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Stack bodies, get paid, get to the ship. “If you can survive Reaper Platoon in the Strange, then Ghost or Dog Platoons will get you for their own. Best to steer clear of the freaks in Voodoo, kid.” Surrounded and outgunned, a group of private military contractors known as “Strange Company” find themselves on a remote planet at the edge of known space, and on the losing end o Stack bodies, get paid, get to the ship. “If you can survive Reaper Platoon in the Strange, then Ghost or Dog Platoons will get you for their own. Best to steer clear of the freaks in Voodoo, kid.” Surrounded and outgunned, a group of private military contractors known as “Strange Company” find themselves on a remote planet at the edge of known space, and on the losing end of a bad contract. Orbital D-beam strikes, dropships bristling with auto-guns, missiles, and troops - even Monarch space marines in state-of-the-art advanced battle rattle - will try to prevent the company from reaching the exfil LZ and getting off-world. For Strange, that means it’s time to hang tough and get it on with as much hyper-kinetic violence as they can muster to get clear of the whole mess. And what the Strange can’t get done by violent assault and crazy firefights, they’ll get done by the freaks of Voodoo Platoon - operators who have been changed by the Dark Labs into powerful and unnervingly unnatural asymmetrical weapons. This is the Strange Company. Because in the Strange, it’s always really Strange. Join them - and get ready for full auto combat at the furthest limits of human exploration.


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Stack bodies, get paid, get to the ship. “If you can survive Reaper Platoon in the Strange, then Ghost or Dog Platoons will get you for their own. Best to steer clear of the freaks in Voodoo, kid.” Surrounded and outgunned, a group of private military contractors known as “Strange Company” find themselves on a remote planet at the edge of known space, and on the losing end o Stack bodies, get paid, get to the ship. “If you can survive Reaper Platoon in the Strange, then Ghost or Dog Platoons will get you for their own. Best to steer clear of the freaks in Voodoo, kid.” Surrounded and outgunned, a group of private military contractors known as “Strange Company” find themselves on a remote planet at the edge of known space, and on the losing end of a bad contract. Orbital D-beam strikes, dropships bristling with auto-guns, missiles, and troops - even Monarch space marines in state-of-the-art advanced battle rattle - will try to prevent the company from reaching the exfil LZ and getting off-world. For Strange, that means it’s time to hang tough and get it on with as much hyper-kinetic violence as they can muster to get clear of the whole mess. And what the Strange can’t get done by violent assault and crazy firefights, they’ll get done by the freaks of Voodoo Platoon - operators who have been changed by the Dark Labs into powerful and unnervingly unnatural asymmetrical weapons. This is the Strange Company. Because in the Strange, it’s always really Strange. Join them - and get ready for full auto combat at the furthest limits of human exploration.

30 review for Strange Company

  1. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Espen

    Strange Company by Nick Cole is a trip deep into the uncanny valley where everything is at once familiar and unsettling. It is a love letter to the lost and the rejected and the broken who nonetheless have enough spirit to give the universe that screwed them over the middle finger. And finally, it is an example of an almost forgotten style, the weird tale, dressed up as military science fiction. After finishing Strange Company, I fear that I lack words to describe it. I can give you a list of thi Strange Company by Nick Cole is a trip deep into the uncanny valley where everything is at once familiar and unsettling. It is a love letter to the lost and the rejected and the broken who nonetheless have enough spirit to give the universe that screwed them over the middle finger. And finally, it is an example of an almost forgotten style, the weird tale, dressed up as military science fiction. After finishing Strange Company, I fear that I lack words to describe it. I can give you a list of things it is like, in some way, yet none of those things are this. The Strange Company is a unit like no other, and it has gone places and seen things that no one else has. The first thing that the Strange Company makes me think of is the crazy stuff that went down in the wars of post-colonial Africa. You can see what happened as wars of liberation, or as proxies of the Cold War, or as tribal score-settling. All of those things happened. Sometimes in the same places. You might think it all makes some kind of sense, until you look at things like the Biafran War in Nigeria, which had the oddest patterns of who was backing whom. The chaotic conditions of Africa in the 1960s and 1970s attracted soldiers of fortune, looking for adventure, for a quick buck, or just because it was the only thing they knew how to do. This is the time and place that gave us Rhodesian range detectives, the Mozambique Drill, and the reputation of South African mercenaries. A fair number were Vietnam veterans, men like Jim Bolen with time on their hands after the United States di di mau’ed out of Southeast Asia. What went on there in that time was, not nice. They were ugly little wars, and no one came out the other side looking good, win or lose. The mercenaries especially, who had no loyalty to anyone but themselves. When I was listening to the Blasters and Blades podcast, Nick talked about giving this book to his wife, and after she read it she came downstairs to ask him “what’s wrong with you?" This is a warts and all presentation of what that time might have been like, and as such, it is also, not nice. I am reminded of a review I gave eight years ago of Hammer’s Slammers on Amazon, and I found that I was quite disturbed by David Drake’s [a Vietnam vet himself] portrayal of mercenaries in it. Back when they still allowed comments on Amazon reviews, I can remember some comments on that review that I didn’t understand the “realism” of Drake’s book. I understood it perfectly well. I just found the callousness and amorality of the mercs disturbing. There is a reason no one throughout history liked mercenaries when they show up. I’ve probably changed in the past decade, and I might write a different review of Hammer’s Slammers now, but I don’t disagree with what I said then. What is so unusual about what Cole does here is how he humanizes the monsters, without pretending they are anything but what they really are. As Sergeant Orion says “We don’t always shoot bad guys in the company, man”. I know, I’m a killjoy. But I can’t do anything but do me. It’s all I know. Your mileage may vary, as I tell guys when they complain about me raining on life with reality and stuff. "We shoot who we get paid to shoot. It’s best not to think about that too much, Boom, if good guys and bad guys is some kind of criteria for you, I mean.” The primary mechanism by which we see the men of Strange Company for who they are is Sergeant Orion, the Log Keeper of Strange Company, who records the story of anyone who chooses to tell it to him, exactly as it is, just as the eighteen Log Keepers before him have done. His dedication to the truth is the one bright spot in an otherwise grim and dark existence. Through his eyes, we can see. We see Gains, the ever cheery gymbro who always has an encouraging word, or Boom Boom, the former hunting guide who joined the Company because he couldn’t abide having to work for a Monarch, the smug and oblivious Masters of the Universe. Or Amarcus Hannibal, who is just a murderous psychopath. Some of the best soldiers have been those. Lost loves and broken dreams abound among the men whose rejection of the corrupt system they find themselves in has brought them to the Company. We also see the war crimes and the brutality and the naked, desperate struggle for survival. Because Orion is setting it all down truthfully. There is that. If Strange Company was just that, it would be a solid example of military scifi in a venerable tradition. But this is where stuff starts getting weird. The advantage of the weird tale is that it allows the story to go places that a more standard narrative cannot. It can “weave a spell of words that mystifies and fascinates the reader“. The pulp tradition has many well known authors who wrote weird fiction, but perhaps the best known author who has blended science fiction and weird tales was Philip K. Dick. Accordingly, there are plethora of Phil Dick references in Strange Company. Like PKD’s work, the veils of reality are thin wherever the Strange Company finds itself. That rupture in reality isn’t necessarily their doing, but being the dirty, cheating, underhanded mercs they are, they take full advantage to fulfill their contract, to get the job done, to survive. The choice of Pascal Blanche to illustrate the cover is absolutely perfect, as his brand of hyper-real surrealism matches up with a gang of ruthless mercenaries whose bag of tricks involves tears in the fabric of reality and psychic voodoo. As we fall further down the rabbit-hole with Strange Company, as they battle their way across the planet of Crash desperately seeking exfiltration from a job gone badder than they thought it possibly could, we gradually leave behind what we thought was real, and learn who tore reality, who the real monsters are. The men of Strange Company, as bad as they are, are not the most horrible things lurking in the dark hollows of the universe. Not even the Ultra Marines, loyal and vicious servants of the Monarchs are that. This being a weird tale, we also get an inversion of Cole’s usual style of elite military operators doing elite military things. The Strange Company has a long and storied history, but now they are down on their luck and flat broke. The real elite units are in hot pursuit, and it will take all the guile and treachery the Company can muster to evade annihilation. And absolutely none of them know what they are getting into. If you liked anything else Nick has done, there is a family resemblance in Strange Company, with the strangeness turned up to eleven. So if you like military scifi, stick around and see how weird it can get. I don’t think you are going to find anything else quite like this. And if you are a fan of weird tales, and I know there are some out there, give this a try. Come and see what redemption there is on the far side of nowhere. Christ died for the least of these too. I was provided with an advanced review copy by the author.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt Smith

    I'm a sucker for military science fiction sometimes. I was a big fan of David Drake's Hammer's Slammers when I was younger. I thought I'd give this one a try since I was looking for something easy to read, and I've liked some of Nick Cole's other stuff. I have to be honest. This is a complete retread of Glen Cook's The Black Company. We start with Strange Company being mercenaries. That's not so derivative, but we also have the wizened, grotesque wizards as well as a beautiful immortal transhuma I'm a sucker for military science fiction sometimes. I was a big fan of David Drake's Hammer's Slammers when I was younger. I thought I'd give this one a try since I was looking for something easy to read, and I've liked some of Nick Cole's other stuff. I have to be honest. This is a complete retread of Glen Cook's The Black Company. We start with Strange Company being mercenaries. That's not so derivative, but we also have the wizened, grotesque wizards as well as a beautiful immortal transhuman female who may as well be the Lady from the Black Company. Oh, and narrator is the company archivist for a mercenary company that has a history stretching back hundreds of years. Again, all elements of the Black Company. For all that, I enjoyed the story despite the shameless borrowing. I did let myself get drawn in, and wanted to see how it would end. If you read this book and like it, do yourself a favor and read the Black Company. It's sort of like if Vietnam took place in a low fantasy setting. The author has another series that billed itself as "Star Wars done right." I enjoyed it for a while. At least he was honest about his inspiration though.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This was a strange book! I guess I should have expected it to be considering it's title, "Strange Company". The title could have meant some kind of strange business and it a way it does. The business of the Strange Company is killing because they are a company of mercenaries! Very, very deadly mercenaries. Their story is being told by a Sergeant Orion who is in charge of the Reaper platoon and the company log keeper. He keeps the stories all the men tell him during their tenure with Strange Comp This was a strange book! I guess I should have expected it to be considering it's title, "Strange Company". The title could have meant some kind of strange business and it a way it does. The business of the Strange Company is killing because they are a company of mercenaries! Very, very deadly mercenaries. Their story is being told by a Sergeant Orion who is in charge of the Reaper platoon and the company log keeper. He keeps the stories all the men tell him during their tenure with Strange Company so it kind of makes for a history book of who was there and when. It also keeps some kind of record of the guys that died while part of Strange Company and if someone wanted to, they could read the logs and remember someone long dead. The guys in Strange Company usually told Sergeant Orion their stories, like about how they got to joining the company and why, and about anything else they wanted him to know, before they died! It wasn't a requirement, that's for sure, but you needed to tell Sgt. Orion your story before you died so he could write it all down. You would become part of Strange Company history then. And it was a very strange company, indeed! You'll read about several key parts of the mission on this world out on the frontier of space. They were hired to help the government of the planet free itself from under the thumb of the Monarch. Explaining who and what the Monarch are is going to take quite a bit of the story, especially since you're going to have a Monarch riding right along with Strange Company. That never happens. The Monarchs don't mix freely with other humans. It's not natural. They are way more superior to normal humans that it's impossible one would come down to their level and be right there with them. But, she did, this female Monarch who was about the most beautiful woman Sgt. Orion had ever seen. Still, his job was to kill those his Captain told him to kill because they were getting paid to do so. This first day, they were setting up to ambush a bunch of people, militia types, who had thought they had won their independence. Little did they know that they were just about ready to die, all of them, at least all of them on that parade ground mall. As the book says, it was a massacre. The thing about being a mercenary is that whomever is paying you, that's who you work for. You ain't on their side, nor are you on the side of whomever they want dead. It's just that you have a job to do and want to get paid. It just so happens in this books that the guys who were supposed to pay, got taken out real bad by the Monarchs so for a while there it looked like Strange Company wasn't going to get paid at all. It also wasn't sure it was going to be able to get off this planet was now being visited by the Ultra Marines who were paid by the Monarch. These guys were the ultimate in fighting. They were highly trained and had all the latest gear to go with all that training. When the Ultra Marines came, everybody else died. Everybody! But, by some strange happenstance, this Monarch female hired Strange Company to do something for her during this world-wide end of everything! So, they had a new contract and were going to get paid after all, provided they lived and got off this planet to do so. And that's what most of this story is about. Oh, there is this ape-army, and the Enterprise spaceship involved. Some of it talks about the future and then you'll also get to hear a lot of stories told by various members of Strange Company when they are talking to Sgt. Orion, the company log keeper. It will be interesting for you to find out who survives this book, if any one does. After all, it's a Strange Company story. Nick Cole has written a number of book along with Jason Anspach and Doc Spears. I don't know how they divide up the writing, but everyone of their stories have been great. This one is no exception so I'll be looking forward to other books just by Nick Cole. He's a very good writer on his own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kort

    I didn't know where this particular journey would take me. I'm glad I went along for the ride. Nick Cole's 'Strange Company' defies easy categorization. I had just finished a cookie-cutter Military Sci-Fi adventure from a series and was waiting for sequels from some of my other favorite genre authors. This was recommended to me so I took a chance. At first I wasn't quite sure what to make of it. Narrated by the primary protagonist, one Sergent Orion of Reaper Platoon, it often has an almost conve I didn't know where this particular journey would take me. I'm glad I went along for the ride. Nick Cole's 'Strange Company' defies easy categorization. I had just finished a cookie-cutter Military Sci-Fi adventure from a series and was waiting for sequels from some of my other favorite genre authors. This was recommended to me so I took a chance. At first I wasn't quite sure what to make of it. Narrated by the primary protagonist, one Sergent Orion of Reaper Platoon, it often has an almost conversational, stream of consciousness flow to it that took me several pages to get used to. After that I was hooked. Essentially, the story takes place at an unspecified future date on a far-flung planet that was settled by humans. The mercenary soldiers of Strange Company are there to fight on someone else's planet in someone else's war. They are there to do a job. Don't let morals get in the way, they don't pay the bills. The author is former military, and there is a gritty realism to the way his characters think, feel, and do what they are hired to do. Sgt. relates the events, but there are also flashbacks and vignettes highlighting other members' lives and setting the galactic stage of events. There is an almost níor meets Apocalypse Now feel to the narration, interspersed with introspection and the just plain bizarre -- not to mention full-tilt battles that go from almost hopeless to well beyond. You can almost smell the cordite and hear the brass clinking as it hits the ground. There is military weaponry, and then there is future tech that can't be easily described. And there are aliens, ...or are there. Anyway, it is the character that will hook you. At least they did me. I won't spoil the story. This is one you have to read and mentally embrace on a personal level. Most novels of this sort I find enjoyable but somewhat forgettable after I finish them and start the next book. Strange Company is lingering. I would read it again. That's high praise considering how many books I have on my list. If there is ever a sequel, I'll be the first in line to get it. There is that anyway... ~ Kort

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Not what you're expecting, yet somehow better. I'm not going to drop any spoilers. Strange Company is science fiction at its best. It mixes futuristic elements with knowable tech and creates both wonder and horror at what may be while shining a clear light on a universal truth about what it means to be human and why we forge bonds with one another. Strange Company is in a style difficult to read but is well worth the effort required to slip into the thinking of our narrator and tells a story that r Not what you're expecting, yet somehow better. I'm not going to drop any spoilers. Strange Company is science fiction at its best. It mixes futuristic elements with knowable tech and creates both wonder and horror at what may be while shining a clear light on a universal truth about what it means to be human and why we forge bonds with one another. Strange Company is in a style difficult to read but is well worth the effort required to slip into the thinking of our narrator and tells a story that reveals something we usually prefer to keep hidden. Strange Company is filled with golden nuggets of battlefield wisdom and the truth reveals itself back layer after layer like an onion not finishing until the final words of the epilogue.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremyf

    An interior monologue interspersed by overwhelming battle Orion is the records keeper for his mercenary company, one that’s gone back from conflict to conflict for over 600 years. He’s the guy who knows each member’s story and keeps the record so no one forgets. This book is how he tells about the contract to advance on the world of Crash as this world teeters on the brink of obscurity or relevance. The book is 80% backstory, people’s stories, filling in context, and 20% action. It’s much differe An interior monologue interspersed by overwhelming battle Orion is the records keeper for his mercenary company, one that’s gone back from conflict to conflict for over 600 years. He’s the guy who knows each member’s story and keeps the record so no one forgets. This book is how he tells about the contract to advance on the world of Crash as this world teeters on the brink of obscurity or relevance. The book is 80% backstory, people’s stories, filling in context, and 20% action. It’s much different than others in the Galaxy’s Edge universe but you’ll find yourself much more emotionally impacted by the depth each character has. Good closure on a lot of angles of the story, but also left open for a continuation of some characters. Just outstanding.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    I came to Nick Cole the Galaxies Edge route, like probably a lot of people. This is my first time reading a solo book from him. The man has interesting tastes. He likes experimental humans, and space mysteries, and really likes the perspective of the grunt. This is a book of almost constant combat, that still manages to start fleshing out a universe. It's not the GE universe, but if you are a reader of GE, you're going to recognize some themes and references. This universe might suck (for the pe I came to Nick Cole the Galaxies Edge route, like probably a lot of people. This is my first time reading a solo book from him. The man has interesting tastes. He likes experimental humans, and space mysteries, and really likes the perspective of the grunt. This is a book of almost constant combat, that still manages to start fleshing out a universe. It's not the GE universe, but if you are a reader of GE, you're going to recognize some themes and references. This universe might suck (for the people in it) more then GE's. A space dictatorship run by metahumans that don't mess around when it's time to go to war. A company of mercs who end up on the wrong side of a war they can't win, and a mysterious asset that might be able to save them. It's worth the read. KTF

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Damn.....Epic. There is a darkness. There are side bars. There is action. There is nothing to Merc life except mem [$]. There is a weaving of a new universe? A side universe? Does it end here? I hope not. The 1st 1/3 of the book does a good job of back story fill with interspersed action, that at times gets a bit frustrating. Bear with it. From then on, it's some racing heartbreaking, astonishing action that reflects at a deeper level today's world. A nice metaphor going here. But above all of that i Damn.....Epic. There is a darkness. There are side bars. There is action. There is nothing to Merc life except mem [$]. There is a weaving of a new universe? A side universe? Does it end here? I hope not. The 1st 1/3 of the book does a good job of back story fill with interspersed action, that at times gets a bit frustrating. Bear with it. From then on, it's some racing heartbreaking, astonishing action that reflects at a deeper level today's world. A nice metaphor going here. But above all of that is the action of Sgt Orion. Thank you Nick, you capture brothers in arms and weave a hell of a story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Nick Cole has never let me down yet I have loved every book he has written or coauthored. He turned this book up to 12 and broke off the nob off throwing it into the sea. This book had touches of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, hard core KTF, and touched on current global, social and political issues effecting our freedoms we take for granted everyday. I can't wait for the next installment of this series and to learn more of Strange Company. Also I am loving Christopher Ryan Grant as a narrator Nick Cole has never let me down yet I have loved every book he has written or coauthored. He turned this book up to 12 and broke off the nob off throwing it into the sea. This book had touches of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, hard core KTF, and touched on current global, social and political issues effecting our freedoms we take for granted everyday. I can't wait for the next installment of this series and to learn more of Strange Company. Also I am loving Christopher Ryan Grant as a narrator I hope Nick continues to use him in future books to come.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert Defrank

    Cole has unleashed the full force of his imagination and created a universe more grimdark than grimdark, a story of brutal warriors armed with high technology and eldritch powers, mercenaries engaged in ugly wars at the behest of one paymaster or another, employing a range of bizarre experimental superpowers as an equalizer when confronted by overwhelming force, and over all, a stellar empire of 'Monarchs' who are inexorably consuming the known universe. One part Firefly, one part intense war mo Cole has unleashed the full force of his imagination and created a universe more grimdark than grimdark, a story of brutal warriors armed with high technology and eldritch powers, mercenaries engaged in ugly wars at the behest of one paymaster or another, employing a range of bizarre experimental superpowers as an equalizer when confronted by overwhelming force, and over all, a stellar empire of 'Monarchs' who are inexorably consuming the known universe. One part Firefly, one part intense war movie, one part Warhammer, pick this one up and you won't regret the ride.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Got about 40% in before I gave up. Up to this point the book has been almost entirely overly detailed backstory on characters and the unit, and very repetitive. A lot of other reviews mention this emphasis on backstory and seem cool with it, but I guess I just didn't realize it was THIS MUCH. The book has glowing reviews on literally every platform so I tried to push on but I am just not enjoying any aspect of it. Got about 40% in before I gave up. Up to this point the book has been almost entirely overly detailed backstory on characters and the unit, and very repetitive. A lot of other reviews mention this emphasis on backstory and seem cool with it, but I guess I just didn't realize it was THIS MUCH. The book has glowing reviews on literally every platform so I tried to push on but I am just not enjoying any aspect of it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Satisfyingly dark and gritty Wow. Thant’s the first word that came to mind when I closed the book. I won’t post spoilers but the way the author stitched together flawed (gentler than monstrous) character with futuristic/fantastical elements and mixed in well/timed comic relief scratched just the right itch.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thibaldo Manrique

    Very engaging book Although the style is little chaotic, it still is a good read. Best to be read in few sessions since the cast is big. GOT big. None the less, once you get past the strange style ( no pun intended ) it's quite interesting. If like violent,action pack, relentless stories this is for you. Very engaging book Although the style is little chaotic, it still is a good read. Best to be read in few sessions since the cast is big. GOT big. None the less, once you get past the strange style ( no pun intended ) it's quite interesting. If like violent,action pack, relentless stories this is for you.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Arnason

    Solid Solid. Tight. Good narration in action-packed, high-tempo fighting. Doesn’t get obsessed with the world/period or tech, and has an interesting gallery of characters, painted with broad strokes (and thankfully always maintaining a human angle to all their stories). Was also nicely contained, so I am sated. Ready for the next one though…

  15. 5 out of 5

    Skybird564

    Wow I really like Glen Cook’s writing, but this book by Nick Cole shows Glen what Black Company should have been. Orion is a great soldier. As one Platoon Sergeant to another, Sergeant Orion,I salute you.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul Gover

    Body stacking is the way of the Strange, but being one of them isn't easy or for the weak of heart. Good start to a series and definitely creative in the characters. I preferred this to Soda Pop Soldier for what that's worth. Fun and worth the time. Body stacking is the way of the Strange, but being one of them isn't easy or for the weak of heart. Good start to a series and definitely creative in the characters. I preferred this to Soda Pop Soldier for what that's worth. Fun and worth the time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patrick R Anderson

    Wow! One of the best I have read. Enjoyed it immensely for nonstop action; but also for the loyalty of people fighting for each other when the reason for the engagement no longer matters.

  18. 4 out of 5

    El Presidente

    Its good. Read it. If you want dark, real, hard, military sci-fi. Read It. If you want silly, all-knowing hero type, always happy ending, plot holes you can see from space. Don't read it, this isn't it. What a refreshing read. Its good. Read it. If you want dark, real, hard, military sci-fi. Read It. If you want silly, all-knowing hero type, always happy ending, plot holes you can see from space. Don't read it, this isn't it. What a refreshing read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David Murray

    Took over 100 pages to get into it and used to the writing style or perspective but it was worth it. Good book

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    Glen Cooks Black Company in SPACE! I wasn't really taken by Black Company as a teenager, but this I liked tremendously. Looking forward to more. Glen Cooks Black Company in SPACE! I wasn't really taken by Black Company as a teenager, but this I liked tremendously. Looking forward to more.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Trax Armstrong

    Good Lord! Don't miss reading this. A strange book from a strange company to a strange world. Absolute must-read. It takes you places weird, funny, wise, sad and wacky. Good Lord! Don't miss reading this. A strange book from a strange company to a strange world. Absolute must-read. It takes you places weird, funny, wise, sad and wacky.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

    Good read. Interesting perspective in future war, the merc and Strange elements was a newer twist for me. A general good sci-fi read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alan Waye

    Wow! Great book however took me a while to get into it. But once in it couldn't put it down! Was a little bit hard following sometimes but was definitely a great read. Wow! Great book however took me a while to get into it. But once in it couldn't put it down! Was a little bit hard following sometimes but was definitely a great read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Walker

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Goff

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greg Trent

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marcelino

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cornel

  29. 4 out of 5

    John Watson

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Saltzgaver

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