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Yog-Sothoth, known as the Key and the Gate and a host of other names, is H.P. Lovecraft's most enduring creation after the Necronomicon and Great Cthulhu itself. An eldritch god that occupies all time and space, Yog-Sothoth is most known for his role as the antagonist in The Dunwich Horror but has played a role in many other Cthulhu Mythos stories. Sometimes as a being inv Yog-Sothoth, known as the Key and the Gate and a host of other names, is H.P. Lovecraft's most enduring creation after the Necronomicon and Great Cthulhu itself. An eldritch god that occupies all time and space, Yog-Sothoth is most known for his role as the antagonist in The Dunwich Horror but has played a role in many other Cthulhu Mythos stories. Sometimes as a being invoked for spells, others as a monster trying to enter reality, and a few places as a giver of hidden wisdom. TALES OF YOG-SOTHOTH features several stories centered around the creepy deity and its monstrous intelligence. Featuring the work of several Neo-Mythos authors who have already dabbled in the world of cosmic horror. C.T. Phipps (Cthulhu Armageddon), David Niall Wilson (The Call of Distant Shores), David Hambling (Harry Stubbs), Matthew Davenport (Andrew Doran), and David J. West (Let Sleeping Gods Lie). Whether pulpy heroes punching evil cultists, robed assassins hunting unnatural monsters, or rednecks dealing with monsters in their back yard, you won't be disappointed with the results. This book is a follow-up to TALES OF THE AL-AZIF.


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Yog-Sothoth, known as the Key and the Gate and a host of other names, is H.P. Lovecraft's most enduring creation after the Necronomicon and Great Cthulhu itself. An eldritch god that occupies all time and space, Yog-Sothoth is most known for his role as the antagonist in The Dunwich Horror but has played a role in many other Cthulhu Mythos stories. Sometimes as a being inv Yog-Sothoth, known as the Key and the Gate and a host of other names, is H.P. Lovecraft's most enduring creation after the Necronomicon and Great Cthulhu itself. An eldritch god that occupies all time and space, Yog-Sothoth is most known for his role as the antagonist in The Dunwich Horror but has played a role in many other Cthulhu Mythos stories. Sometimes as a being invoked for spells, others as a monster trying to enter reality, and a few places as a giver of hidden wisdom. TALES OF YOG-SOTHOTH features several stories centered around the creepy deity and its monstrous intelligence. Featuring the work of several Neo-Mythos authors who have already dabbled in the world of cosmic horror. C.T. Phipps (Cthulhu Armageddon), David Niall Wilson (The Call of Distant Shores), David Hambling (Harry Stubbs), Matthew Davenport (Andrew Doran), and David J. West (Let Sleeping Gods Lie). Whether pulpy heroes punching evil cultists, robed assassins hunting unnatural monsters, or rednecks dealing with monsters in their back yard, you won't be disappointed with the results. This book is a follow-up to TALES OF THE AL-AZIF.

31 review for Tales of Yog-Sothoth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tim Martin

    Very interesting anthology, one that can serve as an introduction in two ways. One, it is an introduction to one of the lesser-known beings of Lovecraftian mythos, the God of Everywhere, Yog-Sothoth. Fans of the mythos probably know this god, being however you prefer to think of it fairly well, star as it was of several well-known tales such as one of my absolute favorites, _The Dunwich Horror_, one of Lovecraft’s very best stories. In a short introduction, C.T. Phipps discusses the role of Yog- Very interesting anthology, one that can serve as an introduction in two ways. One, it is an introduction to one of the lesser-known beings of Lovecraftian mythos, the God of Everywhere, Yog-Sothoth. Fans of the mythos probably know this god, being however you prefer to think of it fairly well, star as it was of several well-known tales such as one of my absolute favorites, _The Dunwich Horror_, one of Lovecraft’s very best stories. In a short introduction, C.T. Phipps discusses the role of Yog-Sothoth in Lovecraft’s mythos (“it is arguably Yog-Sothoth whom Lovecraft loved most”) and some of course what Yog-Sothoth is. Casual fans of the genre who have not heard of or have much familiarity with Yog-Sothoth are in for a treat with this book. As much as I love Cthulhu is it great to see stories devoted to the other beings in the Lovecraftian mythos. The other way this anthology serves as an introduction is that it is a bit of a box of chocolates, introducing the reader to not only a variety of authors, as anthologies of course do, but also to apparently on-going series. Some of I had heard of, others were completely new to me, one I have already ordered one of the stories of which this was an introduction for me. The anthology has six tales by five different authors. After the foreword by C.T. Phipps we get one of his tales, “The True Name of God,” a tale I really liked, set in the Middle East and revolving around an assassin character, one of the Hashishin, by the name of Ali ad Fariq. Really nice pacing, loved the setting, had some surprising elements, and a had a good balance of the trademark terror and horror of Lovecraftian writings with what Phipps noted in his foreword the anthology would have, a “collection of stories…on the pulpier – rather than the horror – side of things.” I believe alone of the six tales this is the only story not part of pre-existing series of books and/or short stories. Next was “The Haunter of the Wheel” by David J. West, labeled a “A Cowboys & Cthulhu Adventure.” Set in Montana in October 1864, it was in sharp contrast to the style of the first tale in the series. Great pacing and a bit of double crossing in the story. I haven’t read a lot of fantasy or horror set in the Old West and apparently I need to remedy that. Then the reader is treated to “The Ghost Door” by David Hambling, labeled “A Harry Stubbs Adventure.” Instead of the Old West in the 19th century, the setting (at least to start with), switches to south London in 1927. Very vivid characters, I liked the narrative style of the main character, Harry Stubbs, and the change in setting later on in the tale was a nice surprise. Also a really cool monster. Next up is “The Forever Gate” by Matthew Davenport, labeled “An Andrew Doran Story.” Time and setting change once more, this time starting out at the port of Salvation Heights, “about an hour south of Arkham” and the year now 1938. Different in feel from the previous stories, hard to describe without revealing a few spoilers. The interaction between the two main characters definitely had a pulpish feel that I liked, quite different from the previous stories in the anthology. Then we get “The Dun WHAT? Horror” by David Niall Wison, “A Cletus J. Diggs Adventure featuring Donovan DeChance.” Really liked this one, it had lots of call backs to _The Dunwich Horror_ beyond just Yog-Sothoth. It read like a novella with a great story structure, I loved the North Carolina setting. It was great to see Lovecraftian stories set in the South and I wish there were more. Also the setting and the characters seemed really identifiable in many cases. Overall very enjoyable. The final tale is “The Final Gate” by C.T. Phipps, “A Cthulhu Armageddon Story,” a series I have heard of but not one that I have read. Easily the most science fictionish of the tales in the anthology. Along with the tale just before, also the one that perhaps the biggest as far as world building, giving me the sense of a created universe to go explore later on (though compared to the previous one, less relatable but definitely more fantastic, embracing an apocalyptic setting with lots of science fiction elements). A good collection, I really love how modern writers are able to play with Lovecraft’s toys and in his sandbox and make all new adventures, adventures with a more accessible, modern feel and completely avoiding any of the problematic aspects of Lovecraft and his writings. Definitely more action-adventure pulpish than horror, though there are definitely horror aspects too, I think regular Lovecraft fans will like the different style than many (really all) of Lovecraft’s actual writings in terms of tone, pacing, tropes, and so forth as well as readers who might like Lovecraft's creations but want some less soaked in dread and despair as Lovecraft so liked to marinate his stories in (these are characters who definitely fight back).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I’m an avid reader of Lovecraft but have never read anyone else’s lovecraftian work. I wasn’t sure how I would like it. I’m so glad I did! I loved all the stories included. The reader is immersed in the world of the Elder Gods, Yog-Sothoth, Innsmouth and Arkham. For readers who have read Lovecraft’s tales, most of the setting, language and even characters will be familiar. It’s like coming home to your favorite fuzzy socks and blanket...although in a strange and alien way. Some of my highlights: T I’m an avid reader of Lovecraft but have never read anyone else’s lovecraftian work. I wasn’t sure how I would like it. I’m so glad I did! I loved all the stories included. The reader is immersed in the world of the Elder Gods, Yog-Sothoth, Innsmouth and Arkham. For readers who have read Lovecraft’s tales, most of the setting, language and even characters will be familiar. It’s like coming home to your favorite fuzzy socks and blanket...although in a strange and alien way. Some of my highlights: The Not Quite Right Reverend Cletus J Diggs and the Dun What? Horror by David Niall Wilson was a solid combination of magic, eldritch horror and comedy. The friendship between the characters of Cletus and Desmond was unique and their dialogue was sometimes hilarious. There was also some animal characters who were as well written as the humans. Dog and Osmodeus; a bird and a dog. Familiars to the main characters. The Whateley clan were evil and powerful villains. The action kept up until the very end! The Final Gate by C.T. Phipps was almost a family saga, complete with birth, betrayal and Yog-Sothoth? John, Mercury, Jackie and Baby John...just your ordinary, not quite human, family trying to make it in a post apocalyptic world. This also had some moments of hilarity. Horror and humor go so well together. And I couldn’t help but notice a reference to another world written by Stephen King. Or maybe I’m reading too much into it... I enjoyed how all the stories wove together to form a fantastic narrative! 5 stars!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sue Raymond

    I was given an advance copy of of "Tales of Yog-Sothoth" by one of the authors of this Lovecraftian fiction. The book holds six stories written as H.P. Lovecraft Fan Fiction.The authors take one of the many Lovecraft Science Fiction stories of Cthulhu Mythos and change the main characters, spinning their own tales of mystical horror loosely base on the original story. Each of the authors does a masterful job of making the stories their own. C.T. Phipps' Ali ad Fariq and John Henry Booth, David J. I was given an advance copy of of "Tales of Yog-Sothoth" by one of the authors of this Lovecraftian fiction. The book holds six stories written as H.P. Lovecraft Fan Fiction.The authors take one of the many Lovecraft Science Fiction stories of Cthulhu Mythos and change the main characters, spinning their own tales of mystical horror loosely base on the original story. Each of the authors does a masterful job of making the stories their own. C.T. Phipps' Ali ad Fariq and John Henry Booth, David J. West's Porter Rockwell, David Hambling's Harry Stubbs, Matthew Davenport's Andrew Doran, David Niall Wilson's A. Cletus J. Diggs draws the readers deep into the chaos they find their selves in the stories. Each author has their own style making a unique blend of mythic and science to create the world of Old world gods, humans and monsters. Each in their own way create havoc on the verge of ripping the universe apart for their own gain. Only a few stand in their way of destruction of the universe in their quest for power. If you love mysterious SF horror this book is a must buy for your classic horror/ Sci-Fi library. You can find it at https://www.amazon.com/Tales-Yog-Soth... .

  4. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Briskin-Rodriguez

    In his letters to friends and other writers, H. P. Lovecraft referred to their collective body of work as Yog-Sothothery, both since Yog-Sothoth embodied his nihilistic view of humanity but also since Yog-Sothoth touches all stories, in all places, at all times. These stories of humanity reacting to Yog-Sothoth's mere existence embody this intent and show how in the face of the entire roster of the Cthulhu Mythos, Mankind's true enemy is, and has always been, Mankind. The True Name of God Set shor In his letters to friends and other writers, H. P. Lovecraft referred to their collective body of work as Yog-Sothothery, both since Yog-Sothoth embodied his nihilistic view of humanity but also since Yog-Sothoth touches all stories, in all places, at all times. These stories of humanity reacting to Yog-Sothoth's mere existence embody this intent and show how in the face of the entire roster of the Cthulhu Mythos, Mankind's true enemy is, and has always been, Mankind. The True Name of God Set shortly after the third crusade, two hashashin pursue an ungodly intruder through the streets of Acre. An engaging story with characters that jump off the page, consider this a definite recommend. The Haunter of the Wheel Minnesota, 1869. A grizzled lawman on the trail of stolen gold finds danger, corruption, a sultry seductress, and unimaginable horrors from being this world. A gritty western that has all the notes of Cowboys and Cthulhu excellently written. The Ghost Door A Harry Stubbs adventure through and through. This pulpy romp sees our protagonist lead a rescue mission around the world accompanied by bookhunter and adventurer Captain Cross. Encountering the missing, the mystic, and the monstrous, Harry needs to rely on his wits if he's to survive. An exciting jaunt, and well worth your time. Andrew Doran and the Forever Gate Set between world wars, we follow Andrew Doran, world-renowned archaeologist, monster-hunter, wizard, and repeated savior of humanity and the world as we know it. Approached by a snakewoman companion from his past, disappearances on a boat hint at Things Man Was Not Meant To Know running amok. Doran and his companion need to dive in and stop the End of the World.... again. The Not Quite Right Reverend Cletus J. Diggs and the Dun-WHAT? Horror Modern day. Cletus Diggs would love to just kick back with a beer and watch Nascar with his dog, Dog, but life is never that simple in Old Mill, North Carolina. Donovan DeChance, an old friend from California, brings dangerous news about the local and reclusive What-ley family, and the two will have to watch each other's backs as they venture into the night to shed some light on the matter. Far exceeded the expectations I had from the title, and I look forward to more tales with Cletus, Dog, Donovan, Asmodeus, Sheriff Bob, and Old Mill. The Final Gate A century after the rise of the Old Ones and the fall of human civilization, life is never boring for the half-shoggoth/half-human sheriff/mayor of New Ulthar. And when Mi-Go cyborgs try to kidnap the newest member of town, he's just going to have to step in and put a stop to all of that. A lurid tale that pokes fun at itself as much as it shows that the more things change the more they stay the same. This story is most steeped in the Mythos of this anthology, but those just encountering the lore will not be lost, a sign of the writers skill.

  5. 5 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    TALES OF YOG-SOTHOTH is the second of my anthology series with Crossroad Press (technically third if we count THE BOOK OF YIG as belonging to it). The premise is that we are attempting to do anthologies that celebrate the pulpier side of the Cthulhu Mythos. Weird Tales with two fisted heroes and square-jawed gunslingers rather than just your typical scared academic about to find out that his ancestors were fish or cannibal apes. I had a lot of fun with this book as I got to do a tale of Assassins TALES OF YOG-SOTHOTH is the second of my anthology series with Crossroad Press (technically third if we count THE BOOK OF YIG as belonging to it). The premise is that we are attempting to do anthologies that celebrate the pulpier side of the Cthulhu Mythos. Weird Tales with two fisted heroes and square-jawed gunslingers rather than just your typical scared academic about to find out that his ancestors were fish or cannibal apes. I had a lot of fun with this book as I got to do a tale of Assassins vs. monsters in the Crusader era of Acre and a sequel to Cthulhu Armageddon that I think fans of that series will enjoy. There's also some really great stuff from David Hambling (Harry Stubbs), Matthew Davenport (Andrew Doran), David Wilson (The Call of Distant Shores), and David J. West. Basically, if you liked TALES OF THE AL-AZIF, you'll love this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    One can debate the back cover's claim that Yog-Sothoth is Lovecraft's best-known creation after Cthulhu and the Necronomicon – what about Innsmouth, or Azathoth? But he's undeniably one of the big boys, quite literally given he's conterminous with all of space and time – and that's more than can be said for ruddy Yig, subject of the last collection I read from this outfit. Pretty key, too; what's now called the Cthulhu Mythos was, as the introduction reminds us, referred to by its creator as Yog One can debate the back cover's claim that Yog-Sothoth is Lovecraft's best-known creation after Cthulhu and the Necronomicon – what about Innsmouth, or Azathoth? But he's undeniably one of the big boys, quite literally given he's conterminous with all of space and time – and that's more than can be said for ruddy Yig, subject of the last collection I read from this outfit. Pretty key, too; what's now called the Cthulhu Mythos was, as the introduction reminds us, referred to by its creator as Yog-Sothothery. Set against which, the Lovecraft story in which it looms largest, The Dunwich Horror, is one of the few times in the original tales that humanity manages to foil the plots of the ghastly entities that lurk outside the world we know, something the editor takes to justify a slightly pulpier tone in this volume, less of an obligation for cosmic alienation and despair. And I can't argue with the logic, even if anything holding up Brian Lumley as an example to emulate is going to make me shudder more than any encounter with nightmarish Old Ones ever could. As with The Book Of Yig, this isn't an anthology per se, but a series of linked stories in which elements from each recur in the next. Meaning we start furthest in the past, with the editor's own contribution set in the Holy Land during the Crusades. It's told from the point of view of an Assassin who, through a favour owed, finds himself fighting something a little harder to kill than he's used to. Possibly it'll be fixed by the final print (I was graciously granted an author ARC), but this one felt like it could have done with another edit; at least once I detected the ghost of an earlier version written in first person rather than close third. Even beyond that, there are little glitches; an attempt at authenticity has been made by having the protagonist refer to Salah ad-Din, rather than the Anglicised 'Saladin', but then it's let down by having the author of the Necronomicon only mildly tweaked to 'Abdul Al-Hazarad'. Now, I know pretty much nothing about Arabic, but the little I do have is from a philological note that was among the supporting material in the old edition I had of Call Of Cthulhu, which pointed out that the 'ul' and the 'Al' in that name are both transliterations of the same syllable, meaning 'the', so you only need one or the other, not both. Still, if you can overlook that, which even I can, then yes, the story's hanging a fairly standard classic undead monster on a Lovecraftian peg, which does feel a little like an artefact of the time when CoC was the default horror RPG so non-Mythos scenarios would get wedged into it, but even so, it's not like undeath during the Crusades is the most oversubscribed niche for horror stories, is it? That's followed by a jump to the Old West, which does really lean into the relaxed approach to facing down Mythos monsters that the introduction promised (enigmatic 'Mr Nodens' lends a hand). Still, it has enough of the authentically pulp note to it, and proceeds at such a pace, that I found it hard to mind too much. Then we get local boy David Hambling, very much the reason I read this, with an especially local story; even on my permitted perambulation in lockdown lunchtime, I could make it as far as the house where I initially thought this was set (though as it turned out, the details didn't quite match). From that starting point, Hambling's recurring character Harry Stubbs is sent on a journey whose exotic locations (some not of this Earth) recall the globe-trotting tone of Eldritch Horror or, not that I've ever had chance to play it but I presume, Masks Of Nyarlathotep – and if you're going for the two-fisted end of Lovecraftian, those are good reference points to have, with a nice balance of derring-do and horror not susceptible to human resistance. After that, another recurring character, Andrew Doran, with whom I clicked no better than last time our paths crossed, though I skimmed this one for longer simply because the co-lead shares the name of someone I used to work with, and come to that, someone I wouldn't be surprised to find in possession of supernatural heritage and powers. This works in much the same way that Agent Of Chaos, an early novel by Norman Spinrad, used to be regarded as a bit of a clunker until having a protagonist called Boris Johnson suddenly became a much bigger point of interest. Then the penultimate story, The Dun WHAT? Horror, which isn't the outright spoof that name might suggest, instead being more of a Joe Lansdale-type affair, following another branch of the Whateley family who moved from Lovecraft's New England to Old Mill, North Carolina. It does that slightly cake-and-eat-it thing of having Lovecraft as known fiction within the world but then also basically true, and I'm not wholly convinced the tones mesh, or that quite such a powerful and benevolent magic-user works in a Mythos tale. For all of which caveats, it's fun enough, and does feature a very good dog, which always helps. Finally, Phipps' second story brings it all back around, taking us to an unspecified point in the future, after the stars are right and the Old Ones return to overturn our flimsy world. Alien as such a world should be, you can set great fiction in it – just look at Neil Gaiman's A Study In Emerald. Here, though, it reads too much like bog-standard post-apocalyptic Western, all frontier towns, cyborg incomers, and good mutants (and ghouls, and so forth) working alongside the battered human survivors to protect a semblance of the old-fashioned life in a small settlement. Aside from being too cosy to ring true to its components, it has the same feeling of being written in haste and minimally revised as Phipps' opening piece, so we get "There was a strange quality about him, and I rarely used that descriptor" mere pages after the same narrator has said that "New Ulthar's citizens had a strange belief that their town was protected. It was one of their stranger superstitions, like the fact they let cats run free around the place..." Yes, you could read that as a sign the character shouldn't be taken at face value, but there are too many other little glitches like it. Again, maybe the final copy will have that stuff fixed, but in the meantime it's one more mark against a story I'm not sure I'd have taken to even were it perfectly proofread.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sylri

    Like The Book of Yig before it, rather than being a traditional short story collection this is a set of interconnected stories. The stories all stand alone well enough that if you’re only interested in following a particular series/character, it’s more than ok to just read what you’re interested in - but for those who are reading through all of them, you’ll be able to pick up on recurring elements/storylines. And while I really enjoyed said Book of Yig, I have to say I think I liked this book e Like The Book of Yig before it, rather than being a traditional short story collection this is a set of interconnected stories. The stories all stand alone well enough that if you’re only interested in following a particular series/character, it’s more than ok to just read what you’re interested in - but for those who are reading through all of them, you’ll be able to pick up on recurring elements/storylines. And while I really enjoyed said Book of Yig, I have to say I think I liked this book even more! There’s a lot that can be done with Yog-Sothoth, being a cosmic god/entity of all time and space, and the authors delivered. There’s more delightful escapades with Harry Stubbs and Andrew Doran, as well as Porter Rockwell. But there were two stories that took me by surprise - The Not Quite Right Reverend Cletus and Cthulhu Armageddon. While all of the stories were good fun, these two were my highlight of the book. The Cletus story takes place in Old Mill, North Carolina; and as a native North Carolinian from an old capital S southern family who is currently not in her home state, but who hopes to someday return, I have to say the descriptions of the natives and scenery gave me a severe case of homesickness. I couldn’t find if Old Mill is the area I’m thinking of, but the way it’s described sounds an awful lot like where my family is from which hit extra close to home. Cletus and his dog companion were a hoot, and I’m not ashamed to admit my family once had a dog named Dog. The Cthulhu Armageddon setting was really imaginative and I definitely need to get around to reading the other books in that series. It serves as the finale to the events of the previous stories and wraps things up in an appropriately climactic way. Since things are set far in the future the author is allowed to get weird and creative and I loved it. In the book’s introduction, Brian Lumley is referenced as an inspiration and rightfully so. As a big fan of Lumley’s, and of the pulpier side of Cthulhu Mythos fiction, this book was a real treat.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cass (only the darkest reads)

    As a huge Lovecraft fan, I'm always interested in seeing new transfigurations of his stories, as there is a wealth of mythology to work with. This is the first time I've read a collection dedicated singularly to one specific elder god, and I think that is the downfall of the collection. Only having stories revolving around the manifestation of Yog-Sothoth means that inevitably they're repetitive. I also struggled with the. pace of the stories, and a story that would normally take me 30 minutes to As a huge Lovecraft fan, I'm always interested in seeing new transfigurations of his stories, as there is a wealth of mythology to work with. This is the first time I've read a collection dedicated singularly to one specific elder god, and I think that is the downfall of the collection. Only having stories revolving around the manifestation of Yog-Sothoth means that inevitably they're repetitive. I also struggled with the. pace of the stories, and a story that would normally take me 30 minutes to read took hours. I just couldn't connect. Having not read any of these authors before, and I feel like I really missed out by not having sentimental feelings to characters that are clearly lovingly featured. For me the two stories I liked the most were "The Ghost Door" and "The Not Quite Right Reverend Cletus J. Diggs & the Dun WHAT? Horror." 2.5 Stars rounded up to 3. Thank you so much to Net Galley and Crossroads Press/Macabre Ink for this advanced readers copy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    William Rankin

    Pulpy Yog-Sothery at its most fun and engaging! In his introduction to Tales of Yog-Sothoth, editor C. T. Phipps states that the collection represents the pulpier-rather than the horror-side of things, and it definitely succeeds in this. To break down what pulpier means, to me anyway, I'd say it means more incident and action-oriented, as opposed to horrifying cosmic vistas and the unknown. The characters in these stories are much better acquainted with the forces against which they're arrayed; s Pulpy Yog-Sothery at its most fun and engaging! In his introduction to Tales of Yog-Sothoth, editor C. T. Phipps states that the collection represents the pulpier-rather than the horror-side of things, and it definitely succeeds in this. To break down what pulpier means, to me anyway, I'd say it means more incident and action-oriented, as opposed to horrifying cosmic vistas and the unknown. The characters in these stories are much better acquainted with the forces against which they're arrayed; sometimes, too, having powers of their own to use against them. Thus, the focus of the stories revolves around understanding the force at work and seeking to put an end to it. The settings and time periods of the stories are varied and include mid-19th century Montana, 1920's London, and 1930's New England, among others. This provides ample opportunity to reference the tales of other writers, thus building upon the mythos and providing a sense of context. I'll mention a few favorites from this excellent collection, starting with David J. West's The Haunter of the Wheel. This is a cowboy story set in the old west and and if you enjoyed the author's novel Let Sleeping Gods Lie (and I did), you'll enjoy this as well. Cowboys, guns, and monsters! I was unfamiliar with David Hambling's occult detective Harry Stubbs, and having read the story included in this volume, The Ghost Door, I'm looking forward to reading more. Harry Stubbs is a different sort of occult detective, but was sufficiently familiar in his modus operandi that I found the story very engaging. The other story I'll mention is The Forever Gate, by Matthew Davenport. It features his occult detective Andrew Doran. I most enjoyed the world-building (especially the, well, monster bar for lack of a better term) in this story, set near Arkham. All the stories I mentioned above are well-paced and exciting, and in the tradition of pulp (perhaps most importantly), fun. This goes for all the stories in the collection, making this a recommended read!

  10. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Davenport

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lillybug

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Linderos

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hail Hydra! ~Dave Anderson~

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Huntington

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pandahanna

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hallie

  19. 5 out of 5

    D

  20. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Buttaro

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  22. 4 out of 5

    SmokingMirror

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jean

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matthew A

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Pleil

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zain

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Weston

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eric Garner

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Sprague

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas J Lafferty Jr.

  31. 5 out of 5

    Michael

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