web site hit counter Lilus Kikus and Other Stories by Elena Poniatowska - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Lilus Kikus and Other Stories by Elena Poniatowska

Availability: Ready to download

Elena Poniatowska is recognized today as one of Mexico's greatest writers. Lilus Kikus, published in 1954, was her first book. However, it was labeled a children's book because it had a young girl as protagonist, it included illustrations, and the author was an unknown woman. Lilus Kikus has not received the critical attention or a translation into English it deserved, un Elena Poniatowska is recognized today as one of Mexico's greatest writers. Lilus Kikus, published in 1954, was her first book. However, it was labeled a children's book because it had a young girl as protagonist, it included illustrations, and the author was an unknown woman. Lilus Kikus has not received the critical attention or a translation into English it deserved, until now. Accompanying Lilus Kikus in this first American edition are four of Poniatowska's short stories with female protagonists, only one of which has been previously published in English. Poniatowska is admired today as a feminist, but in 1954, when Lilus Kikus appeared, feminism didn't have broad appeal. Twenty-first-century readers will be fascinated by the way Poniatowska uses her child protagonist to point out the flaws in adult society. Each of the drawings by the great surrealist Leonora Carrington that accompany the chapters in Lilus Kikus expresses a subjective, interiorized vision of the child character's contemplations on life. "A tantalizingly complex feminist author, whose importance and originality have yet to be appreciated in this country."--Cynthia Steele, author of Politics, Gender, and the Mexican Novel, 1968-1988


Compare

Elena Poniatowska is recognized today as one of Mexico's greatest writers. Lilus Kikus, published in 1954, was her first book. However, it was labeled a children's book because it had a young girl as protagonist, it included illustrations, and the author was an unknown woman. Lilus Kikus has not received the critical attention or a translation into English it deserved, un Elena Poniatowska is recognized today as one of Mexico's greatest writers. Lilus Kikus, published in 1954, was her first book. However, it was labeled a children's book because it had a young girl as protagonist, it included illustrations, and the author was an unknown woman. Lilus Kikus has not received the critical attention or a translation into English it deserved, until now. Accompanying Lilus Kikus in this first American edition are four of Poniatowska's short stories with female protagonists, only one of which has been previously published in English. Poniatowska is admired today as a feminist, but in 1954, when Lilus Kikus appeared, feminism didn't have broad appeal. Twenty-first-century readers will be fascinated by the way Poniatowska uses her child protagonist to point out the flaws in adult society. Each of the drawings by the great surrealist Leonora Carrington that accompany the chapters in Lilus Kikus expresses a subjective, interiorized vision of the child character's contemplations on life. "A tantalizingly complex feminist author, whose importance and originality have yet to be appreciated in this country."--Cynthia Steele, author of Politics, Gender, and the Mexican Novel, 1968-1988

30 review for Lilus Kikus and Other Stories by Elena Poniatowska

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mariel

    Through the fog of her illness, Lilus sees many women pass, stiff and moralistic, with black letters on their chests and backs that say, "Prohibited, Prohibited," and who threaten her with expulsion from the organization Flowering Souls. Lilus feels enclosed and imprisoned. A train that is happy for some, sad for others stomps through their beds like he's Godzilla. Not stopping to smell anything, smile anything, bringing Lilus to the convent school. God speed to God fearing. All of the things s Through the fog of her illness, Lilus sees many women pass, stiff and moralistic, with black letters on their chests and backs that say, "Prohibited, Prohibited," and who threaten her with expulsion from the organization Flowering Souls. Lilus feels enclosed and imprisoned. A train that is happy for some, sad for others stomps through their beds like he's Godzilla. Not stopping to smell anything, smile anything, bringing Lilus to the convent school. God speed to God fearing. All of the things she liked to do travel backwards. She would charge her little friends to see her cuts and scrapes. She'd smash blackberries in her palms to see the blood. I bet they tasted better than they looked. Lilus used to be a little friend and a wild haired child. Little beneath the answering figures. All of the stories of Lilus' life end in swallow yourself and be good. This is the way to goodness. I liked the drawings (Leonora Carrington's illustrations) of the nuns who cloister in cross-eyed and straight ahead knowing slants. They know everything of which she must do to grow up and be submissive. I stare at them all to see if one of them looks like she knows something else than she is saying. In these stories a wild flower is stomped on and crushed as if it were the only way it could ever go. If some trains were sad and some were happy they share the same destination. Sometimes they are similar Lilus Kikus flowers. They could answer to Kolis Liko or maybe a Fuchis Lokis. It killed me a little every time she learns the right way to be. Little girls don't. The best friend to Lilus is a simpleton. I didn't hear secrets in her baby talk. The word on the street is to be a stupid woman is to be more attractive to men. Her husband will strangle her one day after an announcement of no dinner. Such a spirited flower makes its bed. I hate the winds if it has got to be this way. Lilus is disillusioned. Things always happen to her only halfway. The drawings were great. Elena Poniatowska's lines of her girls and people, sometimes happy and sometimes sad, are in movement and not in endings. Every time I think she's going to peel back the too fasts and then the boots win again. So I liked the drawings the best. A giant and hair you can't see her eyes as if she were a breed of the Muppets that don't have eyes, only hair. She sits in a tree and seems to want to hold the nest of birds. She's this big only when she's alone. There's a bed with a cat underneath it as if it were made of the bed and the bed were made of it. Covers up to the eyes. Shrouding the eyes. Maybe if you keep your eyes closed you could avoid the maybe not inevitable but happens too damned often fates of flowers in a world of sexist beasts. The sides of her fever dream bed are met in fishies, frogs and creepy crawlies. They appear walk upside down and shaking fists. I'm relieved someone noticed. If someone saw her stop and smell the flowers I hope they hope she was doing it without any conscious gratitude. In this story Lilus learns about virgins and Mary Magdalene. Don't learn about that. It doesn't have to always be that way. Hide the big book with all of the hateful words like slut and virgin. Someone should, anyway. Lilus is so little under mustachioed men (their mustaches swallowed their smiles like satisfied felines) and a big messy sun. No one tells this sun what to do. Look up. I can't see the eyes and I like that she seems to be looking up. I liked that. Would it be terrible to say that I missed the heroine of my childhood, Ramona Quimby. I'd reread those books, hidden under my desk in class. In a move to make Ramona herself proud I had the ludicrous notion that I would get in less trouble if I pretended to be asleep rather than reading. She was the not-right girl I could wear over my heart and say: "This is me." I wonder if little girls in Mexico took Lilus Kikus to their sleeves and then walked as slow as they could to avoid reaching the end. I read in the biography/introduction that Poniatowska had to have her rape baby in secret,far away in France. Later she would marry a man she loved and he adopted this baby. The wikipedia page on her is la di da happy clappy this didn't happen and the depressing as shit(though that's in this edition's biography too) of the exception, the Mexican lady author. The in spite of, carving away against the tides. (She sounds bad ass too, still working her bad ass butt off for the downtrodden.) I wish I had something to rail against and make that not so. Where are the maps to send the trains of everything in other directions? Lots of other possibilities. That anyone has to be the exception. It is written all over her face hidden behind earth and wind hair that it is a world to make me feel pitfall stomach. The other side of the speeding future. I can understand the shadows and the ugly and all of that without knowing where she was when she wrote Lilus Kikus. The fear overtakes the running. Was anyone listening to the injustices when the own lives kill themselves for supposed to-dos and gottas? Lilus Kikus made me too damned sad. Would it be terrible if I rewrote the ending? Lilus isn't afraid of God. She looks out the window and she's big no matter if anyone else is around.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Omaira

    “Es una niña de conchas y caracoles, de grandes golpes de agua, que dan en su rostro como puñados de lluvia” Mi primer acercamiento a la literatura mexicana, y no será el último. ¡Qué bello fue! Breve historia donde Poniatowska nos narra las aventuras de una niñita por diferentes lugares. Los tintes surrealistas, el precioso estilo de la autora, las ilustraciones de Leonora Carrington y las imágenes generadas me cautivaron profundamente. Historia infantil muy recomendable. Volveremos a “Es una niña de conchas y caracoles, de grandes golpes de agua, que dan en su rostro como puñados de lluvia” Mi primer acercamiento a la literatura mexicana, y no será el último. ¡Qué bello fue! Breve historia donde Poniatowska nos narra las aventuras de una niñita por diferentes lugares. Los tintes surrealistas, el precioso estilo de la autora, las ilustraciones de Leonora Carrington y las imágenes generadas me cautivaron profundamente. Historia infantil muy recomendable. Volveremos a encontrarnos, señora Poniatowska.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Vega

    http://www.neapoulain.com/2017/08/lil... Este libro se clasificó erroneamente para niños porque estaba ilustrado por la gran e increíble Leonora Carrington (si no la conoces, les recomiendo googlear su nombre) y porque era muy cortito y porque lo protagonizaba una niña, al menos, al principio. Gracias a ese pequeño error al catalogarlo (pues sólo la literatura para niños tenía dibujos y sólo a los niños les interesaba leer cosas que tuvieran a niños de protagonistas, según la gente que lo decidió http://www.neapoulain.com/2017/08/lil... Este libro se clasificó erroneamente para niños porque estaba ilustrado por la gran e increíble Leonora Carrington (si no la conoces, les recomiendo googlear su nombre) y porque era muy cortito y porque lo protagonizaba una niña, al menos, al principio. Gracias a ese pequeño error al catalogarlo (pues sólo la literatura para niños tenía dibujos y sólo a los niños les interesaba leer cosas que tuvieran a niños de protagonistas, según la gente que lo decidió) durante muchos años muchos niños (y adultos que se atrevían a leerlo) pudieron disfrutar una obra tan magistral como lo es Lilus Kikus, uno de los primeros libros que Elena Poniatiwska publicó en su carrera (y sigue publicando). Pero vamos a hablar de Lilus Kikus. Para empezar, lo ilustró la genialosísima Leonora Carrington, a quien si no conocen les recomiendo que la busquen en internet porque sus ilustraciones y todo su trabajo no tienen desperdicio. Para seguir, pues ya vamos a hablar del libro. El libro empieza con Lilus como una niña y acaba con Lilus como una jovencita. En cierto sentido, estamos ante un coming-of-age, pero seguramente muy diferentes a todos los que conocen. Lilus no juega con muñecas porque se le mueren todas. Es que es un poco torpe. Lilus no entiende mucho de política y dice que siempre le pasan a ella las cosas a medias. El libro se divide en pequeños capítulos, todos con un tema diferente, en el que podemos notar que Lilus va creciendo y que sus experiencias van cambiando. Si al principio no jugaba con muñecas porque las mataba todas, al final es una jovencita en una sociedad conservadora que quiere meterla en cintura y que, como con muchas jovencitas alocadas antes que ella, lo va a lograr. Sobre si es un libro para niños o no, no me meto. Yo sí se lo leería, por ejemplo, a los mayores de diez años, quizá un poquito antes. Los cuentos están bonitos, narrados poéticamente y siempre desde el punto de vista de Lilus, así que vemos su percepción del mundo y no otra. Creo que eso es lo más bonito de todo el libro. Siempre tenemos ahí el punto de vista de Lilus, cómo ella ve las cosas. Entonces tenemos que leer entre líneas para saber qué cosas pasan, para entender un poco a Lilus Kikus. Entre sus páginas hay una muchacha embarazada de la escuela expulsada porque se embarazó y es la oveja negra de un blanquísimo rebaño (como no, si era escuela de monjas): —Ahora estoy completamente desilusionada del amor, Lilus… Ahora solamente pienso en la maternidad, y ya he dado los pasos conducentes… Expulsaron a la Borrega. Se fue con su petaca escocesa, y sus grandes anteojos negros eran como lágrimas postizas. Le sacó la lengua a la directora, le hizo dos estupendas muecas a Lilus y le avisó que muy pronto le mandaría una botella de champaña… Si lo pensamos mucho, el mundo no ha cambiado demasiado. Si se embaraza una adolescente primero la condenan y le dicen que perdió el camino y luego ya, si eso, se preocupan por ayudarla. En averiguar qué pasó para que pasara eso, pues no, pero bueno. Ahí se fue la borrega, desilusionada del amor y pensando en la maternidad. Elenita, por ahí, entre líneas, también se mete con los matrimonios en los que parece que el marido cambió a la mamá por esposa o creyó que en vez de esposa estaba adquiriendo una sirvienta, con la amiga de Lilus, Chiruelita, que se casó con un artista lánguido y maniático al que siempre le hacía la comida. Y, claro, por que no, en el acoso callejero, porque desde que Elenita publicó este libro a las mujeres ya les gritaban despropósitos en la calle y todavía los hombres siguen insistiendo que, de alguna manera, eso es halagador. Y mientras anda averiguando de que sabor son los besos que la da su novio a la sirvienta de su casa y preocupando porque la quieren mandar a vivir con las monjas. Es un coming-of-age, sí. Es el coming-of-age de las jovencitas alocadas que viven en una sociedad conservadora que las tiene que meter en cintura, volverlas castas y puras, hacerlas preocuparse por lo Bien Visto y lo Mal Visto y sobre todo por los símbolos y la iglesia y la religión y volverlas creyentes en sus filas. Se los recomiendo mucho, más si les gusta leer entre las líneas o quieren conocer una de las primeras obras que publicó Elena Poniatowska. Es considerado Literatura Infantil y Juvenil y la verdad es que para niños ya cercanos a la pubertad y jóvenes, es un libro hermoso (incluso antes). Y para los nostálgicos, pero no tanto, nos recuerda un México conservador y que vivía cuidándose de lo Mal Visto y siguiendo las reglas de lo Bien Visto. En serio, léanlo. (Y si todavía no los convenzo, le pueden echar un vistazo en epublibre.org y luego, cuando se enamoren, ir a comprarlo con Ediciones Era).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manuel Alfonseca

    ESPAÑOL: Cuento infantil sobre una niña (Lilus Kikus), un personaje que no me ha gustado demasiado. Quizá sea culpa mía, o quizá sea por la forma de hablar del narrador y los personajes. Mi edición no contiene más que el cuento del título. ENGLISH: A story for children about a girl (Lilus Kikus), a character I did not like too much. Maybe it's my fault, or the way the narrator and the characters talk. My edition contains just the title story. ESPAÑOL: Cuento infantil sobre una niña (Lilus Kikus), un personaje que no me ha gustado demasiado. Quizá sea culpa mía, o quizá sea por la forma de hablar del narrador y los personajes. Mi edición no contiene más que el cuento del título. ENGLISH: A story for children about a girl (Lilus Kikus), a character I did not like too much. Maybe it's my fault, or the way the narrator and the characters talk. My edition contains just the title story.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ángel

    "Los amores tempranos son los que esperan en las esquinas para ver pasar y después irse a soñar. Son amores que no se tocan pero que se evocan mucho. [...] Estaba contenta al verlo de lejos, sin hablarle jamás. En las noches me dormía siempre pensando en él. No esperaba que me estrechara en sus brazos ni nada. Mi falta de curiosidad era completa..." "Los amores tempranos son los que esperan en las esquinas para ver pasar y después irse a soñar. Son amores que no se tocan pero que se evocan mucho. [...] Estaba contenta al verlo de lejos, sin hablarle jamás. En las noches me dormía siempre pensando en él. No esperaba que me estrechara en sus brazos ni nada. Mi falta de curiosidad era completa..."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ose Hernand

    No soy muy fan de Elena Poniatowska y creo que pudo desarrollar más el personaje de Lilus, al final pierde un poco de fuerza. Sin embargo, los dibujos de Leonora Carrington son bastante preciosos y lo que sí le aplaudo a Elena es la sutil crítica que hace, en los últimos cuentos, al machismo, la violencia de género y al papel femenino en la sociedad heteronormativa. La mujer no debería esperar ‘sumisa y paciente’ a su marido en el lecho y, por supuesto, convertirse en esposa-madre no es el sueño No soy muy fan de Elena Poniatowska y creo que pudo desarrollar más el personaje de Lilus, al final pierde un poco de fuerza. Sin embargo, los dibujos de Leonora Carrington son bastante preciosos y lo que sí le aplaudo a Elena es la sutil crítica que hace, en los últimos cuentos, al machismo, la violencia de género y al papel femenino en la sociedad heteronormativa. La mujer no debería esperar ‘sumisa y paciente’ a su marido en el lecho y, por supuesto, convertirse en esposa-madre no es el sueño-objetivo de vida de todas las mujeres.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luis R Salazar

    Parece ser que este libro lo catalogaron como infantil solo por tener ilustraciones y estar muy corto. ¡Grave Error! Es un libro muy bonito en donde te hace ver las cosas bonitas que tiene la vida mediante los ojos de una niña. Lilus es un excelente personaje del cual puedes aprender mucho. Además de que es super fácil de leer.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Iveth Martínez

    Esta es la historia de Lilus Kikus, una niña sumamente inquieta, traviesa, soñadora, imaginativa y curiosa, que desea indagar de todo lo que le rodea, entender el mundo, adueñárselo e imaginar aspectos fantásticos de este mismo. Puede quedarse sentada largo rato, indagando en cuestiones que le inquieten o tratando de entender y apreciar todo lo que le rodea; así como ser una exhalación en el mundo, correr y devorar su entorno, la realidad. Seguimos sus aventuras, en la escuela, en su casa, con su Esta es la historia de Lilus Kikus, una niña sumamente inquieta, traviesa, soñadora, imaginativa y curiosa, que desea indagar de todo lo que le rodea, entender el mundo, adueñárselo e imaginar aspectos fantásticos de este mismo. Puede quedarse sentada largo rato, indagando en cuestiones que le inquieten o tratando de entender y apreciar todo lo que le rodea; así como ser una exhalación en el mundo, correr y devorar su entorno, la realidad. Seguimos sus aventuras, en la escuela, en su casa, con sus compañeras. Pero hay algo que no terminó de convencerme: el tono y perfilación de Lilus Kikus, así como la narrativa, no lograron atraparme. Y si bien hace buenas descripciones, lo encontré un poquito aburrido.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Magnolia Blanca

    De mi amada infancia, que estos libros hicieron mejor...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alejandradavilah

    Una visión infantil del mundo, llena de la magia, la inocencia y la simplicidad con la que se prciben las cosas a esa edad.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stella

    Qué bonitos recuerdos de la infancia! Y no fue hasta que crecí que pude pronunciar correctamente el apellido de la autora!! :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Lilus Kikus series are excellent - sort of like ANIMAL FARM in that you can interpret it on two levels and it's good reading on either one. It's chock full of interesting imagery and social commentaries. The introduction section to this (written by a different author), however, is way too long and wordy for my taste (it's about 1/3 of the book) and spoils all the stories. It's like a high school literature analysis essay -- one of those ones where you have to pick an author and compare 3 of her Lilus Kikus series are excellent - sort of like ANIMAL FARM in that you can interpret it on two levels and it's good reading on either one. It's chock full of interesting imagery and social commentaries. The introduction section to this (written by a different author), however, is way too long and wordy for my taste (it's about 1/3 of the book) and spoils all the stories. It's like a high school literature analysis essay -- one of those ones where you have to pick an author and compare 3 of her works -- but with more formal language. The other (not Lilus Kikus) short stories are hit and miss. I did like some of them, but others, such as "Happiness" was written in a style that just did not work for me. These stories are more absurdist, ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD style.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Flores

    "Lilus Kikus" relata la parvulez de la escritora y periodista Elena Poniatowska; para muchos, es una de las etapas más apoteósicas que existen en la vida del ser. Para infortunio mío, no conecté con este relato; alguna vez compartí que sólo dos libros de la autora me gustan... pero éste, no. Aun así, invito al lector a que lo lea y comparta su opinión; yo, dispuesto siempre a leerle. Un amplexo para todos, mis mejores deseos. "Lilus Kikus" relata la parvulez de la escritora y periodista Elena Poniatowska; para muchos, es una de las etapas más apoteósicas que existen en la vida del ser. Para infortunio mío, no conecté con este relato; alguna vez compartí que sólo dos libros de la autora me gustan... pero éste, no. Aun así, invito al lector a que lo lea y comparta su opinión; yo, dispuesto siempre a leerle. Un amplexo para todos, mis mejores deseos.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Martha Graciela

    Este libro llegó a nuestra biblioteca como regalo por el nacimiento de mi hija. Mientras lo leía pensaba en ella todo el tiempo, en que seguramente va a tener un espíritu libre y puro como el de Lilus Kikus. No es una gran historia, pero es simple y está bien escrita, los dibujos de Leonora Carrington no tienen desperdicio y debido a ellos es que le doy tres estrellas al libro.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Delgado

    El mundo de los niños es usualmente idealizado por los adultos. En este relato, tal idealización aparece como fuerza opresora a la imaginación y voluntad de una niña, a quien se le roba la niñez a la vez que se le impone un futuro convencional dentro de la rigidez de la iglesia católica. Esta edición cuenta con geniales ilustraciones por la genial Leonora Carrington.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pame

    Hubo cuentos que me gustaron mucho, otros no tanto. partes que me llenaron de ternura y otros de desacuerdo y molestia. A mi gusto tiene mejores libros, pero es una joya que esté ilustrado por la gran Leonora C. Tal vez en algún otro momento lo vuelva a leer y piense diferente de ahora.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    What a sweet story. It reminds me of "Un tal Lucas" by Julio Cortázar. I loved reading the little incidents mentioned and seeing the illustrations by Leonora Carrington - so glad I ran into this. It's one of those simple stories that seems like a kids book but has so much more if you care to look for it. Very worth reading. What a sweet story. It reminds me of "Un tal Lucas" by Julio Cortázar. I loved reading the little incidents mentioned and seeing the illustrations by Leonora Carrington - so glad I ran into this. It's one of those simple stories that seems like a kids book but has so much more if you care to look for it. Very worth reading.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elias Betancurt

    Soy admirador de la obra de Leonora Carrington. Por tal motivo, decidí revisar esta versión ilustrada de Lilus Kikus. Elena Poniatowska posee una maravillosa habilidad de crear bellísimas imágenes a través de las palabras.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Reads & Rambles

    3.5 - Loved the title story, the others were good but didn't leave as much of an impression. Will definitely look out for more of this author though. 3.5 - Loved the title story, the others were good but didn't leave as much of an impression. Will definitely look out for more of this author though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carlos Alejandro

    I would describe it as a lovely and weirdy piece of book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Are Rana

    Me parece muy bello saber que las grandes amigas Leonara y Elena trabajaron juntas ❤

  22. 4 out of 5

    Iván Sandoval

    Lilus Kikus es una niña muy entrometida y divertida que trata de encontrar un sentido al mundo.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leidy Laura

    Espectacular el modo de escritura que maneja Elena en este libro, es verdaderamente mágico

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebeca

    Poniatowska wrote it in 1954 great short story and way ahead of it's time. Ladies read it Poniatowska wrote it in 1954 great short story and way ahead of it's time. Ladies read it

  25. 5 out of 5

    Iván

    Lo empecé a leer hace unos años en una biblioteca movil y me pareció llamativo, ahora pude leerlo completo y no me enganchó como la primera vez, pienso que podría definirse como una oda a la blanquitud. A pesar de todo creo que el estilo narrativo de Poniatowska es interesante .

  26. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    El lector se introduce primero en Lilus cuando ella está jugando afuera. Lilus no le gusta jugar con muñecas (que son tradicionalmente femeninas), en lugar de eso prefiere jugar al doctor y realizar experimentos (tradicionalmente papeles masculinos). A medida que crece, se une a una escuela sólo para chicas donde uno de sus amigas "la borrega", está siendo expulsada por tener sexo antes del matrimonio y con esto haber quedado embarazada. Cuando Lilus está hablando con su vecino de al lado, el fil El lector se introduce primero en Lilus cuando ella está jugando afuera. Lilus no le gusta jugar con muñecas (que son tradicionalmente femeninas), en lugar de eso prefiere jugar al doctor y realizar experimentos (tradicionalmente papeles masculinos). A medida que crece, se une a una escuela sólo para chicas donde uno de sus amigas "la borrega", está siendo expulsada por tener sexo antes del matrimonio y con esto haber quedado embarazada. Cuando Lilus está hablando con su vecino de al lado, el filósofo, dice esto de la borrega: "LA BORREGA, LA BORREGA... DÉJAME PENSAR. AH SÍ, LA FEMINISTA. LA LIBRE PENSADORA... BUENO, LA VIDA COMENZÓ DEMASIADO PRONTO PARA ELLA." Lilus no es ni totalmente femenina ni totalmente masculina, pero ella sabe que no debe tratar de ponerse de pie por los derechos femeninos. Ya que sabe que va a terminar en el exilio como la borrega y decide que es mejor guardar silencio. De hecho, la borrega nació en el período de tiempo equivocado, en los que no se les permite a las mujeres cometer los mismos "pecados" que los hombres o mantener las mismas posiciones. Tienen el propósito de ser hermosa, vivaz y sumisa. "ADEMÁS, LILUS HABÍA OÍDO DECIR QUE LOS MANIQUÍES ERAN LAS MUJERES MÁS ENCANTADORAS DEL MUNDO." Una de mis partes favoritas de este libro es cuando Lilus está describiendo a su amiga Chiruelita, que es muy inocente. Chiruelita es la imagen perfecta idea de una dama, de una mujer "delicada". Ella termina casándose con un artista y le obedece on facilidad, hasta el día en que ella decide a pensar por sí misma y "con un gesto lánguido, el artista excéntrico retorció el cuello!" Finalmente, Lilus no puede contenerse y se interna en un convento donde ella está completamente oprimida, tanto por el patriarcado como la religión católica. El final es abierto pero el mensaje esta claro: el lugar de la mujer está en el silencio de las voces de los hombres. Todo esto en un libro "de niños". Ya que fue publicado por primera vez en 1954 erróneamente como la novela infantil debido a la edad del protagonista (aunque su edad nunca está claramente definida) y el estilo escrito.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is essentially a book of short stories, though the first half of the book is a novella about the character in the title: Lilus Kikus. This book, according to the introduction, was first written in Spanish, and in some cases some parts of the story are [sometimes obviously] lost in translation (one occasion being Lilus being called a "witch" instead of a "brat"--very different connotations). The stories are well written, though I imagine they would be more delicious if I read them in the This book is essentially a book of short stories, though the first half of the book is a novella about the character in the title: Lilus Kikus. This book, according to the introduction, was first written in Spanish, and in some cases some parts of the story are [sometimes obviously] lost in translation (one occasion being Lilus being called a "witch" instead of a "brat"--very different connotations). The stories are well written, though I imagine they would be more delicious if I read them in their original tongue. Some of the short stories were slow, and Lilus Kikus itself was also a bit laborious to read, but one story stood out in particular. You Arrive By Nightfall was the last story in the compilation, and a wonderful story for the book to finish with. Poniatowska's sassiness, and flowery writing shine through in this piece, instead of a dull glow that emanate within the other stories. Perhaps this is a better novel that I think in Spanish, but alas, that is something I will never know. However, I do hope that one day my stories will be beloved enough, as Poniatowska's certainly are, that there will be a call for them to be translated into Spanish--though hopefully with a translator who could do me justice.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I liked all her spirit, curiosity and originality when she is little. How she sees the world as an interlinked universe that all is alive!!! How beautiful to see the simplicity yet the most important truth.... Feeling is more important that knoweldge, because knowledge is nothing without feeling. But when religion gets in the way it smothers and finally kills her true spirit, so Lilus Kikus learns to follow signs and live in fear. Point ...RELIGION = KILLING YOUR TRUE SELF TO BE A SLAVE MOVED BY I liked all her spirit, curiosity and originality when she is little. How she sees the world as an interlinked universe that all is alive!!! How beautiful to see the simplicity yet the most important truth.... Feeling is more important that knoweldge, because knowledge is nothing without feeling. But when religion gets in the way it smothers and finally kills her true spirit, so Lilus Kikus learns to follow signs and live in fear. Point ...RELIGION = KILLING YOUR TRUE SELF TO BE A SLAVE MOVED BY FEAR, BECAUSE YOU NEVER QUIESTION ANYTHING IN RELIGION OR YOU GO TO HELLL... THERE FOR YOU SURVIVE OUT OF FEAR. HORRIBLE, HORRIBLE RELIGION.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gaby

    Este librito está lleno de imaginación por parte de la autora, nos narra de una forma bastante poética (característica de Elena) el paso de la niñez a la pubertad, las preguntas que se hace una niña y las respuestas poco convencionales que se da, si bien es un libro infantil, puede leerse fácilmente y sin menor prejuicio por individuos de cualquier edad, tiene toques de realismo mágico que consiguen una sonrisa y capítulos especialmente divertidos. Lee la reseña completa aquí: https://thevelvetb Este librito está lleno de imaginación por parte de la autora, nos narra de una forma bastante poética (característica de Elena) el paso de la niñez a la pubertad, las preguntas que se hace una niña y las respuestas poco convencionales que se da, si bien es un libro infantil, puede leerse fácilmente y sin menor prejuicio por individuos de cualquier edad, tiene toques de realismo mágico que consiguen una sonrisa y capítulos especialmente divertidos. Lee la reseña completa aquí: https://thevelvetbooks.wordpress.com/...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    3.5/5

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.