web site hit counter Women's Liberation!: Feminist Writings that Inspired a Revolution & Still Can - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Women's Liberation!: Feminist Writings that Inspired a Revolution & Still Can

Availability: Ready to download

When Betty Friedan published The Feminine Mystique in 1963, the book exploded into women’s consciousness. Before the decade was out, what had begun as a campaign for women’s civil rights transformed into a diverse and revolutionary movement for freedom and social justice that challenged many aspects of everyday life long accepted as fixed: work, birth control and abortion, When Betty Friedan published The Feminine Mystique in 1963, the book exploded into women’s consciousness. Before the decade was out, what had begun as a campaign for women’s civil rights transformed into a diverse and revolutionary movement for freedom and social justice that challenged many aspects of everyday life long accepted as fixed: work, birth control and abortion, childcare and housework, gender, class, and race, art and literature, sexuality and identity, rape and domestic violence, sexual harassment, pornography, and more. This was the women’s liberation movement, and writing—powerful, personal, and prophetic—was its beating heart. Fifty years on, in the age of #MeToo and Black Lives Matter, this visionary and radical writing is as relevant and urgently needed as ever, ready to inspire a new generation of feminists. Activists and writers Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore have gathered an unprecedented collection of works—many long out-of-print and hard to find—that catalyzed and propelled the women’s liberation movement. Ranging from Friedan’s Feminine Mystique to Backlash, Susan Faludi’s Reagan-era requiem, and framed by Shulman and Moore with an introduction and headnotes that provide historical and personal context, the anthology reveals the crucial role of Black feminists and other women of color in a decades long mass movement that not only brought about fundamental changes in American life—changes too often taken for granted today—but envisioned a thoroughgoing revolution in society and consciousness still to be achieved.


Compare

When Betty Friedan published The Feminine Mystique in 1963, the book exploded into women’s consciousness. Before the decade was out, what had begun as a campaign for women’s civil rights transformed into a diverse and revolutionary movement for freedom and social justice that challenged many aspects of everyday life long accepted as fixed: work, birth control and abortion, When Betty Friedan published The Feminine Mystique in 1963, the book exploded into women’s consciousness. Before the decade was out, what had begun as a campaign for women’s civil rights transformed into a diverse and revolutionary movement for freedom and social justice that challenged many aspects of everyday life long accepted as fixed: work, birth control and abortion, childcare and housework, gender, class, and race, art and literature, sexuality and identity, rape and domestic violence, sexual harassment, pornography, and more. This was the women’s liberation movement, and writing—powerful, personal, and prophetic—was its beating heart. Fifty years on, in the age of #MeToo and Black Lives Matter, this visionary and radical writing is as relevant and urgently needed as ever, ready to inspire a new generation of feminists. Activists and writers Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore have gathered an unprecedented collection of works—many long out-of-print and hard to find—that catalyzed and propelled the women’s liberation movement. Ranging from Friedan’s Feminine Mystique to Backlash, Susan Faludi’s Reagan-era requiem, and framed by Shulman and Moore with an introduction and headnotes that provide historical and personal context, the anthology reveals the crucial role of Black feminists and other women of color in a decades long mass movement that not only brought about fundamental changes in American life—changes too often taken for granted today—but envisioned a thoroughgoing revolution in society and consciousness still to be achieved.

39 review for Women's Liberation!: Feminist Writings that Inspired a Revolution & Still Can

  1. 4 out of 5

    Selkis

    I received a free copy of Women's Liberation! from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review - many thanks! This is a collection of feminist essays, ranging from the 60s to the 90s. For a while now I've been wanting to find out more about the history of feminism. While I'm normally not a huge fan of essay collections, I thought it might be a good way to approach this topic. And I'm glad I did. The editors of Women's Liberation! clearly put a lot of thought and effort into collecting and combinin I received a free copy of Women's Liberation! from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review - many thanks! This is a collection of feminist essays, ranging from the 60s to the 90s. For a while now I've been wanting to find out more about the history of feminism. While I'm normally not a huge fan of essay collections, I thought it might be a good way to approach this topic. And I'm glad I did. The editors of Women's Liberation! clearly put a lot of thought and effort into collecting and combining all these wonderful essays. It was an interesting experience to listen to the voices of women who were (and are in some cases) part of the movement. Many of these essays were very thought-provoking and made clear to me how far we've come. But also how much still needs to be done. As is often the case for me with non-fiction (especially essay collections), some were more interesting to me than others. That's not the book's fault though. I'd even say it's a point in the book_s favour, as there's something of interest to everybody in this huge collection. I can highly recommend Women's Liberation! to anybody interested in the history of feminism.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kimba Tichenor

    This edited volume provides an excellent introduction to second-wave feminism. The editors, Alix Kates Schulman and Honor Moore, have assembled an impressive array of writings from the feminist movement (1963–1991) that highlight the diversity of the activists and their views. The writings are presented chronologically, and each text or excerpt of a text is prefaced with a brief introduction written by the editors that provides the reader unfamiliar with the feminist movement with background on This edited volume provides an excellent introduction to second-wave feminism. The editors, Alix Kates Schulman and Honor Moore, have assembled an impressive array of writings from the feminist movement (1963–1991) that highlight the diversity of the activists and their views. The writings are presented chronologically, and each text or excerpt of a text is prefaced with a brief introduction written by the editors that provides the reader unfamiliar with the feminist movement with background on the author and on the context in which the writing appeared. Opening with an excerpt from Betty Friedan's iconic book The Feminine Mystique in which Friedan describes "the problem that has no name" and talks about women's need for meaningful work outside the home, the editors are careful to note that Friedan did not address the concerns of women, both black and white, who did work outside the home, while at the same time showing how this book served as a springboard for protests by women from diverse backgrounds. This diversity immediately becomes apparent as the reader moves through the book, reading excerpts by African American women, Native American women, as well as women that promote very different solutions to the problems of gender and sexual discrimination, including, but not limited to, legislative reform, consciousness-raising, and lesbian separatism. As a result, no reader can come away from this collection still thinking that second-wave feminism was a monolithic movement in which only white middle-class women took part. The chronological presentation of the essays also allows the reader to see how the movement evolved over time, that is, how it went from a few isolated women who were unsure if such a movement was even possible to a highly diverse movement which at times was deeply divided on issues such as sexuality—that is, whether the emphasis should be on sexual pleasure as a path to liberation or on sexual danger, that is, taking action against pornography and prostitution as oppressive of women. The editors include sample writings from both sides of this debate, as well as from many other debates within the movement. The body of literature produced by second-wave feminists is vast. Thus, for reasons of space, the editors could not include everything. They opted not to include feminist fiction, poetry and drama. They also chose to exclude academic writings largely addressed to other academics. Obviously some may take issue with these choices. Still others, such as I, might prefer fewer selections with more contextualization, that is, more about the larger historical context in which these selections emerged and the opponents and obstacles that these women encountered. But these very minor objections and wishes are just that and take away nothing from a book that should be a must-read for every person, regardless of gender, interested in women's rights and how the pursuit of women's rights overlaps with issues of race, class, religion, and sexual orientation. I would like to thank NetGalley, the publisher, and the editors of this volume for providing me with an advance copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Viola

    https://lithub.com/a-brief-history-of... Brief History of Women’s Liberation Movements in America Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore Map Genealogies of Feminist Activism By Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore February 19, 2021 During the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, feminist activism—richly diverse both in the women involved and in its aims, tone, and strategies—exploded in the United States and around the world, forever changing society by expanding the rights, opportunities, and identities available to wom https://lithub.com/a-brief-history-of... Brief History of Women’s Liberation Movements in America Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore Map Genealogies of Feminist Activism By Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore February 19, 2021 During the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, feminist activism—richly diverse both in the women involved and in its aims, tone, and strategies—exploded in the United States and around the world, forever changing society by expanding the rights, opportunities, and identities available to women. And at the center of everything that the women’s liberation movement achieved was the writing that both forged and propelled it, writing that continues to inspire, challenge, educate, and even offend. Yet, by the mid-1980s, despite occasional victories, the feminist movement had become so distorted and vilified that the tag “feminist” was rejected by many women who had welcomed the changes in their lives the movement produced. At the end of World War II—and even as recently as 1970, as detailed by Gene Boyer in her essay, excerpted in this volume, “Are Woman Equal Under the Law?”—a husband’s forcing sex on his wife was not legally considered rape. In some states, unless there was a title establishing the wife’s ownership, all her purchases belonged to her husband, even if bought entirely with her own earnings, and a married woman could not make a contract or obtain a credit card without her husband’s signature. In many states a mother who daily lifted and carried her toddler could be barred from any job that required lifting more than 25 pounds, or, in California, newspaper employment ads were segregated by sex, and sometimes also by race. There were no policewomen or female firefighters and hardly any women broadcasters—female voices were considered too “shrill.” In fact, any job that required authority was in practice off limits to women: most law and medical schools had female quotas, and women were excluded from the clergy of most religions. Women made on average 59 cents for every dollar a man made for similar work, with the largest gender pay gap for women of color. All hurricanes bore female names, women being considered the creators of chaos, and in 1970 a prominent physician famously declared on TV that women were unfit for high office due to “raging hormonal imbalances of the lunar cycle.” The revolution began quietly in 1946, when a French philosopher in her thirties named Simone de Beauvoir began to write about what it meant to be a woman. When her book Le Deuxième Sexe (The Second Sex), which criticized all Western thought for positioning woman as Other and man as default, was published in France in 1949, it became a sensation, and, given its stance on religion and sexuality, was banned by the Vatican. When The Second Sex: Woman as Other was published in the US in 1953, it had a profound effect, influencing many of the women who would go on to create the American feminist movement. One of them was Betty Friedan, then a freelance writer for women’s magazines, who surveyed her Smith College class at their fifteenth reunion and found that an overwhelming number had a common set of complaints, ranging from the vague to the desperate. To their shared malaise she gave the appellation “the problem that has no name.” The Feminine Mystique, published in February 1963, quickly became a best seller. Friedan based her conclusions, which included the need for married women to work outside the home, on her sample of white educated housewives. Though she did not take up the concerns of women, both white and of color, who already had outside jobs and whose paychecks were essential to a family’s survival, the book’s revelations of discrimination against all women reverberated through the culture. During the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, feminist activism exploded in the United States and around the world, forever changing society by expanding the rights, opportunities, and identities available to women. Like The Second Sex, The Feminine Mystique was a call to action, but no movement yet existed. This changed in 1966, during the Third National Conference of Commissions on the Status of Women in Washington, DC, which was attended by Friedan. The network of state commissions had been created five years earlier by President John F. Kennedy to document the barriers that limited women’s full participation in American life. The initial report of the commissions, published in 1963, endorsed women’s legal equality, and sex—what is now called gender—was included in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as one of the bases for which employment discrimination was prohibited. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was established as Title VII’s enforcement arm, but although nearly a third of the almost two thousand complaints filed during the EEOC’s first year concerned sex discrimination, those complaints were seldom acted upon. Anger at this injustice led 28 conference attendees, meeting in Friedan’s hotel room in June 1966, to plan a civil rights organization “to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society now, assuming all the privileges and responsibilities thereof in truly equal partnership with men.” The result was the National Organization for Women (NOW), the first grassroots organization of the movement that has been written into history as the second wave of feminism. (The 19th-century women’s rights movement, which won the women’s suffrage amendment in 1920, is known as the first wave.) NOW’s first organizing conference was held in Washington, DC, four months later. The 49 members in attendance—five of whom have writings in this volume: Friedan, Gene Boyer, Mary O. Eastwood, and civil rights activists Pauli Murray and Shirley Chisholm—hammered out a platform focused on ending legal discrimination in employment, education, and reproductive rights. NOW grew rapidly and today has hundreds of thousands of members, female and male, in more than five hundred chapters nationwide. Soon after its founding, NOW would feel pressure from an emerging movement of radical women activists to broaden its concerns. That movement, which named itself women’s liberation, had its own history, goals, and style that differed from those of NOW. Its members, many of them young veterans of the civil rights, antiwar, and student movements, began to extend the radical social analyses they had learned in those movements to the situation of women. Some organized women’s caucuses within their civil rights and New Left organizations, such as the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Young Lords Party (both represented in this volume); but others, after presenting their ideas to dismissive or contemptuous male comrades, decided their cause required an independent women’s movement. Unlike women’s rights activists (also sometimes called moderate, reformist, or liberal feminists) who created traditional organizations like NOW and the National Women’s Political Caucus with officers, bylaws, and chapters, radical feminists came together in small, autonomous, women-only groups that rejected formal structure and focused on exposing the deep-rooted attitudes of sexism and misogyny and challenging everyday humiliations and injustices. In Chicago, in 1967, a small band of radical feminists established The Westside Group, widely considered the country’s first radical feminist group. When its cofounder, a 22-year-old art student named Shulamith Firestone, moved to New York City later that year, she helped organize New York Radical Women, the first group in that city. Soon small groups were forming in cities, in towns, and on campuses all over the country—from Boston, New York, and Gainesville, to Chicago, Detroit, Iowa City, and Madison, to Seattle, Berkeley, and Los Angeles. By the early 1970s, radical feminists of diverse identities, ethnicities, races, classes, and sexualities had organized into groups—mainly of like rather than mixed membership—of Black feminists, lesbian feminists, socialist feminists, separatist feminists, high school feminists, as well as collectives devoted to a particular feminist activity, such as providing safe, though illegal, abortions; publishing a journal or books; opening a gallery or bookstore; opposing racism; practicing women’s self-defense; teaching vaginal self-examination; and starting a day care center or a battered women’s shelter. Soon after its founding, NOW would feel pressure from an emerging movement of radical women activists to broaden its concerns. In some cities, umbrella organizations like The Chicago Women’s Liberation Union or the Boston area’s Bread and Roses gathered autonomous groups into loose coalitions. Frequently groups divided or split apart—resulting in the proliferation of new ideas and new organizations, and sometimes anger or heartbreak. Yet despite their many differences, radical feminists shared the overarching goal of creating a mass women’s liberation movement to transform power relations between the sexes and thus revolutionize society. Having grown up in a society in which female subordination in nearly every aspect of life was not only taken for granted but so normal as to be often invisible, radical feminists embraced as their foremost task convincing women of their oppression as women—and the need for a women’s liberation movement. This was accomplished through two major organizing methods: the technique of consciousness-raising (CR), by which women in small groups gained understanding of their subjugation through shared personal testimony—described in Kathie Sarachild’s article on CR in this volume—and women’s liberation writings, a creative ferment of ideas proliferated via feminist newspapers, journals, conferences, and radio programs on radical stations. For many, recognition of a need for change was instantaneous—an experience Jane O’Reilly named a click! moment in her 1972 article “The Housewife’s Moment of Truth,” included here. A mounting sense of purpose aroused excitement, commitment, and sometimes such feelings of rebirth that some women, rejecting patronymics, renamed themselves: Elana Dyke-woman, Laura X, and Judy Chicago, whose name change proclamation we include in our photo insert. Under the slogans “the personal is political” (discussed by Carol Hanisch in her article “The Personal Is Political”) and “sisterhood is powerful,” women in small groups, in many thousands of living rooms, kitchens, and newly opened women’s centers throughout the country, practiced CR by describing their maltreatment and exploitation in a range of ordinary experiences concerning sex, race, class, family, jobs, housework, health care, childcare, and more. Speaking for the first time of forbidden truths or private humiliations—as would women in the #MeToo movement decades later—they discovered that feelings they thought unique were widely shared: resentment at being judged by their looks, at having to fake orgasms, at being overlooked, silenced, and patronized. In 1969, CR went public in a Greenwich Village church, when the radical feminist group Redstockings presented the movement’s first public speakout—on the subject of abortion—to be followed in subsequent years by other groups’ speakouts on rape and sexual harassment, which ended taboos and opened vital national conversations. It was after reading about the first rape speakout that I, Honor, joined my first CR group in Manhattan. At the same time, from the mid-1960s on, beginning with Valerie Solanas’s notorious SCUM Manifesto, excerpted here, there was a great outpouring of feminist writing, from incitements to action, group manifestos, and visionary analyses to seething satires, passionate polemics, and the burgeoning of feminist poetry, fiction, plays, film, and visual arts. Before photocopier technology and the Internet, these writings circulated as mimeographed pamphlets piled onto literature tables at every feminist gathering, and in the new feminist newsletters and journals springing up across the country, such as Chicago’s Voice of the Women’s Liberation Movement and The Lavender Woman, Washington DC’s off our backs, Denver’s Big Mama Rag, Iowa City’s Ain’t I a Woman?, Seattle’s Lilith, Baltimore’s Women: A Journal of Liberation, Boston’s No More Fun & Games, New York’s Aphra, Triple Jeopardy, and Notes from the First Year, and the San Francisco Bay Area’s Tooth and Nail, It Ain’t Me Babe, and Mother Lode. In 1970, the first anthologies of these writings were issued by mainstream publishers and reached an eager mass audience: Sisterhood Is Powerful, The Black Woman, Voices of Women’s Liberation, Women’s Liberation: A Blueprint for the Future. Also that year, two scathing book-length radical feminist manifestos, The Dialectic of Sex by Shulamith Firestone and Sexual Politics by Kate Millett, both excerpted here, swept the nation and the best-seller lists. Having grown up in a society in which female subordination in nearly every aspect of life was not only taken for granted but so normal as to be often invisible, radical feminists embraced as their foremost task convincing women of their oppression as women. On August 26, 1970—50 years to the day after the suffrage amendment was adopted and two years after the small, now iconic Miss America protest garnered national media attention for women’s liberation (see photo insert), and which I, Alix, helped to plan and gleefully attended—the movement held its first mass demonstration. A huge march, organized by a coalition of feminist groups as a Women’s Strike for Equality, urged women not to go to work or do housework that day (“Don’t iron while the strike is hot!”). Some fifty thousand feminists, individually and in more than seventy groups—with names like Revolutionary Childcare Collective, the Lesbian Food Conspiracy, Black Women’s Liberation, Women Artists in Revolution, and Half of Brooklyn, representing both the radical and moderate branches of the movement—paraded together in triumph down New York’s Fifth Avenue (see photo insert). Demonstrators carried signs expressing the day’s spirit and demands: “Free Universal Childcare,” “I Am Not a Barbie Doll,” “Free Abortion on Demand,” “Liberté Egalité Sororité,” “Equal Pay for Equal Work.” In Boston, Syracuse, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Louis, San Francisco, and Los Angeles “sister marches” were held, drawing between one hundred and five thousand demonstrators. The movement had entered the mainstream. ...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Women’s Liberation! Feminist Writings that Inspired a Revolution & Still Can Edited by Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore, Library of America, 16 February 2021. Thank you to Net Galley for providing this unedited copy for review. Firstly, let me address the unedited nature of the copy I received for review (a kindle version). This has been fairly difficult to navigate, and I believe that the writers would benefit from a little further formatting before providing the galleys for review. That being Women’s Liberation! Feminist Writings that Inspired a Revolution & Still Can Edited by Alix Kates Shulman and Honor Moore, Library of America, 16 February 2021. Thank you to Net Galley for providing this unedited copy for review. Firstly, let me address the unedited nature of the copy I received for review (a kindle version). This has been fairly difficult to navigate, and I believe that the writers would benefit from a little further formatting before providing the galleys for review. That being said, I have enjoyed the papers that have been well worth the chase. Women’s Liberation! Feminist Writings that inspired a Revolution & Still Can is a commanding title – which, in my initial view, could well have done without the exclamation mark. I found it, together with the ampersand, likely to undermine the serious nature of the work. However, this collection, although serious in nature and intent, comprises a large range of material which omits academic works. As a ‘clarion call’ motif, the cover is eye catching, and not only denotes the popular nature of the work but is perhaps essential in a period when the stories of many inequalities are fighting for attention. The insertion of pamphlets and other short works provide the variety in sources that makes this collection so accessible. Hopefully, many of them ‘still can’ influence the way in which women continue to address the nature, impact, and resolution to the discrimination we endure. However, a proviso, there are some papers that, while historically worth inclusion, resonate uncomfortably in the context of the anger and heightened attention that surely must be given to the importance that governments must be able to govern without violent harassment. Kates Shulman and Moore have brought this collection together in a manner that helps explain and describe the diversity of women and ideas that made up the women’s movement and women’s fight for recognition from 1963 to 1991. In addition, there is a valuable introduction to the collection, and short introductions to individual papers throughout. The latter usually combines information about the background of the work, the writer/s and the historical context. The introduction to the collection goes further. However, amongst the excellent scene setting, development of historical context and detail about the writers and the movements they represent, I would have liked to have seen some discussion of the ideas and how they fit into today’s need for inspiration. Are they ‘just’ historical papers that are interesting relics of their time? Or do the ideas provide a foundation for the inspiration that Kates Schulman and Moore’s title suggests they would like to see? The early section begins with an excerpt from Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique The Problem that has No Name. This piece was a “must read” when it was first published, was a huge part of thinking during the 1970s, and is as pertinent today. As familiar are the works associated with the politics of housework, birth control, vaginal orgasm, consciousness raising, “the personal is political” and criticism of beauty pageants. A significant addition is the number of commentaries from and about the politics of being black or a woman of colour. This concern with the intersection of sexism and racism is a theme throughout the papers, and particularly relevant today where movements advocating white supremacy are dangerously prevalent. Excerpts from Schulamith Firestone and Kate Millett begin the 1970 – 1979 section. Shirley Chisholm, Robin Morgan Gloria Steinem, Alice Walker, Susan Brownmiller, Judy Chicago, Barbara Ehrenreich, Andrea Dworkin and Mary Daly, familiar names from the 1970s, are joined by pamphlet writers and (to me) less well-known women who contributed to the women’s movement in this period. There are papers on women and the law, abortion law repeal, rape, lesbian politics, welfare, madness, ‘verbal karate’ (Florence R Kennedy), health (how fondly I recall Our Bodies, Ourselves), more on housework, a letter from a battered wife, and sexual harassment. In the 1980 to 1991 section issues related to women in third world countries are raised, along with concerns with pornography, women’s invisibility, psychology, further work on black and coloured women, and an interesting reflection on whether men will be freed first by feminism, and prostitution. Familiar names in this section are Catherine McKinnon, Andrea Dworkin, Ursula K. Le Guin. To finish, I must acknowledge that some women reading this collection will find other women’s names familiar. I have enjoyed re-reading and reflecting upon the material that I read at the height of my involvement in the women’s movement. Complementing that reading was the material new to me, some distinctly disturbing, other writing making me think in new ways about issues with which I thought I was familiar. This collection readily offers both to its readers in a well organised chronology of our past and ideas that might indeed provide information for our future action.

  5. 4 out of 5

    J Earl

    Women's Liberation!: Feminist Writings that Inspired a Revolution & Still Can is a wonderful collection of writings from second wave feminism. There is such a wealth of ideas here that speak to our contemporary society as powerfully as it did then. Depending on your background, many if not all of these writers and works (excerpts, essays, etc) may well be familiar to you. If so, this offers you a chance to remember some key points you may have forgotten. I found myself reading some of these almos Women's Liberation!: Feminist Writings that Inspired a Revolution & Still Can is a wonderful collection of writings from second wave feminism. There is such a wealth of ideas here that speak to our contemporary society as powerfully as it did then. Depending on your background, many if not all of these writers and works (excerpts, essays, etc) may well be familiar to you. If so, this offers you a chance to remember some key points you may have forgotten. I found myself reading some of these almost as if I had never seen them before. So much has been written and so much has happened over the past sixty years or so that some things fade. Shulan and Moore made some phenomenal choices to include and made a point in the introduction of reaching back to The Second Sex, a work that sits outside the time frame of this collection but is definitely a part of it in spirit. For any readers new to feminist thought, this is an excellent primary document source. There are some very good histories available to help create more of a narrative, within which these works played key roles. As they also mention in the introduction, some people over simplify the past, giving the impression that every conflict or debate had only two sides, the popular "cat fight" narrative. If anyone is interested in getting a broader view of the so-called sex wars during this period, one that disputes the sex-positive/sex-negative dichotomy, I would recommend the forthcoming Why We Lost the Sex Wars by Lorna N Bracewell. I believe it is being published next month, March, from University of Minnesota Press. We must continuously look back so we don't forget in order to make the change we need to make. This volume serves that function for both those of us who remember these works and those for whom these are new. Highly recommended for both reading and reference. Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via NetGalley.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Thank you #NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review Women’s Liberation in exchange for an honest and fair review. I’ve been working to read books outside of my “normal” criteria lately so when this popped up on NetGalley I jumped at the opportunity to read and review Women’s Liberation. This is a collection of diverse feminist works from 1963-1991 and honestly some parts I’m not even sure what to say about them except they got my blood boiling. It took me a while to read the all of the c Thank you #NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review Women’s Liberation in exchange for an honest and fair review. I’ve been working to read books outside of my “normal” criteria lately so when this popped up on NetGalley I jumped at the opportunity to read and review Women’s Liberation. This is a collection of diverse feminist works from 1963-1991 and honestly some parts I’m not even sure what to say about them except they got my blood boiling. It took me a while to read the all of the collections but I read them little by little over the past month, and it was a really inspiring read just to know more of feminism history before I was born. I particularly appreciated that there was diverse voices and perspectives. Women’s Liberation is an great compilations of writings, pamphlets and works, and I appreciated the opportunity to read them and would recommend them to pretty much everyone alive today as I think it’s important to reflect upon where we were and how we got to where we are now. It feels like an important part of history, and I’m so thankful for all the strong women who fought before me, all the strong women alive and fighting now, and all the strong women that will fight in the future. Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️✨

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Westlake

    This is a great anthology of both well-known and less-known works contributing to women's equality and liberation. There's the Feminine Mystique but then some works by feminist groups in the 1970s that I found very interesting. If you're looking for a wide range of sources and perspectives, spanning the 1950s (which typically is seen as the ""beginning" of the feminist movement) to the present day, this is it. For me, and someone who has read on this topic before, the first part was the expected This is a great anthology of both well-known and less-known works contributing to women's equality and liberation. There's the Feminine Mystique but then some works by feminist groups in the 1970s that I found very interesting. If you're looking for a wide range of sources and perspectives, spanning the 1950s (which typically is seen as the ""beginning" of the feminist movement) to the present day, this is it. For me, and someone who has read on this topic before, the first part was the expected and less engaging than the second part. For someone who is first setting foot into interacting with these readings, the whole book will be equally engaging. I think the 50s, 60s, and some of the 70s always gets its place in the sun. The later 70s through the present often gets left behind in the narratives and history- partially because it seems too close to the present, but also because I think women get overshadowed by other events in these eras. So glad this was put together by the Library of America. I always find their layouts, font, and formatting so aesthetically pleasing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mich

    *Arc kindly given via Netgalley* As a women who has been intimately related with feminism, this book was everything I was hoping it would be. The chorus of diverse voices we get to hear talk about different struggles helped me to widen my perspective and learn so much more about this movement and its roots. You get to read about black feminism, queer feminism, radical feminist, among others which I consider to be a really good selection since before this book, I haven't got a chance to read about *Arc kindly given via Netgalley* As a women who has been intimately related with feminism, this book was everything I was hoping it would be. The chorus of diverse voices we get to hear talk about different struggles helped me to widen my perspective and learn so much more about this movement and its roots. You get to read about black feminism, queer feminism, radical feminist, among others which I consider to be a really good selection since before this book, I haven't got a chance to read about this branches that the movement have. I consider this book to be a “must read” to anyone who's looking to learn more about occidental feminist history.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Montague

    Nice collection of writings from second wave feminism. I loved Women’s Studies in college and this was a nice refresher. A lot of articles I hadn’t come across before and many are very relevant to women’s experience today. I was able to read this book early through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    Thanks to NetGalley and Library of America for providing an ARC!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Disclaimer: Received a copy for review from the publisher via NetGalley ✮ Read this review and more like it on my blog ✮ Disclaimer: Received a copy for review from the publisher via NetGalley ✮ Read this review and more like it on my blog ✮

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kit

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chanecka

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Massey Barner

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Long

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hogmire

  19. 5 out of 5

    April

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Ladeby

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elspeth

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jakub Szestowicki

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chrisanthi

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stace A

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sally

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jayme

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Oglesby

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bailey

  30. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  31. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Park

  32. 5 out of 5

    Maeholly

  33. 4 out of 5

    annie

  34. 4 out of 5

    Romadera

  35. 4 out of 5

    Niamh

  36. 5 out of 5

    Lynn LeRoy

  37. 4 out of 5

    Megan Peters

  38. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Terry

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.