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A Shadowy Figure Is Intent on Harming Denver’s Women Step into True Colors -- a new series of Historical Stories of Romance and American Crime Denver of 1900 is still a dangerous place to be following the silver crash of 1893. And of out of the dark comes a shadow intent on harming women. Ambitious young Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe is searching for the big story t A Shadowy Figure Is Intent on Harming Denver’s Women Step into True Colors -- a new series of Historical Stories of Romance and American Crime Denver of 1900 is still a dangerous place to be following the silver crash of 1893. And of out of the dark comes a shadow intent on harming women. Ambitious young Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe is searching for the big story that’s going to launch her career. On Friday evening, August 24, 1900, she gets her break when two women are cracked over the head within a two-minute walk of each other. But policeman Edwin Timmer thwarts Polly’s ideas of a serial criminal. . .until the shadowy figure strikes again. Will the reporter and the policeman team up to find the culprit before her strikes too close for comfort?


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A Shadowy Figure Is Intent on Harming Denver’s Women Step into True Colors -- a new series of Historical Stories of Romance and American Crime Denver of 1900 is still a dangerous place to be following the silver crash of 1893. And of out of the dark comes a shadow intent on harming women. Ambitious young Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe is searching for the big story t A Shadowy Figure Is Intent on Harming Denver’s Women Step into True Colors -- a new series of Historical Stories of Romance and American Crime Denver of 1900 is still a dangerous place to be following the silver crash of 1893. And of out of the dark comes a shadow intent on harming women. Ambitious young Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe is searching for the big story that’s going to launch her career. On Friday evening, August 24, 1900, she gets her break when two women are cracked over the head within a two-minute walk of each other. But policeman Edwin Timmer thwarts Polly’s ideas of a serial criminal. . .until the shadowy figure strikes again. Will the reporter and the policeman team up to find the culprit before her strikes too close for comfort?

30 review for The Silver Shadow

  1. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    Liz Tolsma is quickly becoming a favorite author of mine. She has strong, unwavering, determined female leads that will do nothing to stop them from getting what they want. Again in this book, Polly is a strong and determined female news reporter who will not let a man tell her what, or where, she should be. Polly Blythe is a reporter for the Denver Post, of engagements, weddings, and articles women would read. But it is her dream to be a front-page reporter of the happenings of Denver, and when Liz Tolsma is quickly becoming a favorite author of mine. She has strong, unwavering, determined female leads that will do nothing to stop them from getting what they want. Again in this book, Polly is a strong and determined female news reporter who will not let a man tell her what, or where, she should be. Polly Blythe is a reporter for the Denver Post, of engagements, weddings, and articles women would read. But it is her dream to be a front-page reporter of the happenings of Denver, and when the Silver Shadow starts his run, that is the story Polly wants. But in the day of men dominating the working world, will she get her big break, and how many will try to derail her dreams because she is just that, a woman. And will the eye of a certain detective change that dream? Edwin Price is an up and coming detective for the Denver police department who also is determined to find the Silver Shadow after the case becomes personal. But when Ms. Blythe comes into the police department asking to speak to the victims and become partners in the case - police and newspaper - can he keep his focus on the case and not the beautiful news reporter. I enjoyed this book from the very beginning and was eager to see how Edwin and Polly solve this case, how working together brings them closer, and how their belief in God sets them in the path of belief and love. I received this as an advanced read from Netgalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Tero

    Another historical crime book! I have appreciated learning more about historical crimes through this series. Yes, they are often sickening because the crimes are committed by twisted minds, but they are also intriguing. This one had me guessing at the antagonist. I was wrong in my prediction, which means I thoroughly enjoyed watching the mystery unfold. This one revolved around the Denver Post and crime against women – not violating them, but giving them concussions. Getting a glimpse inside the Another historical crime book! I have appreciated learning more about historical crimes through this series. Yes, they are often sickening because the crimes are committed by twisted minds, but they are also intriguing. This one had me guessing at the antagonist. I was wrong in my prediction, which means I thoroughly enjoyed watching the mystery unfold. This one revolved around the Denver Post and crime against women – not violating them, but giving them concussions. Getting a glimpse inside the criminal’s twisted mind added a depth to the story. Since this book was more mystery-driven than romance driven, I did enjoy the romantic elements. Yes, Edwin and Polly were sweet on each other, but their romance seemed to develop slowly and believably instead of rapidly. The majority of the romance was toward the end of the book and was more sweet than sappy to me. There was a strong independent-woman thread, with Polly wanting to prove herself so much so that she defied her father (even if she had a reason) and refused to listen to the men in her life who cared for her. I personally would have liked to see a glimpse of forgiveness of her toward her father instead of her insisting on her own way. The spiritual thread came out most toward the end and primarily when the characters were helpless and had to rely on God. The criminal actually had a contorted view of his actions pleasing God, which were disgusting as they were intended to be. I would have liked to have seen a little more balance between this and an actual Biblical viewpoint of pleasing God. It was kind of there, but not really in the forefront of the story. As with many of the other True Colors books, you have to love disturbing mysteries to appreciate this book. *I received this book from CelebrateLit and happily provided my honest review*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    I love these True Colors crime novels as it is so fascinating to learn of true criminals and try to figure out why they perpetrated the crimes they did. I then like to look up the actual cases and research them. This author has become one of my favorite to follow as she weaves truth with fiction like a well woven tapestry. I especially love the faith element and how the characters see the need to rely on it when they see doing things on their own strength isn’t working. Weave in a little spark o I love these True Colors crime novels as it is so fascinating to learn of true criminals and try to figure out why they perpetrated the crimes they did. I then like to look up the actual cases and research them. This author has become one of my favorite to follow as she weaves truth with fiction like a well woven tapestry. I especially love the faith element and how the characters see the need to rely on it when they see doing things on their own strength isn’t working. Weave in a little spark of romance to lighten the story and you have a winner. This book is part of a series but each book stands alone. Barbour Publishing has done an outstanding job creating something different to capture our attention. I highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys history, true crime, and a well woven story of truth and fiction where truth is stranger than fiction. I received a complimentary copy from CelebrateLit. The honest review and opinions are my own and were not required.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Loraine

    Polly Blythe is ahead of her time and determined to become a serious journalist, but instead the editor has assigned her to engagements and weddings. Edwin Price is a detective for the Denver Police Department. It is 1900 and a man who becomes dubbed by Polly as the Silver Shadow is brutalizing women throughout the city. All have the same MO, nothing stolen, no sexual attacks, just simply hit over the head with a metal object. When one of Polly's roommates is attacked and left with brain damage, Polly Blythe is ahead of her time and determined to become a serious journalist, but instead the editor has assigned her to engagements and weddings. Edwin Price is a detective for the Denver Police Department. It is 1900 and a man who becomes dubbed by Polly as the Silver Shadow is brutalizing women throughout the city. All have the same MO, nothing stolen, no sexual attacks, just simply hit over the head with a metal object. When one of Polly's roommates is attacked and left with brain damage, Polly knows she has to find out who is doing this and soon becomes entwined in Edwin's investigation. Liz Tolsma never disappoints. Her suspense is always a roller coaster ride that leaves me wondering what will happen next. Her obvious research adds depth and interest to her writing, and she brings her characters to life with vividness and intensity. Well written novel that is part of the True Crime series. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly-Ann ~ Sassy Bookish Mama

    This is my fifth book that I have read from this series and so far I have enjoyed all of them. I will say that this one was a bit different than the others I have read in the series. There was suspense but it was bit more subdued but the storyline does keep you engaged and at least for me it kept me guessing on who the culprit was. It was also different because in this one you actually get to know the Silver Shadow and get a peek inside his train of thought and see his reasoning for attacking th This is my fifth book that I have read from this series and so far I have enjoyed all of them. I will say that this one was a bit different than the others I have read in the series. There was suspense but it was bit more subdued but the storyline does keep you engaged and at least for me it kept me guessing on who the culprit was. It was also different because in this one you actually get to know the Silver Shadow and get a peek inside his train of thought and see his reasoning for attacking these women which was an interesting take on the storyline. I really enjoyed the characters of Polly and Edwin. Polly is a go-getter and all she wants is to be a reporter that actually reports news and not society events. She really fights for this throughout the story and it made me sad that a huge part of it was because she was trying to get her father to be proud of her and accept her for who she was. Edwin is a detective with the Denver Police Department. He meets Polly through her investigation of these incidents and through that build a friendship and a later on a relationship. Their romance was nice and slow and very realistic. I really enjoyed their banter and how she would take over and somehow run the show. This is my second book from this series that was written by her and I thought she did a great job. You can tell that she did her research and I think she did a great job at making these characters come alive even though a huge chunk of it is more fiction than historical. She did a great job at weaving the message that God's bigger and knows all of the plans for our lives throughout the story. Overall I thought this was a great story and addition to the series. If you enjoy historical true crimes, suspense and a little romance then this is the book for you! I can't wait for the next one! I received a copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to post a positive review. All views expressed are only my honest opinion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan Snodgrass

    I have really been enjoying this series. Most of the crimes I have heard of. And I did some researching on the ones I did not. This one was very elusive. I couldn’t find a thing about it. Still it was fun to read. I wonder what is in store for readers next? My thanks to Barbour Publishing for a copy of this book via Net Galley. I was not required to leave a review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chautona Havig

    I'm pretty sure The Silver Shadow is Liz Tolsma's best book to date.  I don't say that lightly, because I LOVED The Green Dress more than probably all of the other books in the series (one still torments me a bit, though).  Maybe it was just when I read it, or even that I just really resonated with the characters on a new level, but this one stands out more than all of Tolsma's books. Polly Blythe (whose name really reminds me a lot of "Nellie Bly" of The Gray Chamber) is a beautiful combination I'm pretty sure The Silver Shadow is Liz Tolsma's best book to date.  I don't say that lightly, because I LOVED The Green Dress more than probably all of the other books in the series (one still torments me a bit, though).  Maybe it was just when I read it, or even that I just really resonated with the characters on a new level, but this one stands out more than all of Tolsma's books. Polly Blythe (whose name really reminds me a lot of "Nellie Bly" of The Gray Chamber) is a beautiful combination of bold, feisty, uncertain, and vulnerable.  The crime--riveting. While motives and the actual culprit were fictionalized, I think Tolsma used the most actual people from the time in her book than in any other book, despite her claim that it is the most fictionalized of the ones she's written.  The fact that they never actually caught the killer, and she brought one to justice, of course makes that claim reasonable. Of everything in the book though, two things stand out most to me. First, personal motivations.  I found that each character's motivations for why they did what they did--particularly Edwin, his family, and Polly--were deep and layered.  It wasn't a simple case of a girl wanting to prove she could do a job as good as a man.  One by one, Polly's motivations were peeled back until you found a core beneath them that breaks your heart.  The same is true for many of the characters. Second, the characters' faith. Each character had a different element of faith they demonstrated in quiet, natural ways that feel as if you're watching faith in action by people who have no idea anyone would be observing. While I received a review copy of this book free, I also purchased two of my own copies so... yeah. There's that. Recommended for lovers of historical fiction, true crime, and excellent writing that keeps you riveted to the page... and makes you look over your shoulder when you're walking out alone after dark. ;)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Wardwell

    What lingers in the shadows… If you have followed my reviews throughout this series, you know how I feel about it. These authors are talented and their stories are gripping. The Silver Shadow is no different. In fact, it might be the best (but I won’t make that official because I haven’t taken a second look at the others). We know the verse, “What ever is done in the dark will be brought into the light.” Or something like that. Polly and Edwin work to bring this person to justice in The Silver Sha What lingers in the shadows… If you have followed my reviews throughout this series, you know how I feel about it. These authors are talented and their stories are gripping. The Silver Shadow is no different. In fact, it might be the best (but I won’t make that official because I haven’t taken a second look at the others). We know the verse, “What ever is done in the dark will be brought into the light.” Or something like that. Polly and Edwin work to bring this person to justice in The Silver Shadow but they seem to work more in parallel instead of together. That proves to be an issues in their investigations. Polly is desperate and a little reckless but her heart and intentions are in the right place. She wants these attacks on the women of Denver to stop and she is a bull dog in sticking to her intuition that tells her it is one person. Edwin, he is admirable but he is singularly focused because of his personal pain. I felt like his reasoning for not agreeing with Polly’s hunch was only an excuse to keep her out of the investigation. Not that I could blame him. Women being out after dark were the target of these attacks. The third point of view that popped up from time to time proved to offer a chilling element to the story that might have you on your guard when out on your evening walks. Page-turner, gripping, heart pounding, engaging—all words I would associate with this story and I know I am not alone. ***I was given a copy of this book from the publisher through CelebrateLit. A positive review was not required but freely given.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Suzie Waltner

    3.5 Stars As the author states in the notes at the end of the novel, The Silver Shadow is the most fictionalized version of a true crime than any other book in the series. This is because of the lack of source materials. Liz Tolsma does a remarkable job of weaving a suspenseful story with many historical names and influences in 1900 and 1901 Denver. While this book isn’t as disturbing as some of the other books in the series, it does still astound the reader as to how some humans can injure others 3.5 Stars As the author states in the notes at the end of the novel, The Silver Shadow is the most fictionalized version of a true crime than any other book in the series. This is because of the lack of source materials. Liz Tolsma does a remarkable job of weaving a suspenseful story with many historical names and influences in 1900 and 1901 Denver. While this book isn’t as disturbing as some of the other books in the series, it does still astound the reader as to how some humans can injure others for their own reasons. And while I enjoyed the slow burn romance between Polly and Edwin, there were a few instances in the book that had me scratching my head. Overall, this was a nice addition to the series, but the fact that I can’t go look into the true facts of the crime made it lose some of the appeal of the other books in the series had for me. Disclosure statement: I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book and was not required to write a positive review. All opinions are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This story is a fictionalized true crime story set in Denver, Colorado in 1900. The story is told from the part of the 3 main characters. The Silver Shadow, Polly and Edwin. Polly is a twenty-something reporter at the Denver Post trying to find her way in a man's world. Edwin is a police officer that is trying to avenge his guilt for witnessing his father's murder. The Silver Shadow is a menacing murderer who is striking women on the streets of Denver. He feels that he is doing the Lord's work a This story is a fictionalized true crime story set in Denver, Colorado in 1900. The story is told from the part of the 3 main characters. The Silver Shadow, Polly and Edwin. Polly is a twenty-something reporter at the Denver Post trying to find her way in a man's world. Edwin is a police officer that is trying to avenge his guilt for witnessing his father's murder. The Silver Shadow is a menacing murderer who is striking women on the streets of Denver. He feels that he is doing the Lord's work and teaching the people of Denver a lesson. This was a captivating story to look at all of the different sides of the people that were being affected by the actions of the Silver Shadow. Thanks to netgalley and Barbour Publishing for the arc. The opinions are my own.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen Hadley

    Imagine living in a city where women are afraid to walk the streets. Women are being attacked and the criminal evade the police. Put together a policeman and a woman struggling to make it in the world of journalism where men dominant the profession and you have a mystery to be solved. Based on a true story, Liz Tolsma brings it to life as you meet great and not so great ones. Well developed story that makes you look behind yourself when walking in the dark. Great book, want to know what happens Imagine living in a city where women are afraid to walk the streets. Women are being attacked and the criminal evade the police. Put together a policeman and a woman struggling to make it in the world of journalism where men dominant the profession and you have a mystery to be solved. Based on a true story, Liz Tolsma brings it to life as you meet great and not so great ones. Well developed story that makes you look behind yourself when walking in the dark. Great book, want to know what happens and how it ends? READ THE BOOK! Blessings, Karen Hadley Rating: 5* I received this book as a gift and all opinions are my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? This is the most unusual book of the True Colors series thus far, in my opinion, which only makes it all the more intriguing. I purposely avoid book summaries, except for perhaps a very bare-bones version, when choosing which books to read, and in the case of this series, I usually recognize the case very early on. As “The Silver Shadow” progressed, however, and I still remained clueless, I really had to fight the urge to peek ahead! Something that s Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? This is the most unusual book of the True Colors series thus far, in my opinion, which only makes it all the more intriguing. I purposely avoid book summaries, except for perhaps a very bare-bones version, when choosing which books to read, and in the case of this series, I usually recognize the case very early on. As “The Silver Shadow” progressed, however, and I still remained clueless, I really had to fight the urge to peek ahead! Something that struck me from the beginning is that this case reminded me of Jack the Ripper, albeit less gruesome, due to the female targets and the nocturnal timing of the crimes, as well as the fact that the perpetrator was able to strike and escape each time. Liz Tolsma, as she details in her author’s note, takes artistic liberty with “The Silver Shadow” because little is known about the crimes themselves. So little, in fact, that only one text appears to mention them: “Famous Crimes the World Forgot” by Jason Lucky Morrow. A quick Internet search of my own turned up only one article, which also references this text. I won’t spoil the story by revealing the ultimate outcome; suffice it to say that this historic crime spree offers plenty of fodder for the imagination. Tolsma provides some of the specifics of the crimes of “The Silver Shadow” committed between August 1900 and March 1901 in Denver, Colorado, crafting a fictionalized storyline around a young female reporter named Polly Blythe and police detective Edwin Price. Tapping into the mindset of the time period, Tolsma writes Polly as a burgeoning careerwoman fighting against the patriarchy in order to prove herself and achieve success. Polly opines: “It’s not that I’m after fame and fortune. I want recognition of hard work. Acceptance as a capable, intelligent reporter. That’s what I would like.” Which puts her directly at odds with the Silver Shadow, who believes that women “had to learn how to stay home and put their husbands and their families first.” Polly’s dogged determination challenges Detective Price to not only solve the case and protect the women of Denver, but also to come to terms with an old burden. An absorbing combination of psychology, romance, and mystery make “The Silver Shadow” a must-read for fans of the genre while simultaneously demonstrating the emergence and subsequent repercussions of women’s rights in society. The insights into the perpetrator’s mind keep readers guessing and offer a speculated motive. A summary of the victims in the author’s note at the end of the story is very helpful for gaining perspective on the case as a whole. I do wonder about one of the fictional characters in the novel, whose story I don’t feel is fully resolved. Also, a pedantic point that is very likely no fault of the author but has niggled my senses: on the back cover, the detective’s name is given as Edwin Timmer, but his surname throughout the book is Price. I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tim-melissa Williamson

    The Silver Shadow is a mysterious story taken from an actual historical series of attacks in Denver, CO between August 24, 1900 and April 19, 1901. I very much appreciated the author’s attention to historical detail even while taking some creative liberties. I also really enjoyed reading what historical facts exist in public record about this series of crimes at the end of the novel. While quite the sensational story, the actual culprit was never found historically speaking. I appreciate Liz Tols The Silver Shadow is a mysterious story taken from an actual historical series of attacks in Denver, CO between August 24, 1900 and April 19, 1901. I very much appreciated the author’s attention to historical detail even while taking some creative liberties. I also really enjoyed reading what historical facts exist in public record about this series of crimes at the end of the novel. While quite the sensational story, the actual culprit was never found historically speaking. I appreciate Liz Tolsma’s easy style as a writer. The narrative never feels forced or awkward and the dialog between characters is quite natural. Sometimes I did feel like there were awkward jumps between scenes, but I did enjoy the way the characters evolved from start to finish. Polly Blythe is quite the spitfire of a heroine! I loved her tenacity and spirit as she pushed forward to do what she felt she was created to do. It was certainly not easy for a woman to break into the word of news reporting at the turn of the century, buy she kept pressing on. Her dogged determination did have some deeply personal roots which are revealed as the story progresses endearing her all the more to the reader. The hero, Edwin Price, was easy to like and root for as he searched for the culprit plaguing the women of the city. His desire to clear his conscience from a regret from childhood drives his passion for justice. I appreciated this character development in particular and enjoyed how this particular individual grew throughout the ordeals he faced. I also very much appreciated the way faith was handled. I pretty much only read Christian fiction or children’s literature as I try to keep what I read clean. Still, I don’t really appreciate a book that forces the faith aspect of the story. Tolsma did an excellent job of weaving the faith of the main characters seamlessly throughout the story. She kept it believable and relatable, while still bringing the reader closer to the Lord in their own faith journey. The love story between the two main characters progressed in a sweet way and with much more grace than I sometimes read in novels. I appreciated that Tolsma does not feel the need to focus on intimacy, especially as my own teen daughters are reaching the age to enjoy reading stories with romance. I am excited to recommend this particular title to my 15-year-old who really likes a good mystery. This is a light read, great for summer vacation. I highly recommend this title and look forward to reading more from Liz Tolsma!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deana Dick

    I absolutely love this series and look forward to learning about crimes that have taken place during different time periods. This story is set in the 1900s where women were not welcomed in the world of working outside the home. Men believed they should be at home tending to children, doing housework and be at their husband’s beck and call. I welcomed the star of the story with enthusiasm. Polly was out to prove that women could work outside the home and do it just as well as men. Her time as a r I absolutely love this series and look forward to learning about crimes that have taken place during different time periods. This story is set in the 1900s where women were not welcomed in the world of working outside the home. Men believed they should be at home tending to children, doing housework and be at their husband’s beck and call. I welcomed the star of the story with enthusiasm. Polly was out to prove that women could work outside the home and do it just as well as men. Her time as a reporter was not welcomed by some and I liked how determined she was to succeed. Her strength and wisdom suited her well as she became involved in a story that shook the quiet neighborhood she lived. Denver was thriving and there was much going on as the city grew and crime picked up. As readers are introduced to this mysterious person who was harming women, I knew it was going to be a race to solve the crime. The author does state that she did take some liberties in the story but I think she did a good job of bringing the characters to life. I was trying to keep up with the little crumbs of evidence but couldn’t quite figure out who it was. Edwin is a good police officer who won’t rest till he finds the culprit that injured women in vicious and random attacks. The choice of weapon made me cringe. As the author described the attacks, I could feel the pain that radiated in the victim’s head. It was a horrible crime and I’m glad that Polly and Edwin teamed up to capture the person. The only problem I had with the story was the way Polly seemed to act like was not concerned about her safety. Why did she keep going out at night by herself knowing someone was out there attacking women? She had been warned many times but she was so determined to break the story she forgot her own safety. Overall the book was entertaining but it did lack the punch that other stories in the series have had. It lacked details at times and some were not consistent with the story and was confusing. I did like how a group of men came together to help catch the person but they disbanded quickly. The police department was not very equipped to handle a case like this as they continually arrested someone who turned out to be innocent. The story is good but I felt like the ending was rushed and I was hoping for more attention given to the person behind the crimes. It was a great opportunity to delve into the reason he did it and perhaps go back to his past and allow readers to see why he chose to target women. "I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and Celebrate Lit and was under no obligation to post a review."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    3.5 stars "I WILL GET YOU. . . That was it. Four small words. Four small, powerful words." A rather ominous four words. They should scare most women to death. But Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe didn't scare easily, or maybe she did . . . but she was still determined that the "silver shadow", the man who had been slinking around the city at night, attacking innocent women at will, had to be stopped; even if it meant being part of the process. And she knew exactly who could help her. Detecti 3.5 stars "I WILL GET YOU. . . That was it. Four small words. Four small, powerful words." A rather ominous four words. They should scare most women to death. But Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe didn't scare easily, or maybe she did . . . but she was still determined that the "silver shadow", the man who had been slinking around the city at night, attacking innocent women at will, had to be stopped; even if it meant being part of the process. And she knew exactly who could help her. Detective Edwin Timmer. Polly was determined to make a name for herself, to prove to her father and her editor that she could write stories of substance, and this case had practically "hit her over the head". "Has anyone ever told you that you are the most hardheaded woman?" Polly Blythe was going to be the death of him; Edwin had been unsuccessful in his efforts to convince the pretty little reporter to leave crime solving in the hands of the police . . . but then again, he could hardly blame her. Even in his own estimation the chief was not putting enough importance on the continual random muggings on the streets of Denver. However, when the case looms very close and personal, Edwin and Polly realize that some things are just out of their hands. Such a fascinating story! Not only the fictional version, but the historical one as well. Readers will feel the urgency and the angst to catch this disillusioned killer, not only to make the streets of Denver much safer, but to clear the way for Polly and Edwin to live outside the shadows for the rest of their days.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Becka

    The Silver Shadow is a terrific addition to Barbour's True Colors series--a series of fictionalized accounts of true crime from American history. In The Silver Shadow, we're in Denver in the year 1900. An unknown man, given the moniker The Silver Shadow, is attacking women who are walking alone at night. He doesn't rob them or sexually assault them, he simply bashes them on the head and flees. We follow Polly, a strong female lead who is trying to make her way as a reporter, when societal norms a The Silver Shadow is a terrific addition to Barbour's True Colors series--a series of fictionalized accounts of true crime from American history. In The Silver Shadow, we're in Denver in the year 1900. An unknown man, given the moniker The Silver Shadow, is attacking women who are walking alone at night. He doesn't rob them or sexually assault them, he simply bashes them on the head and flees. We follow Polly, a strong female lead who is trying to make her way as a reporter, when societal norms and family expectations have the odds stacked against her. We also follow Edwin, the police detective involved in the Silver Shadow case. Author Liz Tolsma does a fantastic job of planting red herrings. I had no fewer than 5 possible suspects, and I kept jumping back and forth between them throughout the book. I love when an author is able to accomplish that. I also love when the suspect that I finally settle on ends up not being the right one! One of my favorite parts of the book is the author's note at the end, where Tolsma shares information about the actual events from Denver in 1900, explaining what aspects of the book were factual and in what areas she was able to fictionalize the account. It's fascinating to learn that some of the things I figured were fictional are actual events from the case. Overall, a fast-paced, keeps you guessing mystery made even creepier by the fact that it's not completely fiction! Thanks go to NetGalley and Barbour Publishing for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tabitha Bouldin

    Intriguing story line and wonderful characters. This book has everything I want in a creepy yet delightful tale of sinister history. I love Polly's determination not to give in to fear. She's made her way up in the world and finally gotten the job of her dreams, but the silver shadow is out to put women in "their rightful place". Polly and Edwin will have to move fast and trust each other if they want to catch him. The mystery of the attacker lends an intenseness to the story that draws Polly an Intriguing story line and wonderful characters. This book has everything I want in a creepy yet delightful tale of sinister history. I love Polly's determination not to give in to fear. She's made her way up in the world and finally gotten the job of her dreams, but the silver shadow is out to put women in "their rightful place". Polly and Edwin will have to move fast and trust each other if they want to catch him. The mystery of the attacker lends an intenseness to the story that draws Polly and Edwin together. I enjoyed the bit of a Cinderella vibe Polly gave off as she and Edwin were of different social classes. Despite his higher social standing, Edwin is fierce about his job as a policeman and needs to solve this case before the people he loves most can suffer even more than they have already. Polly has a tendency to rush into things. She seems to have little concern for herself as long as she gets closer to her goal of proving herself worthy. Edwin believes himself to be a failure as well, and seeing them bolster the other throughout the story helped boost the romance and keep me turning pages. I received a copy of this book through the publisher via NetGalley. I was not required to leave a positive review. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Connie Saunders

    Just who was the Silver Shadow? Why were women in Denver attacked, and often killed, with no apparent motive? These are the questions that rookie news reporter Polly Blythe is determined to answer, with the help of Denver policeman Edwin Price. Author Liz Tolsma has created an intriguing fictional story around the true facts of this crime wave that terrorized Denver in 1900-1901, and she imagines the thoughts of Polly, Edwin, and the criminal that she has dubbed The Silver Shadow. The intrigue k Just who was the Silver Shadow? Why were women in Denver attacked, and often killed, with no apparent motive? These are the questions that rookie news reporter Polly Blythe is determined to answer, with the help of Denver policeman Edwin Price. Author Liz Tolsma has created an intriguing fictional story around the true facts of this crime wave that terrorized Denver in 1900-1901, and she imagines the thoughts of Polly, Edwin, and the criminal that she has dubbed The Silver Shadow. The intrigue kept me guessing throughout the story, and I was especially interested in the Shadow's reasons for attacking these innocent women. Tolsma vividly depicts the extreme fear of Denver citizens, and the frustrations of those who failed to stop this assailant, and she adds even more interest by creating a romantic connection between Polly and Edwin! Apparently. there's little recorded information about these crimes, and the author's notes explain what is fact and what is fiction. I enjoyed The Silver Shadow and I recommend it to all who enjoy historical fiction and romantic suspense. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing via Net Galley and was under no obligation to post a review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    This true crime during the early 1900’s in Denver was another winner by Liz Tolsma. The characters, vivid scenes and dialogues among each player drew me in from the start. Polly aspired to see her byline on the front page of the Denver Post and wanted to work with Detective Edwin to help some solve the mysterious attack on women by the offender, known as the Silver Shadow. The conflicts for Polly and Edwin between their employers increased the drama. Will the true offender attacking the women be This true crime during the early 1900’s in Denver was another winner by Liz Tolsma. The characters, vivid scenes and dialogues among each player drew me in from the start. Polly aspired to see her byline on the front page of the Denver Post and wanted to work with Detective Edwin to help some solve the mysterious attack on women by the offender, known as the Silver Shadow. The conflicts for Polly and Edwin between their employers increased the drama. Will the true offender attacking the women be punished or will women continue to live in fear along with the residents of Denver? Tolsma created a well written story with very little history about this true crime in Denver. I appreciated her notes at the end sharing her research with facts and the fiction she used. I’ve enjoyed the true crime series books I’ve read thus far including earlier ones by Tolsma. I won a complimentary kindle copy of this book from Goodreads in the giveaway by Barbour Publishers and the author without any obligation to write a positive review. I have expressed my own thoughts.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Sluiter

    Author Liz Tolsma has written another compelling true crime story. (Although it’s number 11 in the series, they are all standalones.) Based on a true crime that happened in 1900, this one was a bit easier for me to read. Although there were many moments of suspense, it wasn’t as gruesome as some others in the series. Strong characters, both Polly and Edwin were determined in their own ways. I really liked both of them. Tolsma wrote them in such a way that they were life-like as they faced life's Author Liz Tolsma has written another compelling true crime story. (Although it’s number 11 in the series, they are all standalones.) Based on a true crime that happened in 1900, this one was a bit easier for me to read. Although there were many moments of suspense, it wasn’t as gruesome as some others in the series. Strong characters, both Polly and Edwin were determined in their own ways. I really liked both of them. Tolsma wrote them in such a way that they were life-like as they faced life's challenges. I found myself often wondering how I would have handled things. The secondary characters were also well written and likeable. Well, a couple of them were foolish but that you have to have characters like that so you have a true representation of life. Tolsma had so little history to go on that I believe she did a really good job with this “could have been” story. And a clean romance thrown into the mix added good tension to the story. I recommend it! I received a complimentary copy of this book but was not required to leave a review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarita

    I was excited for this one ever since I gave 5 stars to The Gold Digger, also part of the True Crimes series and written by Liz Tolsma. I was again provided with an intriguing historical mystery, a hero you don’t see every day, and a headstrong heroine who tried to find her place in a male dominated world. Sophie’s recovery from the Silver Shadow was probably the saddest for me. I didn’t find the crime as strong and creepy as in the Gold Digger, but the author again kept me guessing with a few dif I was excited for this one ever since I gave 5 stars to The Gold Digger, also part of the True Crimes series and written by Liz Tolsma. I was again provided with an intriguing historical mystery, a hero you don’t see every day, and a headstrong heroine who tried to find her place in a male dominated world. Sophie’s recovery from the Silver Shadow was probably the saddest for me. I didn’t find the crime as strong and creepy as in the Gold Digger, but the author again kept me guessing with a few different suspects, made me second guess myself and threw in some creepy factor by showing us some POV from the culprit and why he was targeting women. The author also ended with a note of what was true facts, where she had to get creative with fiction and a list of the real victims of the Silver Shadow. Recommended for readers who like a bit more of a thriller plot. Looking forward to the next true crime book in the series. *I received a complimentary copy from the publisher. All opinions expressed are my own.*

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pooja

    Polly Blythe is a reporter at the Denver Post, hoping for a chance to write more important news than covering society events. When a prowler on the city streets starts attacking women, she works with Detective Edwin Price to try and catch the killer. The author picks up a little-known historical crime and transforms it into a compelling mystery in this book. I admired the two main characters, especially Polly and her determination to look after herself. The writing felt a touch lacking in subtlet Polly Blythe is a reporter at the Denver Post, hoping for a chance to write more important news than covering society events. When a prowler on the city streets starts attacking women, she works with Detective Edwin Price to try and catch the killer. The author picks up a little-known historical crime and transforms it into a compelling mystery in this book. I admired the two main characters, especially Polly and her determination to look after herself. The writing felt a touch lacking in subtlety, though, and the ending a little haphazard, though I understand that the author was limited by historical fact. Disclaimer: This book was won in a Goodreads giveaway. This is my honest and voluntary review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Becky Lewis

    “God had given him the job to bring order to the world again. And that’s just what he would do.” Every crime has a motive, and it can be surprising the justification perpetrators give to a crime. The year is 1900, and women have begun the fight for the right to vote. Many men feel that a woman’s place is in the home, either under her husband or her father’s protection and jurisdiction. Polly Blythe is trying hard to disprove her father of that notion as she struggles for a place in the newsroom o “God had given him the job to bring order to the world again. And that’s just what he would do.” Every crime has a motive, and it can be surprising the justification perpetrators give to a crime. The year is 1900, and women have begun the fight for the right to vote. Many men feel that a woman’s place is in the home, either under her husband or her father’s protection and jurisdiction. Polly Blythe is trying hard to disprove her father of that notion as she struggles for a place in the newsroom of the Denver Post. Can she succeed against the odds in a man’s world, as an evil force begins to target people surrounding her and finally Polly herself? I think the wonderful unfolding of the relationship between Polly and police detective Edwin Price held me captive from the first. I loved the whole Price family. And villains? Tolsma gives us plenty to dislike heartily, and I just couldn’t put the book down no matter how late the hour. Be ready for unexpected twists and one thrilling chill of a ride! I received a copy of the book from the author and publisher via Celebrate Lit and NetGalley. No remuneration was received and no positive review was required. All thoughts are my own.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    This was another good book in this series. Polly and Edwin are trying to find out who is attacking women. Polly writes for the newspaper and Edwin is the detective in charge of the case. It was a fairly quick book with lots of action and mystery. It’s a good depiction of the time period. I enjoyed the story and think other fans of this series will also. Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the early copy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    This has been my favorite novel in the True Colors series so far. The protagonists are active Christians who try to walk out their faith despite their struggles resulting from past events. We know little about whodunit except for a vague physical description. Most victims are knocked out and do not see him. I found the history of the new century and what Denver was like to be satisfying, and I came to care about many of the very realistic characters. Polly moved to Denver where she was a cleaning This has been my favorite novel in the True Colors series so far. The protagonists are active Christians who try to walk out their faith despite their struggles resulting from past events. We know little about whodunit except for a vague physical description. Most victims are knocked out and do not see him. I found the history of the new century and what Denver was like to be satisfying, and I came to care about many of the very realistic characters. Polly moved to Denver where she was a cleaning lady at the Denver Post until she talked the editor into giving her a chance to be a reporter. As the few other women newspaper reporters in 1900, she was only allowed to write society articles despite longing to do something of substance. Her father wanted her to return to St. Louis and get married like women were supposed to. She wrapped up her worth in her earthly father’s opinion of her, while her heavenly Father longed to be and do so much more for her. Edwin was a detective at the police station near the Denver Post building and Polly’s boardinghouse. He was from a prominent Denver family. His father was murdered more than ten years ago; Edwin still lived in the family home with his mother and sister. He wanted to make a difference and worked hard for Denver’s citizens. His mother was a firm believer in the Lord, knowing that everything is in God’s hands. Edwin was trying to pay for past shortcomings, even though Jesus had already done so. They met when someone began attacking women. Women out after dark were targeted. They were hit over the back of their head but not robbed or violated. Polly was told by Harry, one of the reporters, that she could take the mugging cases the first evening and write a brief article about them. She met Edwin when trying to find one of the victims to interview. They found another victim, Rachel, a close friend of Edwin’s; by the time they helped Rachel to his home, got the doctor, and returned to the newspaper office, Harry wrote up the article, sent it to press, and left. Rachel died during the night. Polly tried to get involved with reporting these attacks as more occurred. She saw Edwin when other women were attacked. Once he invited her to have Sunday dinner with his family. While neither would admit it, they were beginning to feel an attraction based on their faith and attitudes about life. My favorite characters were Polly and Edwin due to their shared faith, work ethic, personal challenges, and how they treated each other. I found myself wanting them to succeed, find the bad guy, and perhaps even find romance. Edwin’s mother was another favorite. She had a strong faith in the Lord and wisdom that she gently shared. I appreciated seeing the same spiritual lessons I continue to re-learn! There are plot twists and surprises throughout, including who the real bad guy was. I appreciated the author’s notes and the truth behind the novel and characters. I highly recommend this to anyone who likes well-written Christian historical fiction based on true crimes and unexpected romance. From a thankful heart: I received a copy of this novel from the publisher, NetGalley, and Celebrate Lit, and this is my honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christi

    The True Colors series is magnificent, and The Silver Shadow is another great installment! It's Chicago 1900 and there is a madman on the loose, bashing helpless women walking down the street alone in the head with a lead pipe, and running off before the victim or bystanders have a chance to get a good look at him. From what witnesses have reported as far as details of the man, he seems to look like every other man in Chicago during that time, striking fear in the community from the beginning. Mu The True Colors series is magnificent, and The Silver Shadow is another great installment! It's Chicago 1900 and there is a madman on the loose, bashing helpless women walking down the street alone in the head with a lead pipe, and running off before the victim or bystanders have a chance to get a good look at him. From what witnesses have reported as far as details of the man, he seems to look like every other man in Chicago during that time, striking fear in the community from the beginning. Much like the true tale that this novel is based off of, the mystery and tension begin from the first chapter, and doesn't let up until the very end, making it incredibly hard to put down, though I will say that after all the build up that the ended fell a little flat for me, but this is just how the true story ended. If only we could help the outcome of history, huh? Though we get to see behind the attackers mind a bit throughout The Silver Shadow, I still craved more. Where were the glimpses of his past that provided fuel for his reign of terror? I think with that perspective from the predator that it would've made this one of my favorites from the series. I also didn't love how the ending felt rushed and more like an afterthought, but that also could derive from my disappointment as well. Polly and Edwin, the heroine and hero respectively, were a favorite of mine in this novel, the charming chemistry and banter the perfect balance to the darker undertones and subject matter. I loved their shared faith, mutual respect, and support for one another, the perfect balance to the darkness swirling around them. The Silver Shadow truly was a fascinating story that was hard to put down. I do feel like the fact that there's not much information about this true crime spree hurt the narrative, but Liz Tolsma did a masterful job with what she had to work with. This was some kind of evil that possessed this man to do what he did, and even though Edwin and Polly are fictional characters, I like to believe that there were fearless individuals that were there to take this monster down, and help to keep the streets of Chicago safe. It still blows my mind that the stories in this series actually happened, once again proving that truth is indeed stranger than fiction. *I have voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from Barbour Publishing, Inc. through NetGalley. All views and opinions expressed are completely honest, and my own.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Drillien

    When a series of attacks on women begin to seem connected, Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe and police detective Edwin Price work together to catch the criminal responsible. Both are hindered by bosses whose priorities are skewed, but when Polly catches the madman's attention, they will have to work extra hard to apprehend the perpetrator while also keeping Polly safe. At its core, this is the story of 3 individuals who are all haunted by something terrible from their past. Each of them is When a series of attacks on women begin to seem connected, Denver newspaper reporter Polly Blythe and police detective Edwin Price work together to catch the criminal responsible. Both are hindered by bosses whose priorities are skewed, but when Polly catches the madman's attention, they will have to work extra hard to apprehend the perpetrator while also keeping Polly safe. At its core, this is the story of 3 individuals who are all haunted by something terrible from their past. Each of them is trying to find a way to deal with that past, none of them is going about it the right way, and not all of them will learn that lesson by the end of the book. Whether this connection between the characters was intentional or not, I couldn't tell you, because I don't think the author capitalized on it much at all. It did lead to a lot of repetition, though. I struggled all the way through this book with not feeling connected to the two main characters or to the relationship they were building along the way. The writing seemed kind of shallow and the dialog was often strange, confusing, or stilted. There was one thing Edwin did part way through the book that appalled me and was just waved away, leaving me feeling very unsettled. Polly is said to be smart and careful, yet constantly goes out alone after dark for one reason or another. Guessing at the identity of the murderer, not even knowing if it would be someone we'd met in the story or not, was something that kept me interested, but that's probably all that kept me moving through the book quickly. The overall plot and many of the specific events that happened were interesting and could have made for an exciting story, but it just all felt so rushed and shallow. Maybe that's due to the length of the book, I don't know. I've had my ups and downs with this series of stand-alone true crime books, but this one is a miss for me. It's a completely clean romance, though doesn't have a particularly strong Christian message throughout, if you're looking for that. I've not read all of the other True Colors books, nor even all of Liz Tolsma's contributions, but I did really like one of her others, The Green Dress. As for this one, please be sure to check out other reviews for the book if you're interested, because many others liked it more than I did. Thank you to Netgalley and Barbour Publishing, Inc. for providing me a copy of this book to review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Theodene

    The True Colors Series continues with The Silver Shadow by Liz Tolsma. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed these historical fiction books in this series! I love the glimpse of what might have happened during the events in each book. Thank you to NetGalley and Barbour Books for providing this amazing series! Polly Blythe is a reporter in Denver, CO. While she’s been thrown to the back societal pages, Polly really wants to get into the action with front page news! She goes as far as writing an editorial to get The True Colors Series continues with The Silver Shadow by Liz Tolsma. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed these historical fiction books in this series! I love the glimpse of what might have happened during the events in each book. Thank you to NetGalley and Barbour Books for providing this amazing series! Polly Blythe is a reporter in Denver, CO. While she’s been thrown to the back societal pages, Polly really wants to get into the action with front page news! She goes as far as writing an editorial to get the attention of the editor regarding the recent nighttime muggings of women being hit at the back of their heads. Some recovered, a few died, and some have lasting brain damage. Her father wants her to return home to St Louis, but she refuses to leave. It’s when the handsome Detective Price gets involved that Polly turns to him for updates. He even offers to walk her home to prevent her from being mugged herself. Unfortunately, Polly heard a whimper as they passed an alley, another victim who happens to be someone Price knows. It’s only a matter of time before stubborn Polly is attacked. Will she be okay? Will she ever get her front page article? Will her father make her return home? What happens with Polly and Detective Price? I love the protagonist, Polly. She’s determined, persistent, knows what she wants, and a real go-getter. Polly is also caring and gets along with most. She’s my kind of girl! I can think of several women who hold values like Polly! The antagonist here is the suspect. He’s sneaky and spiteful. His wife left pregnant and with another man. He believes women belong at home making babies, cooking, and cleaning. They don’t belong out and about and definitely not working. In this day and age, we call it “old-fashioned.” In this time period of early 1900s, it’s the era where women began to make a name for themselves and many were still against it. The Silver Shadow by Liz Tolsma is an excellent historical fiction that had me at the edge of my seat wondering when Polly would be at the wrong place at the wrong time. I also found myself worried that they’d never catch the suspect! I give this book 5 out of 5 tiaras because I was so engaged and concerned about Polly!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Floyd

    A woman’s place was in the home, raising children, caring for her husband, keeping house. She had no business out working a job, thinking she didn’t need a man. That was the thug’s motivation for attacking the women of Denver CO in the ending months of 1900 and the beginning of 1901. The problem was that it was not only his thoughts, but also those of the Denver Post’s editor, Joseph Ward, and at least one rising star of its newsroom, Harry Gray. And the only woman assigned to the newsroom, an a A woman’s place was in the home, raising children, caring for her husband, keeping house. She had no business out working a job, thinking she didn’t need a man. That was the thug’s motivation for attacking the women of Denver CO in the ending months of 1900 and the beginning of 1901. The problem was that it was not only his thoughts, but also those of the Denver Post’s editor, Joseph Ward, and at least one rising star of its newsroom, Harry Gray. And the only woman assigned to the newsroom, an attempt to show that an early 20th century employer could be inclusive, Polly Blythe, had to work in that environment. It also appeared to be the attitude of the Denver Police Department’s Chief of Detectives, Hamilton Armstrong. And if that was the case, why should anyone, police or otherwise, investigate the brutal attacks on 11+ women on the streets of Denver. The attacks involved the use of a lead or copper pipe hitting the women over the head - three died, the others were injured with varying degrees of physical damage. None were robbed; none were sexually assaulted. Altogether, it did make a good story - except many of the facts and people were taken from Denver’s historical record. Borrowing from that historical record, the author has done a surprising job of weaving a believable, faith-based, tale from the known facts of the era. The remarkable story concludes with a brief epilog describing the actual events that provided a foundation for the plot. The book provides fictional answers to many of the unanswered questions that remained from the actual events that took place in early 20th-century Denver. In the present book, Polly Blythe and Denver Detective Edwin Price would be the two characters with enough gumption and curiosity to continue to follow the story - though many city leaders thought it a less than worthwhile task. Their work and the creativity of the author merit this five-star review. ______________ This review is based on a free electronic copy provided by the publisher for the purpose of creating this review. The opinions expressed are mine alone.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Renee Knoblauch

    Another interesting book in the True Colors series centered on Historical Stories of American Crimes. Each book is a standalone book. These true crime stories are captivating. Some liberty is added more so to fictionalize this story due to the lack of source materials. This book is the most fictionalized version in the True Colors Series. Polly Blythe is a journalist in a male dominate field in Denver. She is determined and is more interested in reporting on the news and not society events. She Another interesting book in the True Colors series centered on Historical Stories of American Crimes. Each book is a standalone book. These true crime stories are captivating. Some liberty is added more so to fictionalize this story due to the lack of source materials. This book is the most fictionalized version in the True Colors Series. Polly Blythe is a journalist in a male dominate field in Denver. She is determined and is more interested in reporting on the news and not society events. She goes against her boss in many ways as her position in the society events. In reality her motivation is trying to make her father proud of her. She is brave and sometimes a bit too much in my opinion. With her friend being attacked it becomes a bit more personal to her. The Silver Shadow starts sending her threats. Edwin Timmer is a detective with the police department. Him and Polly become acquainted from this case and team up to solve the mystery. He isn’t sure all the cases are related at first. It becomes personal and he teams up with Polly. The other character is the Silver Shadow who is murdering women on the streets of Denver. In his delusion he feels that by him doing this he is doing the works of the Lord and teaching the residents of Denver a lesson. He thinks women should be at home taking care of the family and not working. Not too far-fetched considering most men at that time felt that way. The story is in Denver, Colorado in the 1900s. The author describes the crimes but doesn’t go into the gruesome details or glorify the crime at all. This is a Christian based book and the faith of Polly and Edwin is very realistic as they are both at different levels in their walk. On the other end you see that the Silver Shadow is using faith to kill women. The romance between Edwin and Polly is realistic and sweet. The story is intriguing and I had a hard time putting it down. This might be my favorite one out of the series. Disclosure: I received this complimentary product through Celebrate Lit Bloggers in exchange for my honest thoughts.

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