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Tell Me Where It Hurts: Private Notes from a Family Doctor's Treatment Room About Patients, Medical Care and Life

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What really happens behind a doctor's closed doors? Sundays are always crowded after the weekend without a doctor. Only two people work in the mornings: one specialist and one resident. I wonder how this morning's list will look. From my parking spot, I can already see that the waiting room is full. Tell Me Where It Hurts is a wholesome peek into the doctor's office: The Int What really happens behind a doctor's closed doors? Sundays are always crowded after the weekend without a doctor. Only two people work in the mornings: one specialist and one resident. I wonder how this morning's list will look. From my parking spot, I can already see that the waiting room is full. Tell Me Where It Hurts is a wholesome peek into the doctor's office: The Intensity, the deliberations, system constraints, and of course, the doctor's own personal life. This book invites you to become a fly on the wall of the doctor's office, to experience what happens within more realistically than you ever have before. Dr. Doron Amosi, a Family physician and emergency room doctor at Tel Aviv medical center, presents the intricacies of family medicine from his unique point of view, shedding new light on the intensity, the difficulties, and most importantly, the beauty of this crucial profession. This is a fascinating book for doctors of all specialties to discover the importance of doctor-patient relationships, and for patients to understand that on the other side of the table, behind the crisp white uniform, is a person.


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What really happens behind a doctor's closed doors? Sundays are always crowded after the weekend without a doctor. Only two people work in the mornings: one specialist and one resident. I wonder how this morning's list will look. From my parking spot, I can already see that the waiting room is full. Tell Me Where It Hurts is a wholesome peek into the doctor's office: The Int What really happens behind a doctor's closed doors? Sundays are always crowded after the weekend without a doctor. Only two people work in the mornings: one specialist and one resident. I wonder how this morning's list will look. From my parking spot, I can already see that the waiting room is full. Tell Me Where It Hurts is a wholesome peek into the doctor's office: The Intensity, the deliberations, system constraints, and of course, the doctor's own personal life. This book invites you to become a fly on the wall of the doctor's office, to experience what happens within more realistically than you ever have before. Dr. Doron Amosi, a Family physician and emergency room doctor at Tel Aviv medical center, presents the intricacies of family medicine from his unique point of view, shedding new light on the intensity, the difficulties, and most importantly, the beauty of this crucial profession. This is a fascinating book for doctors of all specialties to discover the importance of doctor-patient relationships, and for patients to understand that on the other side of the table, behind the crisp white uniform, is a person.

30 review for Tell Me Where It Hurts: Private Notes from a Family Doctor's Treatment Room About Patients, Medical Care and Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Píaras Cíonnaoíth

    A very insightful, positive and helpful book... The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today. Most doctors strive to maintain a healthy relationship with their patients and this helps to diagnose their problems clearly and make them feel better. Healthcare providers are constantly trying to engage their patients in order to create awareness regarding their current health status. It’s a known and obvious fact when we feel understood by our doctor, we tend to get A very insightful, positive and helpful book... The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today. Most doctors strive to maintain a healthy relationship with their patients and this helps to diagnose their problems clearly and make them feel better. Healthcare providers are constantly trying to engage their patients in order to create awareness regarding their current health status. It’s a known and obvious fact when we feel understood by our doctor, we tend to get better faster. In fact, the relationship between the doctor and the patient can stimulate or hinder the efficacy of the treatment. Research has shown that people, who feel cared for with respect and concern, not only reported a higher satisfaction, but also better results with their care. Tell Me Where It Hurts: Private Notes from a Family Doctor's Treatment Room About Patients, Medical Care and Life by Dr. Doron Amosi gives a ‘wholesome peek into the doctor’s office: The Intensity, the deliberations, system constraints, and of course, the doctor’s own personal life.’ The book invites the reader to become a fly on the wall in the doctor’s office, to experience what happens within those walls more realistically than most of us have ever considered before. This was an excellent read that will be beneficial ‘for doctors of all specialties to discover the importance of doctor-patient relationships, and for patients to understand that on the other side of the table, behind the crisp white uniform, is a person.’ Highly Recommended. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Petra Rapaić

    "Over the weekend, I become aware of a professional burden for the first time, one which I have been privy to but hadn’t given the time of day, until today. The surge of morbidity around me is leaving me unsettled. All of a sudden, this cluster of Oded N., Simon C., Hanan N., Joash H., and now Moriah K., starts closing in on me. It’s too much for me to handle. I feel as though an epidemic is unfolding before my very eyes. Give me back aches and throat infections any day. Give me writing up appro "Over the weekend, I become aware of a professional burden for the first time, one which I have been privy to but hadn’t given the time of day, until today. The surge of morbidity around me is leaving me unsettled. All of a sudden, this cluster of Oded N., Simon C., Hanan N., Joash H., and now Moriah K., starts closing in on me. It’s too much for me to handle. I feel as though an epidemic is unfolding before my very eyes. Give me back aches and throat infections any day. Give me writing up approval forms for joining gyms and bearing arms. What’s with all the cancer patients? I didn’t know it would be like this. They spoke with us about this during our residency, and I also talk about it pretty often with my students – about how we arrive at the clinic, morning after morning, and work with people who are suffering. The result is that we bear a heavy burden; but for some reason, I hadn’t come to terms with how difficult this is, until today. I’ve experienced changes in mood because of this, but never such heavy distress that refuses to leave. Perhaps it’s related to my colon, it’s hard for me to say. I make sure not to work too hard and maintain other focuses in life, that help prevent me from getting burnt out, but the recent string of bad news has been really hard on me. I need a vacation. I’ll start planning summer vacation. Maybe it will revive me."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Helen Robare

    I was not entranced with this book. The doctor did not seem to know what he was doing most of the time. He would send people home when they had real symptoms and send patients whose symptoms were not that dire to the hospital for x-rays and tests. He did not seem all that empathetic or sympathetic to his patients at all. To be honest, if I had a doctor like that, I would look around for a new one! However, this doctor and his patients were in India and I'm guessing his patients were poor and grat I was not entranced with this book. The doctor did not seem to know what he was doing most of the time. He would send people home when they had real symptoms and send patients whose symptoms were not that dire to the hospital for x-rays and tests. He did not seem all that empathetic or sympathetic to his patients at all. To be honest, if I had a doctor like that, I would look around for a new one! However, this doctor and his patients were in India and I'm guessing his patients were poor and grateful to have any doctor within walking distance. What a far cry medicine in India is from medicine in the United States. The one thing this book did was show me the vast difference between medicine in India vs medicine in the U.S. Which is why I gave it 3 stars instead of one.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    What a fascinating book! This was unlike anything I have ever read : Non-Fiction, written by a family doctor in an engaging informal notes style, each note a paragraph to a page or so in length, interspersing the doctors observations with conversation with the patient and medical commentary. The experience is almost like reading a journal. Each entry chronicles the visit of a patient, in a continuous stream as they are experienced in the doctor’s office over the course of each day. We get only s What a fascinating book! This was unlike anything I have ever read : Non-Fiction, written by a family doctor in an engaging informal notes style, each note a paragraph to a page or so in length, interspersing the doctors observations with conversation with the patient and medical commentary. The experience is almost like reading a journal. Each entry chronicles the visit of a patient, in a continuous stream as they are experienced in the doctor’s office over the course of each day. We get only snippets, brief glimpses at a time of each of these characters, dozens of them - their personalities, histories, medical complaints and sometimes traumas. Many of them become recurring characters, as they return for follow-up visits, experience hospitalizations, receive blood and other medical tests, or other developments occur in their medical history. Dr Amosi also provides a handy summary at the end of book listing each patient, with their diagnosis and the related page references, so we can go back and revisit an individual patients story in chronological order at any point in our reading. ( I ended up taking advantage of this index for several of the patients I found most interesting). I so enjoyed my literary visit with Dr Amosi - a wonderful, caring, family doctor who practices in Tel Aviv. I was constantly blown away by the fact that, in between his crazy busy days, he somehow manages to not only keep track of and provide treatment as needed for the hugely varied needs of his patients, but also demonstrates an incredibly touching level of compassion, responsibility and insight into their behavior, as well as a particularly engrossing ongoing evaluation and introspection of himself and his own actions. Some things that struck me when reading this book include: - How busy this doctor's office is and how Dr Amosi’s care and concern extends long beyond the actual time spent in his office each day with the patient. Patients repeatedly call him, some on his private number, and he has many requests for help after hours that he never fails to respond to. - How often psychological factors, and in particular, a patients anxiety, can be a cause of, or a contributor to, a visit with the doctor. This becomes a little ironic, as later, (no huge spoilers here) Dr Amosi himself experiences a medical condition, and is introspective enough to recognize his own anxiety and how it is impacting his recovery. - Sociological factors are hugely related to wellness, and it really warmed my heart to see Dr Amosi encourage and welcome patient visits from depressed, lonely and grieving patients for no other purpose than to chat and help them feel less alone. - Dr Amosi takes his patients diagnosis, treatment, and support to heart and the huge level of empathy and personal responsibility he feels sometimes spills over, threatening his peace of mind and home life. In one case, his work day done, and dealing with a difficult diagnosis he needs to share with a patient the next day, he forces himself to turn off his thoughts regarding the bad news and instead focuses on the thought , “She’s lucky she just had the opportunity to visit Chile and spend time with her son, while still thinking she was healthy.” -Dr Amosi is open minded regarding alternative medicine and shares some really interesting thoughts as he debates internally the responsible applicability of holistic practices to the treatment of chronic care (eg diabetes) vs acute care (eg broken bone). - i had never really considered how pervasive liability issues are in the practice of modern-day medicine - a good portion of Dr Amosi’s patient visits include providing doctors authorization for gym memberships, sponsored travel, or marathon participation. A good precaution, but as he points out, not one that of course can really control/prevent some forms of sudden illness. - As he interacts with his patients Dr Amosi considers many areas of medical ethics and suffers crises when patients refuse or delay the treatment he is offering. Where does his responsibility end and the patients right to choose begin? (He always ends up favoring the latter). Privacy, trust, the need to act - when does he personally need to get involved, and when is the patient, or another doctor, more accountable? - How to go about prescribing opiates to drug addicts in pain - this raises a quagmire of uncertainties in Dr. Amosi who is uncomfortable but cannot avoid treating such patients. - And finally, over-diagnosis - how to act, now that technology has allowed us to diagnose many things, some perhaps very unlikely to develop into issues yet very anxiety producing for the patients (and their families) involved. 5 “I just loved it” Stars. I so enjoyed reading this book, and welcomed the chance to share a brief glimpse into a fascinating world - one that allowed me to think about so many things, and forced me to remind myself, time and again, how lucky I am to be healthy in a world where anything can change, at any time. A very big thank you to BookSirens, the publisher, and the author for an advance review copy of this book. All thoughts presented here are my own.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This memoir covers most of a year in a family practice doctor’s life. He practices in Tel Aviv, I believe. I found it interesting, but I don’t think everybody would. I did appreciate this book and think readers who can overlook some of its unusual qualities would, also. Here are my suggestions for readers to consider before reading it. (1) If you are, like me, of an older generation, who grew up with quotation marks and separate paragraphs for each conversant, and you don’t like trying to discern This memoir covers most of a year in a family practice doctor’s life. He practices in Tel Aviv, I believe. I found it interesting, but I don’t think everybody would. I did appreciate this book and think readers who can overlook some of its unusual qualities would, also. Here are my suggestions for readers to consider before reading it. (1) If you are, like me, of an older generation, who grew up with quotation marks and separate paragraphs for each conversant, and you don’t like trying to discern who is talking, you may get frustrated. I have no idea if this writing style is a common practice in Israel, if this is a practice for those who love texting, if the doctor is just too busy to recall exactly what was said so prefers to sum things up with a conversational style without quotation marks. (2) If you must know what every medical phrase means, you might get tired of looking them up somewhere else. Often further down the page,it becomes clear what the doctor is discovering, but not always. I understood the majority of them and was comfortable with not bothering to look them up. However, if you really want to know details, consider if this book is for you. (3) If you are a feminist, who thinks that wearing make up is a personal choice and could be understood as a subtle message that men are always handsome, but women must spend time and money to become presentable in public, this book might make you want to growl. Not always, but more than once the doctor uses the absence of make up on a woman as a diagnostic tool, i.e, she is not taking care of herself. I have never traveled to Israel. Maybe cosmetics are a cultural thing there. I know here in the US many women do feel they are necessary. Still, to me it is not a symptom of anxiety or some other disorder to wear only skin on one’s face. (4) If you are a stickler for remembering names and you aren’t familiar with names from another country, you need to know that a list of all the patients is in the back of the book. Again, I was comfortable with only remembering the people whose names appeared repeatedly. (5). The design of the book is that most of the patients, whose visits are described, get a summary paragraph or two. Complicated medical examinations may get more. Personalities that are a bit unusual may also get more. Tell Me Where It Hurts gives the reader a sense of how full a doctor’s day can be. For me, the book started and ended more abruptly than I expected. That might just be the author’s ingrained habit of being taken from one person’s concerns to another’s all day long at work. Also he might be trying to share how he may become acquainted with a patient or family abruptly and then at some time in the future just as abruptly no longer be part of their lives. I found that to be one of the most significant things I learned from reading this book. In the past I have only thought from the patients’ perceptions. I had no idea how at least for some doctors, this suddenness might be difficult. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grady

    The ubiquitous Doctor Patient relationship Israeli author Doron Amosi. MD is a Family Practice physician, practicing at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and offers these ‘private notes from a family doctor’s treatment room about patients, medical care and life.’ TELL ME WHERE IT HURTS is his debut publication, and it is so timely and genuinely informative that we can only hope he continues to share his expertise – and humanity! Dr. Amosi’s patient encounters read like the inside of a physician’s mind a The ubiquitous Doctor Patient relationship Israeli author Doron Amosi. MD is a Family Practice physician, practicing at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and offers these ‘private notes from a family doctor’s treatment room about patients, medical care and life.’ TELL ME WHERE IT HURTS is his debut publication, and it is so timely and genuinely informative that we can only hope he continues to share his expertise – and humanity! Dr. Amosi’s patient encounters read like the inside of a physician’s mind as the office visits pour through the door. He assigns his short observances with a patient’s abbreviated name and age and proceeds to relate his responses to various patients. Example: ‘Ludmilla N. Age 73. Only wants prescriptions. Great. A two-minute visit. We won’t discuss the blood tests that she might need to get done because of the crowd in the waiting room. I won’t even measure her blood pressure.’ Vis-à-vis ‘Liat H. Age 56. A married mother of three, and grandmother to a young grandson. Throat pain since early morning hours. No fever. Looks good. Concerned. I wonder what she believes I am supposed to reveal this quickly after the onset of her symptoms. The most effective way to treat Liat is to tell her how great it is that she has arrived today, to conduct a serious examination, as thorough as possible, and to invite her to return if the situation worsens in any way. Five serious and attentive minutes later, and she is already outside feeling more relieved.’ Two appointments – and a spectrum of how physicians and patients interact! Sharing interviews in person and on the telephone, house calls, and repeat, followup visits for myriad disease complaints allows Dr. Amosi to shares both his evaluation and concern and attention to patient problems, but also to insert his own response to various people and how his life as a physician incorporates is impacted by his personal family life and his personal experiences as a patient himself. In this ‘charting of patient visits’ format we are provided entry into his thought processes as well as his response to the current status of current medical care delivery. The extended section on his own confrontation with disease and how that has been managed is illuminating! A more human response between physician and patient as well as on target insights as to the use of ‘tests’ and multiple doctor management would be difficult to find. Dr. Amosi elicits understanding and compassion from both sides of the doctor/patient relationship, and in doing so provides many ‘a-ha’ moments about medical care. This book should be required reading for medical students! For gaining understanding about that sacred bond between physician and patient this little book is invaluable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carianne Carleo-Evangelist

    Thank you, Book Sirens and the publisher. I really enjoyed this look into a family doctor's work in a clinic in Israel. As the book promises, these are his patient notes. I would have liked a little more of an introduction to give us some context to the book, although some of it comes out throughout the notes: Passover, weeks starting on Sunday, his own age when he's being treated for a health condition in the book's second section. He realizes his own faults as a doctor when he finds himself tre Thank you, Book Sirens and the publisher. I really enjoyed this look into a family doctor's work in a clinic in Israel. As the book promises, these are his patient notes. I would have liked a little more of an introduction to give us some context to the book, although some of it comes out throughout the notes: Passover, weeks starting on Sunday, his own age when he's being treated for a health condition in the book's second section. He realizes his own faults as a doctor when he finds himself treating some (mostly female) patients more harshly, but I also appreciated that while he saw himself as a western trained doctor, he also offered some acupuncture to patients with orthopedic conditions. It was interesting to see how the Israeli medical system works with respect to referrals, primary v. secondary care, clearance to join a gym, etc. I enjoyed "following" some of his patients including Daphna, Chicha/Emilio, Oded N., Simon C and of course Aunt Leah and looked forward to their returns. I appreciated the patient index at the book's end as there were many patients he treated over the course of the year. My only issue with the book was the translation. I expected (and was fine with) the medical jargon and the doctor's notes not being flowing prose, and I wonder if some of this was meant to be a literal translation, but some of the word choice was odd. For example every patient with diabetes, high blood pressure/cholesterol, etc. was "unbalanced" whereas "unmanaged" would seem to be better. Overall, a good, quick read. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily. Thank you, Book Sirens and the publisher.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chantil

    I really enjoy books of this type but I am in two minds over the diary format used in this instance. On one hand, I liked seeing what happened on a daily basis and the variety of patients and issues dealt with. Things seem to work differently to my experiences in the UK so I liked seeing the contrast. I also liked the fact that it highlighted the fact that time passes between each appointment rather than having a whole chapter about a single patient it issue where timelines can get lost. On the fl I really enjoy books of this type but I am in two minds over the diary format used in this instance. On one hand, I liked seeing what happened on a daily basis and the variety of patients and issues dealt with. Things seem to work differently to my experiences in the UK so I liked seeing the contrast. I also liked the fact that it highlighted the fact that time passes between each appointment rather than having a whole chapter about a single patient it issue where timelines can get lost. On the flip side, I'd have liked perhaps dates to be included rather than the chapters numbered like they are to highlight the passing of time more acutely. The list of patients at the back so you could review all the pages for one case story was great and helps immensely because you do tend to get a bit lost trying to skip back to see where you recognise the patients name from. This is where for me I think reading an ebook really let's it down, my version at least was really hard to skip from page to page without losing your place and I think I'd have enjoyed the book more reading it as a proper book to allow me to leisurely skip back and forth. Finally I really enjoyed the thoughts and extra comments from the author. Details on things such as using alternative medicines was interesting and I'd have liked more of this throughout the book. Perhaps a final chapter of thoughts at the end would be welcome as I feel it finished very abruptly and felt somewhat unfinished. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lolu

    Overall, this is a very informative read. The author does well to explain his thinking and diagnosing process throughout the book. As for the story and entertainment value, it’s an OK read. I most of all appreciated getting a front seat experience of the day to day of this real-life doctor, without the glamorization usually found in a TV production. Although after a while, I got bored from reading the daily entries as the journal itself is not very eventful. Again, it’s basically the day-to-day Overall, this is a very informative read. The author does well to explain his thinking and diagnosing process throughout the book. As for the story and entertainment value, it’s an OK read. I most of all appreciated getting a front seat experience of the day to day of this real-life doctor, without the glamorization usually found in a TV production. Although after a while, I got bored from reading the daily entries as the journal itself is not very eventful. Again, it’s basically the day-to-day of a family doctor. The best parts come from the author's personal recount of his experience as a patient. For me, this section was gold. Throughout the book, I least appreciated the fact that there were so many characters (aka patients) being discussed such that it was hard to keep track of what was going on. I think the book would have benefited a bit from having a better structure... perhaps if it was built around the more memorable storylines in the book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    George Heidenrich

    A rather gentle, absorbing account of a day-to-day medical practice in Israel, including his own response to discovering he has cancer. It made for good bedtime reading, because it can be laid down and picked up without wondering what happened before. Enough medical information to be informing without being overwhelmed, although there are certainly some medical terms which I had to look up. Lots of patient names (first name and initial only) which I didn't try to track carefully, but which are l A rather gentle, absorbing account of a day-to-day medical practice in Israel, including his own response to discovering he has cancer. It made for good bedtime reading, because it can be laid down and picked up without wondering what happened before. Enough medical information to be informing without being overwhelmed, although there are certainly some medical terms which I had to look up. Lots of patient names (first name and initial only) which I didn't try to track carefully, but which are listed at the end of the book. I enjoyed looking forward to the next night's reading.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mikki

    Another book about the work of a doctor in Israel, where - it seems - their system is socialized medicine, in common with many other countries in that part of the world. Overworked and often anxious, the author plainly cares about his patients, some of whom are very trying and wear on his good nature. The abrupt end to the book was rather odd. I was expecting a bit of a personal summing up to finish. Didn't happen. Still, I expect he's still practising and treating his patients. Enjoyable read i Another book about the work of a doctor in Israel, where - it seems - their system is socialized medicine, in common with many other countries in that part of the world. Overworked and often anxious, the author plainly cares about his patients, some of whom are very trying and wear on his good nature. The abrupt end to the book was rather odd. I was expecting a bit of a personal summing up to finish. Didn't happen. Still, I expect he's still practising and treating his patients. Enjoyable read if you like reading real life medical drama.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Hughes

    Seeing the Doctor's Side of Illness I worked years in the medical field as a secretary and data input operator. I have always been interested in what goes on in the doctor's mind when he sees a patient. This book is almost like being a fly on the wall. I loved it, and gave it 5 stars. Seeing the Doctor's Side of Illness I worked years in the medical field as a secretary and data input operator. I have always been interested in what goes on in the doctor's mind when he sees a patient. This book is almost like being a fly on the wall. I loved it, and gave it 5 stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Penny Johnson

    Tell Me Where It Hurts I am not at all familiar with medical care outside of the United States. I could follow the medical part but it was the stream of the author’s thought processes that was fascinating and never dull. He talked through diagnoses, treatments, and most important, what was best for the patient. I look forward to reading another book by this author.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    Interesting and Informative I enjoyed reading this book. The doctor cared about his patients. He seemed to go the extra mile for his patients. I also learned a few things.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Miles

    Very interesting throughout. I had not thought of the daily routine or thoughts of a doctor about his views of his patients. They are people, too.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Greer

  17. 5 out of 5

    Meryl Hauck

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dienekes

  19. 4 out of 5

    Harold Murry

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

  21. 5 out of 5

    philip r. albert

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jan Schweikert

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary Jo Asadorian

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cath Thorley

  25. 4 out of 5

    Louise Livesey

  26. 4 out of 5

    george egor

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark Peacock

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steve Walter

  29. 5 out of 5

    JEFF NOYES

  30. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

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