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Marines in the Garden of Eden: The True Story of Seven Bloody Days in Iraq

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On March 23, 2003, in the city of An Nasiriyah, Iraq, members of the 507th Maintenance Company came under attack from Iraqi forces who killed or wounded twenty-one soldiers and took six prisoners, including Private Jessica Lynch. For the next week, An Nasiriyah rocked with battle as the marines of Task Force Tarawa fought Saddam's fanatical followers, street by street and On March 23, 2003, in the city of An Nasiriyah, Iraq, members of the 507th Maintenance Company came under attack from Iraqi forces who killed or wounded twenty-one soldiers and took six prisoners, including Private Jessica Lynch. For the next week, An Nasiriyah rocked with battle as the marines of Task Force Tarawa fought Saddam's fanatical followers, street by street and building to building, ultimately rescuing Private Lynch.


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On March 23, 2003, in the city of An Nasiriyah, Iraq, members of the 507th Maintenance Company came under attack from Iraqi forces who killed or wounded twenty-one soldiers and took six prisoners, including Private Jessica Lynch. For the next week, An Nasiriyah rocked with battle as the marines of Task Force Tarawa fought Saddam's fanatical followers, street by street and On March 23, 2003, in the city of An Nasiriyah, Iraq, members of the 507th Maintenance Company came under attack from Iraqi forces who killed or wounded twenty-one soldiers and took six prisoners, including Private Jessica Lynch. For the next week, An Nasiriyah rocked with battle as the marines of Task Force Tarawa fought Saddam's fanatical followers, street by street and building to building, ultimately rescuing Private Lynch.

30 review for Marines in the Garden of Eden: The True Story of Seven Bloody Days in Iraq

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Silva

    This was my first time reading military non-fiction, so I don't really have much to compare it to. But it was clearly a thorough, well-researched account of the Battle of An Nasiriyah. The author was very dedicated in interviewing witnesses and getting all the information he could, and it shows. Not all the details he included interested me, and it was often difficult to keep track of all the different characters and stories woven through the narrative. But, it was meant to be a historical accoun This was my first time reading military non-fiction, so I don't really have much to compare it to. But it was clearly a thorough, well-researched account of the Battle of An Nasiriyah. The author was very dedicated in interviewing witnesses and getting all the information he could, and it shows. Not all the details he included interested me, and it was often difficult to keep track of all the different characters and stories woven through the narrative. But, it was meant to be a historical account, not a fast-paced summer read, so I suppose it worked for its own purposes. I may not have been its primary audience, but rather a sort of "secondary" audience that enjoyed the topic and general content but didn't prefer the format. Still, glad to have taken my first step into the world of military nonfiction. I know I'll be reading more books in this genre in the future. ----- P.S. I need to go on an angry rant. This is mostly just my opinion, but I was really bothered by two things in this book: #1 The black and white way the war was portrayed. The Iraqi soldiers were literally called "bad guys", and the Marines were elevated a bit too highly for my taste. SERIOUSLY. There are two sides to every war. Yes, much evil was committed on the other side. But this is an overly simplistic, and almost dehumanizing, way to view an enemy. I have to wonder: What was the story from their perspective? #2 Jessica Lynch Probably the most famous prisoner of war story in recent American wars. I need to hear the story from her perspective, because... wow. My complaint isn't against the author specifically, but against the overall way she was covered by the media at the time, and perceived by her fellow soldiers. They heard rumors that she was raped and tortured, and they were angry that a female soldier was in the position to become a POW? Instead of, oh I don't know, being angry at her captors? I can't be the only one who sees how infuriatingly backwards this is. Also, the fact that she WASN'T the only female POW, but as a blond, blue-eyed woman, she somehow got more fame and coverage than the black and Native American female soldiers that were in similar situations. HMMMM. The male savior complex of her fellow soldiers as they came to rescue her was just... disgusting. The way everyone portrayed her as this delicate little victim. I read her own words recently, and she called herself a "survivor". Very different image. Again, I need to hear the whole story from her perspective. This was more than a decade ago, so I know that sexism has certainly improved in the military since then, but it was still frustrating to read about it so blatantly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gus

    Most of this book seems to be filled with military liturgy. Lots of acronyms to remember (or forget). Once through all that a well reported rendition of yet another military miscommunication fiasco. Glad I read it, but would have trouble doing it again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Arlomisty

    This was a really good book. It started off kind of slow, but once you get past the first few chapters and the combat starts it gets really interesting... I recommend it to anyone who is interested in more recent military operations.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I've had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Lowry. Very interesting gentleman. His books are memorable, especially for a Marine mom like me. I hope to read all his books - once my boys are back on US soil for good. I've had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Lowry. Very interesting gentleman. His books are memorable, especially for a Marine mom like me. I hope to read all his books - once my boys are back on US soil for good.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I'm probably bias since this book is technically about my husband and people he served with. I'm probably bias since this book is technically about my husband and people he served with.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Arthur

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robert Marshall

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Boiko

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bill Mason

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steven John Borho

  14. 4 out of 5

    James Williams

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Parm

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben Ewing

  17. 4 out of 5

    David

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ted

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  21. 5 out of 5

    Damon

  22. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vance

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Crowley

  25. 4 out of 5

    Darrell Griffin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Goodman

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joel Erickson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Darin

  29. 5 out of 5

    colleen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Corynn

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