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The Treasure Map of Boys: Noel, Jackson, Finn, Hutch, Gideon—and me, Ruby Oliver

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Ruby is back at Tate Prep, and it’s her thirty-seventh week in the state of Noboyfriend. Her panic attacks are bad, her love life is even worse, and what’s more: Noel is writing her notes, Jackson is giving her frogs, Gideon is helping her cook, and Finn is making her brownies. Rumors are flying, and Ruby’s already-sucky reputation is heading downhill. Not only that, Ruby is back at Tate Prep, and it’s her thirty-seventh week in the state of Noboyfriend. Her panic attacks are bad, her love life is even worse, and what’s more: Noel is writing her notes, Jackson is giving her frogs, Gideon is helping her cook, and Finn is making her brownies. Rumors are flying, and Ruby’s already-sucky reputation is heading downhill. Not only that, she’s also: running a bake sale, learning the secrets of heavymetal therapy, encountering some seriously smelly feet, defending the rights of pygmy goats, and bodyguarding Noel from unwanted advances. In this companion novel to The Boyfriend List and The Boy Book, Ruby struggles to secure some sort of mental health, to understand what constitutes a real friendship, and to find true love—if such a thing exists.


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Ruby is back at Tate Prep, and it’s her thirty-seventh week in the state of Noboyfriend. Her panic attacks are bad, her love life is even worse, and what’s more: Noel is writing her notes, Jackson is giving her frogs, Gideon is helping her cook, and Finn is making her brownies. Rumors are flying, and Ruby’s already-sucky reputation is heading downhill. Not only that, Ruby is back at Tate Prep, and it’s her thirty-seventh week in the state of Noboyfriend. Her panic attacks are bad, her love life is even worse, and what’s more: Noel is writing her notes, Jackson is giving her frogs, Gideon is helping her cook, and Finn is making her brownies. Rumors are flying, and Ruby’s already-sucky reputation is heading downhill. Not only that, she’s also: running a bake sale, learning the secrets of heavymetal therapy, encountering some seriously smelly feet, defending the rights of pygmy goats, and bodyguarding Noel from unwanted advances. In this companion novel to The Boyfriend List and The Boy Book, Ruby struggles to secure some sort of mental health, to understand what constitutes a real friendship, and to find true love—if such a thing exists.

30 review for The Treasure Map of Boys: Noel, Jackson, Finn, Hutch, Gideon—and me, Ruby Oliver

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    As seen on The Readventurer "The Treasure Map of Boys" is the third book about Ruby Oliver, a 16-year old girl unsure of what and who she wants in her life. Ruby's life is messy and stressful and she always seems to be trying to figure out how to deal with her overbearing parents, ex-boyfriend, potential boyfriends, her on and off friends, and undeserved reputation of a roly-poly slut. Once again, E. Lockhart doesn't disappoint. Her knowledge of the inner works of a teenage girl's mind is profoun As seen on The Readventurer "The Treasure Map of Boys" is the third book about Ruby Oliver, a 16-year old girl unsure of what and who she wants in her life. Ruby's life is messy and stressful and she always seems to be trying to figure out how to deal with her overbearing parents, ex-boyfriend, potential boyfriends, her on and off friends, and undeserved reputation of a roly-poly slut. Once again, E. Lockhart doesn't disappoint. Her knowledge of the inner works of a teenage girl's mind is profound and portrayal of Ruby is extremely realistic, albeit often painfully so. My only complaint is that in spite of a lot of self-examination and sessions with her shrink, Ruby still appears to be stuck in the same place where she was at the beginning of "The Boyfriend List." Her inability to articulate what she feels and to be frank about her feelings with her friends is particularly frustrating in this installment compared to the previous two books. So many problems in her life could have been avoided by honest communication. I am not sure that I want Ruby to have a boyfriend at the end of this series anymore. Her life is too wrapped up in boy business. Her main goal should be to work on herself instead of angsting about inconsequential things. Ruby is an interesting person and has a lot to offer, but she is absolutely incapable of handling relationships with guys at this point. But the 4th (and as far as I know) last book is called Real Live Boyfriends: Yes. Boyfriends, plural. If my life weren't complicated, I wouldn't be Ruby Oliver, so I am guessing a lot of boy drama is bound to take place. Oh, Ruby, Ruby...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nataliya

    Ruby Oliver, she of red lipstick, glasses, fishnets, vintage clothes, mystery novels, and old movies, is at the point where she needs to reevaluate her life, her goals, and her relationships, perhaps grow a backbone, and, well, draw a treasure map. And so she does, in her trademark anxiety-and-quirk-filled way, which is just "Spankin' with a side of ennui." Among the other lessons of adolescence Mocha Latte (per Ruby's request, to avoid the immediate association with all the unpleasant things li Ruby Oliver, she of red lipstick, glasses, fishnets, vintage clothes, mystery novels, and old movies, is at the point where she needs to reevaluate her life, her goals, and her relationships, perhaps grow a backbone, and, well, draw a treasure map. And so she does, in her trademark anxiety-and-quirk-filled way, which is just "Spankin' with a side of ennui." Among the other lessons of adolescence Mocha Latte (per Ruby's request, to avoid the immediate association with all the unpleasant things like pimples), Ruby has learned the value of friendship, having created a new friends circle of Meghan, Nora, and Noel. She has learned that friendships are not only for happy times, but that they also demand sacrifices and difficult decisions. And she dealt with this like a pro, making me SO PROUD of her. "There is a lot to be said for a girl who sticks by you when hardly anyone else at school will, and the two of us secretly sing ridiculous pop songs at the top of our lungs when she carpools me to school."But now the time has come to critically look at the relationships she's built and destroyed and ask herself a question - how exactly does this whole friendship thing work? How much are you expected to sacrifice? How much are you expected to ask for in return? Where is point when you've had enough? Which friends are real and which friends are not? Is it worth hanging on to the friendships that are not as 'real' as you would like? And why is being treated like a dog actually not that bad? And what is is that she, Ruby Oliver, actually wants?"And why was it that I had to lie to my friend in order to do the right thing by her? In order to be a good person, I had to pretend I didn’t feel the way I felt. Was that what good people did? Denied their feelings and acted fake?"And here's another reason why I adore Ruby Oliver books. Ruby asks herself the tough questions. She makes the hard choices. She sometimes does the right thing, and sometimes does not. But, unlike many teen heroines, she does not magically make everything right. She gets it wrong quite a bit, and does not always learn from that. She messes up like a real teenage girl would do. There is no sugar-sweet fake ending - e.lockhart thankfully seems to steer clear of those. I applauded Ruby for growing up quite a bit in the last book, and I stick by that. [Yes, she is still quite silly, and can be clueless, and yes, IS quite a bit boy-obsessed (but hey, to paraphrase her shrink, she is "sixteen years old and heterosexual", and therefore "a little obsession with boys is natural."] But her personal growth continues - despite, or maybe because of, so many things getting in the way! Like orange bras. Frogs Laden with Meaning. Mayonnaise chemistry. Orange ponchos. Bake sales (say "no" to marshmallow Jesuses and "yes" to deliciousness!). Birkenstocks and smelly feet. Offending pygmy goats. Heavy metal therapy. Carefully folded notes in her mail cubby. Nora. Noel. Meghan. Jackson. Finn. Hutch. Gideon. I love the person Ruby Oliver is growing up to be! I love her developing assertiveness and willingness to work out her issues. I love that she really tries to do the right thing. I love that she finally learns to stand up for herself, painful as it may be. I love that she continues to figure herself out, and does not let a few stumbling blocks stop her. I love that she sticks for what she believes in. I love that she comes to realize many things that quite a few of us are still struggling with in adulthood (Riding into the sunset with your true love with your hair looking gorgeous is one example of many)."[...] Sometimes, people do cut you slack and forgive you and want you anyway. Sometimes they do. And when they do, even if it's not a happy ending, it is delicious." The first Ruby Oliver book was all about Ruby making mistakes and learning that her actions have consequences. Oh, and frogs. The second book saw Ruby humbled and more mature, working on her friendships. Oh, and llamas. This book is about Ruby finally learning to assert herself, questioning the value of friendships, and confronting her 'Rabbit Fever'. Oh, and let's not forget the Great Dane Polka-Dot. I just can't wait to see what book four has in store. Go Ruby!!! 4.5 stars. ------------ By the way, here is a link to an awesome review by Catie, whose love for Ruby Oliver books convinced me to give them a try - and it was so worth it. ------------ And, if you care, here are my ramblings about the first and the second Ruby Oliver books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Catie

    The fourth book in this series is most definitely my favorite, but it’s this one that really cemented Ruby Oliver into my fictional-soul-sister-for-life hall of fame forever and ever. In book two, Ruby was struggling to be a better friend – to be more considerate and thoughtful – while at the same time stand up for herself and respect her own feelings. But how far should she go in the name of friendship? How much should she sacrifice? It’s easier to see that line with frenemies like Kim and bad- The fourth book in this series is most definitely my favorite, but it’s this one that really cemented Ruby Oliver into my fictional-soul-sister-for-life hall of fame forever and ever. In book two, Ruby was struggling to be a better friend – to be more considerate and thoughtful – while at the same time stand up for herself and respect her own feelings. But how far should she go in the name of friendship? How much should she sacrifice? It’s easier to see that line with frenemies like Kim and bad-news-boys like Jackson, but what about friends she genuinely cares about and wants to keep? How much of herself should she repress in order to do so? “And why was it that I had to lie to my friend in order to do the right thing by her? In order to be a good person, I had to pretend I didn’t feel the way I felt. Was that what good people did? Denied their feelings and acted fake?” I think that this is Ruby’s book about taking a stand. It’s about recognizing her real friends and saying goodbye to bad ones. And for the friends who lie somewhere in between, it’s about vocalizing all of her thoughts and grievances and feelings, and giving them a chance to respond. Maybe it will destroy the friendship, or maybe it will forge even stronger bonds, but either way it’s better than repressing everything. And I absolutely love that Ruby doesn’t ever get everything “right.” Two of my favorite aspects of this series as a whole are Ruby’s parents. Ruby’s mom is a serial health-craze follower, performance artist, poor listener, and a loud mouth. Ruby’s dad is a specialty gardener, kumbaya-lover, emotional analyzer, and is generally irresponsible. They both make a ton of mistakes, don’t really get Ruby, and argue with each other at almost every turn. AND YET. And yet, they are both caring parents who have a healthy marriage. I love this passage from Ruby: “ In life, there’s no happily-ever-after-into-the-sunset. There’s a marriage, complete with arguments, bad hair, lost hair, mentally unstable children, weird diets, dogs that fur up the couch, not enough money. Like my parents. That’s their life I just described – but then, there they were, talking on the phone about my dad massaging my mom’s groin area after yoga; cuddling on the couch; holding hands and wearing stupid Great Dane paraphernalia. That’s all we can really hope for. In fact, I think it’s as close to happily-ever-after as things get.” The ability of E. Lockhart to write quirky, hilarious, three-dimensional characters who I inevitably fall in love with is amazing! Perfect Musical Pairing Cyndi Lauper – I Don’t Want To Be Your Friend This song is such an anthem! I loved seeing Ruby finally stand up and tell Jackson exactly how she felt. And the showdown at the CHUBS bake sale was hilarious! No more Ms. Passive Nice Girl, Ruby! Also seen on The Readventurer.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Isamlq

    What does Ruby Oliver have that has me going through her books one after another? It's not like she's perfect, she is so far from being perfect. She's boy crazy. (Or maybe just plain crazy?) She's slightly neurotic. (Make that very neurotic.) Her friends Suck. (Let's face it, they do suck. Boo!) She is completely aware of the fact that she does not know what she wants! (But with the help of the awesome Dr. Z, some bitchy llamas, zoo animals that don't judge, and her parents, the new dog named Polka D What does Ruby Oliver have that has me going through her books one after another? It's not like she's perfect, she is so far from being perfect. She's boy crazy. (Or maybe just plain crazy?) She's slightly neurotic. (Make that very neurotic.) Her friends Suck. (Let's face it, they do suck. Boo!) She is completely aware of the fact that she does not know what she wants! (But with the help of the awesome Dr. Z, some bitchy llamas, zoo animals that don't judge, and her parents, the new dog named Polka Dot... that's slowly changing.) Her observations are hilarious. Her lists, while hilarious in their own right, managed strike at the truth too. (I'd copy paste all her lists but you'd miss out on all the fun.) Basically, this story is honest, sometimes painful, but almost always funny. So, Read This! Read all of Ruby's stories. 4.5/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    Another great book in the Ruby Oliver series. This series is such fun but also offers great messages for teen girls (and really for adults too). Ruby continues on her path through high school, standing her ground when pushed and dealing with high school drama issues. This one started off slightly slower than the first two, but once in to the book I did not want to stop. It is funny, enlightening and just pure enjoyment.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Oh this one you guys. Everyone. How bad does it hurt seeing Ruby have trouble. She is so mad and so trying. She's learned how to stick up for herself but that sometimes makes things worse. The fight at the zoo, and Nora still judging her, and every single time she dissolves into another panic attack, which get so much worse in this book I lost count. I love the Tate Boys Bake campaign. And the fight with the older girl, and the scene there at the bake sale. With Jackson, when she says what she thi Oh this one you guys. Everyone. How bad does it hurt seeing Ruby have trouble. She is so mad and so trying. She's learned how to stick up for herself but that sometimes makes things worse. The fight at the zoo, and Nora still judging her, and every single time she dissolves into another panic attack, which get so much worse in this book I lost count. I love the Tate Boys Bake campaign. And the fight with the older girl, and the scene there at the bake sale. With Jackson, when she says what she thinks. I cried on the subway. The chapter titles are particularly good. And the emulsions. Am not super excited I caught the misspelling in Hilary Duff's name. (Not Hillary.) YA is a little perilous, I guess. In addition, I am tempted to try this "my therapist says you have to get me a really big dog" thing at home. . Edit 7/21/11: Whenever I think about how much I loved the things that happened in this book, I totally feel like I five-starred it, so. Up we go.

  7. 5 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    FEELINGS ARE EVERYWHERE. I CAN RELATE TO THIS BOOK SO MUCH RIGHT NOW. I LOVE THIS SERIES OH MAN.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    Initial Thoughts: I'll wholeheartedly admit I shadow read this between four other books I was supposed to be reading, and ended up finishing this one far sooner than I thought. I think this is my favorite book in the series so far. The ending was just the touch I needed. I think I might have another book crush to consider as well. Full review: "The Treasure Map of Boys" is the third novel in E. Lockheart's Ruby Oliver series, and if you think that Ruby catches a break in this novel after the event Initial Thoughts: I'll wholeheartedly admit I shadow read this between four other books I was supposed to be reading, and ended up finishing this one far sooner than I thought. I think this is my favorite book in the series so far. The ending was just the touch I needed. I think I might have another book crush to consider as well. Full review: "The Treasure Map of Boys" is the third novel in E. Lockheart's Ruby Oliver series, and if you think that Ruby catches a break in this novel after the events of the last, you would be quite wrong. Ruby's still contending with the ups and downs of high school, family, and her overall social life. It's not an easy road considering one of her only friends (Nora) crushes on the one guy (Noel) who's approached and taken an interest in her since the whole fallout from the first novel. Not to mention she has to contend with ups and downs surrounding her employment, seemingly expressed interest from quite a few other boys (Finn, Hutch, and Gideon) AND a rocky reunion with Jackson (who just so happens to be single again - go figure). Ruby's voice is just as humorous in this novel as the previous two, but somehow this novel hit a little closer to home for me considering Ruby has to deal with quite a bit of fallout as the relationships she comes to consider turn out to be not as clear cut as she thought they were, and in drawing the treasure map of boys that Dr. Z gave her as a therapeutic tool, she realizes she's at more of a loss with certain events than ever before, which bring along some rather jarring panic attacks. I think this book had a more clear cut resolution arc than the last two novels, and the ending of this one was particularly sweet in my eyes. I loved the cast of characters, their interactions - light as well as tough, and the peppering of humor that's so close to the heart of this series. I'll admit I developed more of a reader crush on Noel because he's such a sweetheart - and its fun to watch his interactions with Ruby in the lighter moments. I'll admit also that my like of him has to do with the Fruit Roll-up love he has, but I have no shame. This was a very good story, and I can't wait to see how things round out in the next book in the Ruby Oliver series. I think this particular one is my favorite for the narrative arc, the navigation of some nice arcs which Ruby experiences her respective highs and lows, and ultimately the turn the narrative takes to have Ruby come to terms with her ongoing relationships. Overall score: 4.5/5

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Re-read in February 2012. What can I say? Ruby Oliver has dazzled me yet again. She is the voice of the female species, or at least, the neurotic half of it. Regardless of how many times I revisit Ruby's story, I never fail to find something new to love about her. She's the kind of girl we've all been and while we, as Ruby, should all strive to be better, who she is is kind of awesome. Over the years, The Ruby Oliver series has become a bit of a guilty pleasure. Something that I delve into when I' Re-read in February 2012. What can I say? Ruby Oliver has dazzled me yet again. She is the voice of the female species, or at least, the neurotic half of it. Regardless of how many times I revisit Ruby's story, I never fail to find something new to love about her. She's the kind of girl we've all been and while we, as Ruby, should all strive to be better, who she is is kind of awesome. Over the years, The Ruby Oliver series has become a bit of a guilty pleasure. Something that I delve into when I'm feeling girly and want something light to read without having to make allowances in the character/plot/dialog department. In The Treasure Map of Boys, it seems dear Roo can't catch a break. Just when she has finally gotten a handle on her panic attacks, formed a new group of friends, and has begun an enjoyable internship at the city zoo, it’s all turned on its feet. Roo gets fired Jackson sends her a frog laden with meaning Noel is flirting and sending her notes Gideon sits with his thigh touching hers Nora is ignoring her once again And Roo has just met Doctor Z’s fungi footed boyfriend. Could things get any more complicated? The answer is yes, yes they can. The Treasure Map of Boys does not disappoint. Filled with bake sale stand offs, emulsions of the kitchen variety, hair band therapy, goat correspondence, Operation Sophomore Love, bodyguard duty and more, we are once again transported into the quirky, neurotic mind of our beloved Ruby Oliver.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Dear Miss E. Lockhart, I cannot ardently enough express my love for this book...best in the series so far. Ruby makes me jittery and uncomfortable, just like I am reliving my teenage years...something I know I should not enjoy so very very much, but I'll be darned if I can put your books down. Seriously. Love, Michelle Disclaimer/confession...before I tell you why I love this book, and all the books I've read by Lockhart so far. I jumped on the Twilight bandwagon...I'm not ashamed to say I enjoyed Dear Miss E. Lockhart, I cannot ardently enough express my love for this book...best in the series so far. Ruby makes me jittery and uncomfortable, just like I am reliving my teenage years...something I know I should not enjoy so very very much, but I'll be darned if I can put your books down. Seriously. Love, Michelle Disclaimer/confession...before I tell you why I love this book, and all the books I've read by Lockhart so far. I jumped on the Twilight bandwagon...I'm not ashamed to say I enjoyed the ride while it lasted. Pure escapism - nothing wrong with that. And yes I realize that Bella is somewhat of a twit, that her romance with Edward is entirely unhealthy and obsessive and nothing like that exists in real life without heads exploding or other horrible happenings. But I'm kind of over the whole "oh my boyfriend is so dreamy/perfect/gorgeous/what a demi-god and I am so in love with him and life will be perfect when we are together...always...when he turns me into an immortal vampire/werewolf/whatever..." blah, blah, blah. Because again, that is not real life. Most especially, I'm sort of sick of all the other writers jumping on the bandwagon. Every time I check out the young adult section at the library or B&N, I find myself cringing. Vampire, werewolf, vampire, werewolf. Oh brother. Enough already. Angsty, teenage drama over immortal, or better yet, sycophantic love please die! And please, please replace said genre with more E. Lockhart Ruby Oliver Frankie Landau Banks! As my good friend Adrienne said, these books are restoring my love for YA literature. Single-handedly. They are fresh and smart. Hilarious comes to mind. And they still contain all that teenage angst and drama, just toned down to a realistic, intelligent level. Lockhart is not pandering to her audience. She's creating lovably flawed characters. They have substance and wit of their own. Ruby may be boy crazy - don't know many sixteen year old girls who are not - but she isn't insane. I guess what I am saying is that I wish more authors would write characters like Ruby and Frankie. You can even keep the fantasy elements (hello, Hermione Granger is one of my fave characters of all time...and she's a smart, and she kicks trash, to boot!). But please, please, please can the female lead have a voice of her own...or at least honest feelings about navigating the dating world whilst only sixteen? And can she realize her life will go on if the "love of her life" turns out to be not so much the "love of her life"? Conclusion? The fantasy, escapist lit of the vampire world might be a fun treat once in a while. But reality is really just so much much much better!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eva Mitnick

    In this third Ruby Oliver novel, Ruby continues to obsess about boys and friends – but mostly boys. Readers of the first two books will know that she hasn’t had good luck with either one, managing (through a series of miscommunications, mishaps, and mistiming) to alienate and/or anger many of the students in her small and prestigious Seattle private school. Although I was an insignificant person in my own large urban high school, my younger daughter’s experiences in her tiny public charter school In this third Ruby Oliver novel, Ruby continues to obsess about boys and friends – but mostly boys. Readers of the first two books will know that she hasn’t had good luck with either one, managing (through a series of miscommunications, mishaps, and mistiming) to alienate and/or anger many of the students in her small and prestigious Seattle private school. Although I was an insignificant person in my own large urban high school, my younger daughter’s experiences in her tiny public charter school showed me how stifling and claustrophobic a small school can be. My daughter was with the same class of kids (and the same teacher) from 5th grade through 8th grade – and there was only one class per grade. Furthermore, most of the students had gone to the same elementary school, and many of them had even known each other in preschool. Relationships, whether between friends or “romantic,” simply seethed with stagnant intensity. Thus we have Ruby Oliver, still stuck with the same tiny group of kids she’s known for untold years, all milling about like rats in a too-small cage. She hates herself when she fails to go after whom she wants but she also hates herself when she goes after whom she wants – and the whole time she wonders if she really wants these people in the first place. No wonder she’s in therapy. Ruby definitely exhibits some major self-destructive behavior, which takes on a particularly annoying passive-aggressive form – she won’t stand up for herself when people act like completely jerks to her, nor will she be forthright and open with people – but then she does stuff that is guaranteed to be misunderstood. My advice to Ruby is to stop the navel-gazing and to spend as little time in that toxic school as possible (bleah, most of the students seem supremely nasty). Enjoy Seattle – what a fabulous place to live. I love the Ruby books for their breezy tone, major likability, and great cover art. They shoot me right back to my boy-obsessive junior year of high school, which is not especially a comfortable place to be – and when I get annoyed with Ruby for her complete lack of perspective, all I have to do is read my diary from that year. As Ruby would say, “Ag!” Highly recommended for Ruby Oliver fans ages 12 and up.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Keertana

    Although the Ruby Oliver books often seem to be all about boys, I never really felt as if they were. To me, The Boyfriend List felt as if it was about Ruby and her inner discovery into herself and her relationships with others. Granted it was told through her experiences with fifteen different guys, but it never felt like a book about boys. Same with The Boy Book. The second Ruby Oliver book was about friendship, acceptance, and moving on with your life despite the bad things that happen. But th Although the Ruby Oliver books often seem to be all about boys, I never really felt as if they were. To me, The Boyfriend List felt as if it was about Ruby and her inner discovery into herself and her relationships with others. Granted it was told through her experiences with fifteen different guys, but it never felt like a book about boys. Same with The Boy Book. The second Ruby Oliver book was about friendship, acceptance, and moving on with your life despite the bad things that happen. But the third Ruby Oliver book, The Treasure Map of Boys, was THE book. The book all about guys. Ruby's junior year is not going as planned. For starters, Jackson seems to have taken a sudden interest in her again. Noel continually writes her letters, despite her having told him that nothing can happen between them because Nora likes him. Finn seems to be blushing whenever he sees her, Hutch suddenly becomes her friend, and Gideon appears back from college and presses his thigh against hers! Ruby's life is anything but perfect and now she can't help but be caught up in a whole lot of trouble - boy trouble. The Treasure Map of Boys was hilarious. I think I finished it the quickest out of the four books in the series and it kept me frantically flipping the pages. Ruby is forced to use everything she knows from therapy, her past relationships, and her own wits to make decisions that are not only good for her, but that also make her a good person. Throughout the novel, Ruby is constantly confronted with difficult decisions about her relationships, friendships, and even her relationship with her parents. Ruby's growth and maturity throughout the novel is remarkable and one cannot help but hope that they'd be just as wise if not more. The third Ruby Oliver novel is about Ruby standing up for herself: what she wants, what she doesn't want, the type of people she wants in her life, and the type of people she doesn't want in her life. It's about her rising to tackle challenges and take on responsibility, all while shouldering her crazy past, her warped present, and her cloudy future. If you haven't fallen in love with Ruby yet, this book is guaranteed to make you realize she's your fictional best friend. ;)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Original post from One More Page I liked the first two Ruby Oliver books I read, and I wasn't planning to buy The Treasure Map of Boys, until one day I was left waiting somewhere without a book. So I finally got this so I would know what happened to Ruby and her state of Noboyfriend. In this book, Ruby seems like she's back to square one, but this time there's Noel. And Hutch. And Jackson again. And there's lots of baking, and Nora and friendship that may or may not be ruined because of boys. Original post from One More Page I liked the first two Ruby Oliver books I read, and I wasn't planning to buy The Treasure Map of Boys, until one day I was left waiting somewhere without a book. So I finally got this so I would know what happened to Ruby and her state of Noboyfriend. In this book, Ruby seems like she's back to square one, but this time there's Noel. And Hutch. And Jackson again. And there's lots of baking, and Nora and friendship that may or may not be ruined because of boys. Oh poor Ruby. It was nice going back into the Tate Prep world, but I really, really want Ruby to have her happy ending. But I'm not even sure if her happy ending should involve a boy, because I think she should find a way to be happy by herself first before going out of the state of Noboyfriend. Not that I personally know, of course, but I wanted to give Ruby a hug every time she gets a nervous breakdown in this book! She becomes a bit more mature here, but even so there were wise and stupid decisions made. In a way, I think there's a little Ruby Oliver in all of us. As always, I liked how real Ruby's voice was here, and funnily enough, her thoughts are not just thoughts of teenage girls but also sometimes, thoughts of someone who's way past that age. Ehem. :p I loved the other characters, too, especially Ruby's friends. I didn't like how she treated some of them...but high school, oh high school. The pettiness makes me cringe, but I can't say I didn't go through the same incidents Oh, Ruby, you are not alone! I'm looking forward to reading the last book in the series, and I really, really hope that she gets the ending she really and truly deserves.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steph Su

    E. Lockhart’s Ruby Oliver books are, quite simply, some of the best studies of high school platonic and romantic interaction that ever exist. What I love about Roo and the books about her are how thoroughly and realistically complex the characters are. Teens do a lot of crazy things in high school, and there are never easy explanations for their motivations. Similarly, Roo is constantly trying to analyze her behavior and decide whether she is being a normal teenage girl or a horrible person. This E. Lockhart’s Ruby Oliver books are, quite simply, some of the best studies of high school platonic and romantic interaction that ever exist. What I love about Roo and the books about her are how thoroughly and realistically complex the characters are. Teens do a lot of crazy things in high school, and there are never easy explanations for their motivations. Similarly, Roo is constantly trying to analyze her behavior and decide whether she is being a normal teenage girl or a horrible person. This kind of three-dimensional psych study isn’t just limited to Roo, however. All of the other people in Roo’s life—with the exception of the adults—are prime candidates for loads of discussion. What makes them do what they do? Are they right to put so much blame on Roo for things going badly, or are they themselves also partially at fault? All the questions that teens subconsciously must answer in high school, and yet rarely have the ability to voice as clearly as Roo does. The excellence doesn’t stop there, either! E. Lockhart not only creates wonderful characters, she also writes humorously. Roo has a habit of using footnotes liberally to either go off on tangents that usually involve cinema knowledge or to make a funny and/or informative note. The result is a book that is easy yet fun to read. Due to E. Lockhart’s insightful observation about the behaviors of teenagers in a small school, as well as Roo’s admittedly dramatic life, the Ruby Oliver books would make great presents for teen girls who read a lot of manga but not many actual novels. The situations involving friends and love interests will be familiar to them, and the language will be accessible and enticing. And at the same time, there are plenty of smarts in this book to win anyone’s heart. If you want to relive those painful high school years of confusing and crazy emotions, this is a great series to pick up.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    The Treasure Map of Boys was as hilarious and meticulously plotted as its predecessors, The Boyfriend List and The Boy Book. Once again Ruby Oliver's quirky, hilarious voice shone through to narrate this tale ridden with teenage angst. I don't think anyone captures the high school experience better than E. Lockhart. She is right up there with Meg Cabot and Sarah Dessen. The Treasure Map of Boys begins after winter break of Roo's junior year. The relative stability Roo established at the end of Th The Treasure Map of Boys was as hilarious and meticulously plotted as its predecessors, The Boyfriend List and The Boy Book. Once again Ruby Oliver's quirky, hilarious voice shone through to narrate this tale ridden with teenage angst. I don't think anyone captures the high school experience better than E. Lockhart. She is right up there with Meg Cabot and Sarah Dessen. The Treasure Map of Boys begins after winter break of Roo's junior year. The relative stability Roo established at the end of The Boy Book is soon gone when Ruby finds herself -running a bake sale when she can't bake -encouraging Nora to go after Noel when she likes Noel -dealing with Jackson and Kim having split -dealing with Jackson's sudden interest in her -with Nora's college student brother Gideon once more becoming a part of her life. This time the story centers around Roo's therapy assignment of making a treasure map of the peer relationships in her life and what she wants them to be. Roo makes it a treasure map of all the boys in her life, with surprising and hilarious results. Ruby is a character I love and who feels like a close friend. Whether she's defending animal rights, falling in love, or making good or bad choices I was rooting for her. Once again, Ruby's foot notes added a fresh commentary to the bottom of many of the pages and had me laughing out loud. That is part of Lockhart's gift: she can take serious issues of adolesence and life and make them funny. This book was a joy to read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deyse

    Review originally posted here. Oh my god, this book you guys, this book finally has a scene that I have been waiting my whole life (ok, not true, but my whole life since I started this series) - Ruby finally realises what a looser Jackson is and join the winning side! No spoilers about what happened but it was a scene from the end and while I read I was like "YOU GO GIRL". Anyway, this book also had a great message of feminism (as all the books on this series but this one specially) when Ruby con Review originally posted here. Oh my god, this book you guys, this book finally has a scene that I have been waiting my whole life (ok, not true, but my whole life since I started this series) - Ruby finally realises what a looser Jackson is and join the winning side! No spoilers about what happened but it was a scene from the end and while I read I was like "YOU GO GIRL". Anyway, this book also had a great message of feminism (as all the books on this series but this one specially) when Ruby convince the boys to help on the bake sell that is usually run only by girls. On the friendship/romantic front I think this was the one that most annoyed me, because I felt like there was some unnecessary drama but still totally believable to happen with teens. I was probably just annoyed because I want so badly to my ship to sail.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ellis

    3.5 stars This book made me so mad. Don't get me wrong, I completely get why it's a necessary instalment in Ruby's "journey", and there are certain scenes that had me jumping up and down with excitement and feels - Noby classroom scene, anyone - but I loved The Boy Book so, so much, and so many of the themes, events and characters so perfectly handled in that one got turned upside down until everything was messy and screwy again. Usually I like messy and screwy, and it's pretty much the Ruby Oliv 3.5 stars This book made me so mad. Don't get me wrong, I completely get why it's a necessary instalment in Ruby's "journey", and there are certain scenes that had me jumping up and down with excitement and feels - Noby classroom scene, anyone - but I loved The Boy Book so, so much, and so many of the themes, events and characters so perfectly handled in that one got turned upside down until everything was messy and screwy again. Usually I like messy and screwy, and it's pretty much the Ruby Oliver trademark, but in this particular case, I often found myself getting upset in a very big is this really necessary? way. Read it all on The Random Transliterator.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nikhat Hetavkar

    3.5 stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    TS

    Honestly, there's nothing more to say that I haven't mentioned in the first and second books' reviews already. I'm loving these. I love Ruby as a protagonist and I love the shit she gets pulled into because of her neuroses and indecisiveness. This book was particularly painful for me because of the whole Noel debacle. Then again, it allowed us to appreciate Ruby's independence and I was rooting for her so much. I love how nonchalantly feminist these books are. It's kind of a huge "fuck you" to t Honestly, there's nothing more to say that I haven't mentioned in the first and second books' reviews already. I'm loving these. I love Ruby as a protagonist and I love the shit she gets pulled into because of her neuroses and indecisiveness. This book was particularly painful for me because of the whole Noel debacle. Then again, it allowed us to appreciate Ruby's independence and I was rooting for her so much. I love how nonchalantly feminist these books are. It's kind of a huge "fuck you" to the believers that feminism directly and advertently means anti-men, when in reality, it just means anti-entitled-asshole-that-happens-to-be-a-man. I especially appreciate the different types of friendships E. Lockhart explores in this novel and how she doesn't shy away from showing us that some friendships aren't meant to last and that that's okay. These books are filled with so many life lessons between their lines and it makes me wish that this was something I picked up when I was younger; I feel like it would have been enlightening to my, at times, closed-minded teen self.

  20. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Sarah

    My Very Own Soundtrack, la troisième partie: Lucy Rose - Shiver Luke Sital-Singh - Bottled Up Tight The Joy Formidable - Silent Treatment Elenowen -Bittersweet Josh Jenkins - I Still Love You Ruby has got to be one of my favorite heroines ever. She's so relatable and perfectly imperfect that it hurts. And she's self-deprecating in a totally lovable way. Ruby's perpetually trying to find her footing in the Tate Prep Universe with the help of Dr. Z (whose dynamic with Ruby is truly magical), and a few My Very Own Soundtrack, la troisième partie: Lucy Rose - Shiver Luke Sital-Singh - Bottled Up Tight The Joy Formidable - Silent Treatment Elenowen -Bittersweet Josh Jenkins - I Still Love You Ruby has got to be one of my favorite heroines ever. She's so relatable and perfectly imperfect that it hurts. And she's self-deprecating in a totally lovable way. Ruby's perpetually trying to find her footing in the Tate Prep Universe with the help of Dr. Z (whose dynamic with Ruby is truly magical), and a few of her "sometimes" friends. She's still completely misunderstood and obviously, struggling within the confines of Tate Prep Universe - and boys - and friends - and her crazy parents - and her new job. But there are bits of film references and hilarious foot-noting sprinkled throughout, per usual, and some delicious back-and-forth poetry, and baking. But of course, she gets one step closer to her own self-discovery and her treasure(s). "And I thought: This is my treasure. My ridiculous dad and my oddball friend Hutch, rocking out with purple mouths from the grape Popsicles, in this room full of flowering plants. Not everybody has this." Another 5-star worthy read. I will end this review with the one poem-note Noel left in Ruby's cubby, "written on yellow legal paper in Noel's cramped, somewhat illegible scrawl... folded eight thousand times and with a bit of coffee spilled on one corner." "In laboratories dim We bend to Fleischman's whim And suffer twice a week Horrors terrible to speak. Will you deign To ease my pain? Or will I slowly Go insane? Say you'll be my partner true In Chemistry, it's me and you."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Wardrip

    Reviewed by Sally Kruger aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.com Ruby "Roo" Oliver is trying to be good. Since the beginning of the school year she has had a thing for Noel, but her promise not to go after any guy one of her friends is interested in is complicating matters. Nora told Roo she likes Noel and that makes him off-limits. Although her focus is on Noel, the other guys in her life are sending strange message as well. Jackson is back to his old self, flirting with Roo. Nora's college-age b Reviewed by Sally Kruger aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.com Ruby "Roo" Oliver is trying to be good. Since the beginning of the school year she has had a thing for Noel, but her promise not to go after any guy one of her friends is interested in is complicating matters. Nora told Roo she likes Noel and that makes him off-limits. Although her focus is on Noel, the other guys in her life are sending strange message as well. Jackson is back to his old self, flirting with Roo. Nora's college-age brother, Gideon, somehow seems interested in Roo, and Finn is volunteering to help with the bake sale she is running. Since Roo's adventures in THE BOY BOOK, she has lost her job at the zoo and is now selling Birkenstocks at a local shoe store. She is still in therapy with Dr. Z, hoping to learn the cause of her panic attacks. As far as family issues, Roo makes a joke about Dr. Z recommending that she should have a dog, more specifically a Great Dane, and her parents take the news seriously when they bring home the giant but lovable Polka-dot. With all this going on, it's easy to understand Roo's worry that her life will never make sense. Colorful characters and crazy capers combined with believable high school stress and pressure make E. Lockhart's series a popular read. Roo's adventures offer plenty of laughs as well as a sympathetic voice for the ups and downs of the teen experience.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leanne

    I may have taken a little break from the sad, sad Fall on Your Knees to read this...but only because I am no longer a library delinquent, and I spotted it in teen fiction on my way out last night! I have been skillfully avoiding the library for quite some time now, due to the fact that accidentally had 4 books overdue for approximately 1.5 years and owed $176. But I decided to eat the frog (sly Ruby Oliver reference there) and go back and pay my dues, because my bank account could no longer hand I may have taken a little break from the sad, sad Fall on Your Knees to read this...but only because I am no longer a library delinquent, and I spotted it in teen fiction on my way out last night! I have been skillfully avoiding the library for quite some time now, due to the fact that accidentally had 4 books overdue for approximately 1.5 years and owed $176. But I decided to eat the frog (sly Ruby Oliver reference there) and go back and pay my dues, because my bank account could no longer handle only purchasing books. I digress. I loved the first 2 of these novels when I was in high school, so I wanted to take a trip down memory lane and see what Ruby was up to. She is just as fun and spunky and crazy as ever - she makes you angry half the time, but you love her anyway. These books are a must-read for any teenage girl or any lover of high school YA! And also, Jackson is a tool.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gelo Salinio

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This third book was great and entertaining all in all. The main conflicts of friendship and romance returns and Ruby Oliver is yet again turned to almost friendless in this third book. Having a best friend who likes your crush is very troubling and with your crush hating you because of a misunderstanding is even more horrible, so I feel really sorry for Ruby :(. But I guess with those kinds of troubles a lesson can be learned from them, and I hope for Ruby Oliver to have the finale she deserves. This third book was great and entertaining all in all. The main conflicts of friendship and romance returns and Ruby Oliver is yet again turned to almost friendless in this third book. Having a best friend who likes your crush is very troubling and with your crush hating you because of a misunderstanding is even more horrible, so I feel really sorry for Ruby :(. But I guess with those kinds of troubles a lesson can be learned from them, and I hope for Ruby Oliver to have the finale she deserves. Now I just have to read the fourth book of this series. :P

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susane Colasanti

    I adore E. Lockhart's books, especially the Ruby Oliver novels. This latest installment did not disappoint. Boy problems, girl drama, head issues, and friendly zoo animals are all included. And, of course, her signature creative word choices, like "pony-tailing around" and "snarfled." When a book makes standing over an hour in airport security lines feel more like ten minutes, you know you've found a winner. I loved this fun, entertaining read. I adore E. Lockhart's books, especially the Ruby Oliver novels. This latest installment did not disappoint. Boy problems, girl drama, head issues, and friendly zoo animals are all included. And, of course, her signature creative word choices, like "pony-tailing around" and "snarfled." When a book makes standing over an hour in airport security lines feel more like ten minutes, you know you've found a winner. I loved this fun, entertaining read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    My heart is smiling !!! Oh, I love Ruby Oliver so much. I cannot stress this enough; she is one of the realest book characters I've ever met. She's messy but she's really just trying to be a good human & how can you not love her for that? On a side note, this series is the most feminist boy-centric material I've ever read so, well...it saw right through me. Thank goodness there's still one more book! My heart is smiling !!! Oh, I love Ruby Oliver so much. I cannot stress this enough; she is one of the realest book characters I've ever met. She's messy but she's really just trying to be a good human & how can you not love her for that? On a side note, this series is the most feminist boy-centric material I've ever read so, well...it saw right through me. Thank goodness there's still one more book!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Ashbaker

    Okay I get it that Ruby is going through stuff and has her own personal struggles, but the way the author is writing her is making her seem mega-impulsive and not sympathetic to anyone's feelings around her. I think Lockhart is doing a disservice to today's youth by painting Ruby as someone who cannot learn from her past mistakes repeatedly. Also, I do NOT like how there is almost NO consistent positive female relationships throughout the series. I mean, there's Meghan, but Ruby still rags on he Okay I get it that Ruby is going through stuff and has her own personal struggles, but the way the author is writing her is making her seem mega-impulsive and not sympathetic to anyone's feelings around her. I think Lockhart is doing a disservice to today's youth by painting Ruby as someone who cannot learn from her past mistakes repeatedly. Also, I do NOT like how there is almost NO consistent positive female relationships throughout the series. I mean, there's Meghan, but Ruby still rags on her occasionally, is (view spoiler)[ initially jealous of her relationship with Finn (hide spoiler)] , and still kinda slut shames Meghan throughout the series. All the business with Nora and Noel is nasty too, and Gideon (I've read into the next book a bit) needs to FUCK off cuz he is creeping on a 17 yr old girl. Basically the only way that Lockhart can save this series for me is -Ruby does NOT end up with anyone and learns not to seek out worth and validation through relationships with boys -Ruby seeks to repair female friendships and reinforce them (specifically with her mom and Kim) -Nora gets a happy ending because honestly she's been through a lot and no one appreciates her

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    I had listened to the first book in this series a few years ago, and I was very fond of Ruby. Now I am bingeing this series, and it's so incredible seeing how much Ruby changes from book to book, year to year. This book had Ruby closing some chapters of her life, and really being ready to move forward. There were many developments, but I was most pleased to see that maybe my ship might still have a chance. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS I had listened to the first book in this series a few years ago, and I was very fond of Ruby. Now I am bingeing this series, and it's so incredible seeing how much Ruby changes from book to book, year to year. This book had Ruby closing some chapters of her life, and really being ready to move forward. There were many developments, but I was most pleased to see that maybe my ship might still have a chance. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  28. 4 out of 5

    Den

    I like this book better than the previous two. Read this book if you like: humor, high school drama, prep school, lists, notes being passed around, entertaining footnotes, certifiable main characters, friendships, bake sales, dealing with panic attacks

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cas ❦

    Yet another hilarious Ruby Oliver book, all teenage girls will enjoy this series! I love how with each book, Ruby's character matures so much and her adventures always end in her learning. Yet another hilarious Ruby Oliver book, all teenage girls will enjoy this series! I love how with each book, Ruby's character matures so much and her adventures always end in her learning.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Federica Aita

    Ruby ti voglio bene, thanks for standing up to yourself and ditching some shitty pod-robots people

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