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How to Be a Hepburn in a Hilton World: The Art of Living with Style, Class, and Grace

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In a society driven by celebutante news and myspace profiles, women of class, style and charm are hard to come by. The Audrey and Katharines of the world continue to lose their luster as thongs, rehab and outrageous behavior burn up the daily headlines. But, despite appearances, guys still want a girl they can take home to their mom, employers still like to see a tailored In a society driven by celebutante news and myspace profiles, women of class, style and charm are hard to come by. The Audrey and Katharines of the world continue to lose their luster as thongs, rehab and outrageous behavior burn up the daily headlines. But, despite appearances, guys still want a girl they can take home to their mom, employers still like to see a tailored suit and peers still respect classy conduct. So is it possible to maintain old fashioned virtues in a modern world without looking like a starchy Amish grandma? Christy shows women how in this guide to glamorous style, professional success and true love...the classy way. Full of fun assignments, notable names and real-life examples, Christy offers a new look at seemingly "old fashioned" advice. She covers diet, speech, work ethic, friends, relationships, manners, makeup, and fashionable yet modest clothing, showing modern ladies how they can be beautiful, intelligent and fun while retaining values and morals.


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In a society driven by celebutante news and myspace profiles, women of class, style and charm are hard to come by. The Audrey and Katharines of the world continue to lose their luster as thongs, rehab and outrageous behavior burn up the daily headlines. But, despite appearances, guys still want a girl they can take home to their mom, employers still like to see a tailored In a society driven by celebutante news and myspace profiles, women of class, style and charm are hard to come by. The Audrey and Katharines of the world continue to lose their luster as thongs, rehab and outrageous behavior burn up the daily headlines. But, despite appearances, guys still want a girl they can take home to their mom, employers still like to see a tailored suit and peers still respect classy conduct. So is it possible to maintain old fashioned virtues in a modern world without looking like a starchy Amish grandma? Christy shows women how in this guide to glamorous style, professional success and true love...the classy way. Full of fun assignments, notable names and real-life examples, Christy offers a new look at seemingly "old fashioned" advice. She covers diet, speech, work ethic, friends, relationships, manners, makeup, and fashionable yet modest clothing, showing modern ladies how they can be beautiful, intelligent and fun while retaining values and morals.

30 review for How to Be a Hepburn in a Hilton World: The Art of Living with Style, Class, and Grace

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandra

    I was horribly disappointed in this book. For starters, the author has no idea who Audrey Hepburn is. She said that classy women should stick to non-alcoholic beverages. Lol. Not Audrey OR Katharine. Which Hepburn are you trying to teach us to be like? And secondly, the Author is too confused to understand what classy truly is, as page by page, she puts labels such as "stupid girls", or passes judgment on the "popular" girls in high school. Classy women do not degrade other people's life choices I was horribly disappointed in this book. For starters, the author has no idea who Audrey Hepburn is. She said that classy women should stick to non-alcoholic beverages. Lol. Not Audrey OR Katharine. Which Hepburn are you trying to teach us to be like? And secondly, the Author is too confused to understand what classy truly is, as page by page, she puts labels such as "stupid girls", or passes judgment on the "popular" girls in high school. Classy women do not degrade other people's life choices to make themselves appear more classy. And then when she tries to tell women how to pick up guys.... Dear me. Unless you are COMPLETELY clueless, this book is not for you. Please, no one take this woman seriously. or you may end up like her, and that would be sad. I could go on for days about the things that the author says and does that are not classy or are condescending and judgmental. At the end of the day, this book is horrible, and I sure hope that people don't think that classy women really walk around thinking they're better than everyone else.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shesten Melder

    I was surprised to see all of the negative reviews of this title. This is not meant to be a book for women who are already married and have started families. Parts of it apply to every woman, but most of it is geared toward the single woman of any age. With its humorous introduction and practical advice throughout, this would make a fantastic high school or college graduation present for a favorite graduate you have high hopes for. Conversely, this would make a terrible wedding present. Topics of I was surprised to see all of the negative reviews of this title. This is not meant to be a book for women who are already married and have started families. Parts of it apply to every woman, but most of it is geared toward the single woman of any age. With its humorous introduction and practical advice throughout, this would make a fantastic high school or college graduation present for a favorite graduate you have high hopes for. Conversely, this would make a terrible wedding present. Topics of modesty, word choice, hard work, people you surround yourself with, courting, style, dieting, modesty, abstinence, and class are covered and covered well. I found a few places where I can improve. Though since I don't wear make-up at all, I skipped the makeup chapter. But it is there. Christy selected quotes from many women I consider classy and interspersed them throughout the book in applicable places, showing that the points she was making were not solely her opinion. I think that the conversational style with which this book is written is refreshing and the only way you could write a book like this and not turn-off many demographics of readers. I didn't feel preached at, I felt reinforced and supported for my decisions.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ciara

    it's hardly a secret that i read my fair share of crappy books. but usually i can justify them. for example, i don't really have anything against "chick lit," & sometimes the books that are marketed as chick lit are interestingly subversive takes on contemporary heteronormativity & beauty standards. i don't really have an opinion on audrey hepburn, but i picked this up (at the library, THANK GOD i didn't waste my duckets on this shill) because it looked like a very quick read & i was curious abo it's hardly a secret that i read my fair share of crappy books. but usually i can justify them. for example, i don't really have anything against "chick lit," & sometimes the books that are marketed as chick lit are interestingly subversive takes on contemporary heteronormativity & beauty standards. i don't really have an opinion on audrey hepburn, but i picked this up (at the library, THANK GOD i didn't waste my duckets on this shill) because it looked like a very quick read & i was curious about what a mainstream take on feminine style, grace, & class looks like these days...since i kind of live in my own little subculturally-infused bubble. this book was WRETCHED. the very first chapter indicted the "stupid girls" of the word for hurting the reputations of women everywhere by wearing revealing clothing, getting drunk & embarrassing themselves publicly, pursuing casual sexual relationships with men, etc. generally, i am a big fan of making life choices that are emotionally & physically healthy, but i think it really sucks to condemn women who make choices i may not make as "stupid". this whole book is just a big steaming pile of girl hate, & the author's reference points are all people like lindsay lohan & paris hilton. i think that the day-to-day lives & privileges that enable people like paris & lindsay to behave the way they do are pretty divorced from the daily lives of the average american women, which helps to render at least half the book's premise ("don't act like these drunken, half-clothed starlets") void. the relationship advice is very questionable. christy's argument hinges on her insistence that men are biologically programmed to be "hunters" (oh hai biological essentialism with a heaping helping of raging heteronormativity!), & women undermine that instinct when they "chase" after men by wearing revealing clothes, calling/texting too frequently, having sex too early in a relationship, etc. christy seems hung up on the idea that women don't really enjoy sex for themselves & would only give it up in order to cement a relationship. is it 1943 & no one told me? what the hell is this shit? she also shares "case histories" from ten men in dedicated monogamous relationships/marriages. in more than one case, the man makes it clear that the woman he married at first had no interest in him, & that his interest was piqued by having to wear her down & win her over. because what love story is complete without a little light stalking, amirite? there were certain things about the book that were vaguely refreshing--for example, in discussing the art of dressing well, christy insists that dressing well doesn't have to be about spending a lot of money on clothes with prestige labels. she makes it clear that your entire wardrobe can come from kmart or a thrift store, & if you are happy & comfortable, that's what matters. that was nice. likewise, she dedicates a chapter to body image & the importance of loving yourself whether you're a size 4, 14, or 24, & making the most of your looks no matter what. that was nice too. but it was derailed to some degree by her ode (literally in poem form) to devouring an entire pan of brownies single-handedly. there's accepting your shape & self-love, & then there's making excuses for dysmorphic binging. i think it was supposed to be a kind of "girlfriends sharing secrets"-type moment, but it didn't work for me...maybe because i doubt i'd be able to hnag out with christy for ten minutes without flying off the handle at some of her retrogressive, fucked up bullshit. this is a classic handbook on how to blame women for their own oppression if they fail to meet some arbitrary set of standards about "style, grace, & class". girl-hating, insulting to the readers' intelligence, & ironically, in poor taste all around.

  4. 4 out of 5

    melanie (lit*chick)

    3.5 stars I understand the criticism in the other reviews, but I think they are expecting more than the book actually promises. I give her a 5 for intent and a 2.5/3 for execution - I am the choir to whom she preaches, although a senior member. Yes she is speaking out against the modern culture that she also sites in her many examples, but her motives are true. And her conversational tone is just right for this slim volume that reminds young ladies to be young ladies ala Miss Hepburn. The author 3.5 stars I understand the criticism in the other reviews, but I think they are expecting more than the book actually promises. I give her a 5 for intent and a 2.5/3 for execution - I am the choir to whom she preaches, although a senior member. Yes she is speaking out against the modern culture that she also sites in her many examples, but her motives are true. And her conversational tone is just right for this slim volume that reminds young ladies to be young ladies ala Miss Hepburn. The author is a 24 year old wife and mother who is tired of watching trashy girls have widespread influence - particularly for the 14 (or younger) to 20something generation. I appreciate her message as my boys are bombarded with offensive images at every turn. I am also privileged to witness my bff succeed(against the tide) in outfitting her 6 year old girls with hairbows and modest dresses - like little girls instead of well, the alternative. Sure it takes a little extra effort to seek out tasteful items but so worthwhile. I would recommend this book for college age and up, i.e. chapter titles like "Keep Your Chin Up and Your Skirt Down". This book serves as a reminder (although somewhat cutesy)to fight the good fight and for that I give it a thumbs up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    This book should have come with a warning that it was meant as a style and class guide for cleaning up those who idolize "Jersey Shore". If you don't dress like a street walker, haven't been in a physical altercation at a bar in the last month, and can name five foreign countries, you probably don't need this book. This book should have come with a warning that it was meant as a style and class guide for cleaning up those who idolize "Jersey Shore". If you don't dress like a street walker, haven't been in a physical altercation at a bar in the last month, and can name five foreign countries, you probably don't need this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    How To Be A Hepburn In A Hilton World by Jordan Christy is a how-to book for young women/professionals about becoming a classy woman. I first picked up this book without realizing it was non-fiction; I was just intrigued by the catchy title and the cute cover. When I found out it was more of a self-help book, I was still willing to give it a try. In a world where most young girls strive to gain attention (and not always in a good way), Christy sets out to teach readers that being classy and whole How To Be A Hepburn In A Hilton World by Jordan Christy is a how-to book for young women/professionals about becoming a classy woman. I first picked up this book without realizing it was non-fiction; I was just intrigued by the catchy title and the cute cover. When I found out it was more of a self-help book, I was still willing to give it a try. In a world where most young girls strive to gain attention (and not always in a good way), Christy sets out to teach readers that being classy and wholesome is better than being skanky and crazy. I have mixed feelings about this book. Some of the chapters were completely useful and interesting. I especially liked the chapter about finding your personal style and accessorizing for work which is something I’m dealing with on a daily basis. I also enjoyed the chapter about makeup and finding the right color palette for you. A chapter on work ethic proved interesting, if not completely obvious. However, some of the chapters I couldn’t even believe I was seriously reading a book that had been written in the 21st century. The chapter that immediately comes to mind is the one where Jordan Christy tells readers that it is absolutely NOT OKAY for young women to ask a guy out, send him a text first or make the first move. HELLO?! Is this 1955? I get that all women should be classy and we shouldn’t be drunkenly throwing ourselves at a guy at a bar in a mini-skirt, but since when does it hurt to show a little interest? I don’t know. I just couldn’t get behind this chapter. She even goes so far to interview “real guys” who all prove her point…right. I read this book fairly quickly and skimmed through some of the more boring sections. I admire Christy’s goal in publishing this book. I completely agree that we should all try to be a little more Audrey Hepburn than Paris Hilton, but I think the message was lost in the pages of this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    emily

    this book is just slut-shaming written by an obviously insecure woman who feels threatened by every woman confident enough to wear a short skirt, flirt and dance without shame. she acts as though it's a horrendous crime against proper womanhood to not be quiet, prim and proper - which fine, i don't like loud, rowdy women either, however it is one's right to live how they choose. i was looking for some fun little tips in this book, instead it was really a rant against unquiet women and reasons wh this book is just slut-shaming written by an obviously insecure woman who feels threatened by every woman confident enough to wear a short skirt, flirt and dance without shame. she acts as though it's a horrendous crime against proper womanhood to not be quiet, prim and proper - which fine, i don't like loud, rowdy women either, however it is one's right to live how they choose. i was looking for some fun little tips in this book, instead it was really a rant against unquiet women and reasons why you shouldn't be like them. i didn't even finish it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Treasa

    I never read books like this, and maybe that's why I suddenly decided to read this one and devoured it in a matter of hours. It's a very fun read. It serves the purpose of helping advise young women on how to behave and dress in order to stay classy in this world of skimpy clothes and girls who can't string together three coherent words without throwing in a few "likes." The book is very much up-to-date, including issues such as how to behave on Facebook. The author brings a great sense of humor I never read books like this, and maybe that's why I suddenly decided to read this one and devoured it in a matter of hours. It's a very fun read. It serves the purpose of helping advise young women on how to behave and dress in order to stay classy in this world of skimpy clothes and girls who can't string together three coherent words without throwing in a few "likes." The book is very much up-to-date, including issues such as how to behave on Facebook. The author brings a great sense of humor to the book, and I never felt as if she was preaching at me. Rather, together we could scoff at those "stupid girls," as she calls them, and strive to be better than that. This book is feminist in a good way - it really wants women to respect themselves and act in a way that will make everyone give them the respect they deserve. This would be a great book for a girl who is just starting at college... or for any young woman, really. I thoroughly enjoyed it myself.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    With such a lovely cover and a promising title, I really expected something deeper than what this book offers. Disappointed to discover an informal chat about shallow, vapid girls and how awful it is to be a shallow and vapid girl. This book provides such sage advice as: wear a longer skirt so your cheeks won't show, don't chase after men, and become more interesting by reading a book. In addition to being underwhelmed by the chatty writing style, I was completely annoyed by the constant pop cult With such a lovely cover and a promising title, I really expected something deeper than what this book offers. Disappointed to discover an informal chat about shallow, vapid girls and how awful it is to be a shallow and vapid girl. This book provides such sage advice as: wear a longer skirt so your cheeks won't show, don't chase after men, and become more interesting by reading a book. In addition to being underwhelmed by the chatty writing style, I was completely annoyed by the constant pop culture references - most of which I didn't get because I don't watch tabloid TV or read gossip magazines. How exactly does reporting "entertainment" news fit into writing a guide that purports to be about style, class, and grace?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I thought this gal has a great point...positive, strong, intelligent role models are needed for the young girls of today. A lot of what they see of women in the media today portrays women as dumb, selfish, ill mannered, diva-ish, and very, very sleazy. our society is obsessed with "reality" tv where the more extreme your behavior, the longer your 15 minutes of fame can last; where people like Paris Hilton and the Kardashians are famus for who knows what, and yet magazines follow and report their I thought this gal has a great point...positive, strong, intelligent role models are needed for the young girls of today. A lot of what they see of women in the media today portrays women as dumb, selfish, ill mannered, diva-ish, and very, very sleazy. our society is obsessed with "reality" tv where the more extreme your behavior, the longer your 15 minutes of fame can last; where people like Paris Hilton and the Kardashians are famus for who knows what, and yet magazines follow and report their every move...and then shove it down our throats, and where it seems being famous is regarded as the ultimate goal for EVERYONE. (I always worry about these delusional American idol, etc contestants who who have absolutely no talent, but seem to feel if they can't make it as a famous singer, dancer, etc, their life is entirely not worth living. Do they not have anyone in their lives to love them regardless? It honestly breaks my heart.) So, I agree with all of that that the author says, but then I think she goes and ruins her message with her approach. She is EXTREMELY judgmental, condescending, and hypocritical. She spends most the book ranting about how we need role models for our little girls who are concerned with their inner beauty, and then has a chapter on how to wear makeup!?? I also think she seriously over-glamorized an age where women were classy and not so sleazy (hepburn's era) but left out the fact, that at that point in our society, women were consider intellectually inferior to men and their main roles revolved around serving men, cleaning the house, and keeping the kids quiet so they didn't give daddy a headache! Yes, Audrey Hepburn may have been a classy lady, but nobody wanted to hear her opinion on economic policy. Women of today have worse role models than they did, but they also have many BETTER ones...of women on the Supreme Court, in politics, as CEO 's, and of wonderful mothers who are more than just maids/nannies! I think her idea of a call for intelligent, classy, and confident women is great. I just don't think she's moving anyone to change their behavior with this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Crissy

    Ah, what to say? I loved the title, the introduction, the premise and the first few chapters... then it devolved into "how a get a man" and I lost interest completely. What I love about it: how it demonstrates that not all women are stupid and silly, or desire to fit that mold. That there is hope for modest, classy, sensible, and dare I say intelligent and possibly brilliant women to make a mark on our world without resorting to short skirts and stilettos. I am disgusted by the tramps traipsing Ah, what to say? I loved the title, the introduction, the premise and the first few chapters... then it devolved into "how a get a man" and I lost interest completely. What I love about it: how it demonstrates that not all women are stupid and silly, or desire to fit that mold. That there is hope for modest, classy, sensible, and dare I say intelligent and possibly brilliant women to make a mark on our world without resorting to short skirts and stilettos. I am disgusted by the tramps traipsing through the media as though they have a right to all of this exposure by virtue of their beauty and idiocy, and am terrified by the young women I see emulating their behavior. So, as a book for a younger woman- say high school or college age, this would probably get five stars. (They may enjoy the how to get a man section more than someone already happily married- that said, all the author had to say was right on- good advice girls if you have a courage to take it, just remember that you don't need a man to be a complete person, be a whole and complete person first, then seek a companion who can help you be your best self, don't dumb yourself down to arm candy thinking that being arm candy for a man will bring you fullfillment and joy).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Snow

    To all the people who think that this book is unoriginal and presents nothing new to the rules of etiquette and class, venture out to some public place. Just take a gander at teenage girls these days. Thongs hanging out, bra cups intentionally visible, overall obnoxious ignorance; we need a refresh. Bad. I, as a 14 year old, public high school-attending girl, have an inside perspective on what this generation considers polite and acceptable. This self help is a breath of fresh air. I thought it To all the people who think that this book is unoriginal and presents nothing new to the rules of etiquette and class, venture out to some public place. Just take a gander at teenage girls these days. Thongs hanging out, bra cups intentionally visible, overall obnoxious ignorance; we need a refresh. Bad. I, as a 14 year old, public high school-attending girl, have an inside perspective on what this generation considers polite and acceptable. This self help is a breath of fresh air. I thought it was perfectly modern and relevant to today, but incorporated morals and virtues "of the past." How to be a Hepburn is my Bible, I read it all the time. Thank you, Jordan Christy!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    Our culture is in desperate need of real women with brains, beauty, and self-respect--women who aren't afraid to take risks, dream big, and order. If we don't do it, who will? Our culture is in desperate need of real women with brains, beauty, and self-respect--women who aren't afraid to take risks, dream big, and order. If we don't do it, who will?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    The subject is an interesting one, which is why I picked up the book. However, I have a few issues with it, which is why I have not finished it yet. First of all, the tone of the book, as mentioned by other reviewers, is somewhat annoying. It's written in a very casual manner, almost too casual to accept it as a guide on acting classy. It's as if you can hear the author speaking her words as part of a conversation with a friend. I guess some people like that kind of thing, but for me, it almost t The subject is an interesting one, which is why I picked up the book. However, I have a few issues with it, which is why I have not finished it yet. First of all, the tone of the book, as mentioned by other reviewers, is somewhat annoying. It's written in a very casual manner, almost too casual to accept it as a guide on acting classy. It's as if you can hear the author speaking her words as part of a conversation with a friend. I guess some people like that kind of thing, but for me, it almost took away its credibility. Second, and the reason why I put the book down last night with little intention of picking it up again, is the chapter on relationships with men. There are so many flaws in this chapter. For example, her main argument for the chapter is that men are biologically programed to be hunters, so we should just let them do their thing instead of pursuing relationships ourselves. Hmmm, sounds a lot like the arguments of male superiority that kept women in the back rooms of history for centuries. She refers to the guy pursuing the girl as being "natural," "old-fashioned," and being "around since the beginning of time." She seems to forget that, until the last century or so, marriages were hardly ever for love, were often arranged, and were more often about property and power than about feelings for each other. My biggest issues are with the section where she uses anecdotal evidence from ten married men. Clearly, the entire male population is represented by them! What's most upsetting to me is that 4 out of 10 mention that the women had no desire for a relationship with these men, but were eventually worn down. How sweet. Maybe it ended up well in these relationships, but for other women, such behavior feels like harassment and stalking. It's sad how many people seem to share Jordan Christy's opinion here. I've heard someone say, "if the guy likes you and treats you well, what more do you want?" That's funny, I would think that you liking him would be just as important and essential to a relationship. I guess being classy means allowing yourself to be worn down into a relationship with someone you find unattractive. Some of what she says is good advice, because there definitely is a difference between a woman pursuing a relationship with some one in whom she is interested, and a woman being desperate and borderline crazy. Still, some of those things really should be a given. It's not a terrible book, but I would by no means call it feminist, as another viewer has. Maybe if I'm bored I'll pick it back up and finish it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Missy

    "It won't be pretty for a while, my friends, but we'll get through it together," from page 73 of Jordan Christy's "How to Be a Hepburn in a Hilton World" sums up Christy's approach to mentoring women who want to live "with style, class and grace." Unlike a self help book, Christy has written a reference manual of modern etiquette that draws on the wisdom of old-fashioned advice. In the introduction, Christy acquaints the reader with the "Stupid Girls," who epitomize the antithesis of living with "It won't be pretty for a while, my friends, but we'll get through it together," from page 73 of Jordan Christy's "How to Be a Hepburn in a Hilton World" sums up Christy's approach to mentoring women who want to live "with style, class and grace." Unlike a self help book, Christy has written a reference manual of modern etiquette that draws on the wisdom of old-fashioned advice. In the introduction, Christy acquaints the reader with the "Stupid Girls," who epitomize the antithesis of living with style, class and grace. Christy's aim is to "make intelligent look attractive! Can we do it? Again, I say YES! But first, you must know what you're up against in a Stupid Girl world. It's easy to slide into stupidity with just a few small, bad choices, so we need to be on the lookout for them ahead of time." The ensuing chapters provide concrete examples of how one can make the choices that will reap huge benefits towards building the character of a woman who emulates style, class and grace. Her advice may not cover new ground, for example one of her key points is the importance to maintain eye contact during conversation, but what is unique is her ability to convey valuable life lessons in a non-preaching manner. Instead of lecturing on how a woman should act, Christy shares her insight on how a woman can respect herself. "How to be a Hepburn in a Hilton World" reads almost like a diary complied of advice from a woman who with a strong sense of self respect. Jordan Christy inspires the reader to demonstrate self respect from how you spend your time to the people you spend time with, from your words to your actions. In a flawless manner, "How to be a Hepburn in a Hilton World" nudges the reader into being a stronger woman. Unforgettable is the best description for "How to be a Hepburn in a Hilton World," as well as this reader's rating. This is a fantastic gift for a high school graduate!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Ironically lacking in intelligence, wit, and basic entertainment. I have a deep affection for, and large collection of, terrible lifestyle advice books for women. Highlights include "No Nice Girl Swears" from 1928 and "Always Ask a Man" from 1965. I expected this book to be in a similar mold, and I was prepared to enjoy it for what it was. I wasn't prepared for an author with a revisionist history view of the 1950's (apparently that was when men really respected women), a surprising love for unfo Ironically lacking in intelligence, wit, and basic entertainment. I have a deep affection for, and large collection of, terrible lifestyle advice books for women. Highlights include "No Nice Girl Swears" from 1928 and "Always Ask a Man" from 1965. I expected this book to be in a similar mold, and I was prepared to enjoy it for what it was. I wasn't prepared for an author with a revisionist history view of the 1950's (apparently that was when men really respected women), a surprising love for unfounded evolutionary psychology, and a tenuous grasp of the English language (my favorite was when she confused "rubble" for "rabble".) In other favorite moments: - Christy quotes noted douchebag John Mayer about what he is looking for in a girl, I suppose as something we should all try to aspire to. - It is spectacularly dated, considering that it came out in 2009. It was really not that long ago, but you would never know it from how often she mentions Myspace.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shaé

    I read this book in my early 20s and I was kind of a snob so I did like it at the time. I was going through some stuff at the time, too. This book is a condescending pile of crap. It has SOME good advice, but the author has no clue who either of the Hepburns are and she is very judgmental. The condescending tone overshadows any advice she was trying to give. She tries to sound relatable with a "Look, I'm not perfect. I've been there, done that." attitude and so she can try to seem like she isn't I read this book in my early 20s and I was kind of a snob so I did like it at the time. I was going through some stuff at the time, too. This book is a condescending pile of crap. It has SOME good advice, but the author has no clue who either of the Hepburns are and she is very judgmental. The condescending tone overshadows any advice she was trying to give. She tries to sound relatable with a "Look, I'm not perfect. I've been there, done that." attitude and so she can try to seem like she isn't being judgmental while trashing people who make choices she deems unclassy. No thank you!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Jen

    In a world of D-list celebs like table-tossing Real Housewives, teen moms turned porn stars, and famewhores whose last name starts with K, it can be a miracle to find a celebrity we can look up to for her talent, compassion, elegance and all-around good manners. No wonder so many people still look up to Audrey Hepburn even though she’s passed away over twenty years ago. I am a huge fan of the late Miss Hepburn so at first I was thrilled to find Jordan Christy’s How to Be a Hepburn in a Hilton Wor In a world of D-list celebs like table-tossing Real Housewives, teen moms turned porn stars, and famewhores whose last name starts with K, it can be a miracle to find a celebrity we can look up to for her talent, compassion, elegance and all-around good manners. No wonder so many people still look up to Audrey Hepburn even though she’s passed away over twenty years ago. I am a huge fan of the late Miss Hepburn so at first I was thrilled to find Jordan Christy’s How to Be a Hepburn in a Hilton World: The Art of Living with Style, Class, and Grace. Because if there is one thing we can use more in this world it is style, class and grace. Sadly, Christy’s book is less about style, class and grace and more about slut-shaming and ripping apart other women, or as Christy snidely puts it “Stupid Girls”. Throughout this book Christy cattily calls out women she deems cheap and low-class. What makes a woman cheap and low-class? Apparently a woman is cheap and low-class if she owns a bedazzled cell phone, wears a mini-skirt and dances on top of tables at nightclubs. Christy also spends time whining about her lack of popularity in high school while ripping apart a couple of her class nemeses who she’s convinced are still horrible bitches. Gee, Christy those two horrible bitches could have grown up to be perfectly nice people who live responsible, decent lives. Did you even think of that? Well, I guess not. Christy doesn’t quite grasp on how people change over the course of their lives, and she also barely touches on how Hepburn can truly inspire us to be our best selves. Instead she name drops celebrities, and behooves the reader to invest in pricey, materialistic items. Christy just has to brag about one of her designer handbags and how everyone is jealous of it. She also intersperses this book with vapid, pointless personality quizzes that make those quizzes you find in Cosmo look like the New York State bar exam. When Christy isn’t discussing celebrities, offering advice on fashion, or encouraging us to take her pointless quizzes, she’s telling us how to behave in the workplace or how to find and keep a man. When it comes to our jobs we should work hard, take on challenging projects and exude a professional attitude. I’m sure your mother taught you the same things. And even when discussing the workplace, Christy can’t refrain from ripping apart another “stupid girl”-her former intern whose antics sound completely made up (or Christy was too stupid to get references from her intern’s former employers or professors). And what’s Christy’s advice on nabbing that elusive man, the ring and a trip down the aisle? Well, never call or text a guy because then he’ll think you’re a crazed stalker. Instead, let the guy ask you out a dozen times even though you’re not interested because eventually you acquiesce. Christy’s male input comes from mostly her husband, a half of dozen guys with the same mindset, and rock musician John Mayer. Yes, John Mayer; you might remember him as the guy who called actress Kerry Washington “white girl crazy” and his ex-girlfriend Jessica Simpson “sexual napalm.” Ugh. Ultimately, this book is more about Christy’s fabulous and perfect life and less about Audrey Hepburn. Audrey Hepburn is not a brand to sell books; she was a complex human being. She barely survived World War II as a child. Her parents divorced when she was young. She was estranged from her father and had an icy relationship with her mother. She was married and divorced twice and suffered from several miscarriages. On-screen, Hepburn was so much more than a fashionable gamine. In her most notable role, Holly Golightly in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” she pretty much plays a call girl. In “A Nun’s Story,” Audrey plays Sister Luke, a woman who at times doubts her faith and her vocation. And in “The Children’s Hour,” Hepburn and Shirley MacClaine play headmistresses who are accused of having a lesbian relationship-pretty heady stuff for the mid-1960s. Off-screen, Hepburn could be bawdy, admitted she sometimes cussed, smoked, and enjoyed a glass of Scotch. She was a devoted mom to her sons Sean and Luca, loved to garden, paint and cook, and spent her final years with the love of her life Robert Wolders. And what was truly inspiring about Hepburn, was her tireless work for UNICEF to help children in third world countries obtain proper nutrition, healthcare and education. If only Christy would have spent more time discussing this aspect of Hepburn’s life rather than ripping apart women who bedazzle their cell phones or telling us what eye shadow we should wear. Hepburn’s memory deserves so much more than the vacuous, judgmental and mean-spirited musings in How to Be a Hepburn in a Hilton World-The Art of Living with Style, Class, and Grace. Originally Published at the Book Self Blog: http://thebookselfblog.wordpress.com/...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    This little gem is a self help guide for all of those stupid girls in our lives. You know the ones, girls that dress like a street walker, wear far too much make up and drop the f-bomb with, like, every sentence. This books can help them realize the "value of manners, responsibility and modesty." "It appears as though the majority of our female generation is being represented by a couple of skinny airheads out in LA." Some of the topics highlighted are make-up application, wardrobe, friendships, This little gem is a self help guide for all of those stupid girls in our lives. You know the ones, girls that dress like a street walker, wear far too much make up and drop the f-bomb with, like, every sentence. This books can help them realize the "value of manners, responsibility and modesty." "It appears as though the majority of our female generation is being represented by a couple of skinny airheads out in LA." Some of the topics highlighted are make-up application, wardrobe, friendships, men and valuing yourself. "A good friendship is built on the mutual sharing of ideas, dreams, concerns and fears." Not only does the book teach stupid girls how to carry themselves with respect and dignity it also celebrates those of us who do that already. The author inundated the book with great quotes by strong feminine role models and entertainment by and/or about strong feminine role models. Some of those include, Jane Austen, Elizabeth Taylor, Breakfast at Tiffany's Reece Witherspoon, My Best Friends Wedding and America Ferrera, just to name a few. Some great women and entertainment if you ask me. Although I don't claim to be a stupid girl, I still learned a few things from this book. A fun look at women.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ange

    I loved this book. The thing is, you have to take it with a grain of salt, because the writer is straight up telling you how she thinks you should live your life. Just because you read a book, doesn't mean you have to change yourself, but if it changes you, that's different. I think a lot of people that rated this poorly misunderstood it. For example, a woman mentioned that the author said to sip nonalcoholic beverages, I think what she meant is that if you're a bit of a "Hilton", it may be easi I loved this book. The thing is, you have to take it with a grain of salt, because the writer is straight up telling you how she thinks you should live your life. Just because you read a book, doesn't mean you have to change yourself, but if it changes you, that's different. I think a lot of people that rated this poorly misunderstood it. For example, a woman mentioned that the author said to sip nonalcoholic beverages, I think what she meant is that if you're a bit of a "Hilton", it may be easier to not drink at all then end up smashed, up on the bar, wearing no panties. A very easy read, I enjoyed it, with a couple of life altering lines. I suggest it. My one negative remark though, what the hell kind of dress is that on the cover? There's nothing wrong with wearing a strapless gown, but we're talking about emulating Audrey here. A black dress with a boat neck would have been much more appropriate for the title.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I LOVED this succinct book. It is a new feminist manifesto! The author says simply that as women we should show respect to all the women who came before us by working hard, being dignified, and acting with class. In the book she gives a nod to Aretha Franklin's song, R-E-S-P-E-C-T, which is frankly one of the best songs of ALL TIME and is up there as one of my favorites! As far as appearance I think Jordan missed a couple of things--a) a quality bra that fits properly is an essential and b) a go I LOVED this succinct book. It is a new feminist manifesto! The author says simply that as women we should show respect to all the women who came before us by working hard, being dignified, and acting with class. In the book she gives a nod to Aretha Franklin's song, R-E-S-P-E-C-T, which is frankly one of the best songs of ALL TIME and is up there as one of my favorites! As far as appearance I think Jordan missed a couple of things--a) a quality bra that fits properly is an essential and b) a good haircut meaning invest in a professional. Part and parcel with this is let a professional do your coloring unless you really know what you are doing!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Corynn

    The perfect book for women living in the age we are! Christy brings about the lost idea that we've all been wondering: Where have all the Audrey's gone? Most have been replaced with the Paris ideals. In the book she gives answers and suggestions for living a classic, sophisticated life, from guys,to fashion, to friends, she covers it all. Great, fun read! The perfect book for women living in the age we are! Christy brings about the lost idea that we've all been wondering: Where have all the Audrey's gone? Most have been replaced with the Paris ideals. In the book she gives answers and suggestions for living a classic, sophisticated life, from guys,to fashion, to friends, she covers it all. Great, fun read!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Aims

    This book is total shit.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gurher

    Some good advice with noble intentions from the author but it was all presented in a very condescending and un classy manner. It also got repetitive despite it being a quick read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Janine

    I like books that make me think and contemplate what it is I'm reading with a critical outlook. And yet, the more I read this and contemplated what I was reading, the more I was distraught. To begin, Christy makes some great points that I did like. Those great points make up about 20% of this book. So I'm sad to say the rest of this book did not measure up. Rather, I started this book with the sudden distraught that this was based off of an idealized imagination of Audrey Hepburn and the time in I like books that make me think and contemplate what it is I'm reading with a critical outlook. And yet, the more I read this and contemplated what I was reading, the more I was distraught. To begin, Christy makes some great points that I did like. Those great points make up about 20% of this book. So I'm sad to say the rest of this book did not measure up. Rather, I started this book with the sudden distraught that this was based off of an idealized imagination of Audrey Hepburn and the time in which she rose to stardom (the 1950s and 60s). Having studied these time periods, I can tell you most of the women were not what this author seems to believe them to be. She even makes a point to ask at which point "skinny minnies" came in fashion. Well that should be obvious as Audrey was one of the big reasons skinny became fashionable. Yet if that were not enough to dissuade me, it was how she brought down others that turned me off. How, might I ask, is it classy to bring down other women to make your lifestyle seem better? I'm not saying those other lifestyles were classy, but that doesn't at all seem like something a respectable classy woman would do. Not only that, but Christy acts as if there are two types of women in the world: Hiltons and Hepburns. Let me assure you this is not true. You can and never will be able to categorized women and their personalities two ways. You cannot say there are two life styles. This misconception is both naive and narrow sighted. Now again, there are some good things here. I liked what she said about being independent thinkers. And she had some good points here and there in a few parts, but again, that was a small portion of this book. Perhaps if I was twelve and had seen but one Audrey Hepburn film I'd enjoy this much more. I'm not twelve, and well I don't need to see more than one Audrey Hepburn film to squirm at this. The kicker for me was the chapter on dressing. For one, telling someone with a bohemian style to model after Mary-Kate and Ashley Olson should just tell you not to listen. For another, body shaming as an excuse for modesty is not okay. Ever. Telling someone they should not be wearing something because they have imperfections in the eyes of the world, and subsequently writing a chapter on how we shouldn't listen to the world's ideals on body image, is as far from classy as it gets. Another thing I found odd was that she seemed to flip flop on opinions. While she claimed the Olson twins were classy she later pointed out their shrinking sizes. She talked against reality television then talked about how she wished she could watch a marathon of The Hills and even referenced The Hills numerous times. There were so many contradictions I couldn't wrap my mind around that left me frustrated. I'm so disappointed in this book. Again, there were good parts. I even quoted one part in a Facebook status. But those small bits weren't enough to keep this book moving in a positive direction. It was, though, a light read. I would have finished sooner if I hadn't gotten distracted by another book and been upset over some of the context. If you really want to know how to be a Hepburn, I think you should just get to know Audrey and understand she'd want you to be yourself. Audrey wasn't perfect. She had affairs, drank and smoked, and struggled with her family relationships. There's this constant misconception as to who Audrey is and it seems this author had it as well. I groaned when she quoted Breakfast at Tiffany's as something Audrey said (keep in mind Audrey struggled with the role of Holly and felt it was the complete opposite of her personality. And she was. It's a wonder people keep thinking Holly and Audrey are the same). And to be fair, there were women like Jayne Mansfield and Marilyn Monroe during Audrey's time. In fact, just go on Netflix and look at some of the covers of old films. Yes, not all of those women are classy. And you can bet class wasn't always favored. It's silly to think of such times in with a mere facade of one's personal desire. I could probably say more as to my problems with this book, but I'll leave it at that. Shame, too. I was hopeful for this one.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caitlyn

    This should be next to Romeo and Juliet for a young girl's curriculum. This is not a book about manners or which fork is used for salad, it is about how to have a healthy social life in TODAY'S society. Geared toward a young adult audience, this truly teaches women that they so not have to act like Snooki to fit in. I was attracted to the title, being an enormous fan of Audrey Hepburn. I am glad that Jordan Christy uses many examples of classy, intelligent, beautiful, and successful women from Ha This should be next to Romeo and Juliet for a young girl's curriculum. This is not a book about manners or which fork is used for salad, it is about how to have a healthy social life in TODAY'S society. Geared toward a young adult audience, this truly teaches women that they so not have to act like Snooki to fit in. I was attracted to the title, being an enormous fan of Audrey Hepburn. I am glad that Jordan Christy uses many examples of classy, intelligent, beautiful, and successful women from Hayden Pannetierre to Lauren Graham to Hilary Clinton. Christy pokes fun at everything women secretlymake fun of about popular culture like the dumb blonde moments and trashy attiregirls wear when they're hitting the town. The section about dating (the one I was looking most forward to) was adorable and reminded girls not to chase but to be chased. However, I did not enjoy the following chapter about fashion as much. Maybe it's the broke college kid in me, but her Christy's suggestions of getting our entire wardrobes tailored is very impractical for me. Also, on the chart describing what to wear and what to keep, I think the only thing girls would have in their closets are evening gowns and tailored suits.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jewelianne

    There is nothing I like to read more than a good etiquette book. Really! I'm not making that up! I think that manners and grace are important. This book in particular I have been wanting to read for quite a long time. Unfortunately, I found it disappointing. I tend to agree with the author on most things she covers. Primarily, in that I think girls and young women need more positive role models. But I depart from agreeing with the author when she veers dangerously close to "slut shaming." I may There is nothing I like to read more than a good etiquette book. Really! I'm not making that up! I think that manners and grace are important. This book in particular I have been wanting to read for quite a long time. Unfortunately, I found it disappointing. I tend to agree with the author on most things she covers. Primarily, in that I think girls and young women need more positive role models. But I depart from agreeing with the author when she veers dangerously close to "slut shaming." I may not think Paris Hilton (or Miley Cyrus, for an updated example) are good role models for children, but that is a far cry from calling them "stupid" or "skanky." You know what's not classy? Saying judgmental things about other people based on their lifestyle choices. In fact, I think that's a lot worse than a penchant for tube tops or glittery mascara. For a much for thoughtful book on a somewhat similar topic (conduct or life for young women, not etiquette) consider reading Female Chauvinistic Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture by Ariel Levy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Guarina

    The author of this book needs some desperate research. The title does not fit at all the contents of the book. It barely discusses HOW to be an Audrey and it is actually very biased. The book discusses topics like the actions of today's Hollywood society, not to make the first move in a relationship [which in my opinion, is retarded (no other word to describe it) considering we don't live in the 19th century anymore and it has nothing to do with class], how to "choose your friends", among other The author of this book needs some desperate research. The title does not fit at all the contents of the book. It barely discusses HOW to be an Audrey and it is actually very biased. The book discusses topics like the actions of today's Hollywood society, not to make the first move in a relationship [which in my opinion, is retarded (no other word to describe it) considering we don't live in the 19th century anymore and it has nothing to do with class], how to "choose your friends", among other topics that are, again, not related AT ALL to the topic. It's overrated and the author discusses more what her grandmother was like [literally, she mentioned her grandmother like 30 times throughout the book] and how she had met many "stupid girls" throughout her life. I think Audrey will revolt in her grave for having her name used for such book. I wouldn't recommend it at all; the author is clearly no expert in the area, just a girl who had a nice upbringing and thinks she can give society a lesson on class and grace. No.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    As an Audrey Hepburn fan, as soon as I saw this title I had to have it. Overall, I did enjoy this book. Taken as a sad yet humorous critique of how too many women behave and what too many young girls aspire to be, it is a decent read. It is a call to exercise the rights we have as women in a society that rewards "stupid girl" behavior such as excessive club hopping and alcohol consumption while playing dumb, wearing far too little clothing and cussing up a storm. It is cool to be classy and use As an Audrey Hepburn fan, as soon as I saw this title I had to have it. Overall, I did enjoy this book. Taken as a sad yet humorous critique of how too many women behave and what too many young girls aspire to be, it is a decent read. It is a call to exercise the rights we have as women in a society that rewards "stupid girl" behavior such as excessive club hopping and alcohol consumption while playing dumb, wearing far too little clothing and cussing up a storm. It is cool to be classy and use manners. You can still have fun without forgetting everything you did the night before and waking up with God knows who. I think the overarching message of this book is sober up, put on some decent clothes, educate yourself, take pride in your work, and exercise your rights. If you are looking for a self help book, a how to book, or something deep and philosophical prepare to be really disappointed. This book can be easily read in an afternoon and though parts feel a bit shallow, I agree with a good chunk of it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Normally I dont bother to review a book as a star rating kind of says it all for me, but my God did this book piss me off. (and I know the author is cringing cuz of my use of that word) Where to begin... I say heed the multiple terrible reviews this book has recieved. This is not a book that tells you how to be classy on modern society but rather how to have women go 50 years into the past and lose all the freedoms our grandmothers worked hard for... all while implying shes doing the opposite. W Normally I dont bother to review a book as a star rating kind of says it all for me, but my God did this book piss me off. (and I know the author is cringing cuz of my use of that word) Where to begin... I say heed the multiple terrible reviews this book has recieved. This is not a book that tells you how to be classy on modern society but rather how to have women go 50 years into the past and lose all the freedoms our grandmothers worked hard for... all while implying shes doing the opposite. What really made me stop reading was when she claims thay the musical RENT glorifies HIV/AIDS... I'm sorry but I cannot be the only one who cried when Angel died in Collins arms, and what was glorious about Maureen finding Mimi in a park nearly frozen to death? Then the author suggests we all throw out our Converse tennis shoes without really justifying that. After this I must say I stoppes reading so I cannot comment on the second half or so of the book but I can say save your money and skip this one.

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