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Practical Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science Using Python

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Computers are used in every part of science from ecology to particle physics. This introduction to computer science continually reinforces those ties by using real-world science problems as examples. Anyone who has taken a high school science class will be able to follow along as the book introduces the basics of programming, then goes on to show readers how to work with d Computers are used in every part of science from ecology to particle physics. This introduction to computer science continually reinforces those ties by using real-world science problems as examples. Anyone who has taken a high school science class will be able to follow along as the book introduces the basics of programming, then goes on to show readers how to work with databases, download data from the web automatically, build graphical interfaces, and most importantly, how to think like a professional programmer. Topics covered include: Basic elements of programming from arithmetic to loops and if statements. Using functions and modules to organize programs. Using lists, sets, and dictionaries to organize data. Designing algorithms systematically. Debugging things when they go wrong. Creating and querying databases. Building graphical interfaces to make programs easier to use. Object-oriented programming and programming patterns.


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Computers are used in every part of science from ecology to particle physics. This introduction to computer science continually reinforces those ties by using real-world science problems as examples. Anyone who has taken a high school science class will be able to follow along as the book introduces the basics of programming, then goes on to show readers how to work with d Computers are used in every part of science from ecology to particle physics. This introduction to computer science continually reinforces those ties by using real-world science problems as examples. Anyone who has taken a high school science class will be able to follow along as the book introduces the basics of programming, then goes on to show readers how to work with databases, download data from the web automatically, build graphical interfaces, and most importantly, how to think like a professional programmer. Topics covered include: Basic elements of programming from arithmetic to loops and if statements. Using functions and modules to organize programs. Using lists, sets, and dictionaries to organize data. Designing algorithms systematically. Debugging things when they go wrong. Creating and querying databases. Building graphical interfaces to make programs easier to use. Object-oriented programming and programming patterns.

53 review for Practical Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science Using Python

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Smalter Hall

    There are definitely a few quirks, gaps and mistakes in this first edition, but I'm a first-time computer programmer and found Practical Programming pretty accessible. They also make an effort to include cute examples about bunnies and babies to make the experience as painless as possible. There are definitely a few quirks, gaps and mistakes in this first edition, but I'm a first-time computer programmer and found Practical Programming pretty accessible. They also make an effort to include cute examples about bunnies and babies to make the experience as painless as possible.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tanner Welsh

    Well structured overview of essential programming concepts and common logic. A good primer for anyone interested in learning to code, especially in Python. Most of the chapters cover topics that are applicable to other high-level languages, but there are some Python-specific parts as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rahul Gupta

    Great book to start off programming with Python. It describes in details the thought process of writing good programs that don't only work well but are also easy to read by other programmers. Great resource. Great book to start off programming with Python. It describes in details the thought process of writing good programs that don't only work well but are also easy to read by other programmers. Great resource.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anittah

    Per Brian T., I should see also http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6U-i4... Per Brian T., I should see also http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6U-i4...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Parva Chhantyal

    If you are new in Python, this book is for you :).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wudongnoodles

    good for starters

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendelle

    the professors are kind and adept at surmising student difficulties, but the fact remains computer science is still very difficult to hurdle. you have to meditate on every word carefully just to comprehend the reason and purpose of the program, and later on in creating your own programs you have to develop a mindset that produces both logical streamlining and clean design. This makes computer programming a heavy feat that goes beyond relying on cookie-cutter algorithms.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Evgeniy Pogrebnyak

    Great short text It is hard to find a"perfect" software book, any choice is subjective. What matters time in this kind of reading is practical value - can take some advice directly to your work, accessibility - you understand what is going on in the text and trust in authors that they know exactly what is needed to say without overwhelming you. I had the book sitting for a while in kindle, but I'm glad I got back reading it, it was a worthwhile cause. Great list of references. Fully endorse this Great short text It is hard to find a"perfect" software book, any choice is subjective. What matters time in this kind of reading is practical value - can take some advice directly to your work, accessibility - you understand what is going on in the text and trust in authors that they know exactly what is needed to say without overwhelming you. I had the book sitting for a while in kindle, but I'm glad I got back reading it, it was a worthwhile cause. Great list of references. Fully endorse this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Mostly useful as a quick Python syntax reference, and as a good source for real-world practice problems ("Sort the DNA strings in a list" and "emulate traffic patterns in a grid with variables for different conditions" being two notable examples). Not a particularly deep reference, but there is some good stuff to be found here. I'd imagine most competent programmers (read: not me) would finish most of these problems in a few hours. Mostly useful as a quick Python syntax reference, and as a good source for real-world practice problems ("Sort the DNA strings in a list" and "emulate traffic patterns in a grid with variables for different conditions" being two notable examples). Not a particularly deep reference, but there is some good stuff to be found here. I'd imagine most competent programmers (read: not me) would finish most of these problems in a few hours.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hung

    This is a good book for beginner or who has a little experience in programming. Each chapter introduce and explain good enough for definitions, data structures, and why Python has those. I recommend reading this book carefully to whom are new and start to study programming. For those who are familiar with at least 2 programming languages, I suggest skimming each chapter quickly and do all the exercises after. It will help you familiar with Python later.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    http://dobbscodetalk.com/index.php?op... http://dobbscodetalk.com/index.php?op...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Porcosedol

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Neely

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karthik Raman

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sidney Powell

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ieva

  18. 5 out of 5

    Frank Yu

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sergio Infante montero

  20. 4 out of 5

    John

  21. 4 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  22. 4 out of 5

    Derek Dadian-smith

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristofleroux

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marc

  25. 4 out of 5

    Abhinav Singh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian Deragon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eslam Taha

  28. 5 out of 5

    Thomas McGuire

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sam Klein

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rod Hilton

  31. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu

  32. 4 out of 5

    Antti Salonen

  33. 4 out of 5

    Maksim

  34. 4 out of 5

    том

  35. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Rodriguez

  36. 4 out of 5

    Amber Skoglund

  37. 4 out of 5

    Lance

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kimbeattie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Bill Weide

  40. 5 out of 5

    rev

  41. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  42. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  43. 4 out of 5

    Trkstr

  44. 4 out of 5

    Anca

  45. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  46. 4 out of 5

    Seth

  47. 5 out of 5

    Oletros

  48. 4 out of 5

    Greg Miller

  49. 4 out of 5

    Dnyaneshwer Pendurkar

  50. 5 out of 5

    Geir

  51. 5 out of 5

    Cezar Popescu

  52. 4 out of 5

    This Is Not The Michael You're Looking For

  53. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Low

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