web site hit counter The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers

Availability: Ready to download

A groundbreaking work by one of the world's foremost psychologists that delves into the complex behavior of memory. In this fascinating study, Daniel L. Schacter explores instances of what we would consider memory failure—absent-mindedness, transience, blocking, misattribution, suggestibility, bias, and persistence—and suggests instead that these miscues are actually indica A groundbreaking work by one of the world's foremost psychologists that delves into the complex behavior of memory. In this fascinating study, Daniel L. Schacter explores instances of what we would consider memory failure—absent-mindedness, transience, blocking, misattribution, suggestibility, bias, and persistence—and suggests instead that these miscues are actually indications that memory is functioning as designed. Drawing from vivid scientific research and creative literature, as well as high-profile events in which memory has figured significantly (Bill Clinton's grand jury testimony, for instance), The Seven Sins of Memory provides a more nuanced understanding of how memory and the mind influence each other and shape our lives.


Compare

A groundbreaking work by one of the world's foremost psychologists that delves into the complex behavior of memory. In this fascinating study, Daniel L. Schacter explores instances of what we would consider memory failure—absent-mindedness, transience, blocking, misattribution, suggestibility, bias, and persistence—and suggests instead that these miscues are actually indica A groundbreaking work by one of the world's foremost psychologists that delves into the complex behavior of memory. In this fascinating study, Daniel L. Schacter explores instances of what we would consider memory failure—absent-mindedness, transience, blocking, misattribution, suggestibility, bias, and persistence—and suggests instead that these miscues are actually indications that memory is functioning as designed. Drawing from vivid scientific research and creative literature, as well as high-profile events in which memory has figured significantly (Bill Clinton's grand jury testimony, for instance), The Seven Sins of Memory provides a more nuanced understanding of how memory and the mind influence each other and shape our lives.

30 review for The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    An interesting - if a bit academic, at times - read that was written by Harvard Psychology Department Chair. Since I'm sure you're dying to know, the 7 sins are: 1. Transience (loss of memory over time) 2. Absent-mindedness (forgetting where your car keys are - due to the info never being properly encoded in your memory because you weren't really paying attention) 3. Blocking (inability to retrieve known information such as someone's name, name of a song, etc.) 4. Misattribution (assigning a memory An interesting - if a bit academic, at times - read that was written by Harvard Psychology Department Chair. Since I'm sure you're dying to know, the 7 sins are: 1. Transience (loss of memory over time) 2. Absent-mindedness (forgetting where your car keys are - due to the info never being properly encoded in your memory because you weren't really paying attention) 3. Blocking (inability to retrieve known information such as someone's name, name of a song, etc.) 4. Misattribution (assigning a memory to the wrong source) 5. Suggestibility (implanted memories due to leading questions, comments, or suggestions) 6. Bias (how we unknowingly change our memory of the past to be more consistent with our current beliefs) 7. Persistence (repeated recall of disturbing info or events you would prefer to forget) Schacter explains how these common foibles can be frustrating and dives into the science of why they happen. While we've all disparaged our memories at one point or another, the 7 sins are a small price to pay for the many times our minds do get it right. Considering the staggering amount of data our minds process every day, it's actually amazing it works as well as it does. I found the tip of the tongue phenomenon (#3) particularly interesting because you can usually tell another person everything about the thing you're trying to name except its name. The science (phonological vs. lexical cues) was totally new to me and just fascinating. A few other factoids: * Concerning the sin of misattribution and the unreliability of eyewitness testimony, according to estimates made in the late 1980s, each year in the US more than 75k criminal trials were decided on the basis of eyewitness testimony. A recent analysis of 40 cases in which DNA evidence established the innocence of wrongly imprisoned persons revealed that 36 of them (90%) involved mistaken eyewitness identification. * Regarding the sin of peristence , propranlol (beta-blockers) can block the usual memory-enhancing effects of emotional arousal that is experienced in traumatic situations. Might we one day see these used for first-responders, military people, emergency workers, etc. * Women are often regarded as having superior spatial location abilities (i.e. always telling men where they left their keys, where the mustard is in the refrigerator, etc.). Some researchers think this may be due to the fact that during the hunter-gatherer period, when human cognition evolved, women primarily foraged for food while men primarily hunted. Women needed to remember the various food locations they frequented, often embedded with complex vegetations. Men used and developed other spatial skills, but apparently not the ability to see things they're looking for that always right in front of their face (or perhaps that's just my husband!). Overall, this was a very interesting read - 3.5 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Wolfe

    We refer to this as one of the "tippingpointblinkfreakanomicsbrainisakludge" books -- one of those books that makes you feel like your brain is filling up -- that gives you insight into how the mind works and -- even better! -- an endless supply of "get outta here" facts that you can share with people. Summarizes classic and state of the art experiments demonstrating the complete and total unreliability of memory! One thing I _think_ learned from this is not to argue about memories -- because me We refer to this as one of the "tippingpointblinkfreakanomicsbrainisakludge" books -- one of those books that makes you feel like your brain is filling up -- that gives you insight into how the mind works and -- even better! -- an endless supply of "get outta here" facts that you can share with people. Summarizes classic and state of the art experiments demonstrating the complete and total unreliability of memory! One thing I _think_ learned from this is not to argue about memories -- because memory is so completely unreliable. That alone is worth the price of the book (which is, btw, 88 cents at Goodwill.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    I was much looking forward to reading this, since the concept and workings of memory particularly intrigue me. I had already taken a few courses on the subject, so I had a very basic understanding of the workings of memory and some of the pitfalls/biases. Nothing too much in depth, however, which is why I thought this book might be good both to tie together what I had learned and to find out something new! Here I was slightly disappointed, however. Although much (much!) research is covered, I fel I was much looking forward to reading this, since the concept and workings of memory particularly intrigue me. I had already taken a few courses on the subject, so I had a very basic understanding of the workings of memory and some of the pitfalls/biases. Nothing too much in depth, however, which is why I thought this book might be good both to tie together what I had learned and to find out something new! Here I was slightly disappointed, however. Although much (much!) research is covered, I felt like it just never hit the kind of depth I was looking for. A friend asked me, just after I read the book, 'what it was about' and I was able to describe to him the 7 sins and the general theme Schacter places them in with little difficulty. This, I think, is both the strength and weakness of the book. It's a very coherent, neat story, and if you haven't studied memory before (like my friend) it is definitely a good start. I applaud the book for this. And, despite the fact that the author's high esteem of himself, Harvard, and other prestigious universities throughly irritated me at times, I would be willing to give it 3 stars. What robbed the book of that 3rd star, however, was the last chapter - the one beyond the 7 sins - the one attempting to exculpate memory's sins by adopting an evolutionary approach. I'm sorry, but in my maybe-not-so-humble opinion this chapter just should not have been in the book. Schacter should have left it at the neat 7 sin story. The reason is this: to end the book, which was pretty much complete after the 7th sin for its particular purpose, with an afterthought on evolution as a principle to explain the discrepancy between its apparent positive and negative effects, is a task much too heavy for a small concluding chapter. If Schacter had announced this framework from the beginning of the book, it would have been clearer since the reader could then actively try to integrate the notions within an evolutionary perspective. Now one is left to make sense of it all retrospectively, which is made difficult by the brevity of the chapter and the obvious redundancy of repeating the previous chapters for the sake of relating it to evolutionary theory. That last chapter is by far the shallowest, at least if you relate it to the prolific debate on evolution. This, while the last chapter is supposed to be overarching and in that sense the most significant, is a letdown. I mean, we're explaining why one of our most prized possessions - memory - which essentially gives us our sense of selfhood, also seems to fail us systematically. Maybe I was expecting some sort of colossal conclusion, in which case my own expectations and desire let me down in part. I do also think, though, that that last chapter came off as a slightly cheap attempt to latch the book onto the evolutionary debate. The question, "can evolution explain the differential effectiveness of memory in humans" is intriguing and absolutely fundamental to our lives; by reducing it to an afterthought Schacter's book in fact covers 8 sins.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Satyajeet

    Schacter approaches his task like a teacher. He focuses on seven problems with memory that have undoubtedly been experienced by the average reader: 1. Transience - Our memories weaken over time. 2. Absent-mindedness - We don't focus on what we need to remember. 3. Blocking - It's in our memory somewhere, but we can't find it. 4. Misattribution - We are wrong about where we learned something. 5. Suggestibility - Other people can "plant" false memories in us. 6. Bias - We rewrite the past with the pen o Schacter approaches his task like a teacher. He focuses on seven problems with memory that have undoubtedly been experienced by the average reader: 1. Transience - Our memories weaken over time. 2. Absent-mindedness - We don't focus on what we need to remember. 3. Blocking - It's in our memory somewhere, but we can't find it. 4. Misattribution - We are wrong about where we learned something. 5. Suggestibility - Other people can "plant" false memories in us. 6. Bias - We rewrite the past with the pen of present beliefs. 7. Persistence - We keep remembering things we'd like to forget. For each of these problems, he gives understandable examples. In the final chapter, the problems are discussed as a group, and the author states the opinion that these problems are a small price to pay for a memory capability that performs extraordinarily well. In the early part of the book, there are references to specific functions of the various lobes of the brain and how those lobes may affect the processes of memory. As the discussion moves on to the rest of the “sins,” there are fewer references to objective scientific data, and more references to hypotheses and activity testing of various types. Professor Schacter does a thorough job of referencing the works of other psychologists, and summarizing their opinions. An informative book, intended for non-technical people who want an overview of the field and a basic understanding of academic progress.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eman Said

    This book is rated 5 simply because it has valuable information in a very easy and interesting way. You do not get lost in science; on the contrary, you fully understand how the memory works.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sid

    Entertainment value (3 out of 5): The book mostly held my interest. Many examples that I could relate to, including Men and Women and how they recall memories. Men seem to remember the gist, while women the details. Knowledge (5 out of 5): There were a lot of nuggets of wisdom. Repeat to remember. Mnemonic reminders are helpful during encoding information. Proper names are harder to remember because a name has no association to the person. Writing Style (3 out of 5): I think the psychological and b Entertainment value (3 out of 5): The book mostly held my interest. Many examples that I could relate to, including Men and Women and how they recall memories. Men seem to remember the gist, while women the details. Knowledge (5 out of 5): There were a lot of nuggets of wisdom. Repeat to remember. Mnemonic reminders are helpful during encoding information. Proper names are harder to remember because a name has no association to the person. Writing Style (3 out of 5): I think the psychological and brain sections of the book were too technical for me. The author could've included more everyday examples to make the novel more entertaining. Final Takeaway (3.5 out of 5): The human memory is susceptible to many forms of failure. While Daniel contends there are 7 types of memory vices, he also shows how these can be virtues. Once we are aware of our memory system's shortcomings, we can look to address them one at a time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michal

    I forgot to mark this as read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Monica Willyard Moen

    We tend to see our memories as constant, reliable, and true. In this book, the author asks us to dig deeper to see how our memory actually works.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mehwish Mughal

    A remarkable insight into how memory works. According to Schacter, these are the seven sins: - The sin of Transcience - The sin of Absent-mindedness - The sin of Blocking - The sin of Misattribution - The sin of Suggestibility - The sin of Bias - The sin of Persistence The first three are irritating and can be combated with straightforward techniques. The next three are problematic, especially in law and can be overcome by being more aware. The last one is the worst one, there is no easy solution to it. A remarkable insight into how memory works. According to Schacter, these are the seven sins: - The sin of Transcience - The sin of Absent-mindedness - The sin of Blocking - The sin of Misattribution - The sin of Suggestibility - The sin of Bias - The sin of Persistence The first three are irritating and can be combated with straightforward techniques. The next three are problematic, especially in law and can be overcome by being more aware. The last one is the worst one, there is no easy solution to it. In the last chapter, he situates these sins in evolutionary perspective and suggests that all these memory "glitches" have adaptive value. I loved the book because there were so many "ahh", "right", "oh! that is why" moments. I was the reader and I was also the subject of the book. I will highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to know why we forget names, how we stereotype, why we leave the soap in the fridge and the butter in the soap dish and why the ugly memories are so persistent.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Isis Cruz

    I was excited when I started reading the book, I was looking for something like this. The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers, is a great introductory book for memory concepts. The book has a lot of examples for each “sin”, these allow the reader to understand with common issues anything that may seem like specialized language. But if you are looking for deep and technical explanations about memory and some of its components that can be known as errors, perhaps this is not t I was excited when I started reading the book, I was looking for something like this. The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers, is a great introductory book for memory concepts. The book has a lot of examples for each “sin”, these allow the reader to understand with common issues anything that may seem like specialized language. But if you are looking for deep and technical explanations about memory and some of its components that can be known as errors, perhaps this is not the right book for you. I see it as a book for people who are introducing themselves to the subject, such as psychology students or anyone who is interested on the topic. The seven sins, (Transience, Absent-Mindedness, Blocking, Misattribution, Suggestibility, Bias and Persistence) are components of our daily life, like when we forget our keys or when we cannot recall the name of an old classmate. And I think that this feature, that we can all easily identify the 7 sins with multiple examples in our past, makes this book interesting. On the other hand, the last chapter, for me, has no reason to be. Why? Well, the author tries to introduce an evolutionary discussion in the last moment, and I think it only impoverishes the whole perspective of the book. But there is a part in this chapter that I like and it was when Schacter tried to put the seven sins like virtues and not vices, and I find his perspective very interesting. Schacter highlights: “The seven sins are not merely nuisances to minimize or avoid. They also illuminate how memory draws on the past to inform the present, preserves elements of present experience for future reference, and allow us to revisit the past at will”.

  11. 4 out of 5

    YHC

    Quite an interesting book to categorize our memory into 7 types. 1. Transience : loss of memory (just happens to everyone, old people more) 2. Absent-mindedness : didn't pay attention to your action. (can't find my glasses ..on my head) 3. Blocking (TOT: Tip of tongue): unable to remember the info you have already known. (what's your name?) 4. Misattribution : assigning a memory to the wrong source. (Ufo kidnap but actually family abuse) 5. Suggestibility : memories twisted because of leading questi Quite an interesting book to categorize our memory into 7 types. 1. Transience : loss of memory (just happens to everyone, old people more) 2. Absent-mindedness : didn't pay attention to your action. (can't find my glasses ..on my head) 3. Blocking (TOT: Tip of tongue): unable to remember the info you have already known. (what's your name?) 4. Misattribution : assigning a memory to the wrong source. (Ufo kidnap but actually family abuse) 5. Suggestibility : memories twisted because of leading questions, comments, or suggestions. (hypnosis, police forcing suspect to confess ) 6. Bias : Our current beliefs changed our past memories. (dislike this person now affects my impression of past even though i could like him/her before) 7. Persistence : can not get rid of certain memories that you intentionally want to forget. (a song keeps playing in my head) After i read this book with many examples to explain, I finally can distinguish each of my memory behavior into right places. Brain is an organ that we yet know the least, it has such mystery like universe. With the technology, we start to know which part in charge of what function. Left side in charge of language, logic; while right side in charge of image and creativity. Amygdaloid will store the traumas that we encountered, PTSD treatment needs to target that part. An fairly interesting and informative book, also entertaining to learn more about our brain.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Interesting and useful book that looks at memory and cognition problems in terms of the seven deadly sins. People who have a good background in psychology and memory studies will see a lot of review of ideas here, which is a good thing, it helps groove the ideas in your brain. As for the “seven sins of memory, here they are: 1) Transience (the forgetting curve, natural loss of declarative memory over time) 2) Absent-mindedness (divided attention, or unmindfully deviating from your normal habits) 3 Interesting and useful book that looks at memory and cognition problems in terms of the seven deadly sins. People who have a good background in psychology and memory studies will see a lot of review of ideas here, which is a good thing, it helps groove the ideas in your brain. As for the “seven sins of memory, here they are: 1) Transience (the forgetting curve, natural loss of declarative memory over time) 2) Absent-mindedness (divided attention, or unmindfully deviating from your normal habits) 3) Blocking (tip-of-the-tongue states) 4) Misattribution (conflating sources of memories) 5) Suggestibility (it’s easy to implant memories with leading questions, esp with children) 6) Bias (making our past “consistent” with our current self image, stereotyping, etc.) 7) Persistence (PTSD, amygdala-based memories) What’s interesting is that these memory sins are features, not bugs... we have these traits because they serve an evolutionary purpose, but at the same time we have the cognition to be “meta” about our memories, and therefore can choose to do things (heh, or not) to counteract our blind spots (just like I know in 10 years I’ll remember next to nothing about this book, thus I’m leaving my book notes at Goodreads about it to help groove my memory of the book now, as well as give it a good hard shake in the future when I reread this review). Helpful book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    I enjoyed the seven sins of memory, but part of me expected more. I suppose I was expecting a little more investigation into the neuro-scientific mechanisms that dictate why our memory functions the way it does. Daniel Schacter is a psychologist and not a neuroscientist, but references a lot of research papers throughout the book and the bibliography at the end is 27 pages, so he has clearly done the research. I guess it's a situation where I want more information than was out there at the time I enjoyed the seven sins of memory, but part of me expected more. I suppose I was expecting a little more investigation into the neuro-scientific mechanisms that dictate why our memory functions the way it does. Daniel Schacter is a psychologist and not a neuroscientist, but references a lot of research papers throughout the book and the bibliography at the end is 27 pages, so he has clearly done the research. I guess it's a situation where I want more information than was out there at the time of this publication. If you have some knowledge of brain structure, memory, or how the brain works, some of Schacter's explanations are tedious to read through. Even if you don't, I feel as though he over-explains some of his points. However overall, I think it's good that the book was written with the "amateur" psychologist in mind.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    I struggle in deciding on a rating for this book. A solid 3.5 might be the best in my view. The book has fascinating information about the seven major flaws in our ability to remember information. Schacter shares a lot of examples how these flaws play out in our lives. He also provides some scientific references and discussions on how our brains work. And he has some very interesting stories about individuals who exhibit extreme examples of memory flaws. It's all excellent information. But, the I struggle in deciding on a rating for this book. A solid 3.5 might be the best in my view. The book has fascinating information about the seven major flaws in our ability to remember information. Schacter shares a lot of examples how these flaws play out in our lives. He also provides some scientific references and discussions on how our brains work. And he has some very interesting stories about individuals who exhibit extreme examples of memory flaws. It's all excellent information. But, the book lacks a comfortable flow of information. There were times I had to force myself to continue reading. Then, pages later, I would be glad I did. A final critique - the title - calling our major, common, memory issues 'sins' doesn't seem quite right. It feels like more of an attempt to have a catchy title that will sell well.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vivian Sophia

    This book presents findings about the ways in which memory is inaccurate. The seven sins are: transience, absentmindedness, blocking, misattribution, suggestibility, bias, and persistence. Transience refers to the basic feature of memory that enables us to remember more of recent events and less as time goes on. It can be somewhat alleviated by making an effort to fix an item in memory, or associating it with something already known. Talking about something also helps. Absentmindedness is usually This book presents findings about the ways in which memory is inaccurate. The seven sins are: transience, absentmindedness, blocking, misattribution, suggestibility, bias, and persistence. Transience refers to the basic feature of memory that enables us to remember more of recent events and less as time goes on. It can be somewhat alleviated by making an effort to fix an item in memory, or associating it with something already known. Talking about something also helps. Absentmindedness is usually caused by paying attention to something other than the object that needs to be remembered. It often occurs during routine activities when people are operating "on automatic". People can fail to notice even dramatic changes in an environment if they are attending to some other aspect. Event-based prospective memory failures are probably caused by not having a strong association between the event and the action to be performed. Blocking is what happens when you have something "on the tip of your tongue." It's more likely to occur with names and other information that has few prior meanings. People can often remember characteristics of the forgotten word such as its initial letter or how many syllables. Thinking of similar words prolongs a TOT state. focusing on certain details of a memory can cause others to be droped. Another type is repressed memory. Mechanism not completely understood. Misattribution. Sometimes people conflate two things into one memory. People remember things they've only imagined or read about. Familiar things are more likely to be taken as remembered. Sometimes people have an idea that really is something they heard elsewhere. Suggestibility makes me people think they remember something because of misleading questions. It's a problem in lineups. Bias induces people to remember the way they felt in the past in a way that fits the story they are currently telling themselves. People forget changing their opinion or think they knew something all along. Persistence is when a person cannot forget something, obsesses over it. It mainly has to do with how we evaluate what has happened. Ruminating is harmful. Disclosing can be helpful. Depressed patients have overgeneral memories. Trying not to think about a traumatic event can cause it to get stuck. the book also describes how each of these shows up in the physical brain.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wes F

    Fairly interesting book overall on the subject of the vagaries of human memory--with lessons learned from animal memories as well--though it wasn't the most engaging book. Had to push my way through it and there was quite a bit of technical jargon along the way. Insightful, though, and bottom-line: our memories' strengths & weaknesses all end up serving us in multiple ways, connecting us to others and to our time-space context, helping us to negotiate our way through complex lives. Though not st Fairly interesting book overall on the subject of the vagaries of human memory--with lessons learned from animal memories as well--though it wasn't the most engaging book. Had to push my way through it and there was quite a bit of technical jargon along the way. Insightful, though, and bottom-line: our memories' strengths & weaknesses all end up serving us in multiple ways, connecting us to others and to our time-space context, helping us to negotiate our way through complex lives. Though not stated, our minds & their connected memories are an amazing testimony to the intricacies & complexities of our creation by a Creator who leaves nothing to chance.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Teachout

    If you want a better understanding of humanity and yes that includes your own, then this is an excellent place to start. Memory is one of those parts of ourselves we intuitively think we know so much about and are reliably wrong. Reading this should invoke a sense of wonder at how our minds work and a sense of deep abiding humility in any contemplation of how we see the world. The "sins" are not processes to avoid, they're innate characteristics of a species having evolved to get by in a constan If you want a better understanding of humanity and yes that includes your own, then this is an excellent place to start. Memory is one of those parts of ourselves we intuitively think we know so much about and are reliably wrong. Reading this should invoke a sense of wonder at how our minds work and a sense of deep abiding humility in any contemplation of how we see the world. The "sins" are not processes to avoid, they're innate characteristics of a species having evolved to get by in a constantly changing world.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This non-fiction book has a creative, catchy title, interesting research studies, and some thought-provoking topics, but overall a bit too pithy to be "enjoyable." Sections on transience and blocking I found to be the most interesting, especially about why we tend to forget proper nouns (names). There were several tidbits that I've shared with others, but overall by the end, the topic felt a little worn out and the author seemed ready to close about 25 pages before "the end". Would suggest readin This non-fiction book has a creative, catchy title, interesting research studies, and some thought-provoking topics, but overall a bit too pithy to be "enjoyable." Sections on transience and blocking I found to be the most interesting, especially about why we tend to forget proper nouns (names). There were several tidbits that I've shared with others, but overall by the end, the topic felt a little worn out and the author seemed ready to close about 25 pages before "the end". Would suggest reading the first few chapters, but once you get bored, skip ahead or drop off.

  19. 4 out of 5

    laurena

    I read this quite some time ago so my comments are only what I remember of reading this book as a teenager? (oh I only noticed the irony of this as I type!) - it was a seminal book in my understanding of memory as an interactive, malleable process - not a tape recorder! And that makes such a difference! I think the 7 categories are a little forced, in a way, but nonetheless a memorable (ha! accidental, once more) way to parse some of the diverse spectrum of oddities of the mind. Now I'm going to I read this quite some time ago so my comments are only what I remember of reading this book as a teenager? (oh I only noticed the irony of this as I type!) - it was a seminal book in my understanding of memory as an interactive, malleable process - not a tape recorder! And that makes such a difference! I think the 7 categories are a little forced, in a way, but nonetheless a memorable (ha! accidental, once more) way to parse some of the diverse spectrum of oddities of the mind. Now I'm going to guess at the date I read it...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Hardesty

    Worth reading This book contains a great deal of information about human memory and how it does and does not work. It includes information about which portions of the brain’s anatomy are involved in various memory tasks. Portions of the book are difficult to wade through, but many of the examples are interesting. I read this book to fulfill continuing education requirements for my social work license.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Akshata

    Loved every bit of it! Schacter (yes, he teaches you how to remember his name at the very beginning!) has a unique knack of coming down to the lay man's level to explain our mysterious, most complex command center. Memory and its various fallouts are one of the brain's entertaining functions, and its magical to see what it can do to you from a very scientific perspective. Might just become a reference book of sorts for me as I go down the path to learning more about the brain :) Loved every bit of it! Schacter (yes, he teaches you how to remember his name at the very beginning!) has a unique knack of coming down to the lay man's level to explain our mysterious, most complex command center. Memory and its various fallouts are one of the brain's entertaining functions, and its magical to see what it can do to you from a very scientific perspective. Might just become a reference book of sorts for me as I go down the path to learning more about the brain :)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I read this for a college class. My only criticism is some of the examples of the sins of memory might be unfamiliar to people younger than myself (22). Example: calling a telephone operator to get a telephone number for someone is so 1990’s. Technology has advanced so much in a short amount of time that some people don’t know what people had to do before technology. The examples might not resonate.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adam Irving

    While the book can read as slightly outdated due to some of the references (twenty years past) and some of the case references running a little onerous, the book does an excellent job of breaking down and examining different facets and failings of human memory in a very relatable way, while also throwing out the lifeline that maybe these things we think of as failings are maybe there to help us too. A great way to look at the internal workings of the mind, if you're interested. While the book can read as slightly outdated due to some of the references (twenty years past) and some of the case references running a little onerous, the book does an excellent job of breaking down and examining different facets and failings of human memory in a very relatable way, while also throwing out the lifeline that maybe these things we think of as failings are maybe there to help us too. A great way to look at the internal workings of the mind, if you're interested.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shane Orr

    We think that memory works like a recording that we can either retrieve or not. Research shows that we only store key elements and assemble the memory on the spot adding in elements and bias that weren't there to begin with. This gets a little too much into brain biology for me, but I've always been fascinated with memory so still enjoyed it. We think that memory works like a recording that we can either retrieve or not. Research shows that we only store key elements and assemble the memory on the spot adding in elements and bias that weren't there to begin with. This gets a little too much into brain biology for me, but I've always been fascinated with memory so still enjoyed it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    I thought this was a good book about the fallacies of our memory, super interesting especially as I’ve noticed my memory change over the past few years. I am currently teaching about memory so it was also very relevant and had great examples and anecdotes. A little redundant at times — intro and conclusion are terribly boring!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Summers-Stay

    I read this for my teaching job. My favorite part was the last chapter, where he explained why each of the "sins" of memory was actually a useful feature of mental operation most of the time, and only became a problem rarely, which was all that we notice. Some of the examples were fun in a "Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" kind of way. I read this for my teaching job. My favorite part was the last chapter, where he explained why each of the "sins" of memory was actually a useful feature of mental operation most of the time, and only became a problem rarely, which was all that we notice. Some of the examples were fun in a "Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" kind of way.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mom

    Informative book with lots of familiar examples, but after the first four or so chapters, I began to feel that I was reading a dry textbook. A few "listen-to-this" sections, but more ones that begged to be skimmed. Informative book with lots of familiar examples, but after the first four or so chapters, I began to feel that I was reading a dry textbook. A few "listen-to-this" sections, but more ones that begged to be skimmed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paula DeBoard

    Fascinating look at memory--the normal forgetting, and the tricks the mind plays. I loved the examples in these chapters, some ripped from headlines and others from medical journals. Best, the writing itself was engaging and not too academic.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I thoroughly enjoyed the book. At times, it was if I were reading a textbook, but mainly I was intrigued by the book. This is a very thought provoking book. It is well worth your time to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Very detailed, yet readable explanation of the impediment and pitfalls of the mechanism of memory. I really enjoyed this!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.