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Love, Aubrey

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"I had everything I needed to run a household: a house, food, and a new family. From now on it would just be me and Sammy–the two of us, and no one else." A tragic accident has turned eleven-year-old Aubrey’s world upside down. Starting a new life all alone, Aubrey has everything she thinks she needs: SpaghettiOs and Sammy, her new pet fish. She cannot talk about what happe "I had everything I needed to run a household: a house, food, and a new family. From now on it would just be me and Sammy–the two of us, and no one else." A tragic accident has turned eleven-year-old Aubrey’s world upside down. Starting a new life all alone, Aubrey has everything she thinks she needs: SpaghettiOs and Sammy, her new pet fish. She cannot talk about what happened to her. Writing letters is the only thing that feels right to Aubrey, even if no one ever reads them. With the aid of her loving grandmother and new friends, Aubrey learns that she is not alone, and gradually, she finds the words to express feelings that once seemed impossible to describe. The healing powers of friendship, love, and memory help Aubrey take her first steps toward the future. Readers will care for Aubrey from page one and will watch her grow until the very end, when she has to make one of the biggest decisions of her life. Love, Aubrey is devastating, brave, honest, funny, and hopeful, and it introduces a remarkable new writer, Suzanne LaFleur. No matter how old you are, this book is not to be missed.


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"I had everything I needed to run a household: a house, food, and a new family. From now on it would just be me and Sammy–the two of us, and no one else." A tragic accident has turned eleven-year-old Aubrey’s world upside down. Starting a new life all alone, Aubrey has everything she thinks she needs: SpaghettiOs and Sammy, her new pet fish. She cannot talk about what happe "I had everything I needed to run a household: a house, food, and a new family. From now on it would just be me and Sammy–the two of us, and no one else." A tragic accident has turned eleven-year-old Aubrey’s world upside down. Starting a new life all alone, Aubrey has everything she thinks she needs: SpaghettiOs and Sammy, her new pet fish. She cannot talk about what happened to her. Writing letters is the only thing that feels right to Aubrey, even if no one ever reads them. With the aid of her loving grandmother and new friends, Aubrey learns that she is not alone, and gradually, she finds the words to express feelings that once seemed impossible to describe. The healing powers of friendship, love, and memory help Aubrey take her first steps toward the future. Readers will care for Aubrey from page one and will watch her grow until the very end, when she has to make one of the biggest decisions of her life. Love, Aubrey is devastating, brave, honest, funny, and hopeful, and it introduces a remarkable new writer, Suzanne LaFleur. No matter how old you are, this book is not to be missed.

30 review for Love, Aubrey

  1. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Love, Aubrey focuses on eleven year old Aubrey, who lost her father and younger sister, Savannah, in a car accident earlier in the year. Aubrey's mom unable to function or deal with her grief left Aubrey. Aubrey is left to fend for herself until her grandma shows up at the door one day. Love, Aubrey is about getting unstuck from the terrible moments in your life and moving forward even if it's really really hard and painful. Even though Aubrey is resistant to leave her home in Virginia and move Love, Aubrey focuses on eleven year old Aubrey, who lost her father and younger sister, Savannah, in a car accident earlier in the year. Aubrey's mom unable to function or deal with her grief left Aubrey. Aubrey is left to fend for herself until her grandma shows up at the door one day. Love, Aubrey is about getting unstuck from the terrible moments in your life and moving forward even if it's really really hard and painful. Even though Aubrey is resistant to leave her home in Virginia and move up to Vermont with her grandma, it's that move that helps Aubrey begin her journey of getting unstuck and dealing with not just the loss of her father and sister, but with the absence of her mother. There are of course happy moments of the book filled with the friends Aubrey meets, her new school and more. Love Aubrey, is a good pick for readers who like books with the same sort of tone, but it's also a great pick for people who are going through a hard time too. You may not be going through the same thing as Aubrey, but her feelings and experiences are something most people can relate to at one point or another in their life. So reading the book is kind of comforting, like you and Aubrey are working through getting unstuck together.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pris

    Lovely book, brought tears to my eyes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adele

    Love, Aubrey is another book to add to my pile of children left behind novels...and yet I enjoyed it. I had heard a lot of very complimentary things about this novel before I read it and so I was expecting a lot. I really wasn't all that sure what to think about it as I started reading. I was piecing together the story well before elements were confirmed and yet I was in the present with Aubrey. This could just be a story about grief, instead it's about being left behind, and all that that means Love, Aubrey is another book to add to my pile of children left behind novels...and yet I enjoyed it. I had heard a lot of very complimentary things about this novel before I read it and so I was expecting a lot. I really wasn't all that sure what to think about it as I started reading. I was piecing together the story well before elements were confirmed and yet I was in the present with Aubrey. This could just be a story about grief, instead it's about being left behind, and all that that means. The eleven year old protagonist is not someone I would normally want to read about. She's mourning her family - how it once was, what it isn't now. She's barely keeping her head above the waters swirling with grief, depression, anger and need. What surprised me is how removed I felt and how much emotion I felt. I am contradicting myself I know, but that's how I felt. The anger I felt towards Elizabeth is overwhelming, I understand on a base level that her depression overrode her daughter's needs but I didn't care. She left her child alone. The last remaining member of her immediate family and she just up and left her. How dare she? While Aubrey's being difficult with her grandmother, befriending Bridget or missing Savannah - I didn't really connect. But it took one letter to her father to break me. I find it interesting that the one member of the family, the one mentioned the least, could elicit so much emotion from me. It was then I realised how beautifully crafted this novel is. Each word is deliberate. LaFleur's words are delicately placed creating a whirlwind of contrasting emotions that race through you, leaving an emotional wreck behind. It is a stunning debut effort, one that I am reluctant to quantify because I cannot place why it is so good. Perhaps it's the use of simple language which leaves you feeling sparse? Maybe it's the number of emotions, conclusions and thoughts that aren't ever directly stated? Maybe it's both. Regardless, this book is a revelation and the start to a very promising career for Suzanne LaFleur.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    Life can’t get any worse for eleven year old Aubrey, or can it? After a devastating car accident claims the lives of Aubrey’s dad and seven year old sister, Savannah, Aubrey and her mom, overwhelmed with guilt and sorrow, struggle to deal with the tragedy. Imagine Aubrey’s surprise one evening when she realizes her mother, unable to cope with the enormity of her loss, has abandoned her. Finally cognizant of her daughter’s neglect and Aubrey’s fragile emotional state, Aubrey’s grandmother takes h Life can’t get any worse for eleven year old Aubrey, or can it? After a devastating car accident claims the lives of Aubrey’s dad and seven year old sister, Savannah, Aubrey and her mom, overwhelmed with guilt and sorrow, struggle to deal with the tragedy. Imagine Aubrey’s surprise one evening when she realizes her mother, unable to cope with the enormity of her loss, has abandoned her. Finally cognizant of her daughter’s neglect and Aubrey’s fragile emotional state, Aubrey’s grandmother takes her home to Vermont intent on providing Aubrey with the love and stability she desperately needs. With patience and compassion, Aubrey’s grandmother, close neighbors and the school counselor assist Aubrey in coming to terms with her loss, gain insight into her mother’s actions and find solace in her memories of Savannah and her dad. Written in first person narrative, Aubrey’s emotions are palpable as random events trigger flashbacks of family memories. Printed in italics and woven throughout the story, letters, written by Aubrey to Savannah’s imaginary friend and significant family members, reveal Aubrey’s painful reflections, the depth of her sorrow and anger. The conflict Aubrey experiences when her mother attempts to reclaim her role will resonate with young readers anxiously awaiting Aubrey’s decision. LaFleur has crafted a poignant tale about loss, the importance of love and the resilience of the human spirit that elementary readers (grades 3-5) will find both credible and touching. For older students, pair this book with Barbara Park's Mick Harte Was Here for a discussion about loss and grieving. Love, Aubrey by Suzanne LaFleur ISBN: 978-0-385-73774-6 $15.99, 262 pgs. hardcover, realistic fiction

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Hickman Walker

    I picked this up on the the strength of the title font along the spine. I glanced at the cover, flipped it over and read the back. I opened it up, read the first few pages and decided I was taking it home with me. Surprisingly, this doesn't usually happen. I frequently pick up books because of the way they look. Reading the back usually induces me to put them back on the shelf. If the book passes that test, I read the first couple of sentences and, usually, a few random passages through the book I picked this up on the the strength of the title font along the spine. I glanced at the cover, flipped it over and read the back. I opened it up, read the first few pages and decided I was taking it home with me. Surprisingly, this doesn't usually happen. I frequently pick up books because of the way they look. Reading the back usually induces me to put them back on the shelf. If the book passes that test, I read the first couple of sentences and, usually, a few random passages through the book. Rarely will I read the first few pages, instead of just the first few sentences. When a book manages to draw me in like that I buy it. Which is what happened with this book. This is a heart-breaking story about death, grief and loss. It should be required reading for all children, and everyone who is too old to have had it required of them. Every single one of you should read this book. This is not a typical children's book. This is a book that deals with real life issues in a way that does not require the metaphor of fantasy. It's an emotional survival handbook that is relevant to anyone who has ever lost someone to grief.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Rounding up to 4 Stars. I read this aloud to my daughter. This novel begins with Aubrey left to fend for herself after her mother flees in response to the accidental death of her husband and youngest daughter. Not only is Aubrey making sense of her unimaginable grief of losing her dad and little sister, she's been abandoned by her mother. The first chapter draws you in. Aubrey is living alone, in secret, scraping money together to buy canned food, insisting to herself that she will be just fine. Rounding up to 4 Stars. I read this aloud to my daughter. This novel begins with Aubrey left to fend for herself after her mother flees in response to the accidental death of her husband and youngest daughter. Not only is Aubrey making sense of her unimaginable grief of losing her dad and little sister, she's been abandoned by her mother. The first chapter draws you in. Aubrey is living alone, in secret, scraping money together to buy canned food, insisting to herself that she will be just fine. Holed up in her house, she is willing to wait as long as it takes for her mom to return. I almost wanted the book to explore her self-reliance more, but soon Aubrey is rescued by her grandmother. This left me slightly disappointed, until I got to know Gram. The characters in "Love, Aubrey" are beautifully crafted. This is not a plot driven story but rather one of relationships and slow recovery. I may have enjoyed it more than my daughter, who cried, "It's sooo sad!" But she still handed the book off to a friend excitedly.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Uzma Sheikh

    This book was beautifully written, and is great plot for the "Real World". It explores the crazy journey a young girl must take after an incident that took away her father and sister. Love Aubrey is a creative, emotional book that has beautiful story worth reading! I recommend this book for mature kids, preferably 11 or 12 MATURE kids! It really matters how you comprehend everything that happens because this is like a real world situation--- this can happen. This book is truly recommended young This book was beautifully written, and is great plot for the "Real World". It explores the crazy journey a young girl must take after an incident that took away her father and sister. Love Aubrey is a creative, emotional book that has beautiful story worth reading! I recommend this book for mature kids, preferably 11 or 12 MATURE kids! It really matters how you comprehend everything that happens because this is like a real world situation--- this can happen. This book is truly recommended young adults. You will love this one!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michelle (Fluttering Butterflies)

    Oh dear, where to begin with this book? Love, Aubrey wrenched out my heart and stomped on it. But in a good way. I started it in the late afternoon/early evening and I couldn't bear to put it down. By 1am the following morning, I had finished it and was bawling like a baby in my bed. Actually sobbing big fat tears. So be warned! This one is a weep-inducing book. Before I started reading this book, I knew it was going to be sad. But I thought that 11 year old Aubrey would be on her own throughout Oh dear, where to begin with this book? Love, Aubrey wrenched out my heart and stomped on it. But in a good way. I started it in the late afternoon/early evening and I couldn't bear to put it down. By 1am the following morning, I had finished it and was bawling like a baby in my bed. Actually sobbing big fat tears. So be warned! This one is a weep-inducing book. Before I started reading this book, I knew it was going to be sad. But I thought that 11 year old Aubrey would be on her own throughout the novel, and that isn't the case, thank god. She is eventually rescued by her grandmother and taken somewhere safe and stable. But that time spent on her own? Using her birthday money to buy Spaghetti-Os and a pet fish for company? Broke my heart. The whole thing did. As the reader, you aren't told straightaway all the details of how Aubrey is left on her own, instead the story is drawn out a bit and you can piece it together through some of Aubrey's flashbacks of life before and through her letters. When she goes to live with her grandmother, things are a bit difficult for everyone. Aubrey struggles to adjust with her new life, the different relationship with her grandmother. She's feeling angry at her mother, grief at the loss of her father and little sister. You can see how hard it is for her to trust again and the deep depression she Aubrey is in, as she doesn't want to get out of bed or just sits and watches television and avoiding any conversations where she might have to feel or remember. Eventually though, with the help of a new best friend, a guidance counsellor and her grandmother, Aubrey is able to fight her way to back to some semblance of a normal 11 year old girl who goes sledding in the snow and has pizza parties on her birthday instead of worrying about her loved ones abandoning her and how she'll cope. Love, Aubrey could have been more heavy-handed with the emotional issues, but despite how it sounds, it really isn't. In some parts, mostly at the beginning, it's like we're really seeing things from Aubrey's perspective as she tries to detach herself from feeling so much so that it all doesn't overwhelm her. But gradually, Aubrey is able to let out a little of what she's feeling and when that happens? Be ready to get walloped by the strong emotions. Keep tissues handy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Wardrip

    Reviewed by Sally Kruger aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.com Aubrey Priestly has eaten the last of the cheese and crackers and finished the juice in the refrigerator. There is nothing left to eat so she takes the birthday money Gram sent and heads to the store. She knows she can buy groceries and take care of herself, but she's worried about what might happen if someone finds out she is eleven and living alone. Tragedy struck and took Aubrey's sister and father, and now her mother has been gon Reviewed by Sally Kruger aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.com Aubrey Priestly has eaten the last of the cheese and crackers and finished the juice in the refrigerator. There is nothing left to eat so she takes the birthday money Gram sent and heads to the store. She knows she can buy groceries and take care of herself, but she's worried about what might happen if someone finds out she is eleven and living alone. Tragedy struck and took Aubrey's sister and father, and now her mother has been gone for days. Aubrey thought it was best to ignore the constantly ringing telephone since she had no idea what to tell any caller that might ask to speak to her mother. However, one afternoon she just couldn't ignore the repeated ringing of the doorbell. When she opened the door, she found Gram standing on the porch. What follows is Aubrey's concerned grandmother bustling about asking questions about how long she's been alone and then giving instructions about what to pack since Gram is taking Aubrey back with her. They ride the train from Virginia to the familiar old house in Vermont. Used to visits only on holidays, it seems strange to be moving in with Gram, but it's a relief to have someone taking care of her again. Aubrey gradually opens up to her grandmother as the two of them work to adjust to the tremendous changes in their lives. But even with Gram's loving care, a new best friend living right next door, and a helpful counselor at her new school, Aubrey finds the most relief when she writes letters to the loved ones now missing from her life. LOVE, AUBREY is the first novel by Suzanne LaFleur. The story is filled with emotion. The heart-wrenching sadness Aubrey experiences as old memories begin to surface are sure to bring tears to the eyes of even the most jaded reader. LaFleur shows Aubrey dealing with grief and loss as she struggles to understand her feelings and the confusing choices made by her grieving mother. This is a powerful story about love, loss, and healing that goes far beyond its targeted middle grade audience.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    "Sometimes I wonder if life is all about one moment. Everything before and everything after is about that one moment, and we are all stuck there." —Love, Aubrey, P. 198 Score another major hit for Wendy Lamb Books. New to the world of writing juvenile fiction, Suzanne Lafleur's first novel is filled to brimming with rewarding, close-knit relationships and the kind of sharply poignant real emotion that is only drawn forth in a select few books. Love, Aubrey begins in the aftermath of the initial "Sometimes I wonder if life is all about one moment. Everything before and everything after is about that one moment, and we are all stuck there." —Love, Aubrey, P. 198 Score another major hit for Wendy Lamb Books. New to the world of writing juvenile fiction, Suzanne Lafleur's first novel is filled to brimming with rewarding, close-knit relationships and the kind of sharply poignant real emotion that is only drawn forth in a select few books. Love, Aubrey begins in the aftermath of the initial grief over the accident that has forever changed Aubrey's family. Only Aubrey and her mother survive, and Aubrey's mother has disappeared for parts unknown. At age eleven, Aubrey must gather the resourcefulness and courage to face life completely on her own, having to face not only the removal of her sister and father, but now also of her mother. This situation does not continue for long, as Aubrey's grandmother comes onto the scene and recognizes developments for what they are. Her grandmother retrieves Aubrey back to her own home state of Virginia, where Aubrey now has a real home and someone to take care of her. In short, Aubrey once again has the security of a family, makeshift and ultimately unsatisfactory though it might be. Things have a way of turning out so differently from the way that one anticipates, however. In a new hometown with a new school and all-new people surrounding her, Aubrey slowly begins to adjust, to survive and eventually even thrive where she is planted, despite the inherently temporary nature of the setup. She quickly meets Bridget, a girl her age next door who turns out to be the kind of friend that a lucky person meets once, maybe twice in a lifetime. The intimacy of their friendship is refreshing and serves as a wonderful buoy, to the story as well as to Aubrey's fragile spirit. So much of the personal progress that Aubrey makes in the pages of this book could be directly attributable to the shoring up of her unstable psyche by this loving friendship with Bridget. It allows her to almost immediately be herself in an entirely foreign locale, and to approach situations at school without the pressure of not having any friends working at the back of her mind. Then Aubrey meets Marcus, a boy in her class whose life contains some elements that parallel hers, and another unique relationship begins to form. Suzanne Lafleur seems to be a master at conveying the multidimensional and dynamic nature of friendship, and it is in this respect that Love, Aubrey most consistently shines for all that it is. The relationships in the book come across as so authentic that I felt as if I were part of those relational connections, as well. Events and the people involved with them are always shifting, though, and through everything that happens as Aubrey gets used to life in a new state and a new unorthodox family, change comes to her new life, as well. The tragedy of her past and the confirming presence of those that have rallied around her help Aubrey to find her way through it all—to understand the grief that looms over and inside of her throughout so much of this book, always threatening to invade and carry her back to a place of darkness— and finally to fully process and walk away from that grief. Then, when suddenly one day Aubrey's mother returns into her life, Aubrey finds that she is now ready to deal with that newest heartache, as well. Love, Aubrey is a transformative work that realistically and painfully takes us on a trip through the most formative time of experience in the life of a bright, conflicted, and completely likable girl, letting us experience alongside her the black tunnels of grief, and the happy moments that serve to light her way forward. This really makes the book into an experience for the reader, and not just a touching story. Above all, what really stood out to me about this book is the deeply personal and emotionally stinging nature of the sadness that comes out with full force in some of Aubrey's letters, especially the ones that she writes to Jilly, her father and her sister Savannah. It is at these brief moments that the full weight of what has been taken from Aubrey's life hits the reader, and we can feel exactly what she feels. It is a hard, hard thing to bear, and for Aubrey it will continue to be that hard for as far into the future as her own life will stretch. I'd imagine that Love, Aubrey is one of those books that really made the 2010 Newbery committee agonize over not recognizing the profundity of its achievement with a Newbery Honor. I think that it certainly is one of the very best books of the year, and I am so thankful to have been given the opportunity to come to know Suzanne Lafleur as an author. I would give at least three and a half stars to this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Relyn

    My work this summer has been different than in past years and leaves me A LOT of time to listen to audiobooks as I work. Since this was one of my daughter's favorite books when she was a third or fourth grader, I finally made time to read it. I am sorry it took me so long. This is a powerful book about loss and grieving, about family and forgiveness. You would think that losing your dad and little sister would be the worst event in a ten year old girl's life. It's not. Aubrey's mother falls into My work this summer has been different than in past years and leaves me A LOT of time to listen to audiobooks as I work. Since this was one of my daughter's favorite books when she was a third or fourth grader, I finally made time to read it. I am sorry it took me so long. This is a powerful book about loss and grieving, about family and forgiveness. You would think that losing your dad and little sister would be the worst event in a ten year old girl's life. It's not. Aubrey's mother falls into a deep depression after driving during the car accident that killed two family members. Needing to pretend that all is well, and unable to recognize her own need for help, Aubrey's mom completely abandons her ten year old daughter. Aubrey is ten and completely alone. It sounds improbable, doesn't it? You expect to read it with skepticism. But you don't. LaFleur remembers what it is like to be ten. And, she must know what it is like to grieve, because it is all in there: - The child avoiding the nosy church ladies who are just being kind and could actually help. - The way a child would be simultaneously furious at their parent and terrified that other people might get mad at the parent. - The way you hide from the world and sleep for days when you are sad. - The way that, no matter what you mother does to you, your heart still aches for her. LaFleur knows what it is to grieve. And to heal. I think the best part of the book was Aubrey's friend, Bridget, and Bridget's family. Their steady kindness and compassion were a big part of Aubrey's healing. The way Bridget would let Aubrey be sad or playful or alone were actually great examples of how to help a friend through their grief. My daughter's best friend lost her dad when they were fifth graders. I was amazed at the maturity and compassion with which my daughter behaved as her friend grieved. I think maybe she learned some of that right here in the pages of this excellent book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caitlyn Scott

    This book was amazing!!! It was one of the best books i've ever read even though parts of it were sad. Aubrey faces big challenges and has to make a wise decision at the end. I really enjoyed reading it...I LOVED IT!!! This book was amazing!!! It was one of the best books i've ever read even though parts of it were sad. Aubrey faces big challenges and has to make a wise decision at the end. I really enjoyed reading it...I LOVED IT!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    ilsa➹

    i loved this book so much as a child, and though it didn't emotionally affect me like it used to, it was a still a good re-read. (book 1 for nostalgiathon) i loved this book so much as a child, and though it didn't emotionally affect me like it used to, it was a still a good re-read. (book 1 for nostalgiathon)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I'm not usually a big reader of Children's fiction but the cover of this book grabbed my attention and I couldn't resist taking it down from the shelf to take a closer look. The premise sucked me in and I found myself heading to the till and paying for the book. And I'm really glad I had a little uncharacteristic browse of the Children's section of a local book store. 'Love, Aubrey' is aimed at children aged 11 and over but it seems to be a world apart from the novels around when I was that age. I'm not usually a big reader of Children's fiction but the cover of this book grabbed my attention and I couldn't resist taking it down from the shelf to take a closer look. The premise sucked me in and I found myself heading to the till and paying for the book. And I'm really glad I had a little uncharacteristic browse of the Children's section of a local book store. 'Love, Aubrey' is aimed at children aged 11 and over but it seems to be a world apart from the novels around when I was that age. I remember fluffy books about babysitters and cheesy horror stories that weren't even intended to be scary. I remember casting aside kids books for teenage (Young Adult wasn't even a genre back then lol) novels that had a bit more substance and some grittier story-lines that my teachers and the school librarian didn't approve of. Things have obviously changed a lot since I was 11 (is it really 16 years ago??) and while reading 'Love, Aubrey' I found myself wishing that this novel had been around for my younger self to read. Because I know that geeky little loner would have adored this book. Eleven year old Aubrey is alone. At first she thought it would be fun living on her own, buying her own groceries and eating whatever she wants for dinner. But then it started to get a little scary. She knows what her Mom did is wrong but all she wants is for people to understand, to not get mad at her mom because it really isn't her fault. A couple of months ago, Aubrey's dad and little sister Savannah died in a family car accident. As the only survivors, Aubrey and her Mom attempted to live their lives, to get up each morning and go on. But Aubrey's mom couldn't handle it. Aubrey's mom began to get more and more distant until one day she just left. And now Aubrey has to face life alone. And then Gram turns up, certain that something is wrong. It must be if nobody is answering the phone. After a few days of unsuccessful searching for her missing daughter, Gram decides the best thing to do is take her granddaughter back North with her, keep her safe until everything sorts itself out. Reluctantly, Aubrey is forced to live again, to get up each morning, to talk to people, to go to school, to move beyond the pain of the accident, the loss of her family. And she begins to find happiness in the most unlikely of places. But when her mom finally turns up, Aubrey's going to have a decision to make. Go home or stay with her new extended family? I read this 256 page novel in one sitting, not even pausing to make myself a drink or eat lunch. From the first page I was sucked into Aubrey's world, her thoughts and her fears. I found myself remembering what it was like to look through the eyes of an eleven year old in an adult world. There were plenty of moments where I had a lump in my throat and a couple where I actually shed a tear. The last book that moved me in such a way was 'The Perks of Being a Wallflower'. As a child, I don't remember a book ever making me cry and I can't help but wonder whether this novel would have the same emotional effect on an eleven year old as it did on this 27 year old reader. Part of me thinks the perspective of adulthood might be what makes this story so poignant, so heart-wrenching. This book has found a special place in my heart and will remain on my bookshelves until my future children are old enough to read it. 'Love, Aubrey' is a classic in the making.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brooke F

    Love, Aubrey By, Suzanne LaFluer As you may know, I am not one who typically picks up a book and reads it for fun, so I was never aware of a special author I liked, or type of book I really enjoyed. I was really surprised by how interesting this book was... It was sad at times, funny, and depressing all in one, but that made the book unique. The author made it easy to follow and easy to understand, and also made it so you could really visualize what you were reading. The author knew when to give Love, Aubrey By, Suzanne LaFluer As you may know, I am not one who typically picks up a book and reads it for fun, so I was never aware of a special author I liked, or type of book I really enjoyed. I was really surprised by how interesting this book was... It was sad at times, funny, and depressing all in one, but that made the book unique. The author made it easy to follow and easy to understand, and also made it so you could really visualize what you were reading. The author knew when to give a lot of details, or little detail into parts, which I liked because it wasn’t boring. I would say ages, ten through thirteen would enjoy this book, and enjoy depressing books, and anyone above that age might think of it as to easy to read. This book starts in Virginia, with an 11 year-old girl, named Aubrey Priestly. She was a survivor of a car crash, but unfortunately her Dad and Sister, Savannah, did not make it out of the crash alive. Her Mother, on the other hand did make it out alive, but could not handle the depression and constant memories, so she disappeared, leaving Aubrey home alone. Aubrey lived alone for a couple of weeks, living off of Spaghetti-Os, cheese and crackers. Her Grandma, eventually shows up at her house, and finds out Aubrey was living alone. They hopped on the next train to Vermont together, and Aubrey spent her summer, and next few years there. At first Aubrey knew no one and felt alone, but then she met a next-door neighbor named Bridget and they become best friends. Week-by-week, they try calling and contacting everyone who could possibly know where Aubrey’s Mom is. Months turned to years and still no one had heard from her Mom. But, one night Aubrey is awakened by the sound of her Moms voice coming from downstairs, she walks down and notices her Mom standing in the living room. She was faced with the decision of going back home with her Mom to Virginia, or staying in Vermont with her Grandma.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Sadly, this book got lost at school. I paid the cost to the library, but now I want to finish it! Update on May 18, 2010. Just finished the copy that I borrowed from another library. A great, sad story that I really loved. I'm so glad I found another copy...most bookstores don't seem to carry it, but I highly recommend it if you find a copy somewhere! PS: If you find the one I left at school (Ilene/Christine/Stephanie :), please let me know! :) Update on December 5, 2011. I reread this book this pas Sadly, this book got lost at school. I paid the cost to the library, but now I want to finish it! Update on May 18, 2010. Just finished the copy that I borrowed from another library. A great, sad story that I really loved. I'm so glad I found another copy...most bookstores don't seem to carry it, but I highly recommend it if you find a copy somewhere! PS: If you find the one I left at school (Ilene/Christine/Stephanie :), please let me know! :) Update on December 5, 2011. I reread this book this past November. The characters are revealed in a way that they really hold on to you. I found myself thinking about them even when not reading. I truly love this book and author...highly recommended! PS: I own a copy now :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Zoe M

    Love Aubrey is one of the best books I have ever read. Through the whole book there was never nothing happening there was always an emotion for the reader to feel. At some points I was crying and for others I was laughing. During the book I never got bored and always wanted to read just one more chapter. I strongly recommend this book to others.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    Five years later, and I still laughed, smiled and cried as if I was reading it for the first time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emily16

    I loved the book. It was amazing!!!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pixi Jo

    Aubrey has a lot on her plate. Her dad & sister die in a nasty car crash (while she & her mum survive), then her mum pulls a runner and leaves her behind, with spagetti-os and her new fishy friend. Luckily her grammie steps in and helps her out, but it's all so much for a wee lass to take in! Your favourtie parent is dead. Your annoying little sister, who you'd now give anything to be annoyed by again, is dead. Your mum isn't right in the head and is off elsewhere leaving you to mourn alone. And your Aubrey has a lot on her plate. Her dad & sister die in a nasty car crash (while she & her mum survive), then her mum pulls a runner and leaves her behind, with spagetti-os and her new fishy friend. Luckily her grammie steps in and helps her out, but it's all so much for a wee lass to take in! Your favourtie parent is dead. Your annoying little sister, who you'd now give anything to be annoyed by again, is dead. Your mum isn't right in the head and is off elsewhere leaving you to mourn alone. And your gran, bless her heart, tries her best with you but isn't used to having kids about as much as she once was. What's a girl to do? She is to make friends with the almost supernaturally empathetic little girl next door. She's to go to school and interact with out children and find out that tragedy hits us all in some form or another. She is to write her heart out. She is to grieve. She is to heal. Recommended book for those who've hit a rough spot and need a bit of encouragement getting over the worst of it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    clara

    *3.75 despite my disappointing first impression due to her inadequate tree-climbing attire, i actually thought this book was pretty ok! very first novel-y, however, and not a ton of original material. we've all read a hundred mg books about a girl with a dead parent. but still. i liked it. also bonus points just realized the "skirt" is really some weird, long, thicc shorts. ew? not to mention that they're burgandy, denim, and some kind of odd plaid. i think it's called dog star. so, still a terrib *3.75 despite my disappointing first impression due to her inadequate tree-climbing attire, i actually thought this book was pretty ok! very first novel-y, however, and not a ton of original material. we've all read a hundred mg books about a girl with a dead parent. but still. i liked it. also bonus points just realized the "skirt" is really some weird, long, thicc shorts. ew? not to mention that they're burgandy, denim, and some kind of odd plaid. i think it's called dog star. so, still a terrible choice but maybe not as bad

  22. 5 out of 5

    London Schlussel

    Love, Aubrey Suzanne LaFeur One girl named Aubrey has been alone in her house in Virginia for more than a couple months now. Then she gets call, after call… she freezes and sobs into tears when she picks up the phone. My favorite part of the novel is when something happens to Aubrey that she has been waiting for so long. This is a remarkable story, Amazing down to the last page wishing it was a series. At the end of each chapter there is a little piece of writing like one of them is to her dad a Love, Aubrey Suzanne LaFeur One girl named Aubrey has been alone in her house in Virginia for more than a couple months now. Then she gets call, after call… she freezes and sobs into tears when she picks up the phone. My favorite part of the novel is when something happens to Aubrey that she has been waiting for so long. This is a remarkable story, Amazing down to the last page wishing it was a series. At the end of each chapter there is a little piece of writing like one of them is to her dad and it is just the sweetest thing ever and another is to her imaginary friend. I think this book would be great for people who love mystery and suspense, and would keep you on the edge of your seat the entire time you are reading it. Made me cry so many times and when I read it a second time I still cried. I like this book because it gives a lot of advice and detail about things that are still going on today. This author gives a lot of detail and Tips on how Aubrey lives these years of her life alone. Like when she goes back to school for the first time in a year. She goes through things that most kids do today. That’s why I love this novel. Quote from the book: “No she never talked about… them either.” Page: 19 Chapter: 2

  23. 4 out of 5

    Quirkyreads100

    Have you ever read a book that is, in every way, perfect? Have you ever read a book conveying a character so well that you feel as if you know them? That’s how I felt after that first delicious read of Love, Aubrey. Yes, my first time. But not my last. I live with my mom, dad, and brother. I can’t count how many times I have rolled my eyes at my dad, stuck out my tongue at my brother, or given my mom the silent treatment. But after I read Love, Aubrey, I remembered how wonderful it feels when Have you ever read a book that is, in every way, perfect? Have you ever read a book conveying a character so well that you feel as if you know them? That’s how I felt after that first delicious read of Love, Aubrey. Yes, my first time. But not my last. I live with my mom, dad, and brother. I can’t count how many times I have rolled my eyes at my dad, stuck out my tongue at my brother, or given my mom the silent treatment. But after I read Love, Aubrey, I remembered how wonderful it feels when I see a movie, just me and my mom, or go out to a wacky café with my dad, or play baseball with my brother. Then I thought of people like Aubrey, whose seven-year-old sister and father died in a car accident, whose mother abandoned her, and who had to move to Vermont with her grandmother. I don’t mean to sound preachy, but I realized how lucky I am. Imagine: you live a happy and normal life, your mom is always (or almost always) ready to play and have fun, your sister is as cute and nice as a seven-year-old sister could be and your dad has a good job that pays him well. This was Aubrey’s life. But while she is driving back from a vacation in a blinding downpour life throws a cruel curve ball that kills both her sister and father. This brings me to the most complex point of all--kids are in many ways more adaptable than grown-ups. After this tragic accident, Aubrey’s mother--out of sheer grief--abandons her. So Aubrey moves to Vermont to live with her grandma. In Vermont, Aubrey has to start more than a new school--she has to start a new life. During the summer and the beginning of the school year Aubrey’s thoughts are constantly clouded by sadness and confusion, especially for her sister, Savannah, who was very similar to the sister of the girl next door. It seems that the only people Aubrey can talk to are her pet fish and Savannah’s imaginary friend, Jilly. It’s like she’s isolated herself on an island that she doesn’t feel ready to leave. But gradually she makes friends with Bridget, the girl next door, gets closer to her grandmother and starts to open up to the school counselor. Oh, school. Lets talk about school. In my life, I have attended three different schools. In first grade, when I spent a wonderful year in Germany with my family, I attended the Comenius School. I felt scared. I wondered what people would think of me. Would I make friends? Would anyone hate me? Would anyone like me? School is the majority of my social life, and it’s the same way for Aubrey. In school, there are other things to deal with besides sorrow--there’s homework, friends, crushes, and you probably know what else. While at school, Aubrey allows herself to flee from her island a little and begins to let the terrible things that have happened in her life fade into the past. Meanwhile, people are frantically searching for Aubrey’s mom. After about three months of school, she is found. So let’s talk about Aubrey’s relationship with her mother. Aubrey’s mother has always loved her. That’s not the problem. Death is a huge force that can do many things to people. I think that the impact of the car crash and all the loved ones lost made Aubrey’s mother do this terrible thing despite her love and care for Aubrey. After her mother is found and spends months seeing a psychologist, she is finally ready to visit. This is a big deal for Aubrey. Think--your mother has abandoned you, apologized over and over through tears by phone, and now she’s coming to visit. I remember last year in my choir when we had auditioned for the first solo of the season. For weeks I had worried and wished and gotten sweaty hands from crossing my fingers, but when it finally came time for our conductor to announce who had gotten the solo, I was suddenly wishing that I had never come to choir. If you morph this into more serious terms, that’s how Aubrey felt. For months she has cried and prayed and desperately wanted her mom to come back, but when she finally does, Aubrey feels scared and confused. Slowly Aubrey and her mother adjust to each other and begin to spend more time together, making dinner, playing Monopoly, hugging, talking, and relaxing outside. Aubrey, her grandmother, and her mom have a fantastic time together. But it’s just a visit and after Aubrey’s mom goes back to their old house to see her psychologist some more and to get a job, Aubrey settles back into her now normal life in Vermont. Then a decision is put in front of Aubrey like an unavoidable door slammed in front of you. She has the choice of living with her mother or staying with her Gram. She finds herself very confused. Should she go back and live with her mom? Should she stay here with Gram, Bridget and her counselor? She feels caught between two huge choices that will have an impact on her life. Decisions cloud up a lot of life, and I sometimes wish that somebody could just decide them for me. But then again, I tell myself every time I am faced with one that I need to make my own decisions without somebody else planning out my life for me. That’s what Gram tells Aubrey when she asks what she should do. I agree completely. I’m not going to say that Love, Aubrey isn’t sad, because it is. Really sad! But I am going to say that you should never let the sadness stop you from reading this amazing book. Because once you begin reading about the life of Aubrey Priestly, you can never stop.

  24. 4 out of 5

    PJ

    I loved this book. I know it was written for children and it's written from a child's viewpoint but that's probably why I liked it. It is about loss and grief but it is so sweet and sad since it is seen through the eyes of a child. I cried at several points throughout this book. I would recommend it to any adult to give to a child who is going through loss. I loved this book. I know it was written for children and it's written from a child's viewpoint but that's probably why I liked it. It is about loss and grief but it is so sweet and sad since it is seen through the eyes of a child. I cried at several points throughout this book. I would recommend it to any adult to give to a child who is going through loss.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stacey (prettybooks)

    I read Eight Keys last year and I absolutely loved it. It was my first foray into children's literature for a little while and I adored the way Elise's story was told — through discovering a key that leads to unlocking eight rooms in her family's barn — and so I did not hesitate to read Suzanne LaFleur's début novel, Love, Aubrey. Love, Aubrey is a heartbreakingly realistic tale of an 11-year-old who suddenly loses her father and younger sister Savannah in a devastating car crash. Aubrey wakes up I read Eight Keys last year and I absolutely loved it. It was my first foray into children's literature for a little while and I adored the way Elise's story was told — through discovering a key that leads to unlocking eight rooms in her family's barn — and so I did not hesitate to read Suzanne LaFleur's début novel, Love, Aubrey. Love, Aubrey is a heartbreakingly realistic tale of an 11-year-old who suddenly loses her father and younger sister Savannah in a devastating car crash. Aubrey wakes up not long after the tragic accident and discovers that her mother is not at home, and it looks like she's never coming back. Aubrey's determined to survive on her own with TV, cheese and crackers, and her new pet fish Sammy, because if she faces the truth too quickly, she won't be able to bear it. Aubrey's emotional transition throughout the novel is slow but noticeable. The story takes place over a few months and we watch as she tries to come to terms with the drastic changes in her life, and frequently has watery flashbacks of the way her family used to be. Suzanne LaFleur is unafraid to show that Aubrey is depressed. Aubrey isn't sad, she isn't unhappy, she's going through something much deeper and traumatic. Suzanne LaFleur does this in a subtle yet purposeful way, which I think is hugely important as a child isn't simply going to say 'I'm depressed'. I also loved how the adults were supportive and not submissive. They recognised that Aubrey was not going to 'snap out of it'. Instead, Aubrey deals with the situation in her own way as she writes letters to her sister's best friend Jilly, and in ways suggested by those that care for her, such as her grandmother giving her 'to do' lists every day. Love, Aubrey is an important reminder that children's books aren't just for children, a poignant story about grief and consoling. It's not a book you 'enjoy', per se. Instead, you'll become deeply invested in the well-being of this little girl, richly understanding every emotion and thought running through her head. Suzanne LaFleur has a talent for understand children's experiences — and how they can be both very different, and very like, the experiences of adults — and I look forward to seeing who she endeavours to tell the story of next. Thank you Puffin for providing this book for review! I also reviewed this book over on Pretty Books.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shae Pigarelli

    Aubrey's father and younger sister were recently killed in a car accident, so it was just Aubrey and her mom. That is, up until the day her mom disappeared. One day, Aubrey woke up to a quiet house. It had been quiet without Savanah and her dad, but it was quieter than usual. Aubrey noticed her mom wasn’t home and decided she must be out at the grocery store. She ate breakfast, brushed her teeth, and watched some TV. Aubrey’s mom still wasn’t home. This went on for hours, then days, then weeks. Aubrey's father and younger sister were recently killed in a car accident, so it was just Aubrey and her mom. That is, up until the day her mom disappeared. One day, Aubrey woke up to a quiet house. It had been quiet without Savanah and her dad, but it was quieter than usual. Aubrey noticed her mom wasn’t home and decided she must be out at the grocery store. She ate breakfast, brushed her teeth, and watched some TV. Aubrey’s mom still wasn’t home. This went on for hours, then days, then weeks. It had been multiple weeks since she had seen her mom, yet Aubrey refused to call for help. She was tired of everyone being all up in her business since the funeral. She decide that when it was time, she would make a call. One day, Aubrey’s grandma showed up without notice at Aubrey’s house. Aubrey wouldn’t answer any questions about her mom, but somehow her grandmother found out. Her grandmother stayed with Aubrey for a few weeks. After a few weeks, her grandmother told her to pack some bags because she was taking Aubrey home with her. Aubrey has to adjust to a new school, new friends, a new house, a new state, and living without her mother. Months had passed since her mother left, but one day, her grandmother received a call. The call was from Aubrey’s mom’s friend, Aubrey’s mom had landed up states away from their home and she was going to stay there for a while. Will Aubrey’s mom come back and want to be with Aubrey? Will she want to live a new life away from Aubrey to get her mind off the deaths? Read (I know you have already, so you already know what happens. :D ) Love Aubrey to find out. I laughed and cried throughout this book. I’m not a big crier when it comes to books and movies, but this book really triggered my emotions. I could really closely relate to events that happened in Aubrey’s life, so I understood why she didn’t want to ask for help. The author did an outstanding (and that’s not a word I use often) job writing this book. As a reader, you feel the hate/love/longing for Aubrey’s mom the same way Aubrey feels. When I was reading this book, I was really torn between love and hate towards her mom. This book totally goes to the top of my list of recommended books. Many people will fall in love with this book and maybe even hate the ending (like I did). The only thing I really disliked, was the ending. I felt it was too abrupt and didn’t really complete the story. I wish Aubrey would have gotten a letter back from here mom being supportive of Aubrey’s decision. Without the reply, I’m left guessing what really happens.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    I can't decide whether to give this three or four stars. I read it a few weeks ago, and although I found it quite absorbing to read, my overall impression of it in retrospect is that it was pretty good, but nothing special. It's quite dramatic subject matter for a children's book - Aubrey (age 11) and her family are in a car accident, which kills her younger sister and her father, while her mother (who seems to have already been suffering from some sort of mental health problems - this is hinted I can't decide whether to give this three or four stars. I read it a few weeks ago, and although I found it quite absorbing to read, my overall impression of it in retrospect is that it was pretty good, but nothing special. It's quite dramatic subject matter for a children's book - Aubrey (age 11) and her family are in a car accident, which kills her younger sister and her father, while her mother (who seems to have already been suffering from some sort of mental health problems - this is hinted at a few times, but never explicit) has some kind of breakdown and leaves Aubrey all alone. Aubrey buys herself a fish and decides she'll be fine running the home with just her and her fish (that beginning part seems just a bit bizarre to me!), and then after a week or so, her grandmother turns up, and realises what's happened, and stays with Aubrey for a whlie and then takes her to her own home. The story is about how Aubrey gradually starts to process and work through her grief, and make a new life for herself in Vermont with her grandmother. I found myself caring about Aubrey as I read it, but also not quite believing in the story - everything seemed too nicey-nicey and cosy and simplified. Of course, it's a kids' book, so it can't be too horrific - but as an adult reading, I felt that surely a kid in Aubrey's situation would be a lot more traumatised, and there would be a lot more emotional chaos. Her grandmother is kind of too good to be true, as is the new friend she makes. I found myself comparing with My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece, and thinking about the difference between American kids' books and British ones - British ones are a lot grittier and messier, I think, in general, whereas American ones are more what I call 'nicey-nicey'. It's not that everything is perfect in this novel though - Aubrey is grieving and gets overwhelmed and depressed, and her grandmother gets frustrated with her, but the overall atmosphere is one of it being okay and safe and cosy and a lot simpler and nicer than it really would be.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristyn

    As you're reading the first chapter, you begin to ask questions - what happened to this little girl? What about her family? Why is she 11 years old and going food shopping by herself? Then you start putting the pieces together. There was an accident. Death has occurred, as well as abandonment. She is learning, quickly, how she must be independent and she cannot rely on anyone else. After a while, her grandmother comes to her rescue, and takes her from her lonely home in Virginia to Vermont. It's As you're reading the first chapter, you begin to ask questions - what happened to this little girl? What about her family? Why is she 11 years old and going food shopping by herself? Then you start putting the pieces together. There was an accident. Death has occurred, as well as abandonment. She is learning, quickly, how she must be independent and she cannot rely on anyone else. After a while, her grandmother comes to her rescue, and takes her from her lonely home in Virginia to Vermont. It's quite a change for this young girl, but it gets better when she meets the neighbor, a young girl who is quite alike. Although she has setbacks, through the many tears that are shed, she begins to see that good things can happen even after the most devastating events. In the end she must choose between a life she once had, and the new life she has only just begun. I think this book would be great for a child in the hospital, because it helps describe times in the hospital, death/loss, abandonment, grief, family, and support. Of course it must be developmentally appropriate. I thought it was interesting to read about Aubrey in the hospital, without a Child Life Specialist, and seeing that she was scared, didn't know what an IV was or where she was, and not knowing what had happened to her. She was given medication to sleep, and wasn't allowed to express any emotion. The letters that she eventually wrote, due to the advice of her counselor at school, helped get her feelings down on paper like a journal would. It's a definitely a book I'd recommend, as I previously said, not only because of the amazing story line, but also because the literary elements flow so well together [flashbacks, memories, letters, sensory language]. If you're looking for a quick, easy read, but one that might make you cry and connect to the characters - this is definitely a must read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I read this for a book review in my MLIS Library Materials for Children course. I read the description and decided that as heartbreaking as the situation would be, I needed to read it. Before the book arrived at my library, I figured the entire story would be written in letters, so I was surprised that wasn't case. Aubrey has been through some heartbreaking couple of months with the loss of her beloved dad and younger sister, Savannah. We're introduced to her alone in her house, grabbing birthday I read this for a book review in my MLIS Library Materials for Children course. I read the description and decided that as heartbreaking as the situation would be, I needed to read it. Before the book arrived at my library, I figured the entire story would be written in letters, so I was surprised that wasn't case. Aubrey has been through some heartbreaking couple of months with the loss of her beloved dad and younger sister, Savannah. We're introduced to her alone in her house, grabbing birthday money to buy groceries and a pet fish for company after she eats the remaining cheese and crackers three times a day. Neighbors question where her mother is, and Aubrey lies. As she detaches herself from her reality, she goes into survival mode, taking baby steps to ensure she will fine on her own. When her grandmother arrives in a panic, Aubrey struggles to admit she's been alone, her mother leaving one morning. With the stability her grandmother provides, her new friendship with next-door neighbor Bridget, and the guidance of counselor Amy, we watch Aubrey go from survival mode mini-adult to some level of normalcy for an eleven year old. And when faced with the toughest decision of her life, Aubrey tackles her decision with maturity and honesty, choosing what is best for her and her alone. "Love, Aubrey" is a beautifully written, heartbreaking story about loss, grief, and learning to move on. LaFleur writes with an honest middle school voice, allowing the readers to experience what Aubrey is going though. Prepare to go through a box of tissues though, as Aubrey goes from a normal moment to one of heartbreak without notice. Her strong, true friendship with Bridget gives hope that Aubrey can make it through her dark days.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Love: Audrey When I read this book I felt I actually was the character. I felt her emotions, her pain; I heard her thoughts and saw what she saw. As I was reading I heard Bridget talking to me, and her little sister laughing as she ran around the yard. I even smelled the Virginia air and how she said it smelled of cows. I pictured the scene of the crash and felt how she must have felt when she found out her father and sister had died. It was a very visual story. I liked the characters because I Love: Audrey When I read this book I felt I actually was the character. I felt her emotions, her pain; I heard her thoughts and saw what she saw. As I was reading I heard Bridget talking to me, and her little sister laughing as she ran around the yard. I even smelled the Virginia air and how she said it smelled of cows. I pictured the scene of the crash and felt how she must have felt when she found out her father and sister had died. It was a very visual story. I liked the characters because I can kind of relate to Aubrey because I kind of lost a person who I consider my mom but she came back. And I also have friends that get mad because I never tell them anything. I also like being alone sometimes too. (And I like fish) I also get mad at people easily just like Aubrey. And I don’t open up to certain people as easily as others. But my biggest and closest relation to Aubrey is that I miss my dad. You will really like this because it’s got a little bit of a mix in it, like it will make you laugh, it will make you cry, and if you get as into it as I did you will feel how loving her family was. And the author explains things well so you can easily visualize things that Aubrey talks about in the book. I had to reread the part when she gets in the crash it was a terrible picture, I heard their screams, and it made me sick to my stomach. This book reminds me of a friend of mine she is tired of being in foster homes and she just wants to be left alone. This book is a great thing to read on free time so pick up a copy and see for

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