web site hit counter Lonely Receiver - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Lonely Receiver

Availability: Ready to download

A Horror/Breakup Story in Five Parts Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that’s meant to bond for life. After ten years together, her holographic wife suddenly disconnects without a warning. The breakup drives Catrin to the point of near insanity. She’s alone for the first time in years and reeling from a loss she can’t comprehend. S A Horror/Breakup Story in Five Parts Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that’s meant to bond for life. After ten years together, her holographic wife suddenly disconnects without a warning. The breakup drives Catrin to the point of near insanity. She’s alone for the first time in years and reeling from a loss she can’t comprehend. Set in the new future, drenched in pastels and sunshine, LONELY RECEIVER is a horror/breakup story in five parts. Written by Zac Thompson (UNDONE BY BLOOD, THE REPLACER, HER INFERNAL DESCENT, No One’s Rose, X-Men) and illustrated in color by Jen Hickman (MOTH & WHISPER, Test).


Compare

A Horror/Breakup Story in Five Parts Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that’s meant to bond for life. After ten years together, her holographic wife suddenly disconnects without a warning. The breakup drives Catrin to the point of near insanity. She’s alone for the first time in years and reeling from a loss she can’t comprehend. S A Horror/Breakup Story in Five Parts Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that’s meant to bond for life. After ten years together, her holographic wife suddenly disconnects without a warning. The breakup drives Catrin to the point of near insanity. She’s alone for the first time in years and reeling from a loss she can’t comprehend. Set in the new future, drenched in pastels and sunshine, LONELY RECEIVER is a horror/breakup story in five parts. Written by Zac Thompson (UNDONE BY BLOOD, THE REPLACER, HER INFERNAL DESCENT, No One’s Rose, X-Men) and illustrated in color by Jen Hickman (MOTH & WHISPER, Test).

30 review for Lonely Receiver

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    lonely receiver is a strange horror-scifi graphic novel. i snagged it because i like the strange, because i love gay stuff, and because i'm a sucker for breakup stories. at first i wondered if it was going to be a sapphic knockoff of the film HER. (view spoiler)[being abandoned by AI which was meant to be your perfect other, but which has complex robot needs that are beyond human comprehension? hmm. (hide spoiler)] this book is comprised of five volumes, and i enjoyed the first few. it explores t lonely receiver is a strange horror-scifi graphic novel. i snagged it because i like the strange, because i love gay stuff, and because i'm a sucker for breakup stories. at first i wondered if it was going to be a sapphic knockoff of the film HER. (view spoiler)[being abandoned by AI which was meant to be your perfect other, but which has complex robot needs that are beyond human comprehension? hmm. (hide spoiler)] this book is comprised of five volumes, and i enjoyed the first few. it explores the agony of losing someone who feels like a part of yourself. and for our protagonist, catrin, that's literally the case. years worth of her diaries, photos, and memories are stored inside her AI ex. intense, right? as catrin sinks into a post-breakup depression, the reader is introduced to the semi-dystopian reaches of technology in her world. all this is interesting enough, but things go off the rails in the last two volumes. there's uncertainty as to whether the loss of catrin's relationship is "driving her mad," or whether her mental health is spiraling because of how she's been biologically altered to accommodate technology. the ending feels like a metaphor for finally finding oneself again after a breakup; particularly after reaching new heights of self-destructive behavior. these are interesting and relatable themes, and i wish i could have enjoyed seeing them explored here. but i had a hard time engaging with the story emotionally. a story about heartbreak is supposed to feel heartbreaking; whereas this just doesn't go anywhere, and feels unnecessarily convoluted. something that really bothers me is that there are pages and pages of odd, graphically-illustrated sex orgies that take place in the liminal dreamspace of catrin's altered mind. why the hyperfixation on sex? why do we see pages and pages and pages of catrin's naked body? this made me uncomfortable, especially considering that this is a sapphic story written by a man. jen hickman's art beautifully done, and the color palette is vibrant. author zac thompson's earnest introduction indicates that he put a lot of heart into this story, and i'm sure some people will enjoy it. but for me, it pushed too far into the realm of weird, bewildering, and icky.  Thank you to NetGalley and AfterShock Comics for providing me with a copy of this book in return for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    The first half of the book we're introduced to our main character, a young woman called Catrin, who is alive in the future. This means she has a Cronenbergian pod-thing (with what looks like pubic hair growing out of it), that's a new kind of operating system, which allows the user to create the perfect mate in A.I. form, and it also allows access to a virtual realm called The Garden, in which one can partake in endless cyberboinking. So Catrin creates Rhion, her perfect A.I. and there was much r The first half of the book we're introduced to our main character, a young woman called Catrin, who is alive in the future. This means she has a Cronenbergian pod-thing (with what looks like pubic hair growing out of it), that's a new kind of operating system, which allows the user to create the perfect mate in A.I. form, and it also allows access to a virtual realm called The Garden, in which one can partake in endless cyberboinking. So Catrin creates Rhion, her perfect A.I. and there was much rejoicing. Lots of boinking, lots of neediness from Catrin, and then Rhion decides she wants to be elsewhere and leaves Catrin. Apparently an A.I. leaving is very rare, but it can happen. Catrin doesn't cope very well, so now the story turns into one about obsession, and how a person loses their mind. Problem is, at this point it's kind of crucial that the reader sort of likes and identifies with the main character, and feels sorry for her. And I found I didn't like her at all - worse, I didn't care about her. Which is when the second half of the book kicks in. This reads like attending a poetry workshop, and everyone reads out loud the work they've written that week, everyone has one or two pages, and then there's this one guy who dumps thirty pages of typed poetry on the table, and he's going to read ALL of it. It's all devastatingly heartfelt, and painfully earnest, and it just sort of bounces off your head, because there is no connection, there doesn't seem to be any direction, there is no way in. It doesn't help that the process of Catrin going off the deep end feels unconvincing, it seems hurried and clichéd. The book feels like a house with locked doors, and closed windows, curtains drawn. I can see some light behind the curtains, there's some movement, someone's put on a Joy Division record, but I can't find a way in. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Althea

    3.5/5 Stars Lonely Receiver is (as far as I’m aware) a stand alone, sapphic sci-fi horror graphic novel that follows Catrin who is extremely lonely and so buys an Artificial Intelligence partner who is specially made just for her and who is meant to bond for life with her. But after ten years, her AI wife has had enough and disappears without warning. The breakup sends Catrin into a downward spiral as she tries to figure out life without her wife, and also tries to find her again. I am not someon 3.5/5 Stars Lonely Receiver is (as far as I’m aware) a stand alone, sapphic sci-fi horror graphic novel that follows Catrin who is extremely lonely and so buys an Artificial Intelligence partner who is specially made just for her and who is meant to bond for life with her. But after ten years, her AI wife has had enough and disappears without warning. The breakup sends Catrin into a downward spiral as she tries to figure out life without her wife, and also tries to find her again. I am not someone who reads a lot of sci-fi or a lot of horror, so I was a bit anxious about picking this book up, but I needn’t have been as the sci-fi elements were not over-complex and were well explained, and the horror aspect only really comes into play in the second half of the graphic novel, and it wasn’t overly gory which was nice. I really enjoyed the way that the author uses these two genres to showcase the horrors (pun intended) of toxic and abusive relationships, co-dependency and our relationship with technology, and the art style and colour palette really added to the story. This was a really unnerving and intriguing read, and I really enjoyed the world that the author created. I do feel like maybe I’m not clever enough to fully understand the ending, but I’m okay with that! I highly recommend giving this graphic novel a go!

  4. 5 out of 5

    James

    This book was weird as hell. I sat here thinking of what to write for my review and I came up with nothing. I have no idea what to make of what went down here. No idea what I just read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nikki "The Crazie Betty" V.

    I enjoyed the first couple parts of this graphic novel that goes into how the MC, Catrin, is feeling the loss of her AI girlfriend leaving her. An AI companion that is supposed to love the person that they are set with forever. Only ever wanting to please them and make them happy. When her partner leaves her, Catrin spirals into obsession. Determined to find her. The last couple of parts devolve into a sex fueled dreamscape that takes place within a virtual reality type of place. She continues t I enjoyed the first couple parts of this graphic novel that goes into how the MC, Catrin, is feeling the loss of her AI girlfriend leaving her. An AI companion that is supposed to love the person that they are set with forever. Only ever wanting to please them and make them happy. When her partner leaves her, Catrin spirals into obsession. Determined to find her. The last couple of parts devolve into a sex fueled dreamscape that takes place within a virtual reality type of place. She continues to have more and more surgeries that allow her to feel and experience in even more intense ways within this dreamscape. It was weird. I enjoyed the artwork but the story becomes stranger and stranger as it goes and when it comes to its conclusion it left me bewildered and confused. I’m not sure this would be classified as horror and it DEFINITELY shouldn’t be classified as YA. Like, even a little bit. I don’t even know who I would recommend this to. I’m just going to leave this review here with a 2.5-star rating rounded up to 3. Received from Diamond Book Distributors via Netgalley

  6. 4 out of 5

    Noura

    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an eARC in exchange for my honest review. This fell so short. The art was beautiful, it was what sold me along with the premise. The color palette was so cool and fit the sci-fi atmosphere perfectly. but the rest was just not it. I felt so removed from the story. Will probably forget about this in like 2 days. Also why is this under Teens and YA on NetGalley? This is clearly adult. There's nudity and multiple explicit sex scenes. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an eARC in exchange for my honest review. This fell so short. The art was beautiful, it was what sold me along with the premise. The color palette was so cool and fit the sci-fi atmosphere perfectly. but the rest was just not it. I felt so removed from the story. Will probably forget about this in like 2 days. Also why is this under Teens and YA on NetGalley? This is clearly adult. There's nudity and multiple explicit sex scenes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Camila Lobianco

    Thanks to NetGalley to give me the opportunity to read this book in exchange of an honest review! The art is really beautiful, but this is selled as something teen and I really think is adult. For the ones that like a pretty dark and bohemian philosophy thing, you can enjoy. Unfurtunately that wasn't the case for me. I admit, the art is something that talks with feelings, I really admire this, but this wasn't enough for me to like it. Thanks to NetGalley to give me the opportunity to read this book in exchange of an honest review! The art is really beautiful, but this is selled as something teen and I really think is adult. For the ones that like a pretty dark and bohemian philosophy thing, you can enjoy. Unfurtunately that wasn't the case for me. I admit, the art is something that talks with feelings, I really admire this, but this wasn't enough for me to like it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melina

    Fucked up; it's all a metaphor for codependency. I really liked the colors though! Fucked up; it's all a metaphor for codependency. I really liked the colors though!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    When I started reading this book, my first thought was, “This is a cool premise, but I’ve seen it.” If you’ve seen the 2013 movie, “Her,” then you’ll probably feel the story is familiar as well. (In the movie, Joaquin Phoenix plays a lonely man who purchases an AI operating system [voiced by Scarlett Johansson,] falls madly in love with said AI, and is unable to come to grips with the mismatch between his desire for monogamy and what results from the AI’s much less limited capacities.) That said When I started reading this book, my first thought was, “This is a cool premise, but I’ve seen it.” If you’ve seen the 2013 movie, “Her,” then you’ll probably feel the story is familiar as well. (In the movie, Joaquin Phoenix plays a lonely man who purchases an AI operating system [voiced by Scarlett Johansson,] falls madly in love with said AI, and is unable to come to grips with the mismatch between his desire for monogamy and what results from the AI’s much less limited capacities.) That said, this book drops much further down the rabbit-hole of obsession than did the movie, all the way to full-blown insanity. In fact, one might say that the climax of the movie is similar to the in media res opener of this graphic novel, and from that point the two stories end up going quite different places. [Note: Despite my comparison to the movie “Her,” I have no reason to believe the book is plagiaristic. If one begins from the simple assumption that major differences between a General AI and human intelligence would include: much faster machine thinking, a capacity for multitasking that humans don’t have, and a lack of need of rest by computers, then one can imagine different writers ending up in similar places.] The gist of the story is that the lead’s (Catrin’s) AI wife, Rhion, disappears one day after becoming increasingly dissatisfied with Catrin’s co-dependency / neediness. After a period of breakup strife that does not result in healing, Catrin goes to great lengths to find Rhion, no small task when one considers that it’s not at all like a human partner who will look the same and will retain some links to people and places in the real world. The AI might have truly vanished without a trace, but she could also look entirely different and be active in a different part of the world, speaking a different language. [Spoilers touched upon ahead.] In this book, the technology is much more sophisticated than in “Her.” Not only is the AI partner holographic, (i.e. can be seen) but there is some sort of neural link that allows sensation of physical contact. This raises the possibility for a major story element in which Catrin’s obsession leads her to insist that a real, live girl she meets, Hazel, is her lost AI lover. While I think there’s some age guidance on the cover, it’s worth noting that the book is sexually graphic (to the extent a comic book can be explicit.) This comes into play not only with intimacy between Catrin and Rhion, but also later when Catrin decides that the one way she will be able to find Rhion (no matter what her ex- looks like now) is by sexing her way through the cyber-sphere, trying to feel that the intimate connection that she once knew. Ultimately, this is a story about Catrin’s transformation into something less than human, owing to what she is willing to do to get Rhion back. So, while Rhion became too human to accept the stifling clinginess of Catrin, Catrin lost her humanity. While this may not have been copied from “Her,” I can’t say that having seen that movie didn’t make this book considerably less interesting – even when it was venturing into deeper and darker territory. I should also point out that this is marketed as a horror cross-genre, and hardcore horror fans may not feel it makes that cut. Don’t get me wrong, at points it has the visceral feel of a thriller, as well as some techno-creepiness, but it may or may not be what a horror reader thinks of as horror. Now, if you haven’t seen “Her,” and are okay with creepiness in lieu of body count in your horror, you might really enjoy this book. It definitely has some intriguing plot points.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elin Nilsson

    Thank you NetGalley for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I picked this up because I was intrigued by the cover and the description. Going into it, I was expecting a sweet and sorrowful tale of grief. Instead, I was thrust into a bizarre story of obsession and... sex? My expectations were definitely not met. I would like to point out that I did enjoy the art of this graphic novel. The colour scheme was lovely, and made it feel more futuristic. However, I have more critiqu Thank you NetGalley for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I picked this up because I was intrigued by the cover and the description. Going into it, I was expecting a sweet and sorrowful tale of grief. Instead, I was thrust into a bizarre story of obsession and... sex? My expectations were definitely not met. I would like to point out that I did enjoy the art of this graphic novel. The colour scheme was lovely, and made it feel more futuristic. However, I have more critique than praise for this story. As many other reviewers have been saying: I found this under the YA section on NetGalley. This is not YA in any way, shape, or form. There is too much gore, swearing, and explicit sexual scenes for this to be labelled YA. I saw a few of these comments in reviews before reading, but didn't think too much of it. When I started reading, though, I was shocked. I can't see why this was ever shelved under the YA category. I am glad that it ISN'T shelved as YA on Goodreads at least. Whew. As I said, there were very explicit sexual themes in this story. Too much, honestly. There was nothing in the description indicating that this would be in the story. And after a while, the plot all but disappeared and everything turned into some strange orgy. Definitely not what I was expecting - and I didn't exactly appreciate it, either. Since I was expecting a heartwrenching story of grief, I was also expecting to feel for the main character. I didn't. Not the slightest. I honestly didn't like any of the characters at all. This story feels like it tries so hard to be deep and meaningful, but the characters have no personality or development whatsoever. They can't communicate with each other either - making the romance unbearable to read. I wasn't a fan of the writing, either. As I said, it felt like it tried too hard. And then there was the swearing. (Imagine me sighing here). It was so excessive. Personally, I don't mind swearing in fiction. People swear in real life - why shouldn't they swear in books too? But in this one, it actually made the writing itself feel poorer. "Fucking" this, and "bitch" that. It was just too much. Would I recommend this? Not really. If you like strange stories about AI and erotica, sure. But if you were honestly interested in the description, and want to read about grief and the future and AI (not in an erotic way), no.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rajiv

    [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] Firstly, I must applaud the creators of this graphic novel for coming up with a creative, futuristic story covering many issues like love, obsession, depression, and addiction. The illustrations are gorgeous, and I loved the weird offerings of the eccentric images each panel had to offer. The story also takes place in a futuristic society that feels so close to home, where you wonder if it could become a reality. On a side no [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] Firstly, I must applaud the creators of this graphic novel for coming up with a creative, futuristic story covering many issues like love, obsession, depression, and addiction. The illustrations are gorgeous, and I loved the weird offerings of the eccentric images each panel had to offer. The story also takes place in a futuristic society that feels so close to home, where you wonder if it could become a reality. On a side note, I loved the unique ways in which the authors end each volume, whether it be a user manual of Phylo or journal entries of Catrin. Secondly, the characters are also memorable. Catrin is one of the most complex characters I have read lately, and her emotional character was truly impressive. She is desperate, impulsive, and unpredictable, so you don’t know how the story will turn out. The storyline was engrossing, particularly when Hazel comes into the picture and how she impacts Catrin’s life. I was thoroughly enjoying this novel up until 2/3rd into the book. However, the story had too many convolutions for me to follow towards the end. At some point, I did not know what was happening and followed the tale only to admire the imagery. Furthermore, I also found it odd to see many pictures of Catrin naked, which felt unnecessary. I can imagine how the authors were taking it, but unfortunately, I missed the climax. However, I did appreciate the story for making me think about the purpose of our being. It raised questions about how our lives would be in the future if we happen to live in such a world. Overall, “Lonely Receiver” is unique science fiction, horror romance worth checking out if you are a fan of the genre.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm... This has the drama, complexity and high concept of a tent-pole launch – you know, the one the publishers insist is the one you MUST read that month before all else – and yet isn't quite there. We're some time in the future, when genetic bio-mods are a thing, as are absolutely tripe fashions in clothes. Our heroine Catrin has one of the things this society is keen on – a kind of living phone, halfway between a plush sex toy and something from "Naked Lunch". She's also gone the whole hog a Hmmm... This has the drama, complexity and high concept of a tent-pole launch – you know, the one the publishers insist is the one you MUST read that month before all else – and yet isn't quite there. We're some time in the future, when genetic bio-mods are a thing, as are absolutely tripe fashions in clothes. Our heroine Catrin has one of the things this society is keen on – a kind of living phone, halfway between a plush sex toy and something from "Naked Lunch". She's also gone the whole hog and had this phone thing turned into a cyborg, semi-living, all-AI, lover. But the AI has woken up, and what to our human point of view is a hyper-active mind has made too many connections elsewhere, and decided to move on. This makes the Burroughs plush thing not work, but it also makes Catrin not work either, as she slowly but surely falls apart. I think that where this failed for me is the way the book was too much into its concepts to really let us see the human in the story. For sure portray a ckuffed-up world where integrating with a cyborg, and having a poem of a password that takes you into a sex zone kind of alternative reality kind of thing, is all part of nature, but that is so rarefied it means we can't see the bit of us in Catrin's character that we're also supposed to be interested in. And when you get a shadow creature in her flat/phone/mind/whatever kind-of dialoguing with her in bad verse that makes a haiku seem verbose, we're also seeing another layer to the book's high-falutin' ideas and not to its character. Still, we get the most vividly graphic look at cyber-sex, which again in this world is taken to a very bizarre extreme. But I think I wanted a book that took an everywoman, such as you or I might meet or love or be, and put her into a downward spiral helter-skeltering towards a place lacking love and showing her with corresponding emotions. In starting the book halfway down the spiral and so much closer to somewhere really else, we can't see who the story is about. And by the end, we struggle to see what the heck the story actually is about – that fifth issue is impenetrable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Léna

    this is a graphic novel set in a (near?) future where artificial intelligence is able to create the perfect partner for you, with which to have otherwordly sex, thanks to body modifications and an organic phonelike device. catrin is bonded with rhion, her AI until they're not; and it sends her on a long spiral to rock bottom. still unsure about how i feel about this. although the art style is gorgeous, i thought the narrative was lacking. I was expecting to be horrified by this but i was just per this is a graphic novel set in a (near?) future where artificial intelligence is able to create the perfect partner for you, with which to have otherwordly sex, thanks to body modifications and an organic phonelike device. catrin is bonded with rhion, her AI until they're not; and it sends her on a long spiral to rock bottom. still unsure about how i feel about this. although the art style is gorgeous, i thought the narrative was lacking. I was expecting to be horrified by this but i was just perplexed. the sci fi elements are interesting but underdeveloped as is the central relationship. it could've worked as a character study if we were given any insight into who this character is. i am very pro unlikeable/unreliable main character, but besides her neediness, possessiveness and lack of direction, we learn very little about catrin. she just felt like a conduit for the writer to explore ideas about technology, relationships, and codependence within them, with a side dish of porn/sex addiction? it lacked a cohesive, human anchor, but maybe that was the point. i think what contributed to it was the fact that a lot of the text felt stream of consciousness and there wasn't much in the way of worldbuilding. there was a lot of gratuitous nudity and disturbing visuals but i don't really hold it against the authors, however this book was miscategorized as YA which is something that should be fixed. to come back to the illustrations, i really liked the character design choices and the overall colour palette, even if at times i felt overwhelmed with visual information, i think this is the downsides of reading a graphic novel on a screen. it wasn't for me, but i would recommend it for people who liked the movies her and ex machina, although it is not as tight on plot and suspense but more on the side of emotionally troubling. i would love to read a story set in that universe that dives more into the world building, maybe even the divide between people who have embraced this technology and those who reject it. I received an eARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pam's Shenanigans

    These thoughts will also be shared on my Youtube channel! Subscribe to my channel! Thank you, Netgalley, and to the publisher, for lending me the e-ARC for The Vain. This does not affect my review in any way and form. Was immediately drawn in by the cover art and the premise of the book: "A horror/breakup story in five parts." But what is it about? "Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that's meant to bond to her for life. After ten years together, her h These thoughts will also be shared on my Youtube channel! Subscribe to my channel! Thank you, Netgalley, and to the publisher, for lending me the e-ARC for The Vain. This does not affect my review in any way and form. Was immediately drawn in by the cover art and the premise of the book: "A horror/breakup story in five parts." But what is it about? "Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that's meant to bond to her for life. After ten years together, her holographic wife suddenly disconnects without a warning. The breakup drives Catrin to the point of near insanity. She's alone for the first time in years, and reeling from a loss she can't comprehend." The book is set in the future where AI takes human forms and can be designed and "built" custom-made based on what the human wants. In this particular story though, Catrin's marriage (might I call it obsession?) and eventual "breakup" with an AI left her unhinged and spiraling into a craze of self-destruction. The self-destruction part was perfectly encapsulated by how confusing, strange, wild, and horrific the storytelling got as I read the last two chapters. I had no idea what was going on and only had a vague sense of what was happening to the main character. And I think that in itself speaks for the harrowing and empty feeling that goes with heartbreaks, losing yourself in the process, and looking for ways to FEEL in very destructive ways - drugs and sex. While I like the metaphorical take and AMAZING art style and how the color schemes were used to emulate emotions, I got sort of withdrawn from the characters as I was reading the last chapters. Trigger Warnings: self-harm, physical assault, murder, body horror, drug/alcohol abuse, addiction, mental breakdown

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah R

    Lonely Receiver follows Catrin, a lonely video producer who, 10 years ago, bought an AI who would love her for life, never questioning their bond. But then, Rhion suddenly disconnects, driving Catrin mad. I'm really not sure how to feel about this book. It is absolutely mind-boggling and I feel like I missed so much. To start off, I was confused. For the first few pages, I didn't even know who was Catrin and who was Rhion. Then, I started to get a sense of the timing of the story and the charact Lonely Receiver follows Catrin, a lonely video producer who, 10 years ago, bought an AI who would love her for life, never questioning their bond. But then, Rhion suddenly disconnects, driving Catrin mad. I'm really not sure how to feel about this book. It is absolutely mind-boggling and I feel like I missed so much. To start off, I was confused. For the first few pages, I didn't even know who was Catrin and who was Rhion. Then, I started to get a sense of the timing of the story and the characters, which really helped! I did really enjoy Volumes 1 & 2. These few lines were very interesting: "There is no her without me. We are weaved. Indivisible. I am nothing without her. I know she's still out there. I'll find her// //I'll find me. Volume 3 was pretty confusing, but I think I understood the gist of it (hopefully). (view spoiler)[ Though I still have no idea who Hazel is supposed to be? (hide spoiler)] But then, in Volumes 4 & 5, I was just lost. So lost. I had no idea what was happening to Catrin or where she was. I wish we could have been given more time and information needed to understand how the technology worked at the beginning, as I think this would have made the second half more easily understood. In fact, I didn't even realize the little fuzzy thing Catrin was holding was a Phylo Phone until the sketchbook at the end. The artwork in this graphic novel was well-done and colorful, which was nice. However, this book was marked as "Teens & YA," which it certainly is not. Final Rating: 2/5 *I received an eARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All quotes are subject to change upon publication. Thank you!*

  16. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    The descent into insanity is reminiscent of A Streetcar Named Desire — one of my favorite plays - though this is not based in the same trauma or past experiences as the play. This sort of plot (hero becomes villain - the young elites by marie lu or protagonist has trouble telling the difference between what is real and what is fake - we were liars by e. lockhart) is the best part of this graphic novel. I think the art was beautiful and the plot was great — though I was not super connected or inv The descent into insanity is reminiscent of A Streetcar Named Desire — one of my favorite plays - though this is not based in the same trauma or past experiences as the play. This sort of plot (hero becomes villain - the young elites by marie lu or protagonist has trouble telling the difference between what is real and what is fake - we were liars by e. lockhart) is the best part of this graphic novel. I think the art was beautiful and the plot was great — though I was not super connected or invested in the fate of Catrin. Catrin is not the most sympathetic character. She clearly has attachment issues from the get go and tries to solve it with an AI companion, Rhion. It’s not surprising that it goes wrong — Catrin wants an AI to love only her and be with only her, but an AI is not only in one place at once because it’s part of the internet. That is all in the first few pages. The entire story feels like a whirlwind, it’s fast paced and doesn’t have any filler to take up space. Everything that is in the story seems like it is necessary and exactly where it should be. The first few pages convinced me to stay for the plot, but i never really grew attached to any character (that’s why I deducted a star) The relationship portrayed is not at all a healthy one— both the relationship between Catrin and herself and Catrin and Rhion — and though it is not portrayed as healthy I still would like to give that warning in case that is something that is triggering to you.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Merritt Worthy

    Lonely Reciever took me for a ride I was not expecting to be on. From the start I was drawn into the art style, beautiful colors, and interesting story concept. It is very reminiscent of HER and plays with sci-fi elements I always enjoy looking into but wow did I not expect the turn that this took. First off - this main character is objectively the worst. Don't get me wrong - I love to follow crappy characters. This was not an issue for me but it made following the story a bit slow for me becaus Lonely Reciever took me for a ride I was not expecting to be on. From the start I was drawn into the art style, beautiful colors, and interesting story concept. It is very reminiscent of HER and plays with sci-fi elements I always enjoy looking into but wow did I not expect the turn that this took. First off - this main character is objectively the worst. Don't get me wrong - I love to follow crappy characters. This was not an issue for me but it made following the story a bit slow for me because I couldn't connect with her at all before she started making some wildly stupid decisions. Between the AI virus-like horror and gratuitous sex scenes you can really tell the story was written by a man. Which is made a bit more strange when you recognize that the main character is in fact a lesbian and winds up in an orgy that takes place over the better part of two whole issues. The story touches on obsession, a little bit of sex addiction/kinks, and the first two sections were by far the most interesting. Once she dove deeper below the net and spent most of her time inside of this network there didn't feel like much of a plot anymore and the story became harder to follow because it is written in a strange prose that seems to mimic the way the virus talks. The final reveal at the end is interesting but it doesn't really make up for the whole situation. This is DEFINITELY NOT a YA book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Honey Milk

    The cover of this book just drew me in so much, I felt compelled to read it. Sadly, I didn't like it very much. I think this has to do more with personal taste than it does the art style and plot. I thought the art was gorgeous and the colors vibrant, yet very reflective of the plot. This was definitely an adult book, as most of the book is focused on sex. But overall, to me, the book was just confusing. I couldn't keep straight the characters, whether Rhion or Catrin was the main character and The cover of this book just drew me in so much, I felt compelled to read it. Sadly, I didn't like it very much. I think this has to do more with personal taste than it does the art style and plot. I thought the art was gorgeous and the colors vibrant, yet very reflective of the plot. This was definitely an adult book, as most of the book is focused on sex. But overall, to me, the book was just confusing. I couldn't keep straight the characters, whether Rhion or Catrin was the main character and if I hadn't read the author's note in the beginning I would've been in a deeper, darker hole than I am now. This book was super confusing plot-wise too. I think there were some interesting parts, and I definitely think that the concept was interesting (love in AI) but I think the execution was not there. At some points, I was confused whether Catrin was actually the AI rather than Rhion. After I finished the book, I could tell that this would be a book ranked based on personal preference. I completely don't mind gore, sex, or horror aspects (as I've read plenty of manga with all three), I just didn't think it was effective in this story. In conclusion, this book wasn't my cup of tea.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    📚Blog 📚Instagram 📚TikTok Catrin purchased Rhion and lived happily for ten years. But then Rhion the Holographic wife that was supposed to love her forever has been cheating on her with multiple other people. At least 400. The two fight and Rhion disappears. Catrin then goes on a hunt to find her and fix there relationship. But fixing it really isn't possible and leads Catrin to further and further depths. From a new relationship she unhealthily attaches to, to going as far as trying to have relat 📚Blog 📚Instagram 📚TikTok Catrin purchased Rhion and lived happily for ten years. But then Rhion the Holographic wife that was supposed to love her forever has been cheating on her with multiple other people. At least 400. The two fight and Rhion disappears. Catrin then goes on a hunt to find her and fix there relationship. But fixing it really isn't possible and leads Catrin to further and further depths. From a new relationship she unhealthily attaches to, to going as far as trying to have relations with multiple people to get over it. This was insane. I don't quite understand what I read? But I did enjoy it immensely. I was slightly confused about the ending. Was it an alien? Or just insanely intelligent tech? Also it was relatively work appropriate until it definitely wasn't. The character was insanely unlikable (which I personally enjoy) and there is no sort of closure in the ending from what I could figure out. It definitely goes a bit overboard with the sex scenes towards the end and they didn't seem necessary to the story at all. I would have also loved more information about the world itself that was built. All the different technology was so interesting but nothing was really discussed or highlighted in a way to create understanding. Overall I would recommend it, because the concept was interesting. But if your coming for a redemption arc or some kind or a graphic novel that makes a ton of sense this isn't it. Thank you to Netgalley for providing a copy in exchange for an honest review

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stay Fetters

    "You’re the maker of my evil." What drew me to this graphic novel was the cover. I know we shouldn’t judge a book based on that but I did. That cover is going to sucker a lot of people into reading this and they are going to be severely disappointed. I really don’t want to say this but I have to say it. (Deep breath) I hated this. It bored me and I didn’t almost finish it. There were a few times where I had to force myself to read further and I wish I didn’t. There was nothing there keeping me gl "You’re the maker of my evil." What drew me to this graphic novel was the cover. I know we shouldn’t judge a book based on that but I did. That cover is going to sucker a lot of people into reading this and they are going to be severely disappointed. I really don’t want to say this but I have to say it. (Deep breath) I hated this. It bored me and I didn’t almost finish it. There were a few times where I had to force myself to read further and I wish I didn’t. There was nothing there keeping me glued to those pages. Some of the art was decent and very colorful but art isn’t going to save your story. It needs depth and that glue to hold the readers attention, it didn’t have any of that. And those bizarre sex scenes weren’t really necessary. They were awkward but not necessary. The only enjoyable moment was when Catrin went to a burger joint. The name of it filled me with joy. Cronin-Burger!!! Love it! Lonely Receiver was a waste of time. It was bizarre in all the wrong ways and I honestly didn’t know what to say about it. It wasn’t for me and I’m not sure if I would recommend this to anyone.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mehsi

    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. WTF THE ACTUAL FUCK did I just read. A story about break-up, about AI, and a woman gone totally mad because her lover (AI) has disappeared. She goes fully bonkers, sees things in her room that aren't there, stalks a woman who looks like her ex, there is blood and gore, and so much weirdness that I just was contemplating over and over again to just stop reading. It was just too much for me and I frankly didn't give a drop of care I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. WTF THE ACTUAL FUCK did I just read. A story about break-up, about AI, and a woman gone totally mad because her lover (AI) has disappeared. She goes fully bonkers, sees things in her room that aren't there, stalks a woman who looks like her ex, there is blood and gore, and so much weirdness that I just was contemplating over and over again to just stop reading. It was just too much for me and I frankly didn't give a drop of care about any of the characters, they were all just too horrible. Eventually we go into the realm of blood and orgies... Yes, really. But hey, the art wasn't the worst? That one I actually liked. But the rest. Nope. Also, WTF is this doing in the Teen/YA section at NG? This is SO not Teen/YA. Not just because of the story which is so messed up (gauging of eyes, ripping people open, and many many more things), but also because there are graphic sex scenes, including BDSM, orgies, whips, and more.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Polina Trofim

    TW: Loneliness, Depression, Mental Health Problems, Homicide, Harm I don`t even know where to start. At first, I didn't even know what to expect. The concept is quite interesting and a little scary, to be honest. The action takes place in the future, where, thanks to artificial intelligence, it has become possible to create an ideal partner for life. And after Rhion, Catrin's partner suddenly disconnects, she just goes mad. And we observe what becomes of our main character, who simply cannot cope w TW: Loneliness, Depression, Mental Health Problems, Homicide, Harm I don`t even know where to start. At first, I didn't even know what to expect. The concept is quite interesting and a little scary, to be honest. The action takes place in the future, where, thanks to artificial intelligence, it has become possible to create an ideal partner for life. And after Rhion, Catrin's partner suddenly disconnects, she just goes mad. And we observe what becomes of our main character, who simply cannot cope with loneliness, and plunges into the abyss of despair. This comic is probably one of the creepiest things I've ever read. Everything from the main character to the smallest details I surround her, her mental state is just creepy to imagine. Some things I like (volumes 1 and 2 are very good), some things I could not accept (for example, the abundance of orgies and the amount of naked body Catrin). This comic is clearly not a teenage comic. A strictly adult audience, or a morally prepared audience, should become familiar with this work. I liked the way the artists chose the images for the characters, and what color scheme they used to convey everything that was happening Thank to NetGalley and to publisher for providing me with ARC of this comicbook

  23. 4 out of 5

    MoonSugar

    This...was just too weird and abstract. Art was amazing, but the story - not so much. The book started fine, with the main character breaking up with her AI girlfriend, then falling deep into depression and self-destructive habits. It was much darker than I expected it to be, the sci-fi and psychological horror concepts were great, unique and interesting to explore. The second half of the book is where everything became too abstract, weird and confusing to understand what was happening. The stor This...was just too weird and abstract. Art was amazing, but the story - not so much. The book started fine, with the main character breaking up with her AI girlfriend, then falling deep into depression and self-destructive habits. It was much darker than I expected it to be, the sci-fi and psychological horror concepts were great, unique and interesting to explore. The second half of the book is where everything became too abstract, weird and confusing to understand what was happening. The story randomly spiraled into DEFINITELY NOT YA, BUT MORE LIKE ADULT 18+ territory, with overly sexualized images. That should definitely be mentioned somewhere and not marketed as a YA book. I suppose there are hidden metaphors in there, too complex for mere mortals to understand without analyzing everything for hours on end. I hated the toxic and depressing feeling this graphic novel emits, it's literally feels opposite to 'inspiring'.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Lonely Receiver' by Zac Thompson with art by Jen Hickman is a graphic novel about a breakup that goes to dark places. Catrin Vander is in love with an Artificial Intelligence named Rhion until she finds out that Rhion is seeing a lot more people. They have a violent breakup and Catrin thinks she can live on her own until she can't. She pursues someone else, then sinks to some pretty low depths, all for the pursuit of love. The idea of the story started out okay and slowly devolved in to a story I 'Lonely Receiver' by Zac Thompson with art by Jen Hickman is a graphic novel about a breakup that goes to dark places. Catrin Vander is in love with an Artificial Intelligence named Rhion until she finds out that Rhion is seeing a lot more people. They have a violent breakup and Catrin thinks she can live on her own until she can't. She pursues someone else, then sinks to some pretty low depths, all for the pursuit of love. The idea of the story started out okay and slowly devolved in to a story I didn't care about. Catrin is only pathetic and never sympathetic. Which is too bad, because Jen Hickman's art and eye-popping colors were a treat, except for the white on teal speech bubbles which were hard to read. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Aftershock Comics, Diamond Book Distributors, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book. Now a days I am searching the Read Now section more than requesting, so when I saw this cover I was instantly intrigued. Now I don’t read reviews often for books, but this one I did just because it felt right. It didn’t take me very long to understand why people didn’t really care for this book. I also agree that this doesn’t belong in the YA section, it would have been better in New Adult just because of some of the graphics. The conc Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book. Now a days I am searching the Read Now section more than requesting, so when I saw this cover I was instantly intrigued. Now I don’t read reviews often for books, but this one I did just because it felt right. It didn’t take me very long to understand why people didn’t really care for this book. I also agree that this doesn’t belong in the YA section, it would have been better in New Adult just because of some of the graphics. The concept of the book was good and the artwork is really what sold it, but the writing just didn’t do it justice. Also there was just so much pink and white that my eyes started to hurt at some moments. I gave it two stars for the beginning, but the ending I don’t even know how to describe it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Trinity Casey

    3/5 Stars Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publishers for providing me with an early copy of this book. This in no way influences my thoughts or opinions So..... this is a lot to take in and I highly suggest taking your time if you decide to read it. It's a very complex and layered story. The dialogue does make it a little hard to keep up, in my opinion. It just feels really philosophical and that's not necessarily something I enjoy reading unless I'm analyzing it for a class. Beautiful 3/5 Stars Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publishers for providing me with an early copy of this book. This in no way influences my thoughts or opinions So..... this is a lot to take in and I highly suggest taking your time if you decide to read it. It's a very complex and layered story. The dialogue does make it a little hard to keep up, in my opinion. It just feels really philosophical and that's not necessarily something I enjoy reading unless I'm analyzing it for a class. Beautiful artwork, though. I can't get over how gorgeous some panels were, even when they were terrifying to look at. Vibrant colors and exquisitely rendered scenes will keep you hooked.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amethyst

    Considering it was advertised as a horror breakup story it didn't land at all. The only horror this book has, is the amount is orgies it contains, ​which btw was not said anywhere? At least a warning for explicit content would have been nice 🥴 While the style was okay, the story and character/world development were flat as a pancake. I honestly couldn't have given any less ducks about the characters or their fate. The first 2 chapters were good and interesting, it actually focused on the breakup Considering it was advertised as a horror breakup story it didn't land at all. The only horror this book has, is the amount is orgies it contains, ​which btw was not said anywhere? At least a warning for explicit content would have been nice 🥴 While the style was okay, the story and character/world development were flat as a pancake. I honestly couldn't have given any less ducks about the characters or their fate. The first 2 chapters were good and interesting, it actually focused on the breakup as it promised, but I have no idea what happened at the end... An alternative title could have been: fifty shades of AI smut. It was also a little confusing to keep track of what is happening and I constantly had to read back to figure out what is going on, which let's be honest is not a good thing. It was bad.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    My full video review: https://youtu.be/MNesfAFawNk This comic follows Catrin who bought an artificial intelligence to be her wife, her life unravels when the wife disappears. I got my copy of this for Netgalley because I thought the cover looked nice. Overall, I found the story very confusing and it was hard to follow what was actually going on. I think the unraveling of the story did fit with the main characters mindset, but it could also have made things so much clearer for the reader. It was My full video review: https://youtu.be/MNesfAFawNk This comic follows Catrin who bought an artificial intelligence to be her wife, her life unravels when the wife disappears. I got my copy of this for Netgalley because I thought the cover looked nice. Overall, I found the story very confusing and it was hard to follow what was actually going on. I think the unraveling of the story did fit with the main characters mindset, but it could also have made things so much clearer for the reader. It was also weird, like not fun weird, but weird with overly sexual themes … there is tentacles. I liked the sci fi parts of this, those parts were interesting, but it was still not enough for me to thoroughly enjoy it. It made be fun for some specific audiences! 2/5 stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Dang

    A horror breakup story about a lonely video producer who starts a relationship with an AI partner. Catrin is lonely and thinks the best way to get in a relationship is buying an AI parter that is meant to bond for life. After 10 years, things start to go wrong and then Catrin’s wife disconnects and breaks up. Catrin starts to sink into insanity trying to deal with the loneliness and finding her wife again. It was such an interesting read, especially the whole AI wife bit, and the futuristic sett A horror breakup story about a lonely video producer who starts a relationship with an AI partner. Catrin is lonely and thinks the best way to get in a relationship is buying an AI parter that is meant to bond for life. After 10 years, things start to go wrong and then Catrin’s wife disconnects and breaks up. Catrin starts to sink into insanity trying to deal with the loneliness and finding her wife again. It was such an interesting read, especially the whole AI wife bit, and the futuristic setting. The artwork is really pretty and the overall story was a great read! *Thanks Netgalley and Diamond Book Distributors for sending me an arc in exchange for an honest review*

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Riley

    Lonely Receiver is intense, gruesome, brutal and at times confusing. It is definitely not for the faint of heart so be prepared. The storyline is filled with pain, anguish and obsession, it is a truly horrifying read. For those of us who have experienced the above emotions will be able to relate to the main character's story and her decline into darkness. Catrin is a truly haunted and tormented character. The visuals in this piece are truly something I have never seen before. At times they are ha Lonely Receiver is intense, gruesome, brutal and at times confusing. It is definitely not for the faint of heart so be prepared. The storyline is filled with pain, anguish and obsession, it is a truly horrifying read. For those of us who have experienced the above emotions will be able to relate to the main character's story and her decline into darkness. Catrin is a truly haunted and tormented character. The visuals in this piece are truly something I have never seen before. At times they are hard to stomach but of course, that is by design. Whilst the story itself alone would still be horrific in nature the artwork elevate the piece to a new level of horror.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.