web site hit counter The Art Book - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Art Book

Availability: Ready to download

An A to Z guide to 500 great painters and sculptors from medieval to modern times, it debunks art historical classifications by throwing together brilliant examples of all periods, schools, visions and techniques. Each artist is represented by a full-page colour plate of a definitive work, accompanied by explanatory and illuminating information on the image and its creator An A to Z guide to 500 great painters and sculptors from medieval to modern times, it debunks art historical classifications by throwing together brilliant examples of all periods, schools, visions and techniques. Each artist is represented by a full-page colour plate of a definitive work, accompanied by explanatory and illuminating information on the image and its creator. Glossaries of artistic movements and technical terms are included, making this a valuable work of reference as well as a feast for the eyes. By breaking with traditional classifications, The Art Book presents a fresh and original approach to art: an unparalleled visual sourcebook and a celebration of our rich and multi-faceted culture.


Compare

An A to Z guide to 500 great painters and sculptors from medieval to modern times, it debunks art historical classifications by throwing together brilliant examples of all periods, schools, visions and techniques. Each artist is represented by a full-page colour plate of a definitive work, accompanied by explanatory and illuminating information on the image and its creator An A to Z guide to 500 great painters and sculptors from medieval to modern times, it debunks art historical classifications by throwing together brilliant examples of all periods, schools, visions and techniques. Each artist is represented by a full-page colour plate of a definitive work, accompanied by explanatory and illuminating information on the image and its creator. Glossaries of artistic movements and technical terms are included, making this a valuable work of reference as well as a feast for the eyes. By breaking with traditional classifications, The Art Book presents a fresh and original approach to art: an unparalleled visual sourcebook and a celebration of our rich and multi-faceted culture.

30 review for The Art Book

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    Much to my husband's dismay, I took the binding off this book and put each page in a page protector; it now takes up two binders. But now, for $19.95 plus page protectors and binders, I have over 500 pieces of art that can be passed around my classroom. Well, most of them can be passed around my classroom. I'm struggling with the nudity. Why is it more acceptable to me in an ancient Greek statue than in modern art? Hmmmmm... Much to my husband's dismay, I took the binding off this book and put each page in a page protector; it now takes up two binders. But now, for $19.95 plus page protectors and binders, I have over 500 pieces of art that can be passed around my classroom. Well, most of them can be passed around my classroom. I'm struggling with the nudity. Why is it more acceptable to me in an ancient Greek statue than in modern art? Hmmmmm...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I've always wanted to learn more about art and art history, and this was a good sampling. It takes 500 different artists and shows one work from each of them. It was a nice introduction to artists I hadn't heard of before, and it gave a brief synopsis of the work and the artist. This isn't an in-depth exploration. It often left me wanting more -- I expected this book to serve as a jump-off point, so that's a good thing. I flagged dozens of pages to research further. I should note that, being an a I've always wanted to learn more about art and art history, and this was a good sampling. It takes 500 different artists and shows one work from each of them. It was a nice introduction to artists I hadn't heard of before, and it gave a brief synopsis of the work and the artist. This isn't an in-depth exploration. It often left me wanting more -- I expected this book to serve as a jump-off point, so that's a good thing. I flagged dozens of pages to research further. I should note that, being an art book, there is a bit of nudity in here. Some of it is artful and appropriate, but there were some that I felt the artist used only for shock value. But that's an entirely different debate... Note: there are two versions of this book: A large coffee-table sized one published in 1994, and a smaller pocket-sized one published in 2005. I read the big one, which was nice, because the pictures were full-page and I could see them well.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maria Panteli

    I got this as a gift recently and I must say it's amazing. I am a bit of an art geek and I always have been. I enjoy this book because of the variety of different artists in it; all of which have contributed to my fascination with art in some way. I know some of the artists pretty well and some are completely new to me, and I love that. I could spend hours just flicking through this book and still not have read/studied it completely. I don't think I'll ever get bored of this book. It would make I got this as a gift recently and I must say it's amazing. I am a bit of an art geek and I always have been. I enjoy this book because of the variety of different artists in it; all of which have contributed to my fascination with art in some way. I know some of the artists pretty well and some are completely new to me, and I love that. I could spend hours just flicking through this book and still not have read/studied it completely. I don't think I'll ever get bored of this book. It would make a great gift or coffee table book too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Plain and simple: This was the book that made me fall in love with the visual arts. Almost every time I went to the library as a girl, I would borrow this book. I would sit and look at it for hours, never getting bored with it. I still haven't purchased this book for my collection, but I am planning on it soon! Plain and simple: This was the book that made me fall in love with the visual arts. Almost every time I went to the library as a girl, I would borrow this book. I would sit and look at it for hours, never getting bored with it. I still haven't purchased this book for my collection, but I am planning on it soon!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was really an interesting concept. Hundreds of artists, drawn from many times, movements, places, one page spread per artist--one work, one short explanation, a little attempt to locate the artist in time and movement. I couldn't stay out of this at work--we kept going back, opening it up, arguing over whether the work chosen was the right one. That was a lot of fun. (Weeping Woman for Picasso???? Ceci n'est pas un pipe for Magritte? Really?) I must say, it did help that I was pretty famili This was really an interesting concept. Hundreds of artists, drawn from many times, movements, places, one page spread per artist--one work, one short explanation, a little attempt to locate the artist in time and movement. I couldn't stay out of this at work--we kept going back, opening it up, arguing over whether the work chosen was the right one. That was a lot of fun. (Weeping Woman for Picasso???? Ceci n'est pas un pipe for Magritte? Really?) I must say, it did help that I was pretty familiar with most of the movements. It might have been tough to follow a narrative if I had had no idea about who was who. And one other caveat--this might not be a good choice for a conservative homeschool family. In addition to a large number of classical nudes, to which I have less objection, there are also quite a few more modern ones some of which I would not want my kids to see. But this was really, really fun and if you have a friend or two that knows a little bit about artists, you can have some really, really fun discussions/arguments/lively conversations about the artwork choices.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    Small book but with quality, glossy pages. All the works are in color. What is interesting about this book (and by the way, I think there is a larger edition), is that, instead of listing artists and art chronologically, they are listed in Alphabetical order. Thus, a painting from the Renaissance is next to the work from a 20th century modern abstractionist. It makes for some interesting comparisons.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diana Habashneh

    very simple, a photo of the artist work, brief about the artist it gives you hints, not very helpful but it's a joy to the eye, you can like a painting or a sculpture and go do the research yourself, witch is not a bad idea after all, that is not a bad idea after all very simple, a photo of the artist work, brief about the artist it gives you hints, not very helpful but it's a joy to the eye, you can like a painting or a sculpture and go do the research yourself, witch is not a bad idea after all, that is not a bad idea after all

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anton Klink

    This book sets out to present one work of art from 500 different artist. This sounds good in theory, but since all the artists and their one work of art are listed alphabetically, the end result is eclectic and chaotic. This would have been a much better book, had the same contents been arranged chronologically or at least thematically. As it stands though, the paintings (there are a few sculptures and installations here and there, but I will mostly refer to just paintings) jump all over the pla This book sets out to present one work of art from 500 different artist. This sounds good in theory, but since all the artists and their one work of art are listed alphabetically, the end result is eclectic and chaotic. This would have been a much better book, had the same contents been arranged chronologically or at least thematically. As it stands though, the paintings (there are a few sculptures and installations here and there, but I will mostly refer to just paintings) jump all over the place in time and subject. It also seems unfair to have some amazing, iconic painters reduced to just one work of art, which is hardly representative of their overall contribution, whereas others (especially some of the more contemporary artists) could easily have been left out of the book altogether. The print quality might have been ok 20 years ago (my copy is the 1994 large format coffee table version, not the more recent 2005 pocket size edition), but is below average by today's standards. The resolution is acceptable, but the colours are quite dull. Also Many of the photos also display a strange yellow and orange colour cast, making the paintings look worse than they should. The captions provide adequate details both about the paintings and the artists. You will learn a detail or two about the paintings, the lives of the artists and even a few fun facts every now and then. It is somewhat sad though to read references to all sorts of other paintings done by the same artists. The format of the book dictates that we can only see one painting per artist and to see the rest, we would have to turn to other books or the internet. The selection of artists has a decidedly Western and Christian bias. There are a few Japanese and South-American artists here and there, but the overwhelming majority are from mainland Europe and English speaking countries. Also the depicted scenes (at least until the beginning of the 20th century) are from either Roman or Christian mythology or Western European aristocratic and everyday life. After a while, seeing the same scenes over and over again, even if depicted by different artists, becomes quite monotonous and boring. The book covers a vast range of genres. As a consequence, you may find your favourite genres either under-represented or too many examples from genres you don't care about. I found myself paying closer attention to the art from around the 16th until the middle of the 19th century, which I consider the golden age and pinnacle of painting. Art from before the 16th century is a bit too simplistic for my taste and with the rise of photography in the 19th century, painting seems to have lost focus and spiralled into an identity crisis, from which it has yet to recover. Impressionism was as an interesting experiment and the last of the tolerable departures from traditional painting, but everything after that - I just found myself turning the pages without even looking at the names of the authors of yet another solid cube, formless splatter or weird installation. It is a matter of taste of course, but I found too much art I didn't care for and thus will most likely not be keeping the book. There are also some fairly obvious errors in the book, where the captions talk about one painting, but the picture is of a completely different one altogether. One example is on page 98. The picture is of a beautiful landscape painting by the venerated landscape artist Frederic Church. However the captions talk about an active volcano Cotopaxi supposedly being in the painting, which actually is nowhere to be found. Only a Google image search turns out another equally impressive painting by the same artist, where a volcano named Cotopaxi can be clearly seen, but it is obviously a completely different painting from the one in the book. I caught the error purely by chance just by browsing around and I haven't read the captions of all the art pieces, so who knows, how many similar errors are in the book. In conclusion, with either a chronological or thematical arrangement, this would have made a passable art book. Unfortunately the paintings are arranged alphabetically by artists, which provides for a very chaotic reading experience. If you take it as a coffee book only to browse here and there, this book is ok, even if the quality of the repros is below average. If however you are interested in only certain time periods or art styles, you'd be better off purchasing a more focused book with better quality prints. If however you want to own just one book on art, I recommend the immeasurably better and magnificent "Art" by DK, which is my opinion is one the best books on art ever published.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maia Sinclair

    I just luvvvv this book. i carry it around whenever i have to travel because it is fun to read and reread. it teaches you a lot about art in accessible and convenient way. Just the kind of book you like reading. hours can pass by and you barely notice it. :) luv it!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thuraya Batterjee

    this book presents a fresh and original approach to art. It is an essential reference to those of us who are always looking for inspiration.. And a good visual sourcebook too..

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    So if you re-titled this, "The (Almost Entirely Western) Painting and Sculpture (14th - 20th Century) Book, you'd know what you're in for - but it's not exactly pithy. Only the "Painting and Sculpture" part is openly acknowledged by the editors. The rest is deduced from what actually appears in the book, which is an alphabetically arranged list of 500 artists with one image each and a paragraph or two of annotation about the artist and the work displayed. There's also basic biographical details So if you re-titled this, "The (Almost Entirely Western) Painting and Sculpture (14th - 20th Century) Book, you'd know what you're in for - but it's not exactly pithy. Only the "Painting and Sculpture" part is openly acknowledged by the editors. The rest is deduced from what actually appears in the book, which is an alphabetically arranged list of 500 artists with one image each and a paragraph or two of annotation about the artist and the work displayed. There's also basic biographical details and information on the chosen image. As the editors note, the alphabetical arrangement leads to some startling contrasts since proximate works in the book can be separated by centuries and continents in terms of their actual production. This was actually quite fun, just look elsewhere for an education on how everything fits together conceptually, geographically and historically. 500 entries gives room for all the most famous artists (given the constraints of my alternative title) with plenty of space left over for people I had not heard of, some of whom piqued my interest. It was also pleasing to find women represented as far back as the 1600s, their work being of a quality matching that of the book generally. Great for flipping through - a perfect "coffee table" book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Love this book - it is alphabetical order of artists, with a picture of their work, and some biological detail. I particularly love the big version, that I saw at a school. The mini version I have at home is a bit small for some of the detail to come through.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tidar Rachmadi

    I guess, no real artits really read this art book. But, this book is very artsy on the cover and 1000 times more artsy inside. And best of all, it's from Phaidon. I guess, no real artits really read this art book. But, this book is very artsy on the cover and 1000 times more artsy inside. And best of all, it's from Phaidon.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    This really should have been called The Western Art Book. There is only one Asian artist represented, and Latin America is limited to a few Cubans and Mexicans. Everyone else is completely absent. Unlike other reviews, I actually liked the alphabetical arrangement of the artists, as it really demonstrated the diversity of the North American and European art tradition. You have this on one page and this on the next. This really should have been called The Western Art Book. There is only one Asian artist represented, and Latin America is limited to a few Cubans and Mexicans. Everyone else is completely absent. Unlike other reviews, I actually liked the alphabetical arrangement of the artists, as it really demonstrated the diversity of the North American and European art tradition. You have this on one page and this on the next.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    I was required to take an art appreciation class in college to graduate--and I loved it! So getting this book was a natural follow-up. It won Illustrated Book of the Year and is in the Top Five Popular Art Books on Goodreads. As stated in the introduction, this book is "an A to Z guide to 500 great painters and sculptors from medieval to modern times." It's that classic coffee table book--I even recently spotted it on a list for the best of the kind. I'm not the kind that collects those--in fact I was required to take an art appreciation class in college to graduate--and I loved it! So getting this book was a natural follow-up. It won Illustrated Book of the Year and is in the Top Five Popular Art Books on Goodreads. As stated in the introduction, this book is "an A to Z guide to 500 great painters and sculptors from medieval to modern times." It's that classic coffee table book--I even recently spotted it on a list for the best of the kind. I'm not the kind that collects those--in fact this is the only book of the kind I own. But if any such book should be part of every home, surely its an art book like this one, where the great Western artists and (alas only) one of their representative masterpieces is laid before you. This is also by far the heaviest book I own--you could do strength training with it--but it's worth its weight. A real keeper.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bogdi

    It would be a mistake to take this book for what it is not: a serious, in-depth treatise on art. No, it's a picture book that gives almost twitter-like info on artists. Every artist included has one picture/one chance to make an impression on the public (art novices). The good things about it: the wealth of periods it hits on and the quality of the reproductions, to say nothing of its size (I have the pocket size version, in case there are others). I also enjoyed the little gimmick: listing artis It would be a mistake to take this book for what it is not: a serious, in-depth treatise on art. No, it's a picture book that gives almost twitter-like info on artists. Every artist included has one picture/one chance to make an impression on the public (art novices). The good things about it: the wealth of periods it hits on and the quality of the reproductions, to say nothing of its size (I have the pocket size version, in case there are others). I also enjoyed the little gimmick: listing artists in alphabetical order juxtaposes somebody like Lorenzo Lotto with Louis Morris. It reminds me of a similar encyclopedia of painting I used as a young teen. This might similarly spur young art lovers to explore further.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    It gives an over view of art and some important works. Information on the art contained in the book is limited but enables you to go look further. Also lists contact details for major Galleries in the back. My copy is a small version however the photos of the art work are printed clearly and you can see all the textures of the paintings as well. Make sure this isn't your only art book in your library, but definately a good place to start when loking for reference, or pictures, or styles, or what It gives an over view of art and some important works. Information on the art contained in the book is limited but enables you to go look further. Also lists contact details for major Galleries in the back. My copy is a small version however the photos of the art work are printed clearly and you can see all the textures of the paintings as well. Make sure this isn't your only art book in your library, but definately a good place to start when loking for reference, or pictures, or styles, or whatever you are looking for.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Robinson

    I love this little goodie. At least mine is little, I think they made two sizes. It's great to flip through. When needing inspiration or just procrastinating. It's fun to discover a new artist or new work by one you've known. I love this little goodie. At least mine is little, I think they made two sizes. It's great to flip through. When needing inspiration or just procrastinating. It's fun to discover a new artist or new work by one you've known.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gahermi class 5-12

    This book is hands down amazing. [image error] This book is hands down amazing. [image error]

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ying

    that book is very good, in this book your can learn more about the art and in this book have something is so surprised for me. one is for the this book have 500 different artists and shows one work from each of them. other thing is for the the art have mandy year's old and have mandy people want to learn more about art. this book can for some one didn't know art and that can geive some one want to learn word art thay can read that book. that book is very good, in this book your can learn more about the art and in this book have something is so surprised for me. one is for the this book have 500 different artists and shows one work from each of them. other thing is for the the art have mandy year's old and have mandy people want to learn more about art. this book can for some one didn't know art and that can geive some one want to learn word art thay can read that book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    ^

    The perfect prescription for someone who thinks Kupka might have something to do with the continuing cup-cake craze. A artist, a picture, a critique, a list of recommendations to other artists of the same school. A pared down minimalistic approach which works. And pocket sized too (a wide pocket). Educational and, what's better, memorable. The perfect prescription for someone who thinks Kupka might have something to do with the continuing cup-cake craze. A artist, a picture, a critique, a list of recommendations to other artists of the same school. A pared down minimalistic approach which works. And pocket sized too (a wide pocket). Educational and, what's better, memorable.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book helped me as an art novice to get a feel for certain artists and styles. The pictures are of a very good quality and the book itself is a monster. It was fun flipping through this and getting snippets about various artists and genres. Each page has a reference to similar artists, giving one the opportunity to keep in theme if desired and learn about related artists.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lavinia

    Remember how this book was seen throughout the whole Friends series? First at Central Perk, then at Monica's. Now it's on my shelf, thanks to Patty :) It's actually a nice read if you're into arts and stuff, and of course I cannot brag for reading it, rather browsed through. Remember how this book was seen throughout the whole Friends series? First at Central Perk, then at Monica's. Now it's on my shelf, thanks to Patty :) It's actually a nice read if you're into arts and stuff, and of course I cannot brag for reading it, rather browsed through.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    An everyday book for Everyman. Quite nice for the coffee table or for the kids to flick through. It does what the title says so probably deserves 5 stars but it lacks sufficient depth or enquiry for my tastes..

  25. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Though it might frustrate those looking for an in-depth analysis, The Art Book is great for casual appreciation or anyone who doesn't know where to start. I personally enjoyed the huge variety of wildly different pieces sitting side by side. Though it might frustrate those looking for an in-depth analysis, The Art Book is great for casual appreciation or anyone who doesn't know where to start. I personally enjoyed the huge variety of wildly different pieces sitting side by side.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J.p. Jones

    Great little book if you take it for what it is - something to dip into to stimulate ideas or discussion... or simply pages to flick through to look at interesting works of art. Not for the academics, but that's part of the appeal. Great little book if you take it for what it is - something to dip into to stimulate ideas or discussion... or simply pages to flick through to look at interesting works of art. Not for the academics, but that's part of the appeal.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I refer to this little book quite often. I am always looking for artists and their styles. I keep it very handy. It's a must have. I refer to this little book quite often. I am always looking for artists and their styles. I keep it very handy. It's a must have.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Todd Pack

    This is a nifty little book (or a nifty big book, if you have the hardcover edition). It only scratches the surface, but it covers a lot of ground. It's a wonderful book for browsing. This is a nifty little book (or a nifty big book, if you have the hardcover edition). It only scratches the surface, but it covers a lot of ground. It's a wonderful book for browsing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nickdepenpan123

    I think this is perhaps the best format for art books introducing artists. A couple of lines about the artist, a couple of lines about the artwork, a couple of lines about the historical context, and that's it, the art can speak for itself after that. A small detail, I wish the artwork dates were moved from the bottom to the top (next to the artwork's title and artist's name), so one has seen all the info/context before checking out the art. Reading the book, it's difficult to ignore a theme whic I think this is perhaps the best format for art books introducing artists. A couple of lines about the artist, a couple of lines about the artwork, a couple of lines about the historical context, and that's it, the art can speak for itself after that. A small detail, I wish the artwork dates were moved from the bottom to the top (next to the artwork's title and artist's name), so one has seen all the info/context before checking out the art. Reading the book, it's difficult to ignore a theme which comes up repeatedly, so many artists seem to be even more manifesto loving, social driven creatures than some stereotypes suggest. So many times, the artist is described to follow philosophy/school A, then switches to philosophy/school B, or idolizes artist/mentor C, then switches to artist/mentor D, or creates a clique E, then switches to collective F, and so it goes. I don't think you get to see that so much in other art forms (for example, with writers or even musicians), where usually, the serious artists dislike (or at least claim to dislike) the notion of genres, tribes or ideology. Anyway, art is different, it requires technical skill (well, see subsequent paragraphs on that), and comes from a tradition of manual workmanship, perhaps it makes sense that when the apprenticeship system weakened amidst the social changes of the modern age, substitute forms would take its place. Another observation, from someone with a lack of knowledge in art, it's interesting how artists seem to fall either above or below a very narrow threshold. Above there are a relatively small number of very familiar names, classic and (semi) modern artists such as Botticelli, Chagall, Dali, Van Gogh, Hogarth, Klimt, Matisse, Miro, Munch, Picasso, Turner. And then there are so many names (in a book that's supposed to be a very basic introduction as well), which to this layman here at least meant almost nothing, usually not even a feeling of vague recognition of the name. It's for such an audience/reader that this book is great, to get acquainted (to pick a sample of names) to "older" (say, born before mid nineteenth century) artists like Hendrick Avercamp, Honore Daumier, Atkinson Grimshaw, John Martin, Jean Francois Millet, and also more modern ones (again, a biased sample of some I found extra memorable) like Max Beckmann, Victor Brauner, Edward Burra, Paul Delvaux, Otto Dix, Raoul Dufy, James Ensor, George Grosz, Gwen John, Wifredo Lam, Laurence Stephen Lowry, Roberto Matta, Paul Nash, Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo, Alfred Wallis, Carel Weight. For one who knows most of these names, I doubt this book will be of value. What makes the book loose seriousness is the tendency of the editors to select laughable modern or conceptual art. I don't blame them, if the art world considers some artists as masters, then who am I to judge. OK, I judge. Especially since the rest of the review is more of a rant, for personal indulgence/reference, including funny/pretentious quotes from the book at the end. The inevitable juxtaposition of different eras/periods (since the entries are alphabetical), creates an unintentionally comical and sad effect. You get the high art of Caravaggio's "doubting Thomas" followed by Caro's "rape of the sabines" (or for a better title, "a hoarder visits a scrapyard"). To quote an amusing and absurd part from the description, "Caro didn't transform his materials into something else". So what did he do? While reading this book, I couldn't help but drag the "joke" with more "better title" aphorisms, this got boring quickly but I write some here. Beuys, felt suit (I didn't feel anything, suit yourself). Buren, two levels (I sentence this column to ten years in prison, for contempt of the court of aesthetics and public opinion). Arp, leaves and navels, I (navel-gazing, I). Broodthaers, casserole and closed mussels (too much to handle, pun-ish me now). Burri, sacco (something fundamental is missing here and it's not Vanzetti). Albers, homage to the square (dommage, to despair). Andre, zinc magnesium plain (tile rust elaborate). Baumeister, mortaruru with red overhead (Willi by name, Baumeister by nature, or vice versa, just too easy, so no retitling. You'd think someone with such a fantastic three in one name would be extra self-conscious to do serious work). Boltanski, reserve of dead Swiss (your reservation has been cancelled. Is that even legal by the way, using photographs of dead people from local newspapers for the unauthorized purpose of an art installation? I'd normally laugh at the artwork's description but considering the topic, the blurb angered me instead "in previous works, Boltanski had used photographs of Jewish children. Here, by using images of the Swiss, a race associated with neutrality rather than a specific and terrible fate, Boltanski lays greater emphasis on the universality of mortality"). Calder, lobster trap and fishtail (interesting to see the use of the word mobile in art in a pre cellphone era. "Calder was the inventor of the mobile in 1932". What is more of an abomination, comparing the older or recent creation, I can't decide). Another amusing/sad detail, you can tell from each entry's blurb how good/bad the art is going to be. If the blurb is actually describing the painting or has some psychological/social context, chances are something imaginative or skillful follows and that something is from the nineteenth century or earlier. If the blurb is talking about symbols, concepts, ideas and the philosophy of the artist, chances are something ridiculous follows and that something is from the twentieth century (with exceptions of course, the century has had its share of impressive artists). I guess I'm being narrow-minded at best or philistine at worse, anyway these are old criticisms that others have expressed better. I vaguely remember many eloquent, fun lines from Tom Wolfe's "painted world" on the topic. Although in the spirit of negativity in this review, I also remember extremely repetitious blah blah, and what should have been a brief, fun, ranty article, not a "proper" book. Yet, let's find something good to quote from it from Wikiquote (and as it turns out, even the quote on its own is repetitive). "In the beginning we got rid of nineteenth century storybook realism. Then we got rid of representational objects. Then we got rid of the third dimension altogether and got really flat (abstract expressionism). Then we got rid of airiness, brushstrokes, most of the paint, and the last viruses of drawing and complicated designs". "There, at last, it was! No more realism, no more representation objects, no more lines, colours, forms, and contours, no more pigments, no more brushstrokes. Art made its final flight, climbed higher and higher in an ever decreasing tighter turning spiral until... It disappeared up its own fundamental aperture. And came out the other side as art theory! Art theory pure and simple, words on a page, literature undefiled by vision. Late twentieth century modern art was about to fulfil its destiny, which was to become nothing less than literature pure and simple". But ironically, the editors and the artists themselves unashamedly express the same points in a language/philosophy that's more ridiculous than any writer's satire. I copy here some of the earnest fawning quotes/blurbs from the book. Excerpt. [The "artwork" is an arrangement of plain, identical boxes, attached to a wall like shelves]. This sculpture [...] demonstrates Judd's simplification of shape, volume, colour and surface, and reduces art to its basic essential, the cube. Minimalist in style, like all his other pieces, the work is deliberately intended not to represent, imitate or express anything. Nor is it composed in any traditional sense. To achieve minimal personal contact with his work, the metal or plexiglass boxes he used were put together in a factory, spray painted and placed in position by other people. All his pieces were called untitled and were as plain as possible because he believed that a work of art should be looked at as a whole. Malevich was the founder of suprematism, a system which strove to achieve absolute purity of form and colour. For him, this method constituted an expression of pure artistic feeling, or what he called non-objective sensation. In 1918, he took the development of non-objective art to its logical conclusion in a series of works entitled "white on white", consisting of a white square on a white background, the abstract to end all abstracts. Realizing at this point that he could take the concept no further, he reverted to figurative paintings. Merz was an exponent of "arte povera", a new form of conceptual art developed in Italy in the 1960s, which aimed at disassociating artistic creation from the notion of high culture. As the name suggests, the defining criteria for arte povera were poverty and lack of refinement, whether of means, materials or effect. Banality was raised to the level of art and commonplace objects were invested with metaphysical significance. Noland leaves a large area unpainted in order to achieve maximum visual intensity. He was one of the first artists to exploit the possibilities of bare canvas in this way. This is a portrait of Iris Clert if I say so. Robert Rauschenberg. [The telegram sent by the aforementioned artist when requested to paint a portrait, which since then is considered to be the "painting"]. Also a theoretician and teacher, he was adamant that art should be completely separate from life, and life from art, saying "art is art as art and everything else is everything else, art as art is nothing but art". [On another blank canvas. The trick never gets old]. Fasteners form an integral part of the blank composition, which aims to rid the painting of any trace of painterly illusion. The work provides the spectator with an ecstatic tranquillity that's constant in its intensity. It also demonstrates the unique interaction between the flatness of the picture's surface and the wall plane behind. The work's connection with minimalism is demonstrated by the lack of emotion and illusionism in the painting's construction. Ryman's work concentrates on emphasizing the qualities of the materials used, both the paint itself and its support (canvas, plastic, aluminium and so on). From the mid 1960s, he's used exclusively white paint, so as not to distract attention from these concerns. He continues to experiment with a wide range of media and brushstrokes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zainab Ammar

    This book is simply a masterpiece. I love it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.