web site hit counter Jak stracić przyjaciół i zrazić do siebie ludzi - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Jak stracić przyjaciół i zrazić do siebie ludzi

Availability: Ready to download

In 1995 high-flying British journalist Toby Young left London for New York to become a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. Other Brits had taken Manhattan--Alistair Cooke, Tina Brown, Anna Wintour--so why couldn't he?But things didn't quite go according to plan. Within the space of two years he was fired from Vanity Fair, banned from the most fashionable bar in the city, a In 1995 high-flying British journalist Toby Young left London for New York to become a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. Other Brits had taken Manhattan--Alistair Cooke, Tina Brown, Anna Wintour--so why couldn't he?But things didn't quite go according to plan. Within the space of two years he was fired from Vanity Fair, banned from the most fashionable bar in the city, and couldn't get a date for love or money. Even the local AA group wanted nothing to do with him.How to Lose Friends and Alienate People is Toby Young's hilarious and best-selling account of the five years he spent looking for love in all the wrong places and steadily working his way down the New York food chain, from glossy magazine editor to crash-test dummy for interactive sex toys. A seditious attack on the culture of celebrity from inside the belly of the beast, How to Lose Friends and Alienate People is also a "nastily funny read." --USA Today


Compare

In 1995 high-flying British journalist Toby Young left London for New York to become a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. Other Brits had taken Manhattan--Alistair Cooke, Tina Brown, Anna Wintour--so why couldn't he?But things didn't quite go according to plan. Within the space of two years he was fired from Vanity Fair, banned from the most fashionable bar in the city, a In 1995 high-flying British journalist Toby Young left London for New York to become a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. Other Brits had taken Manhattan--Alistair Cooke, Tina Brown, Anna Wintour--so why couldn't he?But things didn't quite go according to plan. Within the space of two years he was fired from Vanity Fair, banned from the most fashionable bar in the city, and couldn't get a date for love or money. Even the local AA group wanted nothing to do with him.How to Lose Friends and Alienate People is Toby Young's hilarious and best-selling account of the five years he spent looking for love in all the wrong places and steadily working his way down the New York food chain, from glossy magazine editor to crash-test dummy for interactive sex toys. A seditious attack on the culture of celebrity from inside the belly of the beast, How to Lose Friends and Alienate People is also a "nastily funny read." --USA Today

30 review for Jak stracić przyjaciół i zrazić do siebie ludzi

  1. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Hoover

    This wasn't a how-to book on how to get rid of friends. I read it and I still have too many friends and none of them feel alienated enough to leave, apparently. This book was funny, but if you're looking to cut people loose from your life, I wouldn't recommend this book as a place to start. You'll have more luck stealing something valuable from your friend to ruin your relationship with them, or maybe, have you considered an affair with a SO? That almost always does the trick. Anyway. This book This wasn't a how-to book on how to get rid of friends. I read it and I still have too many friends and none of them feel alienated enough to leave, apparently. This book was funny, but if you're looking to cut people loose from your life, I wouldn't recommend this book as a place to start. You'll have more luck stealing something valuable from your friend to ruin your relationship with them, or maybe, have you considered an affair with a SO? That almost always does the trick. Anyway. This book is fiction. Not a how-to manual. Would help if they put that in the title, but that might be a spoiler alert, I dunno.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    I found this book to be really amusing when I read it, but now after seeing Toby Young on this past season of Top Chef, I think he just an unfunny douche bag. I'll leave the original four star rating, but only because reading about a douche bag can be funny. I found this book to be really amusing when I read it, but now after seeing Toby Young on this past season of Top Chef, I think he just an unfunny douche bag. I'll leave the original four star rating, but only because reading about a douche bag can be funny.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sheree

    Honestly super difficult to read. A white man from a first world country, talking out of his ass about the rise of political correctness, feminazis and how he never made it in New York because he just couldn't take the town seriously. White mediocrity personified. I hate giving up so it took me about 3 months to read it through. 2 stars because it was funny sometimes. Edit: now 1 star, I really disliked this book Honestly super difficult to read. A white man from a first world country, talking out of his ass about the rise of political correctness, feminazis and how he never made it in New York because he just couldn't take the town seriously. White mediocrity personified. I hate giving up so it took me about 3 months to read it through. 2 stars because it was funny sometimes. Edit: now 1 star, I really disliked this book

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    In 1995, British journalist Toby Young got the phone call every Fleet Street hack dreams of — an offer from Graydon Carter, the renowned editor of Vanity Fair, to fly to New York and work on the magazine. Toby then proceeded to stuff up every opportunity that came his way, starting with his interpretation of the “casual” dress code as a pair of vintage 501s and a T-shirt “featuring a bare-chested Keanu Reeves and the strapline: ‘Young, Dumb and Full of Come’”.I first read How To Lose Friends & A In 1995, British journalist Toby Young got the phone call every Fleet Street hack dreams of — an offer from Graydon Carter, the renowned editor of Vanity Fair, to fly to New York and work on the magazine. Toby then proceeded to stuff up every opportunity that came his way, starting with his interpretation of the “casual” dress code as a pair of vintage 501s and a T-shirt “featuring a bare-chested Keanu Reeves and the strapline: ‘Young, Dumb and Full of Come’”.I first read How To Lose Friends & Alienate People in 2002 as I commuted to my new job in an organisation I came to refer to as The Ministry of Truth. It was all I could do not to burst into horrified laughter right there on the bus. Over a decade later, Toby Young’s ghastly faux pas, complete lack of judgement, and drunken antics continue to appal.I re-read How To Lose Friends & Alienate People shortly after My Salinger Year, another memoir set in the New York publishing industry. While the latter could be a career guide for young hopefuls (do what you’re asked but be prepared to take on more challenging work, be discreet at all times, and be aware of the impression you’re making), Toby Young’s book is a how-not-to guide (don’t smuggle a strippergram into the office on Take Our Daughters to Work Day, don’t slide smart-arse remarks under your boss’s door, and try to avoid being photographed doing lines of coke at work).Between his truly outrageous tales, Toby Young offers up interesting digressions on celebrity culture and academia in the late 1980s, and the importance of the New York media in determining the zeitgeist:“If Vanity Fair announces that London is on fire, then, to all intents and purposes, it’s on fire. On the other hand, if London’s so-called cultural renaissance goes completely unnoticed by anyone outside the city, then the whole thing is a bit of a non-event… In the global kingdom, New York is the home of international court society.”He also muses on exactly what it takes to be successful at a magazine like Vanity Fair:“I often wondered how it was that a group of such apparently sophisticated people were able to devote so much energy to producing an upscale supermarket tabloid. How did they preserve their sanity while thinking up cover lines like ‘Jemima and Imran: The High-Stakes Marriage of Pakistan’s Camelot Couple’? Were they all on Prozac?”Toby answers this question in a footnote: “The answer is probably yes.”How To Lose Friends & Alienate People is much more than gossipy recollections of Toby’s time among the glitterati. He shows enough insight, self-awareness and wit to keep the reader on his side, despite his unspeakable behaviour. In the last chapter, he recounts some of the “spectacularly idiotic” things he did, then ponders:“Up to a point, these episodes were simply the result of blind ignorance; of not knowing, and not bothering to find out, the appropriate way to behave. But some of my more destructive acts seemed to be the result of the anarchic side of my character tripping the other side up, doing whatever it could to ensure I’d never end up achieving the things I’d set my heart on…I can’t help feeling that the terrorist inside of me was the British part sabotaging the American part. The longer I spent in the States, the more British I felt. Like so many others, I thought that by moving to New York, I could re-invent myself; I could become an American. It seemed entirely possible, too — for about six months. Then my Britishness started to reassert itself. It was if I took a flight across the Atlantic and my nationality came by boat.”But perhaps the last word should go to the Director of Public Relations at Vanity Fair, quoted in the reviews at the front of the book:“We’ve been looking through our files, and we can’t seem to find any record of a Toby Young ever having worked here.”

  5. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Why did I find Toby Young such an annoying twerp. I very nearly didn't finish this book, a very rare occurrence. His obsession with celebrity, parties and tottie just made me cringe but his analysis of the cultural differences between New York and London was very incisive and that is what kept me reading, as it was I read two other books in breaks when I'd had too much of Toby. Why did I find Toby Young such an annoying twerp. I very nearly didn't finish this book, a very rare occurrence. His obsession with celebrity, parties and tottie just made me cringe but his analysis of the cultural differences between New York and London was very incisive and that is what kept me reading, as it was I read two other books in breaks when I'd had too much of Toby.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    In the accordance with Hydra principle - I'd link you but it got deleted. I'd also like to say that I didn't get a notice that this review will be deleted. If we are deleting anything off-topic, does this mean that those pre-release, pre-read reviews that are nothing but a pile of gifs "expressing reader's excitement" go to? The one you chose to defend? In the accordance with Hydra principle - I'd link you but it got deleted. I'd also like to say that I didn't get a notice that this review will be deleted. If we are deleting anything off-topic, does this mean that those pre-release, pre-read reviews that are nothing but a pile of gifs "expressing reader's excitement" go to? The one you chose to defend?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    I didn't expect much when I impulse bought this book at a used book store. I recognized Toby Young's name from his appearances as an occasional guest judge on Top Chef, where I didn't like him much but appreciated his shameless bitterness, and I found the book title very clever. When I finally got around to reading the book, though, I was surprised to love it. The story is a memoir from Young's journey through the New York City magazine publishing world in the mid-1990s. I have little interest in I didn't expect much when I impulse bought this book at a used book store. I recognized Toby Young's name from his appearances as an occasional guest judge on Top Chef, where I didn't like him much but appreciated his shameless bitterness, and I found the book title very clever. When I finally got around to reading the book, though, I was surprised to love it. The story is a memoir from Young's journey through the New York City magazine publishing world in the mid-1990s. I have little interest in NYC culture or print magazines, but I found Young's observations fascinating, with a real depth of analysis of a subject that could have been a silly collection of gossip. To be sure, there is plenty of gossip here, with horror stories about life in the offices of a Conde Nast publication and observations from Oscar parties, but Young approaches his work with a surprising amount of sobriety and gravity. He describes a particular magazine's goal as being something like "smart people writing about stupid things," and that's what he achieves here. The dualities really create a positive tension that makes this book rewarding to contemplate after the fact. Young doesn't fit in with some crowds because he shamelessly loves celebrity culture, and with others because he recognizes that this love is stupid and possibly harmful to society. He indulges in immaturity in the vein of Tucker Max (constant hangovers from booze and drugs, a callous encounter with an immigrant woman that will make you hate him almost as much as he momentarily hates himself, a prank with a stripper that made me laugh out loud) but develops a truly impressive maturity through a relationship near the end of the book. Through it all, Young is intelligent, articulate, and witty, willing to criticize others but refusing to humiliate anyone but himself. I didn't expect to like this book, but by the time I hit the 2/3 mark, I had already purchased a copy of the follow-up (The Sound of No Hands Clapping: A Memoir). I highly recommend this book to fans of pop culture.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Eiseman-Renyard

    How to Alienate Readers, Too I bought this book because the title caught my eye, and the quotes on the cover were divine: "I'll rot in hell before I give that little bastard a quote for his book" - Julie Birchill However, having read this all the way through - I agree with the various nay-sayers on the cover, and would like to hit Toby Young about the head with a hardcover copy of this memoir. It would be safe to say Mr. Young doesn't really get it. When writing yourself as the cute, laddis How to Alienate Readers, Too I bought this book because the title caught my eye, and the quotes on the cover were divine: "I'll rot in hell before I give that little bastard a quote for his book" - Julie Birchill However, having read this all the way through - I agree with the various nay-sayers on the cover, and would like to hit Toby Young about the head with a hardcover copy of this memoir. It would be safe to say Mr. Young doesn't really get it. When writing yourself as the cute, laddish fool - firstly you have to actually be likeable, and secondly for fuck's sake never make the kind of zany little blunders that may - for example - risk your girlfriend getting raped. Yes, you read that right. Toby Young presents all his brazen idiocies as lovable mistakes. Perhaps to him they are. To me, and I suspect most other readers, you need to warm to the protagonist a whole lot more before you let him get away with half the shit that Young does. And does repeatedly. You know that obnoxious, arrogant, knuckle-dragging friend of a friend you probably have to deal with down the pub every now and again? Well one of them's managed a media career, and thanks to this book you can now read the world from his point of view. It doesn't make much more sense than it did down the pub, but at least this one hollers less, and you can put it aside whenever he becomes to much. Don't get me wrong, it was educational, too: I now know to not turn up to my first day of work wearing a t-shirt that says "Young, Hung and Full of Come." The frustrating thing is that there is an intellect fighting to get out. Some of his analysis of transatlantic differences are interesting and valid, as well as his analysis of the illusion of meritocracy - it's just that these glimpses are so severely overshadowed by all his antics/arrogance/all-round arsery that this book, as a whole, is best left alone. God knows how they managed to turn this into a romantic comedy with that nice Simon Pegg in it. I suspect it involved some industrial cleaning to remove all traces of Toby Young's noxious personality.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    My fondest memory of this book was the day that I was reading it on the train on my way home from work. A guy got on the train and sat down next to me. He was reading "How to Win Friends and Influence People." Sometimes the planets just align. My fondest memory of this book was the day that I was reading it on the train on my way home from work. A guy got on the train and sat down next to me. He was reading "How to Win Friends and Influence People." Sometimes the planets just align.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mom

    This book was a very light read and not too difficult to get through, interesting enough to keep me reading. Beyond that I can't think of much positive to say. Another British writer (at least this one didn't use a lot of terms that were unfamiliar to me), male, and very opinionated, his biography reflects his experience in a very specific social setting in America in which he, self admittedly, acted like a pompous jerk. In the telling he seems to work through his problems and become a better pe This book was a very light read and not too difficult to get through, interesting enough to keep me reading. Beyond that I can't think of much positive to say. Another British writer (at least this one didn't use a lot of terms that were unfamiliar to me), male, and very opinionated, his biography reflects his experience in a very specific social setting in America in which he, self admittedly, acted like a pompous jerk. In the telling he seems to work through his problems and become a better person in the end, but still has a chip on his shoulder where America is concerned. I shouldn't take it personally because the social setting he was in has nothing to do with me and I would never be in this situation, but I guess I am just too patriotic for it not to affect me. Another pet peeve that seems to be ever increasing in today's literature is the unnecessary overuse of profanity! Unless you are using it sparingly and to show extreme emotion I find it repulsive. I do realize that I am among the minority in this opinion so I won't tell you not to read it, but I caution you: you might find this book a waste of time. Oh, and it didn't make me want to see the movie either.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Babs

    What I learned from this book? Don't believe the hype. This was one of the shittest books I've ever read. Toby Young has no conception as to why he can't get a shag and why no-one laughs at his jokes. Want to find out why Toby? Read your own retarded humour-vacuum of a book. What I learned from this book? Don't believe the hype. This was one of the shittest books I've ever read. Toby Young has no conception as to why he can't get a shag and why no-one laughs at his jokes. Want to find out why Toby? Read your own retarded humour-vacuum of a book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lee Ann

    This was smart and funny. The inside Vanity Fair stuff is great. The last third of the book falls apart. There was too much of his “oh what a loser I am schtick.” I'm glad he found love but the girl comes across as a snobby twit. The first third was a great take on celebrity culture and New York in particular. The book falls flat when he tries to equate New York with America as a whole. His experience with limousine liberals in Manhattan doesn't give him any insight into how the rest of the coun This was smart and funny. The inside Vanity Fair stuff is great. The last third of the book falls apart. There was too much of his “oh what a loser I am schtick.” I'm glad he found love but the girl comes across as a snobby twit. The first third was a great take on celebrity culture and New York in particular. The book falls flat when he tries to equate New York with America as a whole. His experience with limousine liberals in Manhattan doesn't give him any insight into how the rest of the country thinks and works. He condemns meritocracy and claims that poverty is inescapable. He thinks those who are born poor will stay that way due to class restrictions. His evidence is Manhattan's incestuous media world. Every real economist thinks about 80% of those born poor will not be poor by the end of their lives. Poverty itself is comparative and fluid. If you give everyone a million dollars, I will have 1 million and fifty dollars while you may have one million one thousand dollars. You are richer than I but we are both better off. Poor Toby is a liberal who found out he hates liberals.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie G.

    So, I didn't actually finish this. I pulled the plug at 172 because this man is such an unmitigated asshole I simply did not want to spend another moment with him. Even if Young were an interesting giant, horny, and surly toddler (and he is not, though he has some interesting experiences) this would have been no fun. To enjoy this you have to want to ride shotgun with Young, and that was the last thing I wanted to do. So, I didn't actually finish this. I pulled the plug at 172 because this man is such an unmitigated asshole I simply did not want to spend another moment with him. Even if Young were an interesting giant, horny, and surly toddler (and he is not, though he has some interesting experiences) this would have been no fun. To enjoy this you have to want to ride shotgun with Young, and that was the last thing I wanted to do.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Clement

    This is a highly entertaining book, but a bit like reading a Bret Easton Ellis novel, where few of the characters have any redeemable qualities, including the author. Only in this book the tales are ostensibly true. (I know the truth of many aspects of this book are disputed, but I figure it's best not to think about it too much and just go along for the ride.) Young certainly sets himself up as a funny but quite shallow and rather misguided character; and I'm not sure if we're supposed to see h This is a highly entertaining book, but a bit like reading a Bret Easton Ellis novel, where few of the characters have any redeemable qualities, including the author. Only in this book the tales are ostensibly true. (I know the truth of many aspects of this book are disputed, but I figure it's best not to think about it too much and just go along for the ride.) Young certainly sets himself up as a funny but quite shallow and rather misguided character; and I'm not sure if we're supposed to see him as a loveable cad, a frat boy with good breeding, or just a normal lad trying to find himself but failing at every turn. As someone from the US living abroad for the past decade and currently in the UK, it was certainly interesting to read his interpretations of cultural differences, though his view of both countries is one that is so far removed from my experience that it's hard to say if he's right or not. The celebrity and money-obsessed neighbourhoods of New York are no more representative of America as a whole than the Oxbridge intellectual elite in the swanky boroughs of London are of England. Of course, my experience growing up in the American Midwest or living in the Northwest of England do not align at all with his accounts. I suspect such people hardly even exist outside the small confines of these bizarre social circles. Nonetheless, I found this book his highly entertaining and engaging. Young's writing is witty, and the portrait he paints of himself is so self-deprecating, you will have trouble believing it's real - even in spite of the well-known British capacity for self-deprecation. I suspect that all the people in the book have the volume turned up on their personalities, but the desired effect is achieved and you are left amused but baffled by this status obsessed world in which Young lived for a brief moment in time. Though a great book and widely regarded as such, I think it would have benefited from a good edit. It's quite long, given the content isn't exactly deep, and there are quite a lot of diversions, some more pertinent and interesting than others. His long rant about meritocracy - though I agree with it 100% - is completely out of place; and I suspect it is there simply as a vehicle to establish his authority on the subject, given that his father coined the term. No one in America actually believes it's a genuine meritocracy. (Okay, no one I know at least. I'm sure some people do, but their delusions are likely being shattered every day.) It's rambles like this that make me wonder just how he managed to encounter so many alien, vapid, uncritical people in his short time in America. I certainly don't doubt that they exist, but the book is full of so many situations that are baffling to the reader. How does he always manage to meet the worst possible people and do the worst possible things? He paints a portrait of New Yorkers as soulless, conforming robots hungry for status, and he tells many stories to support this hypothesis. It makes for a very entertaining read, but it is often so surreal that it's very difficult to believe. At the very least, he has a knack for meeting the very worst people. Overall, a great light-hearted and humorous book, perfect for reading on a summer holiday.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    With a title like "How to Lose Friends and Alienate People: A Memoir", you'd expect Young to come off as a completely annoying prat that you'd want to stab to death, say, 50 pages into the book. I found myself pleasantly surprised on this front. Young does come off as a clueless and delusional prat with self-destructive tendencies at several points, but his book is surprisingly readable. Unlike, say, Tom Parker Bowles' Year of Eating Dangerously (now there's a prat for you) or the Twilight serie With a title like "How to Lose Friends and Alienate People: A Memoir", you'd expect Young to come off as a completely annoying prat that you'd want to stab to death, say, 50 pages into the book. I found myself pleasantly surprised on this front. Young does come off as a clueless and delusional prat with self-destructive tendencies at several points, but his book is surprisingly readable. Unlike, say, Tom Parker Bowles' Year of Eating Dangerously (now there's a prat for you) or the Twilight series, I didn't end up banging my head with the book, asking myself why I couldn't just put the book down and pick up something more intelligent to read. (I have a habit of finishing every book I pick up, no matter how horrid I may find it. Bram Stoker's Dracula is the only exception.) "How to Lose Friends" is part memoir of Young's failed attempt to break into the ranks of Manhattan's elite and part social commentary. The memoir part is mildly entertaining; Young uses self-deprecation for all its worth to milk laughs from his descent from contributing editor of Vanity Fair to unemployed hack with a major drinking problem. The social commentary bit, where Young snarkily discusses the differences between UK and US media, American courtship rules and rituals and American vs British social attitudes, is more interesting. The big question at this point is why did I even pick up a book with such a (un)promising title? Well, I like to interperse more intelligent reads with lighter ones like...Toby Young's book. And in that respect, Young's book is not a bad choice for a mindless vacation read. If Goodreads allowed people to assign half stars in their ratings, I'd probably give Toby Young's effort two and a half stars.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erika Gill

    Toby Young's ruminative work on social psychology, popular culture, the workplace hierarchy at Condé Nast in the 90s, and generally being unable to relate with people is a raw nerve, honest, and very British-ly self-effacing story that is VERY different from the 2008 movie. As the son of Michael Young, who coined the term meritocracy long before his son Toby would come to be, well, sort of sidelined and knocked down by the cultural interpretation of it, Young offers an academic insight into the k Toby Young's ruminative work on social psychology, popular culture, the workplace hierarchy at Condé Nast in the 90s, and generally being unable to relate with people is a raw nerve, honest, and very British-ly self-effacing story that is VERY different from the 2008 movie. As the son of Michael Young, who coined the term meritocracy long before his son Toby would come to be, well, sort of sidelined and knocked down by the cultural interpretation of it, Young offers an academic insight into the knock down, drag out head butting experience he faced as a journalist working for Vanity Fair. In reading this book you might, at times, come to despise Young as much as it seems most who encountered him did, you'll also be impressed by his insight, his intertextual sociological connections, and his rather breathtaking ability to delude himself. Can a book written about one's delusions still leave one delusional? I think I may have read the book a bit more seriously and with less of a cultural context than its intended audience, due to my age (I was 5 when the book opens) and sense of humor, which is quite malleable, thank you. Less funny, more cry for help, to me. All in all, great book. Young does in this work what he reminisces about the hacks of NYC in the 30s did, what Graydon Carter did in The Spy but then quit, and what Young himself had set out to do: make fun of Hollywood from the inside. Sort of.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathrina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A light, enjoyable read. Puts a spotlight on the world of celebrity and the journalists who feed off them. It's not a world I pay much attention to, but fun to dip into now and then, remind yourself that glamour is all about spin, and not to waste too much time on it. Young claims to have learned that lesson, and his creds since then seem to mildly prove it. I did just a moment of research just to satisfy myself, and here's what I learned: Alex de Silva is, of course, not his rising star pal's re A light, enjoyable read. Puts a spotlight on the world of celebrity and the journalists who feed off them. It's not a world I pay much attention to, but fun to dip into now and then, remind yourself that glamour is all about spin, and not to waste too much time on it. Young claims to have learned that lesson, and his creds since then seem to mildly prove it. I did just a moment of research just to satisfy myself, and here's what I learned: Alex de Silva is, of course, not his rising star pal's real name. Unfortunately, this pseudonym was a poor choice, as it is the name of a once successful Hollywood choreographer from Brazil, glamorized on the tv show So You Think You Can Dance. He's since been charged on several counts of rape (2003-2009) and it looks like that career is over... Apparently, his pal's real name is Sacha Gervasi, and the two haven't spoken since the book was published. That Welsh dog grooming bit turned into the film The Big Tease. The un-named supermodel is allegedly Veronica Webb, and he's since fathered a child with ex-Spice Girl Geri Halliwell in 2006. As for Toby, looks like that romantic bit with Caroline was the real deal. They're still married and have four children. He is a comfy food critic and appears as a judge on Top Chef. Feel like maybe my career in the gossip rags has just begun!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dathan

    This book was sort of a break from the ordinary for me. I normally read plot-driven novels -- Louis L'Amour, Dan Brown, and a whole host of science-fiction and fantasy. I picked this one up on a whim, mostly because they cast Simon Pegg to play the lead role in the movie based on it. I was about a third of the way through, and thoroughly disappointed, when I realized I was reading it all wrong. I was waiting for the plot to pick up; for the author to stop making what seemed like pointless, exten This book was sort of a break from the ordinary for me. I normally read plot-driven novels -- Louis L'Amour, Dan Brown, and a whole host of science-fiction and fantasy. I picked this one up on a whim, mostly because they cast Simon Pegg to play the lead role in the movie based on it. I was about a third of the way through, and thoroughly disappointed, when I realized I was reading it all wrong. I was waiting for the plot to pick up; for the author to stop making what seemed like pointless, extended ramblings; for something to just HAPPEN, DAMMIT! when I should have been reading it for the observations Toby Young makes about the world - his philosophies and musings on life, power, the mystique of fashion, and how some people just don't fit into it -- I should have been reading it to appreciate his journey and maturation over the course of the book. It's not a novel, it's his memoir, and the important part is what's happening inside him, not what's happening to him. Once I realized that, I thoroughly enjoyed the rest of the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Toby Young is an Englishman, a journalist who is intent on making a success of himself in the US, namely New York City. He fails miserably. Not because of his character, but because of the gulf in the culture. Despite appearing to be a fool, Toby is well-educated and explains what and why things went wrong, which they do for him with alarming consistency. He cannot get it 'right', but then again, the picture he paints of social life in NYC is one of men who are 'not quite human' and women who ar Toby Young is an Englishman, a journalist who is intent on making a success of himself in the US, namely New York City. He fails miserably. Not because of his character, but because of the gulf in the culture. Despite appearing to be a fool, Toby is well-educated and explains what and why things went wrong, which they do for him with alarming consistency. He cannot get it 'right', but then again, the picture he paints of social life in NYC is one of men who are 'not quite human' and women who are looking for anything but love in a relationship. What a sad place New York must be in that case, and what a anti-hero Toby is. Ok, in English terms, he is a middle-class bore, but he is also a fellow countryman, who is spontaneous, eccentric, amiable and does not take himself or life seriously. Good book!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jerramy

    I used to hate Toby Young. In fact, his London newspaper articles used to upset me so much that I actually wrote a letter to the editor to express how much I detested Mr Young and all of his ludicrous, sexist views. Then a friend of mine lent me his book and insisted I read it. Of course, I didn't want to, but one day I picked it up and then I couldn't put it down. And by the time I had finished, my views had made a 180-degree turn. Instead of hating Toby, I wanted to be his apprentice. This boo I used to hate Toby Young. In fact, his London newspaper articles used to upset me so much that I actually wrote a letter to the editor to express how much I detested Mr Young and all of his ludicrous, sexist views. Then a friend of mine lent me his book and insisted I read it. Of course, I didn't want to, but one day I picked it up and then I couldn't put it down. And by the time I had finished, my views had made a 180-degree turn. Instead of hating Toby, I wanted to be his apprentice. This book is sold as celebrity fluff, but it is actually quite a deep and quite a cerebral commentary on our modern, transatlantic society - and I think in the end, when we're all dead, it will be recognised as such. Sure, Toby's a selfish, bumbling idiot - but most men are. The difference is that most men can't write about it so beautifully and with such sharp humour.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Saw the movie because I love Simon Pegg movies. I was pleasantly surprised by this book though. There were some pretty outlandish things that went on with the author and I question how this book got published if they were true. Let alone the people he talked about so candidly - it's interesting in that he talks about reputation and yet there were some things revealed in this book that would slightly tarnish said rep. In my opinion anyways. Either way, if you're a total fashionista who's into the Saw the movie because I love Simon Pegg movies. I was pleasantly surprised by this book though. There were some pretty outlandish things that went on with the author and I question how this book got published if they were true. Let alone the people he talked about so candidly - it's interesting in that he talks about reputation and yet there were some things revealed in this book that would slightly tarnish said rep. In my opinion anyways. Either way, if you're a total fashionista who's into the glossy fashion magazine of New York's Conde Nast, you might be interested in learning about the inner workings of such profession. I personally stopped buying magazines because they were a waste of money and space, so now my head is filled with more useless information! But still, an interesting read with a happy ending of course.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    If you're fascinated by the media culture in New York, you'd probably like this book. It was all about Toby's wild ride as a "writer" for Vanity Fair. I put it in quotes because he says he got paid $60,000 for about 3000 words, making him the highest paid writer (per word) in the history of Vanity Fair. Toby is, well, original. I thought I've said and done some pretty heinous things at work, but Toby wins. I love the fact that he wasn't actually trying to get fired, and yet, he could write the h If you're fascinated by the media culture in New York, you'd probably like this book. It was all about Toby's wild ride as a "writer" for Vanity Fair. I put it in quotes because he says he got paid $60,000 for about 3000 words, making him the highest paid writer (per word) in the history of Vanity Fair. Toby is, well, original. I thought I've said and done some pretty heinous things at work, but Toby wins. I love the fact that he wasn't actually trying to get fired, and yet, he could write the handbook for how to do it. In fact, I think this is the handbook for how to do it. I'm really excited to see the movie because he's played by Simon Pegg and I just love that man.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Martin

    I had great hopes for this behind-the-scenes look at a young writer employed at Vanity Fair Magazine. It's a bitter, dreadfully self-pity-laden book that thinks it is far wittier than it is. I finished it, but by the end could understand why the author met with no success working under Graydon Carter in New York City and returned to the UK. The only surprising thing is that the magazine kept him on as long as it did. One star. I had great hopes for this behind-the-scenes look at a young writer employed at Vanity Fair Magazine. It's a bitter, dreadfully self-pity-laden book that thinks it is far wittier than it is. I finished it, but by the end could understand why the author met with no success working under Graydon Carter in New York City and returned to the UK. The only surprising thing is that the magazine kept him on as long as it did. One star.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    One of the funniest books I have ever read. Toby Young is hilarious in his memoir which details his inabilities to conform to the roles and responsibilities at the prestigious Vanity Fair. Almost everything he does is wrong, yet he manages to stay afloat for an impressive amount of time. Imagine a real-life version of Ron Livingston (Office Space) working at Vanity Fair.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Fabulous...a detailed account of what NOT to do when handed the job of a lifetime.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sooraya Evans

    The author appears to be an unlikable person. Make sense, given the title of this memoir. Nevertheless, still an amusing book. Kinda reminds me of 'The Devil Wears Prada'. The author appears to be an unlikable person. Make sense, given the title of this memoir. Nevertheless, still an amusing book. Kinda reminds me of 'The Devil Wears Prada'.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    This was actually painful to read. It's about an British writer who moves to the U.S. to work for Vanity Fair and makes every kind social faux pas he possibly could. He realizes too late how bad his instincts are, though he never comes out and says as much or even that he learned anything from his mistakes. There's a bit of a subplot here in that he moves to the U.S. at the same time as a friend of his and follows the career of his friend on the West Coast. Unlike the author, he is wildly succes This was actually painful to read. It's about an British writer who moves to the U.S. to work for Vanity Fair and makes every kind social faux pas he possibly could. He realizes too late how bad his instincts are, though he never comes out and says as much or even that he learned anything from his mistakes. There's a bit of a subplot here in that he moves to the U.S. at the same time as a friend of his and follows the career of his friend on the West Coast. Unlike the author, he is wildly successful. You realize very quickly, though the author himself probably doesn't, that the differences in their career trajectory has everything to do with their respective approaches to the culture of the U.S. It's clear the author, though willing to embrace American culture, is highly critical of it. He seems to view Americans as a stereotype, of which, you can tell, he doesn't think admirably. The problem is when you stereotype a people, you miss the nuances of the culture, which can be a deadly pitfall. For example, if you see Americans as open, honest and outgoing to the point you believe you can say anything to them or ask anything of them. You find out the hard way that there are unwritten rules as numerous and stringent as those of British culture. Americans know not to ask a Brit what he does for a living, but apparently Brits—at least this Brit—do not know you don't ask an American his sexual orientation. Sorry, but it's hard to read about an idiot doing stupid things and actually enjoy reading it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I picked that book because the cute cover and the title. (I should know better by now). I've started reading; Brad Pitt, Oscars, Vanity Fair and so much more other name dropping that I didn't really understand what the story was about. (If there's any) Some times, when I'm annoyed by the author style, I play a little game where I randomly open a page in the middle of the book and check for things that irritate my reading, like in this case name dropping. I played my little game and decided I didn I picked that book because the cute cover and the title. (I should know better by now). I've started reading; Brad Pitt, Oscars, Vanity Fair and so much more other name dropping that I didn't really understand what the story was about. (If there's any) Some times, when I'm annoyed by the author style, I play a little game where I randomly open a page in the middle of the book and check for things that irritate my reading, like in this case name dropping. I played my little game and decided I didn't want to continue to waste my time reading more celebrity names than actual story! But as they say ; "To each their own". Update; I played my little game once more before totally giving up, opened at the page where Toby Young's saying Braveheart was a new low, and was an "Anti-Britite" piece of propaganda. Obviously, currently living in Scotland, I found this pretty ... ignorant, and as a French-Canadian, history wise, British aren't my favourite people neither. I can deal with it, but do I really want to invest more time in a book written by this English man? No thanks!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Not only one of the funniest autobiographies I've ever read (the first time in my life I've openly laughed on two different occasions while reading a book) but also provides serious, deep insight into America's commercial culture. British journalist / writer Toby Young's experience working for a well renowned fashion magazine, Vanity Fair, in the 1990s portrays the America that I know and moved away from in 2009 (I now live in The Netherlands). Describes the way Americans (some, mind you, not al Not only one of the funniest autobiographies I've ever read (the first time in my life I've openly laughed on two different occasions while reading a book) but also provides serious, deep insight into America's commercial culture. British journalist / writer Toby Young's experience working for a well renowned fashion magazine, Vanity Fair, in the 1990s portrays the America that I know and moved away from in 2009 (I now live in The Netherlands). Describes the way Americans (some, mind you, not all but a significant portion of the population) worship celebrities and judge each other based on social status, job, perfect looks, and income rather than personality / soul. Example: "In London, the girls in my peer group didn't behave that differently from the boys. They drank in the same pubs, laughed at the same jokes and had a similarly relaxed attitude to sex. They enjoyed being looked at and admired but they weren't in any sense ornamental. It rarely took them more than fifteen minutes to get ready. Women in Manhattan, by contrast, behaved more like courtesans -- at least, the ones I met did. They existed in a completely different world from their male counterparts, often spending the whole day preparing for an evening out. A typical New York party girl would start the day with a visit to her dermatologist, followed by a trip to an expensive hair salon, then go shopping for a designer outfit on Madison Avenue and, finally, summon a makeup artist to her boudoir to apply the finishing touches." He describes how in London the journalists regularly criticize or make fun of celebrities and the rich but in New York journalists are climbing over each other to be the first to kiss their butts. A fantastic book. He continually burned bridges with celebrities by asking them the 'wrong questions' while working at Vanity Fair and was eventually "let go" for being too rebellious against Vanity Fair's power worshipping, soulless interpretation of the world. His practical jokes, sense of humor, and humility weren't seen as an asset there. I loved how he pissed off his manager, some rich big shot named Graydon who thinks he owns New York, again and again with his snyde or joking remarks. Toby learned that Americans can be a serious people with little sense of humor when it comes to their sense of materialism, worship of celebrities / the rich, superficiality, obsession with good or perfect looks, masking greed as ambition, women who act sexual and open-minded but are actually prude and judgmental, religious fundamentalism, emotional reliabillity, and cultural arrogance ("we're number one!").

  30. 5 out of 5

    Angel

    TLDR: This is the male version of the Devil Wears Prada. Toby Young plays Anne Hathaway to Graydon Carter's Meryl Streep. But there are some key differences - Toby is not wholly new to the journalism industry, and he does not end up climbing the ranks at Vanity Fair, unlike Anne Hathaway, who is a fashion noob who ultimately rises to become Meryl Streep's personal assistant. Further thoughts: I quite enjoyed this book. It's funny and a tad inspiring how Toby has managed to turn a string of seemin TLDR: This is the male version of the Devil Wears Prada. Toby Young plays Anne Hathaway to Graydon Carter's Meryl Streep. But there are some key differences - Toby is not wholly new to the journalism industry, and he does not end up climbing the ranks at Vanity Fair, unlike Anne Hathaway, who is a fashion noob who ultimately rises to become Meryl Streep's personal assistant. Further thoughts: I quite enjoyed this book. It's funny and a tad inspiring how Toby has managed to turn a string of seemingly endless career disasters into a book, and indeed, celebrate those mishaps. It's also incredible how he simply brushes off humiliation after humiliation (so many embarrassing moments during his time at Vanity Fair!), not to mention having his article pitches constantly rejected by his boss, Graydon. The book also provides insight into the insularity of the Hollywood media industry, accompanied by Toby's observations of the cultural differences between the UK and the US. But sometimes Toby and his giant ego (as it comes across through the book) absolutely irritate me - like some of the other reviewers, I've had to put down the book a couple of times and go read something else, simply to get away from 'too much Toby'. I'm relieved he seemed a bit more humble at the end - but perhaps he could afford to be, now that his book's been turned into a Hollywood movie. I didn't particularly enjoy Toby's occasional detour into political philosophy. It felt pretentious and, frankly, boring. For example, he uses Tocqueville and the 'tyranny of the majority' to explain why people at Vanity Fair, the Hollywood media industry and Americans in general are too politically correct and feel the need to take into account everyone's feelings. I see why Toby does this but he's at his best when he just puts down his observations of culture clashes, without bringing in abstract concepts and philosophical mutterings. (Perhaps he felt the need to show off the fact that he has a degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Oxford.) Conclusion: Worth a read if you're feeling down in the dumps about your own failures. Because if Toby can write a book and get a movie made out of his failings, so can you!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.