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The Myth. The Magic. Dominarian legends speak of a mighty conflict, obscured by the mists of history. Of a conflict between the brothers Urza and Mishra for supremacy on the continent of Terisiare. Of titantic engines that scarred and twisted the very planet. Of a final battle that sank continents and shook the skies. The saga of the Brothers' War. Linked to the Antiquities e The Myth. The Magic. Dominarian legends speak of a mighty conflict, obscured by the mists of history. Of a conflict between the brothers Urza and Mishra for supremacy on the continent of Terisiare. Of titantic engines that scarred and twisted the very planet. Of a final battle that sank continents and shook the skies. The saga of the Brothers' War. Linked to the Antiquities expansion of the Magic: The Gathering trading card game.


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The Myth. The Magic. Dominarian legends speak of a mighty conflict, obscured by the mists of history. Of a conflict between the brothers Urza and Mishra for supremacy on the continent of Terisiare. Of titantic engines that scarred and twisted the very planet. Of a final battle that sank continents and shook the skies. The saga of the Brothers' War. Linked to the Antiquities e The Myth. The Magic. Dominarian legends speak of a mighty conflict, obscured by the mists of history. Of a conflict between the brothers Urza and Mishra for supremacy on the continent of Terisiare. Of titantic engines that scarred and twisted the very planet. Of a final battle that sank continents and shook the skies. The saga of the Brothers' War. Linked to the Antiquities expansion of the Magic: The Gathering trading card game.

30 review for The Brothers' War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    I loved this book, not for its content, but because of the impact it had on me. I read this book for the first time 15 years ago, when I got the entire Artifacts Cycle for Christmas. I have to admit, above all else, that it has not aged as well as I would have liked. My entire life I would have called this my favorite book, but now that I've got so many more stories under my belt and given this a critical look, I'm inclined to reconsider. First of all, this story had to exist. If you know anything I loved this book, not for its content, but because of the impact it had on me. I read this book for the first time 15 years ago, when I got the entire Artifacts Cycle for Christmas. I have to admit, above all else, that it has not aged as well as I would have liked. My entire life I would have called this my favorite book, but now that I've got so many more stories under my belt and given this a critical look, I'm inclined to reconsider. First of all, this story had to exist. If you know anything about Magic: the Gathering, you probably know that the epic continent-spanning battle between Urza and Mishra is one of the most iconic and integral elements of Magic's history. I used to claim that you don't need to know anything about Magic to love this story, and while that's technically true, it seems like this novel was actually written with the assumption that every single card in the entire Antiquities expansion must get name-dropped, no exceptions. In my first reading, I was excited to see the plot unfold, but this time I found myself stopping to point out, "oh that's this card" every single time an obligatory name is mentioned. Sometimes it's awkward and feels forced, but if you have no prior knowledge of such old Magic: the Gathering lore, you won't even notice. The plot is great. It's a well-developed and deeply-intertwined sequence of events with all the right payoffs and "aha" moments. In a lot of ways, this is a story about getting older, and seeing that from the lens of my 13-year-old self and present day, the story hits me in a different way. I'm glad for that, because it made the reread worthwhile, but it's also quite sobering as it prompts a reflection on one's life choices and brings to light how quickly things change. Now that I'm older, a lot of the themes make a lot more sense to me: character motivations political machinations are a lot clearer and easier to follow than when I was younger. The editing is absolutely dreadful. Many sentences flow awkwardly, and words and punctuation are often doubled or misused entirely. It's a really long book for what it is, but in my opinion, it sets the stage for much more important stories. If you've ever been curious about Magic's 20+ year backstory and you want to dig deeper into the story that started it all, I would recommend this. But if you're not a Magic storyline enthusiast (or a 13-year-old SciFi enthusiast) this book is not for you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    E.M. Shelton

    By far my favorite book from the Artifacts Cycle. The characters were well written and the world rich in imagery and invention. The Brothers War is a how-it-all-started piece, and while not all the information is given up-front, the twists at the end weave events together adequately. The writing itself was a bit erratic and slow to start, but the story was captivating and the characters believable. The end seemed somewhat rushed, which I found forgivable since the loose ends were tied up without By far my favorite book from the Artifacts Cycle. The characters were well written and the world rich in imagery and invention. The Brothers War is a how-it-all-started piece, and while not all the information is given up-front, the twists at the end weave events together adequately. The writing itself was a bit erratic and slow to start, but the story was captivating and the characters believable. The end seemed somewhat rushed, which I found forgivable since the loose ends were tied up without the story seeming forced. I would definitely recommend this book to any fan of Magic: The Gathering, and will even go so far to say it is a must-read if you like the game. If you're not a big fan of the game, it also does well on it's own (it would be much like watching a Star Trek movie and missing out on all the references from the show), and I would still recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael T Bradley

    I recently started playing the card game Magic: The Gathering (again), and enjoying it immensely, so I thought I would give the book world a spin. I believe I'd tried it years ago, but gave up rather quickly. Ostensibly "War and Peace," but in the Magic: The Gathering world, this book wends its way through four generations, though it mostly focuses on the one featuring Urza and Mishra, the two titular brothers, and their endless squabbling. My biggest problem with this book is one I think Grubb s I recently started playing the card game Magic: The Gathering (again), and enjoying it immensely, so I thought I would give the book world a spin. I believe I'd tried it years ago, but gave up rather quickly. Ostensibly "War and Peace," but in the Magic: The Gathering world, this book wends its way through four generations, though it mostly focuses on the one featuring Urza and Mishra, the two titular brothers, and their endless squabbling. My biggest problem with this book is one I think Grubb struggled with, as well, and that is: neither Urza nor Mishra are very likable. They have to remain petty children throughout the entire book for everything that needs to happen plotwise to happen. In order to get around this, Grubb decides to start focusing more on their assistants, Tawnos (for Urza) & Ashnod (for Mishra), who both get along but just happen to be on opposite sides of the building conflict. Hell, later in the book Grubb even makes Harbin, probably-Urza's son (though possibly Mishra's), into a starring character. Tawnos and Ashnod are decently enjoyable, but I kept wondering why they didn't just run away somewhere less ridiculous. Harbin just never gets enough screen time to feel like anything more than a placeholder. I kept pushing myself through this, hoping for at least some explanation of different M:TG cards. I now know what an ornithopter is. Dear God, do I know what an ornithopter is. Beyond that, nothing much sprang to mind (possibly because all the cards mentioned in here are older, more difficult cards to get a hold of). Beyond that, however, mana is confusing (it's the ... memories of one's homeland ... put into a magic bowl ... ?), no one appears to cast a spell (except at the end, where Urza apparently casts Obliterate? Which isn't a spell that would have been out at this point, I don't think. And again, he needs the magic bowl for it). If nothing else, this very firmly establishes Urza as the Elminster of this world, Dominaria as the kind of "base world" amongst the M:TG universe, and Phyrexia as the boo-hiss bad guys. I'm curious to see where this goes, but I'm planning to skim a lot before I get somewhere worthwhile.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Arjuna Perkins

    I wanted to enjoy some good pulp fantasy, and I'd played Magic: The Gathering back in the day, so I was looking forward to this dramatization. With low expectations and good humor, I started into it. What a disappointment! Grubb has a flair for description (as any good fantasy author should) and decent characterization, and the setting hooked me at first. Dominaria is a world of commerce and rationality that dismisses artifice and magic as superstitious legends. One thing always leads to another I wanted to enjoy some good pulp fantasy, and I'd played Magic: The Gathering back in the day, so I was looking forward to this dramatization. With low expectations and good humor, I started into it. What a disappointment! Grubb has a flair for description (as any good fantasy author should) and decent characterization, and the setting hooked me at first. Dominaria is a world of commerce and rationality that dismisses artifice and magic as superstitious legends. One thing always leads to another, and a pair of brothers end up opening Pandora's box in their archaeological vocation. Cue the dramatic explosions, the emotional rift, the world-changing grudge. The cliches were expected, as was the melodrama, so I tried to let those slide and enjoy the yarn. Unfortunately, this novel became unforgivably poor. Grubb has a propensity to end chapters with suspenseful, foreshadowing statements such as, "To Argoth's pain and her own shame, she would live to see how wrong she had been." In fact, the text abounds with cringeworthy moments that should leave any decently-read person shocked that it ever came to the press. Foundational characters turn out to be unspeakably naive, making grave errors that facilitate lazy plot development. Many of the book's most dramatic moments occur through a dazed montage, a sort of 'we all know what's coming' vaguery that seems to want to excuse the author of properly building his narrative. As a result, the book reads as more of a history with a few personal flairs thrown in, and the whole work lacks detail, development, suspense, and all the juicy bits we really want from this kind of fiction! I didn't like either of the Brothers, nor identify with their silly war, making this an ultimately unsatisfying experience. It's a shame, because the source material is quite rich, and I could see tantalizing strands of it reaching through. This really should have been a series (3-4 books of the same length) to allow the narrative to develop and breathe. This novel is short, but it doesn't even manage to be breathless.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sammy

    Not that great. Grubb's writing is poor. I did find myself enjoying it more and more towards the end, however, i do not recommend it, even to a fan of the card game. Not that great. Grubb's writing is poor. I did find myself enjoying it more and more towards the end, however, i do not recommend it, even to a fan of the card game.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I think this is probably the first book I've ever read that I absolutely loved. It's certainly the first book I've read that I'd give a 5 to, Harry Potter aside. Through and through, it's a very amazing book. Of course, you probably have to be a Magic fan to enjoy it to the utmost, but I think it might be good enough regardless. The first time I read it was during the 7th grade. I read it as a project, and a rather big project it was. It even included a map of Dominaria. I immersed myself in this I think this is probably the first book I've ever read that I absolutely loved. It's certainly the first book I've read that I'd give a 5 to, Harry Potter aside. Through and through, it's a very amazing book. Of course, you probably have to be a Magic fan to enjoy it to the utmost, but I think it might be good enough regardless. The first time I read it was during the 7th grade. I read it as a project, and a rather big project it was. It even included a map of Dominaria. I immersed myself in this as much as I could. I had been a Magic player prior to this and whilst reading it. I had also played a portion of the game that involved Urza, though only a portion. For those that have played during the Weatherlight saga (anything including Urza or the Weatherlight), you'll enjoy this book a ton. The book covers the life of Urza and his brother Mishra. Urza and Mishra are two brothers, born on the same year, though Urza on the first and Mishra on the last. Urza is the kind of older brother who knows he's the smarter and wiser one. He's also ready to remind his younger brother he's the older one. Mishra lives in his older brother's shadow, and is always quick to remind his brother that on the last day of the year, they're the same age. Urza and Mishra are sent away to a camp as little kids where they look for relics of an ancient civilization thought to have been much more advanced than theirs. Urza develops into the braniac, spending his time in the library and researching, while Mishra develops into the brawn, spending his time out in the sun and searching for buried relics. The two are inevitably set on a collision course that will change the world. The world building is what stands out the most to me in this book. They spend a lot of time searching after relics from this old civilization. So inevitably when they have interesting moments about them, you become really interested in them. World building is really huge in books and it's probably the thing I enjoy the most. Having some mystery in the book and uncovering it is really enjoyable for me. Jeff definitely does a good job at getting you hooked on it and giving you just enough to keep you interested while keeping you wanting more. For any MTG fan, this is probably the first book I'd recommend for you to read. It's absolutely amazing and it's a good book regardless of whether you're a fan or not. For those who've spent ages on Dominaria or playing the game while Urza was the man, it's certainly going to fit right at home. I don't want to spoil too much but you'll definitely see some familiar things and have a trip down memory lane. More importantly you'll learn some of the backstory to the cards you've been playing with and the storyline the cards have been following. It's everything you could want or expect.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alex Richey

    I love this book for what it adds to the lore of Magic: the Gathering. I wish they had invested in a good edit. There's a lot of mistakes, and also a lot of extraneous plot that doesn't need to be there. I also found myself looking up a lot of words I'd never seen before. Read this one before bed most nights with Robert. <3 I love this book for what it adds to the lore of Magic: the Gathering. I wish they had invested in a good edit. There's a lot of mistakes, and also a lot of extraneous plot that doesn't need to be there. I also found myself looking up a lot of words I'd never seen before. Read this one before bed most nights with Robert. <3

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    This was a solid story, though the jumps in time between sections were a bit jarring. I also forgot who some of the characters were as time went on,very which to me says that the story was a bit longer than it needed to be. Overall a great kickoff to a great character in Urza. I look forward to reading more about him.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Overall I enjoyed this book quite a bit, it wasn't the most well written book ever but it was ok for what it is. My attention was held throughout wanting to know what happened next. Overall I enjoyed this book quite a bit, it wasn't the most well written book ever but it was ok for what it is. My attention was held throughout wanting to know what happened next.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I enjoyed the story and the creativity using MtG devices, and I loved the explanation of what mana is that came in at the end, but the writing quality was meh. If I read the next books in the series, it'll definitely be at a later date, though they are written by different authors and probably about different characters. We'll see. I enjoyed the story and the creativity using MtG devices, and I loved the explanation of what mana is that came in at the end, but the writing quality was meh. If I read the next books in the series, it'll definitely be at a later date, though they are written by different authors and probably about different characters. We'll see.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    Of the 30-or-so magic books I own, this is probably my favorite. In a way it parallels the cold war. "Remember me as I tried to be, not as I was..." Of the 30-or-so magic books I own, this is probably my favorite. In a way it parallels the cold war. "Remember me as I tried to be, not as I was..."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mgon8819

    This book needs a movie.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Albert Meadows

    Book 3 for JALL This is the first book in about 40 (I counted), for the Magic the Gathering canon, just before the timelines were reset by Sarkhan. As such, this is crucial to the story (even if you don't care to keep up with the 'Oldwalkers' storyline.) The book stars Urza and his brother Mishra. They are the main protagonists throughout the book, and are both entwined with each other. This is also the first (and to my knowledge the only book), that stars Urza without his planeswalker spark. Char Book 3 for JALL This is the first book in about 40 (I counted), for the Magic the Gathering canon, just before the timelines were reset by Sarkhan. As such, this is crucial to the story (even if you don't care to keep up with the 'Oldwalkers' storyline.) The book stars Urza and his brother Mishra. They are the main protagonists throughout the book, and are both entwined with each other. This is also the first (and to my knowledge the only book), that stars Urza without his planeswalker spark. Characters- I love them all. Most of the book has a small cast (which is already something I adore.). I was actually hesitant to read the first in forty considering the already ballooning cast of characters from set to set, but I found the dozen at best or so characters to be memorable. I love Kayla (I didn't even know Urza HAD a wife.) and I love a few other characters. Their mannerisms are memorable and are very easy to spot and understand. Setting- The setting of this book is in Dominaria, just before the 'Ice-Age'. The only negative about this book, is the amount of kingdoms you have to keep up with is ludicrous. Thankfully, if the title of the book didn't give it away, that number will quickly drop. It is large and expansive, despite the book being 'short' by my standards. Plot- The plot and the characters are very closely tied. It is always moving, and the characters help move it. I can't unfortunately speak about the plot itself due to spoilers, but it does twist and nudge in very subtle directions with the characters. Time to finish: I read through this in three days, a rare accomplishment even for me. I finished the book in about six hours. I usually am a very slow reader, but this was a fun read that had me turning the pages. Strengths- Even after nearly 20 years and the anniversary of the book being published coming up, it has aged rather well. Easy to read, easy to finish. Characters are memorable, and even if you don't play the card game you can still enjoy this novel. The plot...is so good. Due to the age of this book and how the wiki is never updated, I was kept on my toes and the lack of spoilers made this even more enticing. NO INFO DUMP! (Alot of this book is characters interacting with eachother and the environment, so the infodump is not here thankfully. Even if you don't play the card game, you will be fine.) Weaknesses Some of the few kingdoms are shallow. The names are easy to mix up minus a few. Overall, I highly recommend this book to fans and non-fans alike. Lucky for most, the book is very complete, and with a very 'thin' hook at the end for those who want to read the second and beyond, you can leave satisfied with just this one book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chip Hunter

    'The Brothers' War' relates one of the most important (and well-known) events from the lore of MTG. The infamous brothers, Urza and Mishra, battle for dominance of Dominaria, creating enormous armies of extremely destructive artifacts and creatures, eventually leading to the cataclysmic final battle in which an entire continent of Terisiare is essentially destroyed. Jeff Grubb does an excellent job of relating this rather well-known story in a way that will keep you interested the whole time eve 'The Brothers' War' relates one of the most important (and well-known) events from the lore of MTG. The infamous brothers, Urza and Mishra, battle for dominance of Dominaria, creating enormous armies of extremely destructive artifacts and creatures, eventually leading to the cataclysmic final battle in which an entire continent of Terisiare is essentially destroyed. Jeff Grubb does an excellent job of relating this rather well-known story in a way that will keep you interested the whole time even though you know from the beginning what the final outcome will be. This is the longest MTG book (at least through 1998), and the story it tells is so epic that it really could have been divided into two or three individual books. A few of the scenes could have been expanded on, and Grubb was forced to skip years at a time in order to get the whole story in a single volume. It does make for an exciting read though, so I'm not complaining too much. Many of the cards from the Antiquities expansion and the standard editions are used in the story, mainly the artifacts and artifact creatures. It doesn't seem forced however, with Grubb doing a great job of working them into the story in a way that seems believable and natural. Tawnos and Ashnod play major roles in the story and they, along with Mishra and Urza, are very well-developed characters with unique and consistent personalities. The most interesting aspect of the story to me was that you don't really have the good-vs-evil story found in most fantasy books. The war between Urza and Mishra results from fatalistic chances and misunderstandings rather than evil intentions by one side or the other. At some point during the book, Mishra does become the 'more evil' of the two, but both brothers are destroying land and lives to fight the other. Bottom line, this is one of the best MTG books and tells one of the most important background stories of the MTG universe. The tale apparently continues in 'Planeswalker', which I look forward to reading.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Thomas

    This book has a special place in my heart, as it was the first Magic: The Gathering novelization that I read, around 20 years ago. It's essentially the origin story of probably the single most important character in MTG lore, Urza Planeswalker. The thing that surprised me is how much I'd forgotten, only remembering the main story beats. Despite being part of a franchise with the word "magic" in the title, there is almost no magic in the book. The main magical resource in the card game, mana, is This book has a special place in my heart, as it was the first Magic: The Gathering novelization that I read, around 20 years ago. It's essentially the origin story of probably the single most important character in MTG lore, Urza Planeswalker. The thing that surprised me is how much I'd forgotten, only remembering the main story beats. Despite being part of a franchise with the word "magic" in the title, there is almost no magic in the book. The main magical resource in the card game, mana, is only first mentioned ~330 pages into a 400 page book, and even after it's rarely mentioned. Another thing that surprised me was the presence of several strong female characters, and the book passes the Bechdel test. Also, Urza himself comes off as borderline autistic, caring only about his machines and artifacts. He only marries a princess because he had an eye on one of the books in her dowry. It's worth noting that the cheapest copy on Amazon at the time that I got the book was 80 bux, and I got a copy from a West Virginia library through inter-library loan for a $2 fee. Love your local library, guys.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Reed

    This book is essential for any Magic the Gathering fan wanting to delve into the story behind the game. The book is becoming dated from the game perspective but still helps to flush out the mythos and background of one of the biggest names in the game. The book itself is a fine story of the dynamic struggle between two rival brothers (obviously). (view spoiler)[As they destroy their country to destroy each other countless casualties ensue. As they strip the land bare they branch out to a new land This book is essential for any Magic the Gathering fan wanting to delve into the story behind the game. The book is becoming dated from the game perspective but still helps to flush out the mythos and background of one of the biggest names in the game. The book itself is a fine story of the dynamic struggle between two rival brothers (obviously). (view spoiler)[As they destroy their country to destroy each other countless casualties ensue. As they strip the land bare they branch out to a new land to ravage with their war. This culminates in the brother's final confrontation and an abrupt end to the war as a whole. (hide spoiler)] The book leaves some unknowns about how the scale of things is shaped. Contrary to the series name magic is missing but the level of artifice is extreme. I had a hard time envisioning the size of the different inventions and referring back to actual cards for an idea became increasingly easy with several newer sets including specific references to parts of the story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    _vladimir_

    One of the greatest, if not THE greatest piece of written Magic the Gathering history. Story that defined past, present and future of Dominaria, most popular realm across the MtG multiverse. Reading this, almost 20 years after i started playing Magic, made me remember some of the best moments from my childhood, and once again my passion for MtG was fully reignited. Those who play MtG and are at least somewhat interested in it's history should read this gem without second thought. Story about Urz One of the greatest, if not THE greatest piece of written Magic the Gathering history. Story that defined past, present and future of Dominaria, most popular realm across the MtG multiverse. Reading this, almost 20 years after i started playing Magic, made me remember some of the best moments from my childhood, and once again my passion for MtG was fully reignited. Those who play MtG and are at least somewhat interested in it's history should read this gem without second thought. Story about Urza and his brother, story about love and hate, story about what was and what could be, story about begging of most impactful events that shaped game itself. Thank you Jeff Grubb from the bottom of my heart.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott Johnson

    It's messed up when what most consider to be a trashy pulp tie-in novel is infinitely better than the best-selling modern science fiction I just read. This really was way better than it had any right to be. It was just solid....there were no mustache stroking villains, they were three-dimensional people with their own goals beyond defeating the protagonist. There were female characters who felt like actual human beings....not perfect, but the bar is pretty low to beat a lot of fantasy. The ending It's messed up when what most consider to be a trashy pulp tie-in novel is infinitely better than the best-selling modern science fiction I just read. This really was way better than it had any right to be. It was just solid....there were no mustache stroking villains, they were three-dimensional people with their own goals beyond defeating the protagonist. There were female characters who felt like actual human beings....not perfect, but the bar is pretty low to beat a lot of fantasy. The ending was a bit deus ex machina for my taste, but it's acceptable. All in all, entertaining and engaging and avoiding a number of problematic fantasy tropes, while having superior writing quality to any number of modern sci-fi and fantasy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sam Julian

    Surprisingly good. Felt like a bible story, with its dramatic archetypes and larger-than-life characters. I appreciated the aesthetic, where 'Magic' as a concept is still being discovered. That beings said, I was disappointed by the end, and I'll tell you why. (view spoiler)[ I was hoping for a more dramatic 'turn' where Gix and Urza have a major confrontation. In fact they never meet. The reveal of Pherexia as a separate plane of existence falls flat, it's not even clear how Urza becomes aware o Surprisingly good. Felt like a bible story, with its dramatic archetypes and larger-than-life characters. I appreciated the aesthetic, where 'Magic' as a concept is still being discovered. That beings said, I was disappointed by the end, and I'll tell you why. (view spoiler)[ I was hoping for a more dramatic 'turn' where Gix and Urza have a major confrontation. In fact they never meet. The reveal of Pherexia as a separate plane of existence falls flat, it's not even clear how Urza becomes aware of how to use his powers, or gains any knowledge of separate planes at all. The final moments of this legend are much more dramatic in my head, and that's how it'll have to stay. (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    Todd R

    This started out good...but then gets really long winded and boring. Could have done with less of the kingdom to kingdom stuff and more of the brothers war. Writing was fair for what it was...way to long winded and unnecessarily distanced from the theme of the book. I was hoping to read the entire Artifacts series, but after this one I won't be returning to it. This started out good...but then gets really long winded and boring. Could have done with less of the kingdom to kingdom stuff and more of the brothers war. Writing was fair for what it was...way to long winded and unnecessarily distanced from the theme of the book. I was hoping to read the entire Artifacts series, but after this one I won't be returning to it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cavin Smith

    Great introduction to the world of magic: the gathering. Tells the epic saga of the brothers Urza and Mishra and the subsequent rediscovery of mana, the source of all magic in the multiverse. I found this book to be very well written and informative to the early years of MTG. It helps to establish the original major characters who have been represented in multiple cards for the game.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Really enjoyed the first half. I kinda get the feeling the writer was far more interested in setting up the brothers backstory, than he was with how things wrapped up. Overall I liked the book but felt the ending was a little disappointing. If your really interested in the world of magic the gathering I could recommend this, otherwise you could probably skip this one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Iain

    Not perfect as it drags at times and suffers from the "everything goes wrong for our heroes" syndrome. That said, this is definitely one of the best MTG tie-ins I've read, and critical to the entire Urza's Saga story line. Recommended for fans of MTG fiction, and rated as such. Not perfect as it drags at times and suffers from the "everything goes wrong for our heroes" syndrome. That said, this is definitely one of the best MTG tie-ins I've read, and critical to the entire Urza's Saga story line. Recommended for fans of MTG fiction, and rated as such.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jason Dookeran

    As an introduction to Magic, it's a very good overview of Dominaria at this point in time. It makes you want to read more, although it is a very good stand-alone read. It does tend to drag from time to time though, so pacing is off. As an introduction to Magic, it's a very good overview of Dominaria at this point in time. It makes you want to read more, although it is a very good stand-alone read. It does tend to drag from time to time though, so pacing is off.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brian Roberts

    Exciting beginning to a classic universe Easy read filled with plenty of action and lots of iconic names for anyone familiar with Magic the Gathering. Can’t wait to finish the trilogy!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Dirgo

    A nice nostalgia kick from my childhood. The writing isn’t great but I still love the story and I think Grubb does a fantastic job building the world and setting the foundation for all of the future MTG novels.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sunkong

    A great start into the long journey of the Planeswalker Urza. I enjoyed the structure where you read a capitel in the role of one person and the next in the role of another. A great way to learn more about the relationship of the two brothers.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Davic Vielma

    I really like it! the history is a little bit slow at the beginning, but then takes form and advance at huge steps, at the end times past by so fast that makes it a little weird... but it's very unpredictable and I did enjoy it! I really like it! the history is a little bit slow at the beginning, but then takes form and advance at huge steps, at the end times past by so fast that makes it a little weird... but it's very unpredictable and I did enjoy it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Todd Finney

    Found my copy again. Bringing me back to my younger memory. Fantasy books should use this as the bar in story and plot.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Khardiss

    The best of the MtG books that I’ve read so far.

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