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Y: The Last Man - The Deluxe Edition Book Two

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An alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here. Y: THE LAST MAN is the gripping saga of Yorick Brown, an unemployed and unmotivated slacker who discovers that he is the only male left in the world after a plague of unknown origin instantly kills every mammal with a Y chromosome. Accompanied by his mischievous monkey and the mysterious Agent 355, York embarks on a transc An alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here. Y: THE LAST MAN is the gripping saga of Yorick Brown, an unemployed and unmotivated slacker who discovers that he is the only male left in the world after a plague of unknown origin instantly kills every mammal with a Y chromosome. Accompanied by his mischievous monkey and the mysterious Agent 355, York embarks on a transcontinental journey to find his girlfriend and discover why he is the last man on Earth. Now, the entire critically acclaimed Y: THE LAST MAN saga written by Brian K. Vaughan, one of the writers of LOST, is collected into a new edition. In this second volume, a Russian space from the International Space Station is returning to earth carrying three passengers: one woman and two men. Could this be the end of Yorick's tenure as last living male? Plus, the group runs up against a roadblock in Arizona where the female remains of the Sons of Arizona militia have cut the interstate to keep out any vestiges of the U.S. government. Collects Y: The Last Man #11-23


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An alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here. Y: THE LAST MAN is the gripping saga of Yorick Brown, an unemployed and unmotivated slacker who discovers that he is the only male left in the world after a plague of unknown origin instantly kills every mammal with a Y chromosome. Accompanied by his mischievous monkey and the mysterious Agent 355, York embarks on a transc An alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here. Y: THE LAST MAN is the gripping saga of Yorick Brown, an unemployed and unmotivated slacker who discovers that he is the only male left in the world after a plague of unknown origin instantly kills every mammal with a Y chromosome. Accompanied by his mischievous monkey and the mysterious Agent 355, York embarks on a transcontinental journey to find his girlfriend and discover why he is the last man on Earth. Now, the entire critically acclaimed Y: THE LAST MAN saga written by Brian K. Vaughan, one of the writers of LOST, is collected into a new edition. In this second volume, a Russian space from the International Space Station is returning to earth carrying three passengers: one woman and two men. Could this be the end of Yorick's tenure as last living male? Plus, the group runs up against a roadblock in Arizona where the female remains of the Sons of Arizona militia have cut the interstate to keep out any vestiges of the U.S. government. Collects Y: The Last Man #11-23

30 review for Y: The Last Man - The Deluxe Edition Book Two

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A-) 82% | Very Good Notes: It uses peril as a vehicle for backstory, while its sparse backcountry landscape accentuates dread, desolation and loss.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eilonwy

    3-1/2 stars I'm not sure I have a ton to say about this installment. The story is interesting enough to keep me reading, and the artwork is appealing, even in the scenes spattered with blood. I personally found the Arizona/southern belle ladies of the militia story line to be absolutely chilling. I do admire how this series does an excellent job of reflecting all the various kinds of women there are, and filling its world with them (why, almost as if women were just regular people!). On the other 3-1/2 stars I'm not sure I have a ton to say about this installment. The story is interesting enough to keep me reading, and the artwork is appealing, even in the scenes spattered with blood. I personally found the Arizona/southern belle ladies of the militia story line to be absolutely chilling. I do admire how this series does an excellent job of reflecting all the various kinds of women there are, and filling its world with them (why, almost as if women were just regular people!). On the other hand, it does still have a bit of a feel of being written by a man, and it's a little aggravating to me that the story of a world populated almost entirely by women is getting told through the eyes of a man. So, mixed feelings here. But I am very fond of the little core group of characters, and committed to seeing them through to however this story ends.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Although it's slower and a little less compelling than Book One (possibly due to the lack of an imposing and formidable villain like Victoria), it's still a well-written season with witty comedy and true heart. Excited to see where the series goes next! Although it's slower and a little less compelling than Book One (possibly due to the lack of an imposing and formidable villain like Victoria), it's still a well-written season with witty comedy and true heart. Excited to see where the series goes next!

  4. 5 out of 5

    RG

    The story is developing really well. Loving the characters even if still a little cliched. Already got the next book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    PROBS 3.5 stars. I liked it more than book one. There was a lot more drama and excitement which I really loved and a lot of the plot points took me by surprise. Will definitely continue the series.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "With little power comes little responsibility." "If there's one thing I hate, it's crappy works of fiction that try to sound important by stealing names from the bard." For some reason Book One seemed to take its time getting started and it felt kinda dry. This did not. Yorick's cheese ball humor is awesome, the character dynamics are captivating, and the plot points seem less incidental and more consequential. I also found myself caring about the characters more, perhaps due to more development. "With little power comes little responsibility." "If there's one thing I hate, it's crappy works of fiction that try to sound important by stealing names from the bard." For some reason Book One seemed to take its time getting started and it felt kinda dry. This did not. Yorick's cheese ball humor is awesome, the character dynamics are captivating, and the plot points seem less incidental and more consequential. I also found myself caring about the characters more, perhaps due to more development. Astronauts, military, fire fights, psychology, jokes galore. And whew, that Safeword chapter. Steamy!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chaitra

    Still not feeling it. I liked the second book of Y even less than the first one, because at least the first one had some originality going for it. In the second, Yorick is still the only male human alive in the world, and Ampersand is still the only male monkey. And the world still revolves around them. They still haven't reached California, and on the way ridiculous things happen. Mostly the women seem extremely horny, in shape and wear not many clothes. Even though some of those women say thin Still not feeling it. I liked the second book of Y even less than the first one, because at least the first one had some originality going for it. In the second, Yorick is still the only male human alive in the world, and Ampersand is still the only male monkey. And the world still revolves around them. They still haven't reached California, and on the way ridiculous things happen. Mostly the women seem extremely horny, in shape and wear not many clothes. Even though some of those women say things like "now that there are no men, why do we need hair?" It also bugs me that nothing works. I mean, really? It's been months & years since the men went, and it's not like a zombie apocalypse where everyone is vulnerable. Half of the population is still there, and so are the books. The expertise is still there if anyone wanted to take advantage of it, considering even in this stupid world there are a few women who were in jobs like electricity and running water and roads, pre-plague. But then again, no one cares, because oh my god, no men. What shall we do for sex? Plague or no plague, no one's turning a lesbian because that seems to be the ultimate curse. It's not even kids they want, they just want a fuck. Speaking of kids, I don't think Yorick has encountered a single child. Probably because they wouldn't be able to seduce Yorick, and thus they don't have a purpose. In other words, I'm hate reading this series. It's like a train-wreck I can't look away from.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    3.5 stars. This is the second installment of the graphic novel Y: The Last Man. I didn’t enjoy it quite as much as the first. There are a couple of parts that seem out of place and disjointed from the rest of the narrative. I had to flip back and make sure I hadn’t missed any pages. The characters are all there, 355, Dr. Mann, Yorick and Ampersand, with a couple new and interesting introductions. The other thing that I think was missing from this book were fleshed out villains. In Book 1 we had H 3.5 stars. This is the second installment of the graphic novel Y: The Last Man. I didn’t enjoy it quite as much as the first. There are a couple of parts that seem out of place and disjointed from the rest of the narrative. I had to flip back and make sure I hadn’t missed any pages. The characters are all there, 355, Dr. Mann, Yorick and Ampersand, with a couple new and interesting introductions. The other thing that I think was missing from this book were fleshed out villains. In Book 1 we had Hero, working with the Amazons, here it felt like Amazon impostors, but with no sister working for them to make it interesting. Still I enjoyed it overall and love the artwork as they travel across America. Can’t wait to see what they do with some of these new twists!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Great series, this seems to split neatly into three story sections and manages a good balance between humour, action and plot development. Great character setup.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    This deluxe edition book two collects issues #11-23, and I liked this installment even less than the first one. Let me try to articulate why. As I've said in my review of the first volume, just because all but one man dies, it's not as if the world stops turning. In this volume, we meet more groups of women, some of whom add absolutely nothing to the plot, other than as a means to show some barely clothed voluptuous bodies. If such a apocalypse were to occur, I'd agree that not all women would re This deluxe edition book two collects issues #11-23, and I liked this installment even less than the first one. Let me try to articulate why. As I've said in my review of the first volume, just because all but one man dies, it's not as if the world stops turning. In this volume, we meet more groups of women, some of whom add absolutely nothing to the plot, other than as a means to show some barely clothed voluptuous bodies. If such a apocalypse were to occur, I'd agree that not all women would respond in the same way, so some of what the author does here could be seen as quite feminist. However, when the only "good girls" around are the ones trying to save the sole man, or are all about the man, it's hard not to see that as very anti-feminist in reality. There is almost no character development or depth, so it feels like watching two dimensional cutouts move across a stage. The Israeli angle is ludicrous, and I continue to be annoyed at all the stuff that no longer works - because you know what would be solved if all the men disappeared? Unemployment. On the plus side, I liked the art much better in this volume, and there were scenes with more realistic women bodies, but at this point I'm wondering if I'm even interested enough to see where this story is headed to continue reading on. If you've read the series, and think I should, please chime in.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenbebookish

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I guess I can proudly admit to becoming full on nerdgirl now with this comic/graphic novel love affair that I seem to have begun. Still not into video games, but there's hope for me yet. I'm loving these. I didn't love this one quite as much as book 1, but I think that's because the first one opened up with the cool premise, intro to cool characters, et cetera et cetera, while this one has really just propagated what I loved in the first one. Every now and again I'm struck by the somewhat irksome I guess I can proudly admit to becoming full on nerdgirl now with this comic/graphic novel love affair that I seem to have begun. Still not into video games, but there's hope for me yet. I'm loving these. I didn't love this one quite as much as book 1, but I think that's because the first one opened up with the cool premise, intro to cool characters, et cetera et cetera, while this one has really just propagated what I loved in the first one. Every now and again I'm struck by the somewhat irksome thought that my gotta-know-attitude is perhaps not the best suited for the ever-ongoing structure of comics, but when I don't think about that I can just enjoy the ride for what it is...a really fantastic work of art and fiction, and a great display of collaborative creativity from an extraordinarily talented team of people. We are introduced to so many new characters that sometimes I am annoyed by this and wish rather that we could get on with the stories of already familiar characters, but sometimes these new characters are so kick ass that I find myself forgiving Vaughan this annoyance pretty quickly. A former CIA type turned dominatrix, a Sinead style grease monkey with a nose ring and the face and body of a Barbie (let's be real though, all of the female characters are all typecast male fantasies, all of them with their little button noses, DD breasts, tiny waisted and long legged. But I don't mind! Why not?! What is this if not Vaghan and team's fantasies drawn and brought to life via comic/cartoon?) I've already purchased through the most current volume, and I go through each one in less than an hour so I am NOT looking forward to reaching the end and having to either read them issue by issue, or else having to wait however long it's going to take to release the next "book." However long it's going to take, I already know it's going to be too long. I reached that same conundrum with Saga, and I found myself having to skim through the former volumes to refresh my memory. Ugh! Yorick, the supposed "last man," remains the single least interesting part of the storyline, with his sorta "duhh" demeanor wearing on me every now and again, but despite the fact that the premise of the story revolves around the last man on Earth, the part he plays is really rather secondary to all the other storylines going on all at once. So while there's the generally sexist female aesthetics that's so typical to video games and comics, there's the feminist angle of the whole women running the world thing. (Who run the world?!) Women are kicking ass, stepping into every role that was previously reserved for men only, and I dig it. I reeeeally dig it. Oh, and I can't forget about the monkey. I just love that little monkey. He's got to be my favorite favorite character-if we can call him that-& his little monkey faces with his little monkey diaper amuses and entertains me to no end. Characters are great, artwork is great, I've recognized several lit references peppered throughout which I think is cool, and the pacing and plot are working well for me so far. I'm looking forward to a little more character development which so far is the only thing I would like to see more of in the place of so many introductions to new people, new lives, new goings on, but truthfully I have no real complaints. Last Man, on point!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Trudi

    I love this series!!! The dialogue is snappy, smart, and funny, the characters are multi-dimensional with their own distinct histories and motivations and the action is compelling and suspenseful. Not only is this an original idea, it is executed with real finesse and with a great sense of humor. Yorick is the perfect not-hero. He's just your regular guy, young, impulsive, mouthy, a little stunned sometimes but basically in possession of real heart and good intentions. It's not easy being the la I love this series!!! The dialogue is snappy, smart, and funny, the characters are multi-dimensional with their own distinct histories and motivations and the action is compelling and suspenseful. Not only is this an original idea, it is executed with real finesse and with a great sense of humor. Yorick is the perfect not-hero. He's just your regular guy, young, impulsive, mouthy, a little stunned sometimes but basically in possession of real heart and good intentions. It's not easy being the last guy on Earth, especially when your two escorts across the country are a top-notch secret agent who is secretly in love with you, and a brilliant geneticist who is secretly in love with the secret agent. Talk about a triangle worthy of the Apocalypse! As if that weren't drama enough there are umpteen special interest groups -- political, paramilitary, rogue, cult -- that want you dead or captured to suit their specific agendas. Including your very own sister! What I love about the writing of this series is that it stays fresh and alive and the situations -- while dramatic -- don't seem contrived. The cast of characters that come and go out of the storyline are all richly drawn no matter how brief their contribution to the story. This time around I'm particularly partial to the lovely Natalya and her broken English in America to rescue a Russian Cosmonaut. All I can say is I can't wait to see what happens next!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Curie

    This was more of everything I loved about the first two volumes of this story. It made me giggle, turn pages in hyper-speed and just have a good time altogether. I felt like there was less depth to it this time around. That doesn't mean that there wasn't loads of stuff happening: a Russian Soyuz capsule is coming down, carrying three passengers: one woman and two men. Men, guys, men! We also get confronted with Yorick's survivors guilt and our group running against a roadblock in Arizona in form This was more of everything I loved about the first two volumes of this story. It made me giggle, turn pages in hyper-speed and just have a good time altogether. I felt like there was less depth to it this time around. That doesn't mean that there wasn't loads of stuff happening: a Russian Soyuz capsule is coming down, carrying three passengers: one woman and two men. Men, guys, men! We also get confronted with Yorick's survivors guilt and our group running against a roadblock in Arizona in form of the not-so-friendly female remains of the Sons of Arizona militia. I'm still in love with Yorick big time. He's still far from being smart, but he's good-hearted and that makes all the difference. I think he's still develop into something rather fascinating in upcoming issues... I'm also starting to like characters that I hadn't gotten quite used to in previous issues. Dr. Mann for example. I don't know why. It's taken a while. There were passages that I didn't quite get the point of. Two volumes focussed on this theatre group performing plays based around the Last Man on Earth, which is a nice gimmick, but they didn't really add anything to either the main plot nor were interesting enough to work on their own. All in all, this is a fast-paced and still exciting series that I am happy I still got multiple issues left of.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed this one even more than the last one! There are still some issues of backwards transphobic comments and some other problematic dialogue. Aside from that, this series has quickly become one of my favorites! Yourick continues to develop into a more complex character. It was painful watching him go through 711's suicide intervention. The scenes with him and PJ were adorable and his relationship with 355 continues to interest me. Their partnership has clearly grown into a friendship and it' I enjoyed this one even more than the last one! There are still some issues of backwards transphobic comments and some other problematic dialogue. Aside from that, this series has quickly become one of my favorites! Yourick continues to develop into a more complex character. It was painful watching him go through 711's suicide intervention. The scenes with him and PJ were adorable and his relationship with 355 continues to interest me. Their partnership has clearly grown into a friendship and it's awesome to see. Admittedly, the playwright storyline waned a bit for me at times but it was interesting to see how other female characters have coped since the plague. The real standout for this book was Dr. Mann's and 355's relationship. I have wanted them to get together since the first book and this just made me want that even more! I was really drawn to Dr. Mann's confession that she just wanted 355 to like her, her bravery and trust in 355's judgement. I love the way they've come into their own way of communicating and 355 is as protective over her as she is Yourick. Sure, her pretending/pretending to pretend (?) she has feelings for Yourick was interesting but a relationship between her and Dr. Mann would be awesome. I have no doubt the next book will be just as great as the last 2.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    In “Y: The Last Man, The Deluxe Edition, Book Two”: The Israelis, tasked with finding Yorrick, have followed him to a nowhere town in Kansas, which also happens to be where the three survivors (two male and one female) of the Soyuz Space Station have programmed their escape capsule to land; meanwhile, since movies and TV and most of the nation’s electrical grid are nonexistent since 50% of the population died, traveling acting troupes are the new big thing; Yorrick’s monkey, Ampersand, is picked In “Y: The Last Man, The Deluxe Edition, Book Two”: The Israelis, tasked with finding Yorrick, have followed him to a nowhere town in Kansas, which also happens to be where the three survivors (two male and one female) of the Soyuz Space Station have programmed their escape capsule to land; meanwhile, since movies and TV and most of the nation’s electrical grid are nonexistent since 50% of the population died, traveling acting troupes are the new big thing; Yorrick’s monkey, Ampersand, is picked up by said acting troupe, which is putting on a show called “The Last Man on Earth”, and there is a ninja lurking in the shadows; in Arizona, a militia group called the Sons of Arizona (a misnomer since all of the sons---and fathers, brothers, and husbands---are all dead) is blocking all traffic to the West Coast, which is suffering severe water and food shortages. Brian K. Vaughan/Pia Guerra’s exciting and thought-provoking graphic novel series about gender identity politics is pretty awesome, and it definitely cements Vaughan (his series “Saga” is one of---correction: my all-time favorite comic series, ever) as one of the best contemporary graphic novelists working today.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    One Small Step (#11-15). The third arc examines another interesting consequence of the "Y" die-off: what if there were men in space who didn't succumb to the plague (or whatever it was)? It's an interesting idea that lets Vaughan really expand the scope of his story, but on the downside it takes time away from Yorick and the rest of our protagonists. Despite that, it maintains some nice tension and keeps connecting up threads from the first volume, this time in the form of the Israelis. In the e One Small Step (#11-15). The third arc examines another interesting consequence of the "Y" die-off: what if there were men in space who didn't succumb to the plague (or whatever it was)? It's an interesting idea that lets Vaughan really expand the scope of his story, but on the downside it takes time away from Yorick and the rest of our protagonists. Despite that, it maintains some nice tension and keeps connecting up threads from the first volume, this time in the form of the Israelis. In the end, you hope that we'll see some of these characters again, down the road [7/10]. Comedy & Tragedy (#16-17). Side-stories with different characters have worked well in some of the more sophisticated comics of the last few decades. Vaughan's first try on the topic doesn't really come off well, though, the main problem being that the traveling troupe that form the protagonists of this mini-arc don't really have much character. There's a bit of fun metatextuality and a good in media res story for Yorick and crew, but it's not enough to really make these two issues worthwhile [5/10]. Safeword (#18-20). I'm not a fan of the whole psychological-assault-as-an-intervention trope, and that's pretty much what this story is. Yeah, we get some insight into Yorick, and yeah it's got an ironic ending, but otherwise, it's a so-so read. And so horribly over the top. [5/10]. Widow's Pass (#21-23). Fortunately, we finally get back on track with "Widow's Pass", which has us ever-so-tantalizingly close to California. We get a new interesting situation (paramilitary right-wing wacko women), believable guest stars with depth, and lots of great moments and interactions for all of our main cast. And that doesn't even speak of the ending, which is ... [8/10].

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brahm

    Book 2 was a fast read (300 pages in a couple hours in one evening), still a fun premise, action moves fast and keeps the pages turning, and the writing quite funny too. It's not faultless but I don't think it's supposed to be a "hard" apocalypse story, clearly the author & art team are having some fun. Book 2 was a fast read (300 pages in a couple hours in one evening), still a fun premise, action moves fast and keeps the pages turning, and the writing quite funny too. It's not faultless but I don't think it's supposed to be a "hard" apocalypse story, clearly the author & art team are having some fun.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Richter

    How is it a story always get better when a dominatrix shows up? second volume get stronger in both story and illustrations.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Introduction: After reading the first book of Brian K. Vaughan’s classic graphic novel, “Y: The Last Man,” I just had to read more from this Eisner Award winning series! So, I finally picked up the second book to “Y: The Last Man” and it was just as INTENSE, HEARTBREAKING AND EXCITING as the last volume! What is this story about? Yorick Brown, along with his new allies, Agent 355 and Dr. Allison Mann, still embark on the journey to reach Dr. Mann’s lab in San Francisco so that way, Dr. Man Introduction: After reading the first book of Brian K. Vaughan’s classic graphic novel, “Y: The Last Man,” I just had to read more from this Eisner Award winning series! So, I finally picked up the second book to “Y: The Last Man” and it was just as INTENSE, HEARTBREAKING AND EXCITING as the last volume! What is this story about? Yorick Brown, along with his new allies, Agent 355 and Dr. Allison Mann, still embark on the journey to reach Dr. Mann’s lab in San Francisco so that way, Dr. Mann can provide a cure for the epidemic that broke out and killed all the males in the world. Suddenly, the three allies are confronted by a Russian woman named Natalya Zamyatin who claims that there are still men in outer space and that they are on their way to Earth! Unfortunately, the four new allies will also have to face against the Israeli troops who want to take Yorick in! What I loved about this story: Brian K. Vaughan’s writing: Wow! Brian K. Vaughan’s writing is just as stellar in this volume as it was in the last volume! As I had mentioned before, I really enjoyed the set up that Brian K. Vaughan brought to this series as you have to wonder about what the world will be like without men. In this volume, Brian K. Vaughan further develops the story as we are introduced to more obstacles that Yorick and his allies have to get through to get to San Francisco. I loved the introduction of Natalya Zamyatin as she brings an interesting dynamic to the story as being the one who warns Agent 355 and Yorick about more men coming to Earth and I was on the edge of my seat trying to see what will become of the male astronauts and whether or not their arrival to Earth will change how everything in the story has been progressed so far. It was also great seeing another tough heroine in the story as Natalya will soon surprise you in this volume! I have been enjoying the intense storytelling that Brian K. Vaughan brings to this volume and I loved the way that Brian K. Vaughan had really developed the characters as we see a darker side to some of these characters that we never saw in the previous volume which made the stories even more interesting! Pia Guerra, Goran Parlov, and Paul Chadwick’s artwork: Pia Guerra, Goran Parlov and Paul Chadwick’s artwork was amazing in this volume as all the characters are drawn dramatically and realistically. I loved the artwork done by Pia Guerra in the stories “One Small Step” and “Safeword” as the characters have realistic features and the backgrounds were realistically drawn, especially the scenes with the trees. Paul Chadwick’s artwork in “Comedy and Tragedy” is similar to Pia Guerra’s artwork as he does a brilliant job in shadowing the character’s faces whenever they are in a dark lighting. Goran Parlov’s artwork in “Widow’s Pass” probably has the most well-defined facial expressions for the characters as the characters show realistic shocked expressions on their faces and their hair is drawn beautifully as they are wavy. What made me feel uncomfortable about this story: Just like the first volume, there is some strong language in this volume including the infamous “f” word and “s” word and anyone who does not like reading strong language might want to skim over these words. Also, this volume has more gory violence than the last volume as there are more characters being killed in gruesome ways such as some characters being shot to death and blood is shown spurting everywhere. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Y: The Last Man: The Deluxe Edition Book Two” is a truly brilliant follow-up to the first volume and anyone who is a huge fan of Brian K. Vaughan’s works or loves reading about post-apocalyptic worlds will definitely want to pick this series up! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  20. 5 out of 5

    B. P. Rinehart

    I;m glad I read this book, as it addressed one of my key concerns of this series: protagonist character development. We finally see Yorrick "grow the beard" some and it is done as well as you could hope in this collection (which collects volumes 3 & 4) and I hope it is sustained in the future volumes. I am not a very experienced reader of sci-fi, but I know my dystopian fairly well so I get a little agitated when the genre is not properly executed. This volume , though, is handled well. I;m glad I read this book, as it addressed one of my key concerns of this series: protagonist character development. We finally see Yorrick "grow the beard" some and it is done as well as you could hope in this collection (which collects volumes 3 & 4) and I hope it is sustained in the future volumes. I am not a very experienced reader of sci-fi, but I know my dystopian fairly well so I get a little agitated when the genre is not properly executed. This volume , though, is handled well.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Quite possibly the best graphic novel series I've read as an adult. It's a book that would have been trenchant and vital on its publication in 2002, but in light of #metoo and #timesup it's taken on even more relevance. This volume continues Yorick's – the "last man" of the title – westward journey with 355, the government agent sent by his Senator mother to protect him, and Dr. Mann, the physician who may have the secret to curing the plague that killed every man on the planet (except Yorick an Quite possibly the best graphic novel series I've read as an adult. It's a book that would have been trenchant and vital on its publication in 2002, but in light of #metoo and #timesup it's taken on even more relevance. This volume continues Yorick's – the "last man" of the title – westward journey with 355, the government agent sent by his Senator mother to protect him, and Dr. Mann, the physician who may have the secret to curing the plague that killed every man on the planet (except Yorick and his monkey Ampersand). Along the way, in the midst of plotlines involving the International Space Station, itinerant theater troupes, Israeli soldiers, and all-woman militias, author Vaughn takes up a range of thematic issues that still resonate more than 15 years after publication. Are men actually necessary? How does their unexpected absence affect the way women now view themselves? Are traditional gender roles suddenly and permanently obsolete? And if so, what should rise to take their place? What role does science play in this new reality? And where does one find hope in a situation that seems so intrinsically hopeless? It's sort of astonishingly deep stuff, and Vaughn's writing is insightful, funny, and profane. The book is aided by Pia Guerra's conventional-looking pencils, the combination of progressive, genre-busting writing with traditional art forming a cool little juxtaposition at the series' center. This whole thing really is a stunner.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cookie

    4.5 stars Definitely the best volume since the beginning. A lot of what appeared to be stupid plot points are explained here though I have to say explaining why Yorrick acts like he does does not explain why the women in charge let him risk his life. The BDSMish questionning was hilarious especially the mention that Sade helped invent it. Everything was quite nice here. One thing that irked me though SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER of course the one person that gets out alive is her. Sheesh...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Einar Jensen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The section with the actors was weird and derailed the story a bit, but the parts in Colorado and Arizona put it back on track.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    This review goes for the whole series. The comic is seemingly smart enough and self aware enough to be critical of its own misogyny. Or, it ought to be: it's full of bright, funny criticism of our society's misogyny and the entrenched, toxic objectification of women's bodies. Why, then, is there so much gratuitous objectification of nearly every female character? Why does every woman have a body of impossible proportions? Why is there so much senseless nudity? Either the comic isn't smart enough This review goes for the whole series. The comic is seemingly smart enough and self aware enough to be critical of its own misogyny. Or, it ought to be: it's full of bright, funny criticism of our society's misogyny and the entrenched, toxic objectification of women's bodies. Why, then, is there so much gratuitous objectification of nearly every female character? Why does every woman have a body of impossible proportions? Why is there so much senseless nudity? Either the comic isn't smart enough or woke enough to see its own TOO PAT BY FAR (given the subject manner) flaws, or it seems them and doesn't care. That leaves me to ask: why should I? Some more pros and cons: A world almost without men and the story focuses on a male protagonist who is endowed magically with the potent reproductive material to repopulate the earth--despite all the sardonic undercutting of the main theme, it's still the main theme. Lol? So much casual misogyny in the dialogue! I find it so obnoxious and gross that there are so many moments of women slurring other women and that being "ok" because... Ugh! It's porny! There is an issue titled "girl on girl." It's really, really, really moving, emotionally realistic, fun, pretty, and tonally brilliant. The ending, also, is pretty amazing. The only reason this thing is getting 3 stars is because it's a glorious feat of comic art with some fucking crippling flaws.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    What if all the men, except one young man and his male monkey pet, were wiped out all over the world and nobody knew why exactly? That's the setup for this series that takes a look at gender issues and progressive science versus a natural order of things. I like that the explanation for the plague is not known and there are several possibilities. In this volume we deal with the possibility that Yorick is not the only human male still alive, Israeli agents trying to abduct him, a play about the L What if all the men, except one young man and his male monkey pet, were wiped out all over the world and nobody knew why exactly? That's the setup for this series that takes a look at gender issues and progressive science versus a natural order of things. I like that the explanation for the plague is not known and there are several possibilities. In this volume we deal with the possibility that Yorick is not the only human male still alive, Israeli agents trying to abduct him, a play about the Last Man on Earth, Yorick's conflicting subconscious emotions to kill himself and the push to San Francisco through a militant zone in Arizona. The main character, Yorick, is a putz and sometimes clueless but believable enough even though some might argue he is a passive character who has very little “game” with women. My favorite part in this volume was the hallucinogenic voyage undertaken unwillingly by Yorick. This is a good starting read for people new to comics/graphic novels. The series has received 5 prestigious Eisner Awards. Hollywood has been trying to make this into a movie since 2007. Some say this series saved Vertigo Comics from financial problems. The deluxe edition includes a watered down script in the back. CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B plus; STORY/PLOTTING: B plus; ARTWORK: B plus; THEMES: B plus; WHEN READ: February 2012; OVERALL GRADE: B plus.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J.M. Hushour

    My estimation of this comic seems to be wilting with every passing issue I read. The three main characters, swiftly devolving into smug, pop-culture reference-vomiting mirror universe versions of themselves, move from crisis to crisis trying to get the last man on Earth to California for reasons that I have, by now, forgotten. There's a lab there or something? Along they way Yorick and his conveniently pigeon-holed compaions move from one psychotic group of women to another. I mean, seriously? W My estimation of this comic seems to be wilting with every passing issue I read. The three main characters, swiftly devolving into smug, pop-culture reference-vomiting mirror universe versions of themselves, move from crisis to crisis trying to get the last man on Earth to California for reasons that I have, by now, forgotten. There's a lab there or something? Along they way Yorick and his conveniently pigeon-holed compaions move from one psychotic group of women to another. I mean, seriously? With the men all gone, it seems like every other woman these guys meet is a Mad Maxian, pistol-wielding militant lesbian or posturing right-wing lesbian maenads. Yeah, there's the neat part about the inmates of an all-female prison who set up a little town for themselves. And the women doing the theater thing. But overall, the antagonists are militant psychotics. Is this what women are without the men around? And Yorick the main character...I'm not sure about this guy. I mean, he's really holding out waiting for his girlfriend in Australia to show up? I think a great story arc would be Yorick going nuts and humping everything in sight and reaping the consequences. How great will that Eden seem when all the shit starts coming down, daddy-o? It'd be better than him getting pointlessly near-raped and shot at by femminazis.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    What have I learned in Book Two? I am still hazy on Agent 355's agenda, but she's growing on me big time. Dr. Mann is amazing. And hilarious. Some women have become a little psychotic. Some are still sane. Some have hearts of stone. Some are still good. Most are powerful, which isn't always predictable. I can't believe how many of these characters have grown on me. I also had my first experience of crushing on Yorick. It was when he drew a gun. I don't know what this says about me, but maybe I'll What have I learned in Book Two? I am still hazy on Agent 355's agenda, but she's growing on me big time. Dr. Mann is amazing. And hilarious. Some women have become a little psychotic. Some are still sane. Some have hearts of stone. Some are still good. Most are powerful, which isn't always predictable. I can't believe how many of these characters have grown on me. I also had my first experience of crushing on Yorick. It was when he drew a gun. I don't know what this says about me, but maybe I'll talk it out on a therapist's couch someday. I just want to take a moment to fan-girl freak out because I am in love with everything about Y: The Last Man. 5 STARS

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mitchel Broussard

    Re-reading this I'm realizing that places I previously viewed as dead-spots were just cleverly disguised moments of foreshadowing. The characters ring true, the situations are tense, and the tone can ping-pong from dire to jovial and never lose a beat. There are epically bite-sized episodic adventures that flow seamlessly together, endless super out-there pop culture references, nimble plotting, and a lovably daft B.A. in English protagonist. It's Y: The Last Man in rare form. Re-reading this I'm realizing that places I previously viewed as dead-spots were just cleverly disguised moments of foreshadowing. The characters ring true, the situations are tense, and the tone can ping-pong from dire to jovial and never lose a beat. There are epically bite-sized episodic adventures that flow seamlessly together, endless super out-there pop culture references, nimble plotting, and a lovably daft B.A. in English protagonist. It's Y: The Last Man in rare form.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Henry Blackwood

    I’m still conflicted on whether I like this series or not. I really liked, again, how the trade came to an end. I thought it was a great way to bring the trade to a close, it worked on a number of levels. But at times, this series feels really disjointed. For example, the highly meta issues centred around the play was awful for me. I personally thought it was the most boring angle BKV could’ve explored for that story and I felt like it took away from the steady character development and pacing t I’m still conflicted on whether I like this series or not. I really liked, again, how the trade came to an end. I thought it was a great way to bring the trade to a close, it worked on a number of levels. But at times, this series feels really disjointed. For example, the highly meta issues centred around the play was awful for me. I personally thought it was the most boring angle BKV could’ve explored for that story and I felt like it took away from the steady character development and pacing that had been built in the issues leading up to that section. It feels like stuff like that happens more often than it should and I don’t think a good story can have this as a trait and remain an indisputably good comic. Yorick is much more likeable in this and doesn’t fall into the same pitfalls as the first trade (never listening to 355 and foolishly thinking he can do stuff himself). But he’s still not as good and as ‘sagely’ as BKV wants him to be. This is still a very interesting story but the flaws are very obvious for me.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    I’m enjoying the art work a lot in this series. Consistent and the characters aren’t confusing like in some I’ve read. The storyline is going somewhere and the timescales are realistic, unlike some post apocalyptic stories where people get from A to B in record time. This group are taking months to travel from one side of the USA to the other, which I imagine would be true with little to no mechanical transport options. I wish the groups of women the main characters meet are explored in depth mo I’m enjoying the art work a lot in this series. Consistent and the characters aren’t confusing like in some I’ve read. The storyline is going somewhere and the timescales are realistic, unlike some post apocalyptic stories where people get from A to B in record time. This group are taking months to travel from one side of the USA to the other, which I imagine would be true with little to no mechanical transport options. I wish the groups of women the main characters meet are explored in depth more. They’re just a few pages and then on to the next group. I feel like some of these women could have some backstory. Like the Israelis in the last book had more to them than just enter the scene and leave. I’m also not sold so much on the groups of women sometimes. Like the Amazons in the last book I find the SOA in this volume to be a bit unbelievable.

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