web site hit counter Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of a Global Empire - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of a Global Empire

Availability: Ready to download

Almost ten years ago, Bloomberg journalist Brad Stone captured the rise of Amazon in his bestseller The Everything Store. Since then, Amazon has expanded exponentially, inventing novel products like Alexa and disrupting countless industries, while its workforce has quintupled in size and its valuation has soared to well over a trillion dollars. Jeff Bezos’s empire, once ho Almost ten years ago, Bloomberg journalist Brad Stone captured the rise of Amazon in his bestseller The Everything Store. Since then, Amazon has expanded exponentially, inventing novel products like Alexa and disrupting countless industries, while its workforce has quintupled in size and its valuation has soared to well over a trillion dollars. Jeff Bezos’s empire, once housed in a garage, now spans the globe. Between services like Whole Foods, Prime Video, and Amazon’s cloud computing unit, AWS, plus Bezos’s ownership of The Washington Post, it’s impossible to go a day without encountering its impact. We live in a world run, supplied, and controlled by Amazon and its iconoclast founder. In Amazon Unbound, Brad Stone presents a deeply reported, vividly drawn portrait of how a retail upstart became one of the most powerful and feared entities in the global economy. Stone also probes the evolution of Bezos himself—who started as a geeky technologist totally devoted to building Amazon, but who transformed to become a fit, disciplined billionaire with global ambitions; who ruled Amazon with an iron fist, even as he found his personal life splashed over the tabloids.


Compare

Almost ten years ago, Bloomberg journalist Brad Stone captured the rise of Amazon in his bestseller The Everything Store. Since then, Amazon has expanded exponentially, inventing novel products like Alexa and disrupting countless industries, while its workforce has quintupled in size and its valuation has soared to well over a trillion dollars. Jeff Bezos’s empire, once ho Almost ten years ago, Bloomberg journalist Brad Stone captured the rise of Amazon in his bestseller The Everything Store. Since then, Amazon has expanded exponentially, inventing novel products like Alexa and disrupting countless industries, while its workforce has quintupled in size and its valuation has soared to well over a trillion dollars. Jeff Bezos’s empire, once housed in a garage, now spans the globe. Between services like Whole Foods, Prime Video, and Amazon’s cloud computing unit, AWS, plus Bezos’s ownership of The Washington Post, it’s impossible to go a day without encountering its impact. We live in a world run, supplied, and controlled by Amazon and its iconoclast founder. In Amazon Unbound, Brad Stone presents a deeply reported, vividly drawn portrait of how a retail upstart became one of the most powerful and feared entities in the global economy. Stone also probes the evolution of Bezos himself—who started as a geeky technologist totally devoted to building Amazon, but who transformed to become a fit, disciplined billionaire with global ambitions; who ruled Amazon with an iron fist, even as he found his personal life splashed over the tabloids.

30 review for Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of a Global Empire

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sudarshan

    Riveting. Enthralling. Difficult to put down. I promised myself that I won’t finish this book within a day and I embarrassingly broke that promise by a couple of hours. I am a huge admirer of Jeff Bezos. Amazon has been a pioneer in an array of fields, AI, retail, e-commerce, Cloud Computing, a list of fields which is frankly too long to list here. But my key takeaway from this book is that Jeff Bezos has pioneered the culture of invention. He is an innovator at innovating itself. The book goes i Riveting. Enthralling. Difficult to put down. I promised myself that I won’t finish this book within a day and I embarrassingly broke that promise by a couple of hours. I am a huge admirer of Jeff Bezos. Amazon has been a pioneer in an array of fields, AI, retail, e-commerce, Cloud Computing, a list of fields which is frankly too long to list here. But my key takeaway from this book is that Jeff Bezos has pioneered the culture of invention. He is an innovator at innovating itself. The book goes into excruciating details into Amazon’s unparalleled success in the second decade of the 21st century driven by products like Alexa, AWS, Prime etc. Each products frenetic launch, its genesis is very carefully researched by the author. Although the world only gets to know about Amazon’s successes, there have been quite a few failures like Fire Phone whose history has been explored in detail. My personal favourite from this book were the war stories that members of the S-team had. The cutthroat politics they encountered, the insane deadlines that the hard taskmaster Bezos had set for them, these experiences altered their professional and quite frequently their personal lives as well. All the major events of the second decade of 21st century, involving Amazon have been covered. Fire phone fiasco, the Alexa launch, AWS stupendous profitability, Prime and Amazon Studio’s spectacular success, Blue Origin and many many more. Finally, the subject of the book, Jeffrey Preston Bezos has received a good hard look. His transformation from an inventive, geeky family man to muscled billionaire who jet sets across the world with his Hollywood celebrity mistress. No stone was left uncovered covering his divorce and infidelity and his sudden transformation from the former to latter. Although the author only covers what is already known to the public. On the whole, it’s rightfully adulatory of Bezos and Amazon because of Amazon’s exploding market capitalisation and subsequently the explosion in Bezos’s wealth. In the annals of American corporate history, Amazon rightfully would be the most successful and innovative company mankind has seen yet. But it doesn’t shy away from asking the tough questions about Amazon and its effects on small retailers, labour markets, on climate change and its seemingly entrenched role in World economy where every action from buying something online to running servers passes through Amazon and it gets a hefty cut of the transaction. Its increasingly monopolistic power has also been examined although not in too much detail. Lest you the reader think I am Amazon employee, I am not. I am just an incredibly satisfied customer who not surprisingly is writing this review on Goodreads (Amazon subsidiary) after buying this e-book from Amazon and having read it on his second Amazon Kindle.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gary Lang

    This book completely describes the people and the initiatives that were underway or started during my years at Amazon as a VP, and correctly. This is not surprising; Stone's previous book, "The Everything Store" is what influenced me to take the offer Amazon made to me. He is a great writer. This book also describes why I only regret that I did not go to Amazon earlier in my career, rather than just before retirement. When, after my first 6 months, Jeff Wilke asked me what I thought of Amazon, I This book completely describes the people and the initiatives that were underway or started during my years at Amazon as a VP, and correctly. This is not surprising; Stone's previous book, "The Everything Store" is what influenced me to take the offer Amazon made to me. He is a great writer. This book also describes why I only regret that I did not go to Amazon earlier in my career, rather than just before retirement. When, after my first 6 months, Jeff Wilke asked me what I thought of Amazon, I said it was fantastic and that when asked what it was like I often said that Amazon was "10,000 startups knit together by 14 leadership principles". The company is far less top-down driven than what this book seems to suggest. The culture of ownership demands that ownership is pushed downward. But that's a minor flaw in an otherwise excellent book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Viola

    Praise Boss When morning Work bells chime, Praise Boss, for bits of Overtime. Praise Boss, whose Wars we love to fight, Praise Boss, the leech and parasite. AhBoss. - IWW Doxology Interested to read if Brad Stone just fawns over “the richest and therefore must be the smartest” Bossy boots gazillionaite Bezos or dares look at Amazon’s ‘lies, deception and illegal activities’ (Probably not! Like 2021 Academy award winning film Nomadland skip through the exploitation @Amazon described in the original Praise Boss When morning Work bells chime, Praise Boss, for bits of Overtime. Praise Boss, whose Wars we love to fight, Praise Boss, the leech and parasite. AhBoss. - IWW Doxology Interested to read if Brad Stone just fawns over “the richest and therefore must be the smartest” Bossy boots gazillionaite Bezos or dares look at Amazon’s ‘lies, deception and illegal activities’ (Probably not! Like 2021 Academy award winning film Nomadland skip through the exploitation @Amazon described in the original book.) The US union that took on Jeff Bezos in Alabama Hollywood stars, journalists, political leaders, everyone wanted to see an elected union at Amazon’s Bessemer facility in Alabama. Except the workers. Did pressure from Amazon make them say no to union representation? - by Maxime Robin The activists who organised a referendum on unionisation in March at BHM1, the huge Amazon fulfilment centre in Bessemer, Alabama, like to make David and Goliath comparisons. That’s understandable — the warehouse workers, almost all of them African American, took on one of the world’s most powerful companies, owned by Jeff Bezos, the world’s richest man, in one of the US’s most conservative states. But in the Bible, David defeated the giant, while at Amazon, Goliath crushed David. Of the 5,805 employees at the eight-hectare site, only 738 voted for a union, and 1,798 against. Stuart Appelbaum, president of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), immediately challenged the result, accusing Amazon of ‘lies, deception and illegal activities’ to influence the outcome. Having thwarted a previous attempt to unionise in Delaware in 2014, the online retailer has confirmed its reputation as a fortress impregnable to workers’ organisations. In the US, unionising a workplace is an arduous process. An employee must first reach out to a union — in this case a BMH1 employee called the RWDSU last August — which then has to prove to the independent federal labour agency, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), that 30% of on-site workers want to unionise. Then, after a union drive, there’s a vote. And the union battle has to be fought one factory, hypermarket or fast-food outlet at a time: if Bessemer had voted yes, the situation in Amazon’s other fulfilment centres would not have changed. For employees, this process means a long, hard slog and, in the event of defeat, possible reprisals — often dismissal — for those who led the drive. Unsurprisingly, only 6.3% of private-sector workers in the US are in a union. Full article: 3 825 words. Wherever you are, whatever you do there is a Union for you. Notes: (1) ‘Map of Amazon warehouses’, CNBC, 19 January 2020. (2) Karen Weise, ‘Pushed by pandemic, Amazon goes on a hiring spree without equal’, The New York Times, 27 November 2020. (3) Francesca Paris, ‘ “The gaps have grown”: Reporter Alec MacGillis talks Amazon, regional inequality and his hometown of Pittsfield’, Berkshire Eagle, Pittsfield, 7 April 2021. (4) See ‘Presidential results’, 2016 and 2020, National Public Radio. (5) Quoted in Sarah Jones, ‘ “It’s not fair to get fired for going to the bathroom”: An Amazon worker in Alabama on the fight for a union’, New York Magazine, 16 March 2021, www.nymag.com/. (6) See Sylvie Laurent, ‘Martin Luther King fifty years on’, Le Monde diplomatique, English edition, April 2018. (7) Referring to the 1965 marches between Selma and Montgomery to protest against the ban on blacks voting in the US South. (8) Lee Fang, ‘Amazon hired Koch-backed anti-union consultant to fight Alabama warehouse organizing’, The Intercept, 10 February 2021. (9) David Streitfeld, ‘How Amazon crushes unions’, New York Times, 16 March 2021. (10) Joe Nocera, ‘Unions are back in favour. They need to seize the moment’, Bloomberg Businessweek, 21 March 2021. Sauce: https://mondediplo.com/2021/05/02amazon

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike Morrissey

    Couldn't put it down Couldn't put it down

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gordon

    Douche chills. Bezos is a dork. This shitty book pretends to not be directly sanctioned by the beez, but his dorky smell is all over it. The author is right up his ass. The guy is the richest feller on earth. Congratulations. I've read a few biographies of these ultra-rich ppl - they suck, they're boring. They're essentially ultra-high functioning psychopaths. Some of this ilk are inspirational, they're creative and interesting, they do interesting things, things that make you go "oh cool, that's a Douche chills. Bezos is a dork. This shitty book pretends to not be directly sanctioned by the beez, but his dorky smell is all over it. The author is right up his ass. The guy is the richest feller on earth. Congratulations. I've read a few biographies of these ultra-rich ppl - they suck, they're boring. They're essentially ultra-high functioning psychopaths. Some of this ilk are inspirational, they're creative and interesting, they do interesting things, things that make you go "oh cool, that's a cool idea, I'd never have thought of that, wow awesome". Others are essentially vacuum cleaners for sucking up capital, grotesque vampires that actually fit Marx's resentiment-laiden description of the capitalist. If you stan successful entrepreneurs solely on the basis of entrepreneurial success; well here's your king - king mid-life-crisis, who leaves his wife for another woman at 50, sending horny texts like a teenager, king loser who needs to hire a consultant to discuss whether or not to return trash-talk fire to Donald Trump on twitter. Douche chills.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steven Z.

    Remember when Amazon first came online in 1995, they would discount books by 33-40%. This pricing lasted for a good 10-15 years then the discounts were reduced under the theory that once they conditioned you as a customer, they could slowly increase their profit margins. After a year of Covid-19 restrictions Amazon’s popularity and bottom line boomed as people were sequestered at home. Today the discount on books is usually 10-15%, and sometimes less, reflecting Amazon’s commitment to the bottom Remember when Amazon first came online in 1995, they would discount books by 33-40%. This pricing lasted for a good 10-15 years then the discounts were reduced under the theory that once they conditioned you as a customer, they could slowly increase their profit margins. After a year of Covid-19 restrictions Amazon’s popularity and bottom line boomed as people were sequestered at home. Today the discount on books is usually 10-15%, and sometimes less, reflecting Amazon’s commitment to the bottom line. Only speaking of book pricing, but I have noticed similar trends with other products. The question is how we arrived at the present juncture, who is responsible, what are the historic trends when it comes to Amazon, and lastly what role has Jeff Bezos played in the process. These questions are answered in full along with a partial biographical portrait of Bezos and how he built Amazon into the most dominant consumer source in the world and a company worth $1.76 trillion today in Brad Stone’s new book, AMAZON UNBOUND: JEFF BEZOS AND THE INVENTION OF A GLOBAL EMPIRE. Stone, the senior executive editor of global technology at Bloomberg News has written an in depth account of Amazon’s phenomenal growth from 2010 through 2021 focusing on the managerial style of Jeff Bezos and his incredible ability to support, develop, and implement projects that would be worth billions. Stone also digs deeply into the culture at Amazon and its mantra of putting the customer first, however, that “bumper sticker” is disingenuous as its record of employee safety, philanthropy, and demanding a certain belief system from executives and others reflects. Bezos’ genius and overbearing personality are on full display in Stone’s account. According to the author the watershed year for Amazon’s overwhelming dominance in multiple markets with varied products is 2010. From its inception through 2010 Amazon was not a very profitable company, but the infrastructure groundwork for what Bezos was able to achieve was in place. Stone covers every facet of the Amazon experience and how it developed into the economic behemoth it is today. Stone delves into the development of Alexa, Kindle, Amazon Go, Amazon Web Services, Amazon Prime, Amazon Prime Video, Amazon advertising, the creation of Fulfillment Centers, its success in India, development of third party sellers, and the purchase of Whole Foods and the Washington Post in detail. Bezos was the driving force behind Amazon’s technology innovations harnessing artificial intelligence, robotics, and other ingenious developments. However, his management style pushed his engineers to the breaking point in many instances and his nasty commentary when not happy at meetings are legend. Bezos could be “remorseless with those that did not meet his exacting standards, but he seemed to have an unusual wellspring of patience for those who practiced the challenging act of invention.” Bezos gets a great deal of the credit for the Amazon experience and success, but he had tremendous executive talent and engineers to work with. Stone explores the work of people such as Dilip Kumar, Greg Hart, Andy Jassy, Dave Clark, Jeff Wilke, Stephanie Landry among many others. Bezos and his deputies believed that algorithms could do the job better and faster than people. In many ways it explains the insensitivity that exists at Amazon toward certain employees especially in Fulfillment centers. According to Stone the ultimate goal was turning Amazon’s retail business into a self-service technology platform that could generate cash with a minimum amount of human intervention. In accomplishing their mission, a number of negatives emerge. Stone’s research uncovers a male dominated culture at Amazon reflected in the lack of women in upper echelon positions. Women complained about the working environment and deals made with the likes of Harvey Weinstein, Woody Allen, Kevin Spacey, Jeff Tomba, and Ray Price all for naught. Female anger emerged at the same time the “Metoo” movement gathered momentum as sexual inuendo, jokes, touching etc. came to the fore. Casting a net around Amazon working conditions and treatment of employees also does not enhance the company’s reputation. The use of robotics at Fulfillment Centers created repetitive motion/health issues; pressure on workers to gather products quickly and package them; worker performance was monitored by tyrannical invisible robots, poor benefits and low pay, periodically firing people at the lowest level of the employee chain, in addition to the constant threat of termination, all take the luster off of Amazon’s workplace propaganda. Further, Bezos and company are very anti-union and went out of their way to expand in areas, i.e.; airplane procurement and location which were also anti-union. During the pandemic when Amazon’s work force passed one million and its annual earnings exceeded $380 billion as sales rose by 37%, the company pursued a virulently anti-union policy. A way to sum this up is that the monograph highlights genius, innovation, and greed. Stone is not a stylist, but he has the ability to explain a great deal of technical jargon in a very easy manner. Whether explaining the role of artificial intelligence in the creation of Alexa or Amazon Go the reader can easily comprehend the arguments presented at executive conferences and meetings, particularly those of engineers. Stone explores numerous topics aside from the development of new products or strategies that in the end created billions in sales and profits. A key part of his discussion is not to reinforce the role of retail in Amazon’s success but focus on “Cloud Computing” which generated the revenue to fuel Amazon’s supercharged expansion. As Mark Levinson points out in his review in the Washington Post, “with cloud computing, an organization can rent computers, programmers and security experts from an external provider such as Amazon instead of maintaining its own data centers. Amazon pioneered cloud computing in the early 2000s, and by the 2010s it was easily the market leader. Bezos divined that finding new uses for Amazon’s burgeoning cloud infrastructure was the key to the company’s future.” Stone’s discussion of the location process for a second headquarters when difficulties developed in Seattle with the city government and the ability to expand facilities is eye opening reflecting Amazon’s insensitivity toward local government. In addition, the chapter on Amazon Web Services which became the most profitable component of the company is key as was the formation of their own advertising strategy and the creation of an airplane fleet and purchase of delivery vans to bring about next day delivery. The Amazon story is one of amazement. How could one company become so powerful economically and culturally as most people seem to consult Amazon on a daily basis, even before the onset of Covid-19 which would allow Amazon to expand exponentially as people had few alternatives to acquire products they needed while they quarantined. By the end of 2020 “Amazon boasted a $1.6 trillion market cap and Jeff Bezos was worth more than $190 billion. His wealth had increased more than 70% during the pandemic…a breathtaking achievement.” Stone stresses that the key aspect of how this was achieved was Bezos’ management style as his underlings knew if the boss had an idea, it was their job to bring it to fruition which in most cases they did. To his credit Stone has laid out the Amazon success story for the general public, but also its warts. Though at times the narrative gets bogged down in details it is worth the read if you wonder when you “click” how did it come to that action by your finger for everything you need.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mide S

    My key take away from this book was Jeff. Bezos words, "don't waste too much time on precision, keep trying stuff." The book is detailed and well narrated. There's a lot to learn from the innovative incentive culture of Jeff. The world is still in day 1. I'm optimistic that entrepreneurs will invent new models to give power back to small businesses in the nearest future. My key take away from this book was Jeff. Bezos words, "don't waste too much time on precision, keep trying stuff." The book is detailed and well narrated. There's a lot to learn from the innovative incentive culture of Jeff. The world is still in day 1. I'm optimistic that entrepreneurs will invent new models to give power back to small businesses in the nearest future.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mal Warwick

    It’s far more than “the everything store” How does a company get to be as big as Amazon in just twenty-seven years? And how does a man become as rich as Jeff Bezos? After all, as of this writing Amazon employs nearly 1.3 million people and is valued by the stock market at $1.7 trillion. That’s trillion, with a T. And Jeff Bezos, with a fortune estimated today at about $195 billion, is the second-richest person on Earth. In Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of a Global Empire, journalis It’s far more than “the everything store” How does a company get to be as big as Amazon in just twenty-seven years? And how does a man become as rich as Jeff Bezos? After all, as of this writing Amazon employs nearly 1.3 million people and is valued by the stock market at $1.7 trillion. That’s trillion, with a T. And Jeff Bezos, with a fortune estimated today at about $195 billion, is the second-richest person on Earth. In Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of a Global Empire, journalist Brad Stone’s second book on the company and its founder, the answers emerge. The Jeff Bezos story is an impressive tale, but it’s not pretty. To the nearly 200 million people who visit Amazon every month, the company represents an online shopping service. It’s the source of books, shoes, groceries, and millions of other items. “The everything store,” as Brad Stone described it in the title of his first account of the Jeff Bezos story. But Amazon is far more than an online store. It’s a conglomerate, ripe for the picking by the trustbusters. And the lion’s share of its profits comes not from the sale of products on its website but primarily from Amazon Web Services, which provides cloud computing resources to businesses and other institutions, and secondarily from online advertising. Three world-class businesses The online store garnered 51 percent of all online sales in 2020 and 9.2 percent of total US retail sales (compared with 9.5 percent for WalMart). But the Jeff Bezos story isn’t a profile of a merchant. Two other businesses operated by the company turned in equally impressive results. ** Amazon Web Services (AWS) commanded 32 percent of the worldwide market for cloud computing services, compared to runners-up Microsoft (19 percent) and Google (7 percent). In the most recent quarter, AWS’s revenue accounted for 47% of Amazon’s profit. ** Then there’s Amazon Logistics, which delivered 2.3 billion of the company’s packages in the U.S. in 2019. That compares with total package deliveries of 3.1 billion by FedEx, 4.7 billion by UPS, and 6.2 billion by the U.S. Postal Service. The numbers for Amazon are even more startling now, after a year of the pandemic. And according to Morgan Stanley, the company’s shipping service will surpass both UPS and FedEx by 2022. Amazon’s online advertising operations are also remarkable, although less so. The company scored 10 percent of US digital advertising revenue in 2020; front-runner Google received 29 percent, Facebook 25 percent. And it’s worth watching Amazon’s media business, too. Prime Video was recently in the news for purchasing the storied MGM film studio. For perspective on this, see “Why Is Amazon in Entertainment?” by Shira Ovide and “James Bond, Meet Jeff Bezos: Amazon Makes $8.45 Billion Deal for MGM” (both in the New York Times, May 27, 2021). The Jeff Bezos story also stars the two men now at the top In Amazon Unbound, Stone introduces some of the executives who have worked most closely with Bezos. Much of the author’s attention focuses on Dave Clark, who is now CEO of the company’s worldwide consumer sales. (In other words, he runs the business most of us interact with.) Like his colleague, Andy Jassy, Clark has been with Amazon for a long time. He joined the company in January 2001 as one of the managers at an Amazon fulfillment center (warehouse) in Kentucky. Andy Jassy, now tapped as Bezos’ successor as CEO of the whole business, ran Amazon Web Services from its start in 2003. Why is Amazon so successful? Stone profiles many other Amazon executives as well as Clark and Jassy. (The two are members of what Amazon calls the S-Team, or what in other companies might be termed the C-Suite.) A fair number of those executives have left the company drained to the point of exhaustion by unrelenting pressure from the top. And that pressure helps explain Amazon’s extraordinary success. But many other company founders and CEOs hound those around them without letup. Other factors seem more important in explaining the company’s success. Bezos’ intense focus on big-picture thinking. His willingness to wait for years for profits to emerge. His ability to learn from mistakes and to allow others to fail without consequences. And his insistence on constant innovation. In telling the Jeff Bezos story, Stone illustrates each of these traits with abundant examples. No doubt about it: Jeff Bezos is a business genius Amazon and its wide-flung operations are, of course, the centerpiece of Stone’s book. But he also relates in passing the stories of Bezos’ two other major businesses. (He owns both independently of Amazon.) At the Washington Post, which he purchased in 2013 for $250 million, Bezos has managed to turn around a money-losing enterprise into a vital, diversified media company. And at the rocket company Blue Origin, which Bezos founded in 2000, he vies with Elon Musk‘s SpaceX for primacy in the private space industry. Bezos has come in second best to date, but given his history of success piled on success it would be foolhardy to count him out. The Jeff Bezos story is far from over. About the author Journalist Brad Stone (1971-) is senior executive editor of the global technology group at Bloomberg News. He’s based in Bloomberg’s San Francisco bureau. Earlier in his career, he worked as a reporter for the New York Times and Newsweek. Amazon Unbound is the fourth of his books and the second he has written about Amazon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rick Wilson

    It’s good. It’s definitely better than the first. Documenting Amazon while so much of it is still changing and hidden from the light is the sort of Herculean task that one has to admire. However, as such a task, one is doomed to fail. There’s simply so much to Amazon that the cursory glance this book takes, while better than most, still falls short of a real portrait. It’s like flying over the Midwest and saying you understand Ohio and Kansas. As is the case with so many of these tech companies, It’s good. It’s definitely better than the first. Documenting Amazon while so much of it is still changing and hidden from the light is the sort of Herculean task that one has to admire. However, as such a task, one is doomed to fail. There’s simply so much to Amazon that the cursory glance this book takes, while better than most, still falls short of a real portrait. It’s like flying over the Midwest and saying you understand Ohio and Kansas. As is the case with so many of these tech companies, it’s a sort of Cronenberg monstrosity that has grown from a cuddly garage sized startup, into a respectable large company, and now into the multi limbed krakennesque behemoth that you see today. The sheer scope of Amazons operations is insane, and no book can truly cover it. There are hundreds of books written about fulfillment by Amazon and this book touches maybe 5 pages of it. AWS gets mentioned in passing, but without much depth. I’ve paid my rent several times over with KDP and it’s not even mentioned at all. That said, for a reasonable view of Amazon from 10,000 feet, read this book. This was a good overview of the unwieldy monster that seems to have snaked a limb into all of our lives.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Mckay

    Everything Store -> Everything Platform It's easy to get caught up in the impact that Amazon as a company has had on American politics. Lina Khan is now the FTC advisor, candidates like Bernie Sanders use Amazon as a punching bag for all that is wrong with tech and American inequality. Yet in the last 5 years, the impact of Amazon as a business has been far greater. Perhaps unique among FAANG businesses, Amazon has reinvented itself, growing by leaps and bounds in the process. Stone describes Everything Store -> Everything Platform It's easy to get caught up in the impact that Amazon as a company has had on American politics. Lina Khan is now the FTC advisor, candidates like Bernie Sanders use Amazon as a punching bag for all that is wrong with tech and American inequality. Yet in the last 5 years, the impact of Amazon as a business has been far greater. Perhaps unique among FAANG businesses, Amazon has reinvented itself, growing by leaps and bounds in the process. Stone describes the differences between his first book and today succinctly: Amazon was a 100 billion company in 2012, now it is 1 trillion. It had 150,000 employees, and now employs over 1.3 million employees. It was the Kindle company, now it's the AWS company, alexa company, grocer company etc. Amazon has gone from the everything store to the everything platform, by using its 22.6 billion dollars of annual R&D to take massive bets, and cash in on enough of those bets to rival the volume of success achieved by nearly all of the silicon valley ecosystem. Two things that stood out to me were the massive success of AWS, perhaps the most important technology since the iPhone, and the focus on company mechanisms (see: Working Backwards) , allowing the sort of scaling that has plagued companies like Facebook and Google. This has created successes like Alexa, the Amazon platform, singlehandedly introducing Chinese suppliers directly to American consumers, and of course the acquisition of whole foods and grocery delivery. Sadly Amazon deserves a better chronicler than Brad Stone. His focus follows the headlines of any given year, and the book fails to provide insight beyond what could be achievable in a series of Bloomberg articles. In Stone's retelling, Bezos is "brilliant, and rather cruel" and ends up overly focused on the glamour of holywood before retirement. A 30 second conversation yesterday with one of many Amazonion friends gets more insight: "They’re scaling too fast to establish rigorous processes... The organizational structure is really wonky and not super functional, which is probably part of the reason they haven’t actually had a successful game yet". After two books, Stone fails to get beyond any buzzwords of what makes Amazon or Bezos successful beyond 'ruthlessness'. 55th book of 2021

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mahendra Palsule

    Unparalleled inside look at Amazon the company and Bezos the CEO. Discusses wide swathes of Amazon's rise as an e-commerce powerhouse during the past two decades. Must read for anyone interested in tech, startups, innovation, and business. The only negative thing about the book is Brad does not discuss the acquisitions of IMDB and Goodreads. How do acquisitions perform at Amazon? Are they a success or failures? What happened to the IMDB and Goodreads acquisitions and why are these sites left negl Unparalleled inside look at Amazon the company and Bezos the CEO. Discusses wide swathes of Amazon's rise as an e-commerce powerhouse during the past two decades. Must read for anyone interested in tech, startups, innovation, and business. The only negative thing about the book is Brad does not discuss the acquisitions of IMDB and Goodreads. How do acquisitions perform at Amazon? Are they a success or failures? What happened to the IMDB and Goodreads acquisitions and why are these sites left neglected by this multi-billion dollar company and lying undeveloped for so many years? With Brad's access to Amazon executives, these would have been great questions to ask and this topic to be covered. However, Brad seems focused only on what he could get access to and leave other aspects of Amazon untouched. Apart from the above gripe, this is a fascinating, well-researched book. Do read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bouke

    Jeff Bezos is a terrifying dude, and so is Amazon. The absolute drive for efficiency in everything they do is awe-inspiring. This book is a good look into all the various projects and scandals that happened since _The Everything Store_. Even though Amazon is so huge, it seems like they could grow to be 5x as large even still.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    This book is unique for covering contemporary content and collecting a lot of good anecdotes, but it focused too much attention on flashy projects that didn’t alter Amazon’s trajectory and on Jeff Bezos’ personal life. Amazon Fresh, Amazon Go, Alexa, and HQ2 are all interesting initiatives — but they weren’t meaningful drivers of Amazon’s growth or competitive moat. I would have liked to learn more about AWS, international expansion, fulfillment center efficiency, and the growth of 3rd party fulfi This book is unique for covering contemporary content and collecting a lot of good anecdotes, but it focused too much attention on flashy projects that didn’t alter Amazon’s trajectory and on Jeff Bezos’ personal life. Amazon Fresh, Amazon Go, Alexa, and HQ2 are all interesting initiatives — but they weren’t meaningful drivers of Amazon’s growth or competitive moat. I would have liked to learn more about AWS, international expansion, fulfillment center efficiency, and the growth of 3rd party fulfillment.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Keven Wang

    Brad stone written a masterpiece. I am exited to read his book on Uber

  15. 4 out of 5

    Arsene

    Finished it faster than I thought I would.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Brad Stone's ostensible sequel to "The Everything Store" is sharper and more purposeful in design. The former serves as a well-researched corporate biography, lifting the veil to provide insights on Amazon's birth and how its blistering expansion stemmed from Jeff Bezos' insatiable customer-focused vision. A decade ago this company creed seemed admirable. But whew, the goodwill around that approach, chiefly because of the externalities it's wrought in the American and global marketplace, has dra Brad Stone's ostensible sequel to "The Everything Store" is sharper and more purposeful in design. The former serves as a well-researched corporate biography, lifting the veil to provide insights on Amazon's birth and how its blistering expansion stemmed from Jeff Bezos' insatiable customer-focused vision. A decade ago this company creed seemed admirable. But whew, the goodwill around that approach, chiefly because of the externalities it's wrought in the American and global marketplace, has dramatically shifted since. Stone drops the gloves and tackles Amazon's blooming role in the American consciousness, troublesome and otherwise, headfirst. He lays out major benchmarks in the last 10 years of Amazon & Bezos — Alexa, Prime Studios, AWS, the WaPo to name a few — in successive chapters, each forming a foundational slab that informs the company's overreach seen in later chapters. There's frank assessments of the HQ2 debacle and Blue Origin's whimpering growth. Stone dabbles in more editorial content than I recall in Everything Store, but the material covered demands greater nuance than a corporate battle with Borders Books did. Through it all, he uses the backdrop of Bezos' increasing appetite for the limelight to hint at foreboding storms in his and Amazon's future. At times these hints resemble an end-of-episode cliffhanger akin to the final ticks on an installment of "24." This can be a tad melodramatic. Still, they keep a forward pace that drives the reader to the next page. Amazon Unbound summarizes a incredible and tumultuous decade for the retail juggernaut. There's intriguing revelations, and I'd say it's a relevant read for any frequent Amazon consumer. Equally for those finding themselves disillusioned with the results delivered on the lofty promises preached by our modern magnates in Tech.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dave Carden

    A fantastic look at Amazon’s incredible expansion during the past decade….which felt all the more apt as I bought and read it on a Kindle and am now reviewing it on a site owned by Amazon.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Writing this review on an Amazon subsidiary (Goodreads) after buying this e-book from Amazon and having read it on his second Amazon Kindle says it all. You might not want to root for him, but you can't argue this guy's success... Writing this review on an Amazon subsidiary (Goodreads) after buying this e-book from Amazon and having read it on his second Amazon Kindle says it all. You might not want to root for him, but you can't argue this guy's success...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paul Vogelzang

    Great book with so many insights and anecdotes. I loved the story of the 'one cow burger,' and Bezos' fanatical way of leadership on even the most obscure Amazon products. Must read! Great book with so many insights and anecdotes. I loved the story of the 'one cow burger,' and Bezos' fanatical way of leadership on even the most obscure Amazon products. Must read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    Read for work.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pritam Chattopadhyay

    “Twenty years ago, Jeff Bezos left a lucrative job in finance to drive across the country and start his own business. He went on a wild ride: from original hero of Internet commerce to poster child of dotcom hype. . . . Amazon is still the greatest tech story of the 1990s; it’s also one of a few contemporaries still run by its founder. Nobody else reinvests almost every cent of profit in growth, as Bezos still does. Amazon is immensely valuable today, and almost all of its value comes from the f “Twenty years ago, Jeff Bezos left a lucrative job in finance to drive across the country and start his own business. He went on a wild ride: from original hero of Internet commerce to poster child of dotcom hype. . . . Amazon is still the greatest tech story of the 1990s; it’s also one of a few contemporaries still run by its founder. Nobody else reinvests almost every cent of profit in growth, as Bezos still does. Amazon is immensely valuable today, and almost all of its value comes from the future. The journey ahead for Jeff Bezos is just as great now as when he first set out in 1994.” [Source: Peter Thiel. “Jeff Bezos.” Time. Time, April 23, 2014.] Amazon.com legitimately launched its website on July 16, 1995. A team of 300 of Bezos’s friends and family had tested it beforehand. Bezos told them to extend the word. There was no other advertising. Bezos felt Amazon was going to be mammoth someday. But he did not apprehend how promptly it would grow. In the first 30 days, Amazon sold books in all 50 states. The rest, as the say is history ….. The history of Amazon.com, as most people comprehend it, is one of the iconic stories of the Internet age. The company started discreetly as an online bookseller and then rode the original wave of dot-com liveliness in the late 1990s to extend into selling music, movies, electronics, and toys. Narrowly avoiding calamity and defying a wave of skepticism about its prospects that coincided with the dot-com bust of 2000 and 2001, it then mastered the physics of its own complex distribution network and expanded into software, jewelry, clothes, apparel, sporting goods, automotive parts—you name it. And just when it had established itself as the Internet’s top retailer and a leading platform on which other sellers could hawk their wares, Amazon redefined itself yet again as a versatile technology firm that sold the cloud computing infrastructure known as Amazon Web Services as well as inexpensive, practical digital devices like the Kindle electronic reader and the Kindle Fire tablet. “To me Amazon is a story of a brilliant founder who personally drove the vision,” says Eric Schmidt, the chairman of Google and an avowed Amazon competitor who is personally a member of Amazon Prime, its two-day shipping service. “There are almost no better examples. Perhaps Apple, but people forget that most people believed Amazon was doomed because it would not scale at a cost structure that would work. It kept piling up losses. It lost hundreds of millions of dollars. But Jeff was very garrulous, very smart. He’s a classic technical founder of a business, who understands every detail and cares about it more than anyone.” Amazon’s accomplishment changed the way books were sold. Bezos had pioneered a new path. Many established booksellers followed him. Two months after Amazon.com launched, it was selling $20,000 worth of books each week. In its first year, the company spent more money than it made. This left Amazon with a $303,000 loss. Bezos needed more money to stay in business. The author travels miles to make the readers aware of the struggle of Bezos to meet the bottom line. And boy, what a struggle it was !! Today, Amazon sells nearly all and delivers its packages rapidly, powers much of the internet in its data centers, streams television shows and movies to our homes, and sells a popular line of voice-activated speakers. But nearly three decades ago, it was just an idea, circulating on the fortieth floor of a midtown Manhattan skyscraper. These are the following things that this most wonderfully written book does: 1) It narrates the story of a hard-driving CEO who created such a fertile corporate culture that even at massive size it repeatedly shucked its own bureaucracy to invent exhilarating new products. 2) The book also tells the story of how a leading technology company became so omnipotent over the course of a single decade that many started to worry that it might definitively tilt the proverbial playing field against smaller companies. 3) The book further shows how one of the world’s most famous businesspeople appeared to lose his way, and then tried to find it again—right in the midst of a terrifying global pandemic that further augmented his power and profit. 4) Finally, it tells the readers a tale, that describes a period in business history when the old laws no longer seemed to apply to the world’s most dominant companies. And it explores what happened when one man and his vast empire were about to become totally unbound. The writer views Bezos in a very approving manner. You might concur or conflict with many of the things written in the book which are up for debate, but you plainly cannot put the book down, owing to its powerfully personal and relaxed narrative approach.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zhou Fang

    I really enjoyed reading Brad Stone's predecessor book on Amazon, The Everything Store, so I had to pick up the sequel. Amazon Unbound basically picks up where The Everything Store left off, discussing some of the more recent innovations and flops among Amazon's product lines, including Alexa, Amazon Go, Fire Phones, AWS, and Prime Video. It also traces Jeff Bezos' evolution as CEO, transitioning from an obsessive product micromanager to a strategic leader more reliant on his "S-Team." The book I really enjoyed reading Brad Stone's predecessor book on Amazon, The Everything Store, so I had to pick up the sequel. Amazon Unbound basically picks up where The Everything Store left off, discussing some of the more recent innovations and flops among Amazon's product lines, including Alexa, Amazon Go, Fire Phones, AWS, and Prime Video. It also traces Jeff Bezos' evolution as CEO, transitioning from an obsessive product micromanager to a strategic leader more reliant on his "S-Team." The book focuses a lot on the members of the S-Team and their critical roles in each of the business verticals (for example Andy Jassy in AWS and Dave Clark in retail). Brad Stone also casts a critical eye towards Bezos' evolving personal life and tastes, characterizing Bezos as a man who began to enjoy the limelight of being the world's richest man and relished schmoozing with Hollywood stars. The book is a narrative of the transition of a startup and its fearless leader from the scrappy underdog into the dominant behemoth, and is an exhaustive examination at what has happened at Amazon and Blue Origin between the late-2000s and today. Overall, the book is thoroughly researched and engaging. However, I wonder if Brad Stone has been influenced by the general shift in media sentiment towards Amazon and Big Tech in recent years. While The Everything Store read like a balanced account of Amazon's early years, Amazon Unbound seems to insist on letting critics have the last word on every issue. For example, Amazon has come under significant scrutiny for its third party marketplace. Sellers who build businesses through Amazon have reported exasperation at Amazon's handling of listings, copycats, and fake reviews with what looks like flippant arbitrariness. Stone effectively explains the problem sellers face. However, he seems to neglect to highlight the fact that (1) Amazon enabled many of these small businesses to exist in the first place, (2) what exactly is problematic about copycat competitive sellers who offer a similar product to customers with a lower price, and (3) the experiences of sellers on the marketplace who may continue to have positive experiences. Similarly, although much is made of Amazon's usage of user data to promote its private label products, little is discussed about the actual effectiveness of that strategy or the low penetration of Amazon's private label products overall. I'm not suggesting that the conclusions that Stone reaches on these specific issues are wrong per se--it's just that the book seems to lean much more critical on every one of these issues. This coincides also with the narrative on Bezos. Stone does an effective job of treating the Lauren Sanchez saga, careful to present the facts without embracing tabloid speculation. But the reporting on this issue, along with Prime Video's involvement in Hollywood seem to bend back to the story Stone is eager to present: one of a man who began to indulge his ego as he rose to be the richest men in the world. All of this is fair game for an author. But it seems like the positive influences Bezos and Amazon have had on the world are lost in this book. And maybe that's the point; once you're writing about a behemoth, it's no longer interesting to talk about the successes. Who wants to hear about Goliath's feats of strength?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

    I had read Brad Stone's other books and had especially enjoyed 'The Everything Store'. In light of the recent news about Bezos and Amazon, etc. it seemed like it might be an enjoyable read to catch up from wherever Stone had left off and the very beginnings of Amazon. So don't expect a recounting of the very beginnings of Amazon, but more of the recent developments such as the COVID pandemic, the development of Alexa, the acquisition of Whole Foods, etc. It was mildly interesting but at the same I had read Brad Stone's other books and had especially enjoyed 'The Everything Store'. In light of the recent news about Bezos and Amazon, etc. it seemed like it might be an enjoyable read to catch up from wherever Stone had left off and the very beginnings of Amazon. So don't expect a recounting of the very beginnings of Amazon, but more of the recent developments such as the COVID pandemic, the development of Alexa, the acquisition of Whole Foods, etc. It was mildly interesting but at the same time it also felt like a recounting a person could find via news articles and other similar long reads. And don't expect to find too much about Bezos's personal life (it is covered but this also isn't really about him the person but rather Amazon the entity, even if you think they are the one and the same). Overall, I think I'll be skipping Stone's books from now on. Maybe I measured the rest of his work after 'The Everything Store' based off of that standard but as mentioned above, this seemed like a rehash of many articles that you can find via Bloomberg and the Wall Street Journal and similar publications. If you're really into Amazon, are a competitor and want more of a bird's eye view of the company in more recent years or are looking for information specific to what Stone covers, this might be for you. For a lay person, this might not be a bad library borrow, especially if you read it right after 'The Everything Store'. If you're doing research about Amazon, specific Amazon products, specific issues that Stone covers in this book, then this might not be a bad purchase. Library was best for me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    Behind the Scenes View of Amazon How did Jeff Bezos and Amazon become such a powerful force in the global economy? With vivid storytelling Brad Stone takes readers inside Amazon in the pages of AMAZON UNBOUND: JEFF BEZOS AND THE INTEVENTION OF A GLOBAL EMPIRE. I listened to the audiobook version of this book from cover to cover. While the detailed storytelling through careful research combined with the author’s interviews is a key portion of this book, readers learn how Bezos operates his busines Behind the Scenes View of Amazon How did Jeff Bezos and Amazon become such a powerful force in the global economy? With vivid storytelling Brad Stone takes readers inside Amazon in the pages of AMAZON UNBOUND: JEFF BEZOS AND THE INTEVENTION OF A GLOBAL EMPIRE. I listened to the audiobook version of this book from cover to cover. While the detailed storytelling through careful research combined with the author’s interviews is a key portion of this book, readers learn how Bezos operates his business. He gives freedom to the various Amazon teams to create automated algorithms which often lose money before they become profitable. The environment to create systems and practices which have changed how the world buys and sells is built into the fiber of AMAZON UNBOUND. This new book is current including a chapter on Bezos’ divorce and the pandemic. I enjoyed this audiobook and learned a great deal listening to it. I highly recommend it. W. Terry Whalin is an editor and the author of more than 60 books including his latest 10 Publishing Myths, Insights Every Author Needs to Succeed .

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amaan Pirani

    In Amazon Unbound, Brad Stone prioritizes entertainment over substance. In that vein, I can't remember the last book I read that was this engaging. Stone's reporting on Bezos's affair with Lauren Sanchez, Amazon's extremely public decision making process for HQ2, and his Bezos's childish feud with Elon Musk over space are all fascinating. That withstanding, the book clearly missed a lot of key elements in telling Amazon's story and ultimately doesn't augment one's understanding of Amazon's busine In Amazon Unbound, Brad Stone prioritizes entertainment over substance. In that vein, I can't remember the last book I read that was this engaging. Stone's reporting on Bezos's affair with Lauren Sanchez, Amazon's extremely public decision making process for HQ2, and his Bezos's childish feud with Elon Musk over space are all fascinating. That withstanding, the book clearly missed a lot of key elements in telling Amazon's story and ultimately doesn't augment one's understanding of Amazon's business much. For one, the book discusses Amazon Web Services for max 3 pages - But AWS is the large profit driver for the business!! Moreover, Andy Jassy is barely discussed - but he's who Jeff Bezos chose to become CEO! Nor are Amazon's major competitive threats discussed either! Nor is antitrust discussed in detail. If you're looking for entertainment, read this book. If you're looking to understand Amazon's business more - look elsewhere.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jonny

    As the successor volume to “The Everything Store”, Stone had a hard act to follow - the narrative arc of that book was reasonably obvious and easy to follow, whereas the period of mega-growth and expansion that Amazon has trodden since is harder to explain. The chronological structure lends itself to understanding how pure scale - even when confronted by political opposition, a distracted CEO, trying to bite off more than it can chew in growth markets - has kept driving Amazon forward, to the po As the successor volume to “The Everything Store”, Stone had a hard act to follow - the narrative arc of that book was reasonably obvious and easy to follow, whereas the period of mega-growth and expansion that Amazon has trodden since is harder to explain. The chronological structure lends itself to understanding how pure scale - even when confronted by political opposition, a distracted CEO, trying to bite off more than it can chew in growth markets - has kept driving Amazon forward, to the point that discussions over how it *should* be regulated seem far more theoretical than real-world. Whether that turns out to be true is - I think - more of an open question than Stone’s conclusion suggest, but his snapshot of Amazon as effectively irresistible seems supported by his interpretation of the last few years.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amit Khandelia

    The books is very well researched and author has spent lot of time on his second book on Amazon. It shares insights about all the struggles the company and Jeff has to face to make Amazon one of the most valuable company in the world. The author also reveals the name behind Alexa which was unknow to the outside world so far even after so many years since the launch of Alexa. Amazon is one such company which has really made it big in just 25 years. The author talks about the mammoth planning and e The books is very well researched and author has spent lot of time on his second book on Amazon. It shares insights about all the struggles the company and Jeff has to face to make Amazon one of the most valuable company in the world. The author also reveals the name behind Alexa which was unknow to the outside world so far even after so many years since the launch of Alexa. Amazon is one such company which has really made it big in just 25 years. The author talks about the mammoth planning and effort that has gone behind making all the projects of Amazon successful - Alexa, Prime, Kindle, Amazon Go, India market. Not only Amazon, Brad has also discussed the favorite space project of Bezos, Blue origin and his personal investment Washington Post. Amazon has produced some of the fantastic and charismatic leaders like Jeff Wilke and Andy Jassy. One thing which surprises me is that none of the employees who even stayed with Amazon right from scratch could make it through the list of billionaire. So, is Amazon rewarding enough? The book also deals about the working culture at Amazon senior leadership team and also at FC level. The sense one gets is - its a pressure cooker environment in which the employees are working. The expectations from the employees are really high but at the same time company is ready to rally behind you in terms of investment if the idea has value in it. The author seems to be having a negative bias towards Amazon and talks about the negatives more than the positives that Amazon has given to the mankind. It would be good to have some different positive version as well. Because if its one of the most valuable company, it must be doing some things right. Infact not some things, many thing right !!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    Good overview of Amazon and Bezos and bolsters support for doing one’s utmost to support anyone-but-Amazon in purchasing options. My favorite anecdotes of the book were: 1) upon requesting Bezos to name his favorite song in an early beta-testing of Alexa he chose the theme song to the original Battlestar Galactica series, 2) in his ‘wild’ days of either pre or post-divorce cavorting with his new paramour they had a joint tattoo session in which Bezos got a ‘black flag’ symbol on his arm/shoulder Good overview of Amazon and Bezos and bolsters support for doing one’s utmost to support anyone-but-Amazon in purchasing options. My favorite anecdotes of the book were: 1) upon requesting Bezos to name his favorite song in an early beta-testing of Alexa he chose the theme song to the original Battlestar Galactica series, 2) in his ‘wild’ days of either pre or post-divorce cavorting with his new paramour they had a joint tattoo session in which Bezos got a ‘black flag’ symbol on his arm/shoulder. Though unclear whether this was the band or the pirate symbol these two encapsulate the man’s utter hollowness and it's just example after example here of how he should be taxed to the Nth degree.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    CEO, entrepreneur Born in 1964 Jeffrey Jeffrey Bezos CEO, entrepreneur Born in 1964 Jeffrey Jeffrey Bezos C’mon Jeffrey You can do it Pave the way Put your back into it Tell us why Show us how Look at where you came from Look at you now -Bo Burnham (The rest of the song isn’t family appropriate, though I do endorse it) I think if you want to know about how Amazon works and grew over the last ten years, this book does the job great.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ardiansyah Ardi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Nice ..

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...