul" and "way" and "day". Dickinson gives us a sense of conclusion and that everything is all right when her poems wrap up so perfectly. However, she also uses slant rhymes or off rhymes. In this collection of poems, I've noticed off rhymes on the last words of certain lines such as "bee" and aristocracy" as well as "beauty" and "antiquity". Another pattern she uses is extended metaphor. In Dickinson's poem, "Hope is the things with feathers", she compares hope to a variety of things and feelings throughout twelve lines. Lastly, even though her poems are generally light, they do have a lot of emotional intensity. For example, in one of her poems she says "I dwell in possibility/ A fairer house than Prose/ More numerous of windows/ Superior of Doors". She is giving the reader imagery of living in a house of possibility, most likely a house of poetry. She compares why poetry is better than prose, just as a house with more doors and windows is more open and has a bigger sense of freedom. The reader is receiving an emotional experience of being in a big house while reading an extended metaphor poem at the same time. Overall, due to all these literary and artistic elements which are abundant in Emily Dickinson's writing, this collection of poems that focused on nature, surprises and riddles, are a great way to introduce poetry to kids, as long as one doesn't overwhelm kids with the difficult vocabulary and the complexity of meanings that most of these poems contain.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hope McCabe

    1. In this collection of beloved Emily Dickinson poems, children are able to delve into the world of Dickinson’s poems at a level in which they will genuinely understand her poetry. The illustrations and captions make the poems relatable and easier to understand by providing explanations. This book collection features famous Emily Dickinson poems including, “I’m nobody, who are you?” and “Hope is the thing with feathers” and more. 2. This collection of poems is beautiful and enticing for children 1. In this collection of beloved Emily Dickinson poems, children are able to delve into the world of Dickinson’s poems at a level in which they will genuinely understand her poetry. The illustrations and captions make the poems relatable and easier to understand by providing explanations. This book collection features famous Emily Dickinson poems including, “I’m nobody, who are you?” and “Hope is the thing with feathers” and more. 2. This collection of poems is beautiful and enticing for children to desire to read. With bright and intricate illustrations, the poems are brought to life. Children will enjoy and learn from these poems—especially with the clever captions in the corner with additional information incase children are unaware of what Dickinson meant in her poems. 3. Other books I may pair this with: Sing a Song of Seasons: A Nature Poem for Each Day of the Year by Fiona Waters; Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein; If I Were In Charge of the World and Other Worries by Judith Viorst; Forget-Me-Not: Poems to Learn by Heart by Mary Ann Hobermann; Poetry for Young People: Carl Sandburg by Frances Schoonmaker Bolin 4. How to use as a mentor text: This book could easily be used as a mentor text during a poetry unit! The characteristics could be taken from her poems and could be the anchor text to a text set. It could also help introduce children to other poetry. It can also serve as a mentor text to help children replicate and become poets themselves! They can use Dickinson’s style to create their own poems.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Glenn

    Summary: This collection of poems by Emily Dickinson is light and delightful and the watercolor illustrations add beauty to the page. Young readers will experience a variety of topics within this collection, which will hopefully pique the interest of a variety of readers. Evaluation: The collection of poems begins with an introduction to Emily Dickinson. This section gives background about the poet and details about her life, including her writing. The 35 poems included in this collection follow Summary: This collection of poems by Emily Dickinson is light and delightful and the watercolor illustrations add beauty to the page. Young readers will experience a variety of topics within this collection, which will hopefully pique the interest of a variety of readers. Evaluation: The collection of poems begins with an introduction to Emily Dickinson. This section gives background about the poet and details about her life, including her writing. The 35 poems included in this collection follow the introduction. My only complaint about the book is that the titles of the poems appear only on the Contents page, and not on the actual page in the book where the poem is located. One of my favorite features about this book is that there are definitions (and sometimes commentary) on each page for terms which are found within the poems. This will be especially helpful for young readers who may not be familiar with the language used in the early 19th century. Teaching Idea: Of course, this book would be ideal for teaching a unit on poetry. Iambic timbre is used throughout most of Emily Dickinson's poetry. There are usually four lines to a stanza. This could be used to model the sing-song quality of poetry. There are a wide variety of topics (imagery, personification, etc.) in Dickinson's poetry that could be used for teaching.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gillian Getlan

    It begins with an introduction about Emily Dickinson. Then the poetry begins, with titleless poems, illustrations varying in size from small to a whole page, and definitions of uncommon words Emily used. The poems illustrate ordinary things in life in incredibly witty, wonderful ways. I love the introduction. It really lays a foundation to appreciate and understand her poetry more, in terms of writing style and meaning. The poems are really lovely and the definitions that accompany many of the po It begins with an introduction about Emily Dickinson. Then the poetry begins, with titleless poems, illustrations varying in size from small to a whole page, and definitions of uncommon words Emily used. The poems illustrate ordinary things in life in incredibly witty, wonderful ways. I love the introduction. It really lays a foundation to appreciate and understand her poetry more, in terms of writing style and meaning. The poems are really lovely and the definitions that accompany many of the poems are subtle and very useful for young children. The poems themselves are short and simple, making it fun to continue reading more and more. I would connect this book to Honey, I Love by Eloise Greenfield. In this picture book, the author narrates the things in life she loves. Like Emily Dickinson, she brings warmth and beauty to everyday things like laughing with her friends or kissing her mama's arm. This book would be wonderful as a mentor text for writing. This book could be used to examine Emily's writing craft more in depth and compare and contrast different poems, in terms of her typical iambic rhythm, themes, and word choice.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Pierson

    Genre: Poetry Unique Feature: There are many unique features within this book. The book offers a compilation of Emily Dickinson poems chosen for a younger audience. The poems are listed and organized in a logical manor within the book. This organization and flow helps the reader through reading the entire book and guides them from one poem to the next. The illustrations that accompany the poems also serve to enrich the reading experience. Grades: This book is best used in 5th grade and above. This Genre: Poetry Unique Feature: There are many unique features within this book. The book offers a compilation of Emily Dickinson poems chosen for a younger audience. The poems are listed and organized in a logical manor within the book. This organization and flow helps the reader through reading the entire book and guides them from one poem to the next. The illustrations that accompany the poems also serve to enrich the reading experience. Grades: This book is best used in 5th grade and above. This is due to the volume of words and the complexity of the text. If individual poems were assigned as reading, the grade level could fluctuate greatly. However, the book as a whole would be best utilized in 8th grade and above.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hailey

    Poetry for Young People: Emily Dickinson is a book of poetry that shares the original poems by Emily Dickinson. Even though some of the poems are very deep and could be confusing for young children, this poetry book is specified for young children and has definitions of certain words on each page to help them comprehend the words being written by Emily Dickinson. I really enjoyed the beautiful illustrations that were provided that make the book engaging and appealing to young children who may no Poetry for Young People: Emily Dickinson is a book of poetry that shares the original poems by Emily Dickinson. Even though some of the poems are very deep and could be confusing for young children, this poetry book is specified for young children and has definitions of certain words on each page to help them comprehend the words being written by Emily Dickinson. I really enjoyed the beautiful illustrations that were provided that make the book engaging and appealing to young children who may not completely have an interest for poetry. I would use this book when teaching about poetry and also famous poets who have had a significant impact on poetry.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniella Delgado

    1. N/A 2. 2nd- 6th 3. This book is filled with lots of poems. The poems in this book are longer poems with higher level vocabulary. The pictures are very soft and realistic looking and there was a picture for every poem. 4. I think that this book has a nice variety of vocabulary and length of poems. These poems were longer than i expected them to be. The pictures were very well illustrated and the poems were enjoyable to read. 5. Poetry, rhyming.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tandava Brahmachari

    Now I've read 6 in this series and this is so far the all-around best. The poetry is classic Emily Dickinson, while still being reasonably suitable for age range that would want a picture book. It has a bunch of my old favorites and some new favorites as well. The illustrations are very nice and accompany the poems well. I was a little bummed that they standardized Emily's capitalization and took out most of her dashes, since those are such a part of her style, but I suppose it's forgivable.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Edwards

    This book was given to my daughter many years ago. She loved it,as I do. The illustrations are beautiful and add to the magic of this book. Emily Dickinson has such a wonderful way of seeing the world and her poetry is accessible to all. This book, I agree really is a wonderful way of introducing young readers to the marvels of poetry.A Perfect addition to any teachers library or a wonderful gift for a curious child.

  17. 4 out of 5

    MaryAnn Pavel

    Copyright: 2008, 1994 Genre: Poetry Themes: Flowers, Birds, Sunsets, the Moon, Life My favorite part of this book is it took classic verses from Emily Dickinson poetry and added beautiful illustrations, helpful definitions and commentary along with it. One way I could use this book in my classroom is by introducing my students to poetry. Some students may not be interested in poetry but, this book does a great way of sharing poetry in a colorful and modern way.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Colby S.

    I thought Poetry for Young People was an okay book. I didn't really like how the author went about the some of the poems, but the majority of poems were okay. I did like the poem about the bee getting a letter from a fly, I thought it was kind of humorous in a way. Overall I didn't really like this book as much as other books, but I did think it was okay.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Irons

    This is a beautiful collection of Emily Dickinson's poetry that would be perfect for upper elementary students. The poems come with intricate illustrations that help the students better understand the poems and create a mental image. This book would be perfect to use as a mentor text during a poetry unit.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Della Tingle

    Emily Dickinson is not my favorite poet. However, she is one of the most famous of all American poets and worth knowing. This book for children is a great introduction to Dickinson whether child or adult. It begins with a four page introduction to and biography of Emily Dickinson. The poems chosen are accompanied by beautiful illustrations.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Royce B

    I thought this book was good because her poem's rhymes and I understood it. The reading age would probably be 4th grade and up. The poem's were not named but, it was a good book. To see what poem's are in this book, read the book to find out!!!!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Lovejoy

    Absolutely loved this book--that BTW is not only for young people, but a joy for us older folks, too. :) The illustrations by Chi Chung are INCREDIBLE! I borrowed this book from the library, but it is one I may want to buy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Child960801

    This is a book of poetry by Emily Dickinson. Pretty pictures. I read this out loud to my children and it wasn’t our favourite poetry book. Some many of the poems establish a rhyming scheme, and then have a word that doesn’t quite work. It’s jarring.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Evan'S Brother

    I liked it because they used some intense words that not many people would know so they had the definition in the sentence. I don't really like the book because the background didn't make sense to me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carole

    Selected poetry by Emily Dickinson with accompanying beautiful illustrations by Chi Chung.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Sopko

    Nice collection of Dickinson's poetry, lovely illustrations.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Kempkes

    3.5 Love Emily's poems. So natural, about life, love that she never thought anyone would see them. The pictures were pretty.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    A pleasant walk into the world of Emily Dickinson including a short biography and her poetry with some illustrations and explanations. Delightful and accessible.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hennessy

    One of my favorites growing up

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nobi Nobes

    Great poetry! Nice to hear.

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