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Exiles at the Well of Souls

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Antor Trellig, head of a ruthless interstellar syndicate, had seized a super computer with godlike powers, which could make him omnipotent. The Council offered master criminal Mavra Chang any reward if she stopped Trellig - and horrible, lingering death if she failed. But neither Trellig nor Mavra had taken the Well World into consideration. Built by the ancient Markovians Antor Trellig, head of a ruthless interstellar syndicate, had seized a super computer with godlike powers, which could make him omnipotent. The Council offered master criminal Mavra Chang any reward if she stopped Trellig - and horrible, lingering death if she failed. But neither Trellig nor Mavra had taken the Well World into consideration. Built by the ancient Markovians, the Well World controlled the design of the cosmos. When the opponents were drawn across space to the mysterious planet, they found themselves in new alien bodies, and in the middle of a battle where strange races fought desperately, with the control of all the Universe as the prize.


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Antor Trellig, head of a ruthless interstellar syndicate, had seized a super computer with godlike powers, which could make him omnipotent. The Council offered master criminal Mavra Chang any reward if she stopped Trellig - and horrible, lingering death if she failed. But neither Trellig nor Mavra had taken the Well World into consideration. Built by the ancient Markovians Antor Trellig, head of a ruthless interstellar syndicate, had seized a super computer with godlike powers, which could make him omnipotent. The Council offered master criminal Mavra Chang any reward if she stopped Trellig - and horrible, lingering death if she failed. But neither Trellig nor Mavra had taken the Well World into consideration. Built by the ancient Markovians, the Well World controlled the design of the cosmos. When the opponents were drawn across space to the mysterious planet, they found themselves in new alien bodies, and in the middle of a battle where strange races fought desperately, with the control of all the Universe as the prize.

30 review for Exiles at the Well of Souls

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    I ***love*** Jack Chalker. He's my SF guilty pleasure, and this is a series of his I hadn't started yet! It was totally weird and a lot of fun to read. Not my favorite of his, but Jack never lets me down. Although I discovered that this is not actually the first in the series--it's the first of the duology about the epic war, but it's not the first book. Well, luckily, betterworldbooks.com is having a bargain bin sale with used books 3 for $10, so the solution to this problem will be shipping to I ***love*** Jack Chalker. He's my SF guilty pleasure, and this is a series of his I hadn't started yet! It was totally weird and a lot of fun to read. Not my favorite of his, but Jack never lets me down. Although I discovered that this is not actually the first in the series--it's the first of the duology about the epic war, but it's not the first book. Well, luckily, betterworldbooks.com is having a bargain bin sale with used books 3 for $10, so the solution to this problem will be shipping to me shortly. (Also luckily, F is too busy working on honeymoon pictures right now to read my book reviews and see that I ordered more books!)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Trike

    Moving on to #2 in the Well World saga, where everything gets epic-er. It’s been 1,100 years since anyone tried to wage war on the Well World, and that was a failure, ultimately, because it was a war of conquest. You can’t have supply lines that cross areas where technology doesn’t work and the air in some places is poisonous to 90% of your multispecies army, half of whom think the other half is delicious. But now two spaceships have crashed on the planet and a war to retrieve those craft is inev Moving on to #2 in the Well World saga, where everything gets epic-er. It’s been 1,100 years since anyone tried to wage war on the Well World, and that was a failure, ultimately, because it was a war of conquest. You can’t have supply lines that cross areas where technology doesn’t work and the air in some places is poisonous to 90% of your multispecies army, half of whom think the other half is delicious. But now two spaceships have crashed on the planet and a war to retrieve those craft is inevitable. Back in the day I don’t think I reread this one nearly as much as I did MatWoS, as I didn’t recall quite as much detail, but the overall plot was still all there. A couple bits I thought came in the third book, so now I’m doubting my memory as to the overall timeline. Once again, the sheer scale of the story is impressive, and I still really want to see this thing brought to life. It’s interesting to me how I never gave a second thought to the fact that the protagonist is a Chinese woman and one of the antagonists is a lapsed Muslim. Nowadays there would be cries of both racism and political correctness, but back in 1978 it wasn’t a big deal at all. Looking back, we really had a lot more diversity in our entertainment in the 70s. All of us watched shows about black families like Good Times, What’s Happening and The Jeffersons, the latter of which had an interracial couple. I’m sure the racists hated that stuff back then but we didn’t hear about it all the time. And those shows were hits, watched by millions of people. So having an antihero like Mavra Chang kick ass and take names wasn’t unusual in the slightest. It’s hard to think of a character who has more toughness and guts than Chang. Her backstory, which Chalker relates in two paragraphs, is brutal and would fill two books on its own. An orphan, beggar, thief, and prostitute who becomes a starship pilot and captain, eventually turning herself into the most dangerous woman in the human part of the galaxy is just the warm-up for what the Well World has in store for her. That’s how epic her story is. Even the part where her former john becomes her husband and partner in crime who engages in a Pygmalion/My Fair Lady transformation of the coarse and streetwise Mavra is something she just casually mentions. Obie the computer is still my second favorite character after Chang, but I was surprised by how little he’s in this book. He has a larger role in the later books, I think, but don’t quote me on that. I am looking forward to the appearance of Gypsy. Although I most identify with Nathan Brazil, Gypsy is the character I always wanted to be. On to #3.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The cover that Goodreads shows is really embarrassing. It suggests S&M or something worse. It is a very tame novel in terms of sexual content and the violence is minimal, so I think the cover is misleading. This novel is really part one of a larger story and ends kind of abruptly just after hinting at the set-up for the next novel. I wonder if Mr. Chalker wanted to sell this as one big novel and the editor stood-up to him and said no and made him break it into two. The world needs more editors li The cover that Goodreads shows is really embarrassing. It suggests S&M or something worse. It is a very tame novel in terms of sexual content and the violence is minimal, so I think the cover is misleading. This novel is really part one of a larger story and ends kind of abruptly just after hinting at the set-up for the next novel. I wonder if Mr. Chalker wanted to sell this as one big novel and the editor stood-up to him and said no and made him break it into two. The world needs more editors like that today. So many authors want to write door-stoppers and editors just let them regardless of the fact of whether or not they have enough of a story to do so. Chalker's writing is actually good enough to carry a large novel, just not everyone has the mental stamina to read one. This is a return to the Well World from "Midnight at the Well of Souls" but with all new characters. Marva Chang, the lead hero, like Julie Wu from "Midnight" is an small Asian woman. Unlike Wu she is a take charge kind of gal right from the beginning, sort of a pirate captain mercenary. If you have a fascination with combining humans with animals as many of the ancient cultures did with their mythology this is really the novel for you. The Well World is actually a giant computer. It houses a large number of habitats for all different races, most of which are animal human hybrids. One thing that bothers me is that Chalker uses the term bi-sexual for describing hermaphrodites, as some the characters and races are hermaphroditic. Perhaps the terms were interchangeable in the 1970's but I do no think they are today. The plot involves an evil ruler who has a super-computer that links up with "The Well of Souls" and gives him the potential power to take over the universe. Maw haw haw haw!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    The premise of the Well World saga is essentially a creation myth: billions of years ago, a highly advanced race called the Markovians created a planet-sized computer that could alter reality, and divided the surface into hundreds of equally-sized regions, each containing a completely different environment and dominant species. These species run the gamut from arachnids to reptilians to mammals to things far more bizarre. From these experiments they seeded the universe with life. The Well World The premise of the Well World saga is essentially a creation myth: billions of years ago, a highly advanced race called the Markovians created a planet-sized computer that could alter reality, and divided the surface into hundreds of equally-sized regions, each containing a completely different environment and dominant species. These species run the gamut from arachnids to reptilians to mammals to things far more bizarre. From these experiments they seeded the universe with life. The Well World remains operational even far into our future, when these stories take place. In this book, the first of a two-part story arc, a human scientist has succeeded in duplicating the Markovians' technology, albeit on a smaller scale. When he's forced to build and operate a larger version of his creation for a ruthless crime lord, everyone in the area is transported to the Well World. And when one of their space shuttles crashes on it, nearly everyone wants a piece. So begin the "Wars of the Well." Word for word, Chalker isn't the best writer. His prose can be clunky and repetitious, and if you are averse to info-dumps, don't even bother. These books are also not for those who demand hard science. Even though technology is responsible for the many wonders within, it may as well be magic. What I like about this series is the creativity and just plain weirdness on display. Decent old-school science-fantasy fun.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    The first book frankly shows a little more promise esthetically than the later volumes, but its denouement is saggy and ultimately dull. "Exiles" and "Quest" on the other hand are actually enjoyable entertainments. And after them, I should have stopped reading these books. The first book frankly shows a little more promise esthetically than the later volumes, but its denouement is saggy and ultimately dull. "Exiles" and "Quest" on the other hand are actually enjoyable entertainments. And after them, I should have stopped reading these books.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jim Razinha

    [update 2018 reread] Some people have comfort food...I have comfort books. Or series, as the case may be. This is a comfort series. Everyone should have an Obie in their life. [2012] Still epic after all these years...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robert Defrank

    Take the intrigue of Game of Thrones, add the insane shape-changing elements of Ovid's Metamorphasis, condense it into a single action-packed volume and you've got the next entry into the Well of Souls series. This book picks up some years after the last volume and introduces us to a new protagonist: Mavra Chang, deadly, competent covert operative for hire as she travels the stars. She's given a job: free a scientist's daughter, who is being held hostage by an evil politician/syndicate crime lord Take the intrigue of Game of Thrones, add the insane shape-changing elements of Ovid's Metamorphasis, condense it into a single action-packed volume and you've got the next entry into the Well of Souls series. This book picks up some years after the last volume and introduces us to a new protagonist: Mavra Chang, deadly, competent covert operative for hire as she travels the stars. She's given a job: free a scientist's daughter, who is being held hostage by an evil politician/syndicate crime lord to force her father to assist in creating a machine that can reshape reality. As readers of the first book can anticipate: the players are soon drawn into the hidden Well World, a secret planet, created by a long-vanished supreme race of aliens. The Well World's guiding artificial intelligence is capable of shaping the universe into whatever one desires, and the entry of these new, marooned space travelers promise the means of controlling it. The newcomers are 'processed', given new bodies to match some of the thousands of sentient races that call the Well World home, each race living in a hexagonal biome with radically different environments, and sometimes radically different laws of physics. War breaks out, complete with shifting alliances and depths of treachery in a book that ends leaving us wanting more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    I first read this maybe 30-35 years ago. It was enjoyable then and is now. It's very much a sci-fi book with very liberal fantasy elements thrown in. One curiosity is that in today's age I can see something that I couldn't have seen back then. Certain people talk of the universe being a fabrication of some sort - a matrix, kind of like the movie - where nothing is actually real. The Well World is almost tailor made for that type of thinking and so gives me a very different perspective from the fi I first read this maybe 30-35 years ago. It was enjoyable then and is now. It's very much a sci-fi book with very liberal fantasy elements thrown in. One curiosity is that in today's age I can see something that I couldn't have seen back then. Certain people talk of the universe being a fabrication of some sort - a matrix, kind of like the movie - where nothing is actually real. The Well World is almost tailor made for that type of thinking and so gives me a very different perspective from the first time I read the book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Russ Moore

    Exiles at the Well of Souls by Jack Chalker In this second book of the Well of Souls series, Chalker introduces the main character for the remainder of the series. ***SYNOPSIS*** Mavra Chang is a resourceful, driven smuggler, with a complicated past who is hired by a political leader to rescue a scientist and his daughter from the clutches of Antor Trelig, the head of the powerful syndicate dealing in the drug called 'sponge'. The scientist, Dr Zinder, and his daughter Nikki, are captives on a pla Exiles at the Well of Souls by Jack Chalker In this second book of the Well of Souls series, Chalker introduces the main character for the remainder of the series. ***SYNOPSIS*** Mavra Chang is a resourceful, driven smuggler, with a complicated past who is hired by a political leader to rescue a scientist and his daughter from the clutches of Antor Trelig, the head of the powerful syndicate dealing in the drug called 'sponge'. The scientist, Dr Zinder, and his daughter Nikki, are captives on a planetoid near Trelig's homeworld where Zinder is building a weapon to end all weapons. Mavra discovers that the weapon is a self-aware computer named Obie with the technological capability to alter the universe's energy field to essentially change reality. If you read the first book in the series, Midnight at the Well of Souls, you'll recognize that this is the same technology that enabled the ancient Markovians to recreate the universe as they wished. Mavra's "secret-agent" abilities are considerable, and when Obie finds out she is there to rescue the Zinders, his de facto father and sister, he alters her body, giving her super-human strength, stamina, night-vision, and even retractable poison needles in her fingernails. Heh. And she almost makes it. She rescues Nikki, and with the aid of a renegade guard named Renard, she piles them into a shuttle and blasts away from the planetoid. Unfortunately at just that moment, and before she can get far enough away, Obie engages the reality field during a scheduled test and it instantly transports the planetoid and everything in its near vicinity halfway across the universe to an orbit around the Well World. Trelig's guards on the planetoid, all sponge-addicts, quickly realize that without their sponge supply they will soon be dead and decide to murder Trelig and his associates. Trelig, Zinder, and Zinder's assistant Ben Yulin make it to another shuttle and leave the planetoid, hoping to make a landing on the Well World. The rest of the story involves the crash landing of both shuttles on the Well World, and the subsequent war to retrieve the engine module of the shuttle that lands in the southern hemisphere (the engine module is the one piece of technology that the Well World will not allow to be built, so with it, the denizens of the Well World could build a spacecraft to leave the planet). Most of the characters go through the well gates and end up as various creatures. Trelig, aptly, wakes up as a giant frog. Yulin becomes a minotaur. Renard becomes a satyr-like creature with the ability to deliver electrical shocks. Mavra herself is stopped from going through the gate - that old six-armed snake-man Serge Ortega is still around from the first book and keeps her in custody as the only one who can pilot the space craft once it is repaired. The remaining shuttle occupants, Dr Zinder and Nikki, disappear after going through the gate and their fate is a mystery(until the next book, that is. The plot of the story continues through shaky alliances and battles as two armies converge on the crash site of the engine module, high in snow-covered mountains. Chalker's imagination is in full swing, with ax-swinging minotaurs, goat-headed men flying winged horses, gargantuan fanged cyclopses, floating smears of intelligent paint, tiny stingered pixies, giant deaths-head butterflies, suicidal bumblebees, screaming pterodactyls, giant toads, talking sphinxes, magic-wielding panthers, philosophical abominable snowmen, and (my favorite) small shape-changing wads of dough. This would be a great book except for one appalling mistake. For some reason, Chalker has Mavra morphed (by those magic-wielding panthers) into a pitiful half-mule creature with no hands. And she stays that way. Not sure why he had to do that, but he took a story with great momentum and a likable character and dropped it on the literary floor. The story falls apart for me at that point and doesn't pick up again until well into the next book. Chalker's gender-confusion issues pepper the story. The guards on Obie's planetoid, thanks to sponge-addiction, are either androgynous effetes or testosterone-laden gorillas. Even Trelig (prior to his conversion to a giant frog) is a hermaphrodite. You also have to look past the guilt-ridden liberal sensibilities instilled into the book (this was written in 1978). The tired old litany of 'what bad people humans are' repeats - the native humans on the well-world apparently were such resource-wasting warlike scaliwags that they started a war with some peaceful giant beavers and got their just desserts: they were gassed into a state of primitive intelligence and are now well-cared for by the benevolent beavers. The absence of heroes and villains continues into this book from the first. All characters are mere pawns, swept this way or that by forces beyond their control. There is of course, no romance (which would be tricky in Chalker's sexually-perplexed universe), and character motivations are weak and uninspired. It's not a book to read for the story, but rather to experience the fun of the amazing variety of creatures. At least the giant cockroaches didn't show up in this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    H Volk

    Own the original printing and found it to be an excellent book well worth the rereading. However if I was looking for a new author to read,the cover art of the version shown would not have intrigued me enough to give this book a chance unlike the original one.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carl Palmateer

    War comes to the Well of Souls as man stumbles onto the secrets of the universe. The races on the Well look to take advantage of the error. Always an amazing place Chalker opens up more mysteries for us. I had the audible edition which is not listed by GoodReads.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bastard Travel

    Ehhh. Same problems as the first one, but much more noticeable, and without the buffer of Nathan Brazil.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrik Sahlstrøm

    Amazing book, even better than the first one in the series, and Chalker is now officially one of my all-time favorite SF authors. Somebody needs to turn this setting into a game ;-)

  14. 4 out of 5

    chris daugherty

    Great story Loved this book. A good read. A classic science fiction story. Easy story to enjoy. I love this book. Great.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Duane I. Kleven

    This is my sixth or seventh time through the series. Great read every time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robert Bartlett

    A very interesting series of books. Mavra Chang is a well rounded heroine, with abilities to help her survive in the universe.

  17. 4 out of 5

    John Sorensen

    Wildly creative and a lot of fun. The world building is amazing and complex.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Ceyton

    Solid.

  19. 5 out of 5

    astaliegurec

    Jack L. Chalker's "Exiles at the Well of Souls" is the second book in his seven volume "Well World Saga." It's also the first book of a two book sub-series introducing Mavra Chang. And, even though the rating shows up here as 4 stars out of 5, I'm really rating it at 3-1/2 stars out of 5. Now for a few details: first, the book is pure Chalker and reads very much like the first book in the series. So, if you liked that book, you'll probably like this one. Second, unlike the first book in the seri Jack L. Chalker's "Exiles at the Well of Souls" is the second book in his seven volume "Well World Saga." It's also the first book of a two book sub-series introducing Mavra Chang. And, even though the rating shows up here as 4 stars out of 5, I'm really rating it at 3-1/2 stars out of 5. Now for a few details: first, the book is pure Chalker and reads very much like the first book in the series. So, if you liked that book, you'll probably like this one. Second, unlike the first book in the series, this book is NOT stand-alone: it requires "Quest for the Well of Souls" to reach completion. But, this two-book sub-series could be read even before "Midnight at the Well of Souls" since the prerequisite knowledge is adequately re-hashed in the books (you'd still be better of reading them in order, though). And finally, I'm dropping the book a half-star because its very "Chalkerness" is also a weakness: if you've read enough Chalker (and I have), you know exactly how this book is going to play out the moment you start reading it. But, still, if you like Chalker and if you liked "Midnight at the Well of Souls," I'd definitely recommend you read this. The books in Jack L. Chalker's "Well World Saga" are: 1. Midnight at the Well of Souls (Well World Saga: Volume 1) 2. Exiles at the Well of Souls (Well World Saga: Volume 2) 3. Quest for the Well of Souls (Well World Saga: Volume 3) 4. The Return of Nathan Brazil (The Well of Souls Book 4) 5. Twilight at the Well of Souls: The Legacy of Nathan Brazil 6. The Sea Is Full of Stars (The Well of Souls) 7. Ghost of the Well of Souls

  20. 4 out of 5

    Neelyc

    Like another reviewer here on GoodReads, I initially read this series out of order. The title "The Return of Nathan Brazil" grabbed my attention one day in my first year of college. Luckily, all but the last two books in the series can be read independently of the rest. Once I had gobbled up "Return", I quickly tracked down the rest of the five. I've been rereading them ever since. This is one of few examples of an author who can sustain an interesting storyline over five titles. Most lose steam Like another reviewer here on GoodReads, I initially read this series out of order. The title "The Return of Nathan Brazil" grabbed my attention one day in my first year of college. Luckily, all but the last two books in the series can be read independently of the rest. Once I had gobbled up "Return", I quickly tracked down the rest of the five. I've been rereading them ever since. This is one of few examples of an author who can sustain an interesting storyline over five titles. Most lose steam as they attempt to complete a basic trilogy. Although I eventually began to find Chalker's themes repetitive in his other series, these five books will always rank as one my top favorites in Science Fiction storytelling.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rodolfo

    This is the 2nd book in the series. Jack Chalker has created a very interesting universe here. Lots of directions and lots of potential. But the common theme so far is "human nature". what ever form that takes. Half way through the book I began to realize that there is much to much information and posibiltiies here that it sould take another whole book to wrap this story up satisfactory. Well, by the time I read the last sentence, I knew. I was right! there is another whole book on this part of This is the 2nd book in the series. Jack Chalker has created a very interesting universe here. Lots of directions and lots of potential. But the common theme so far is "human nature". what ever form that takes. Half way through the book I began to realize that there is much to much information and posibiltiies here that it sould take another whole book to wrap this story up satisfactory. Well, by the time I read the last sentence, I knew. I was right! there is another whole book on this part of the story. Well, I am interested enough to read the next one. are you kidding? its just getting good

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    All of the well of souls books explores the strong social problems of our own world in a tale of science fiction. Social injustice, prejudice, close-mindedness - all are some of the common problems that plauge the inhabitants of the strange worlds and cause their problems and lead to the wars between species. Its just like our own world, except instead of different species we have different races or nationalites. Chaulker, like Clarke, explores terrestrial human issues thru extrterrestrial world All of the well of souls books explores the strong social problems of our own world in a tale of science fiction. Social injustice, prejudice, close-mindedness - all are some of the common problems that plauge the inhabitants of the strange worlds and cause their problems and lead to the wars between species. Its just like our own world, except instead of different species we have different races or nationalites. Chaulker, like Clarke, explores terrestrial human issues thru extrterrestrial worlds.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Scott Templeman

    Accidentally read this before #1, fortunately it won't seem to ruin it for me due to the nature of the series. Aside from some ominous references to Brazil that are never fleshed out the only overlap I am noticing so far is an explanation of well world. That being said I loved the book and will be tearing through the series. One thing I will note is the themes and protagonists of this series are strikingly libertarian, it will not pull punches on certain ideologies and hurt feelings or resentmen Accidentally read this before #1, fortunately it won't seem to ruin it for me due to the nature of the series. Aside from some ominous references to Brazil that are never fleshed out the only overlap I am noticing so far is an explanation of well world. That being said I loved the book and will be tearing through the series. One thing I will note is the themes and protagonists of this series are strikingly libertarian, it will not pull punches on certain ideologies and hurt feelings or resentment may ensue

  24. 5 out of 5

    stormhawk

    Reread after many years. Still good, but the Wars of the Well were never my favorites. I think we get a little too much insight into Chalker's kinks here. Also, it's really half of a longer story, and leaves you at an uncomfortable caesura. However ... I think we have some in jokes here. A reaction to another author's description of an alien race that is a hyperintelligent shade of the color blue, and also, an electric sheep. Reread after many years. Still good, but the Wars of the Well were never my favorites. I think we get a little too much insight into Chalker's kinks here. Also, it's really half of a longer story, and leaves you at an uncomfortable caesura. However ... I think we have some in jokes here. A reaction to another author's description of an alien race that is a hyperintelligent shade of the color blue, and also, an electric sheep.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Don

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was very excited to read this, having thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this series. Unfortunately, what I found so intriguing and novel in the first book quickly became tedious and annoying in this one. I'm afraid this is a case of a good concept taken too far. I have 3 more books in this series, and will probably give them a try . . . hopefully I'll be pleasantly surprised. I was very excited to read this, having thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this series. Unfortunately, what I found so intriguing and novel in the first book quickly became tedious and annoying in this one. I'm afraid this is a case of a good concept taken too far. I have 3 more books in this series, and will probably give them a try . . . hopefully I'll be pleasantly surprised.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Driskill

    This series collects all the lose ends from other mythologies and ties them in a neat bow. Along the way are fabulous adventures and other-worldly creatures of endless variety. This series flies in the face of philosophy and religion but as a fictional story is creative and highly entertaining.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Alvarez

    These books are a guilty pleasure of mine, though, reading this volume made me feel guiltier than usual.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Second book in the Well World. It's really first half of a book divided because of the length. Second book in the Well World. It's really first half of a book divided because of the length.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Anderson

    See Midnight At The Well of Souls, for my discussion of this series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Couldn't get enough of these. Couldn't get enough of these.

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