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Latinx Screams

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An anthology of Latinx horror stories from some of the most stellar voices writing today.


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An anthology of Latinx horror stories from some of the most stellar voices writing today.

38 review for Latinx Screams

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann

    4.5 stars!! V. Castro is a new-to-me author that I discovered on Twitter and then read her novella, HAIRSPRAY & SWITCHBLADES. I was drawn into her effortless storytelling voice rich in cultural and feministic overtones. I have enjoyed several of her short stories found in various anthologies I've read over the last year. V. Castro is a hard working, strong voice in horror that I enthusiastically seek out whenever I see that she has a contribution on a TOC for upcoming anthologies. Cynthia Pelayo i 4.5 stars!! V. Castro is a new-to-me author that I discovered on Twitter and then read her novella, HAIRSPRAY & SWITCHBLADES. I was drawn into her effortless storytelling voice rich in cultural and feministic overtones. I have enjoyed several of her short stories found in various anthologies I've read over the last year. V. Castro is a hard working, strong voice in horror that I enthusiastically seek out whenever I see that she has a contribution on a TOC for upcoming anthologies. Cynthia Pelayo is also a new-to-me author. I've read two poetry collections and a novella and she has not disappointed. She has a unique voice that can be soft and lyrical in one moment and then pitch-black bone-chilling the next. Highly recommend checking out her work. All of this being said, I was excited to see they were the editors for LATINX SCREAMS, an entire showcase of Latinx voices "screaming" to be heard but also writing stories to make you scream. I love that play on words. The back of the book makes a simple statement, "An anthology of Latinx horror stories from some of the most stellar voices writing today." I think this sets the proper expectations for readers because the stories collected here do not adhere to any singular theme. They are joined together in blood with a common purpose-to provide readers with a full anthology of Latinx horror writers in order to make a loud sound in an otherwise "noisy" genre that can snuff out POC voices. Let's dive in! For the sake of full transparency, the only authors I had read previously were Sergio Gomez (CAMP SLAUGHTER-loved it), Monique Quintana (CENOTE CITY), and V. Castro (HAIRSPRAY & SWITCHBLADES) Hector Acosta/Sangre Derramada- A man must investigate the reason for why a finger was found in a package of chicken. Acosta infuses social commentary on classism with all the impending doom of violence. Thick anticipation/suspense as the reader feels a growing sense of frustration given the situation the protagonist finds himself in. Sarah Davis/Black Sheep- Another sort of investigative vibe with this story as a reporter/journalist goes on assignment to uncover the truth behind a series of violent attacks where the victims are beaten and left with shaved heads. I liked the unraveling of this vengeance horror and the mystery behind the identity of the "Black Sheep". Rios de la Luz/Morning of the Teeth- Ooooooh, exorcism. As soon as I read the first line, I settled into my reading position to get fully invested. I love a good demon possession story. This one took an unexpected turn as the exorcism transitioned from one "tried and true" method to one more unconventional. I think readers will enjoy where this one ends up. Laura Diaz de Arce/Frijoles- First, frijoles is one of my favorite Spanish words to say and reminds me the most of my Papa Isaac who made the best refried beans known to any and all Mexican Restaurants. He made his beans for his customers in a giant steel pot and used a big, flat wooden spoon too-so this story gave me all the feels right off the bat. I enjoyed the storytelling and rich cultural flavor in this story. Sergio Gomez/Come, Play- SERGIO!!! This guy can write. I already knew Sergio could write authentic teen characters given his work in Camp Slaughter, but it's a welcomed surprise that he's just as adept writing younger children as well. I loved how this story starts so carefree about chasing frogs and then takes a cold, hard left into an unsettling, menacing tone. Arasibo Campeche/The Organometallic God- Wow! What an opening line. The first indication this was not going to pull any punches. I think body horror/disease/health crisis horror is one of the scariest tropes because it hits so close to home for so many of us who either battle our own health anxiety or our fears about the health of our loved ones. Richie Narvaez/Galan- OK, this story made me hungry talking about yummy food smells and family. This one was a little bit dialog-heavy and the format was something I needed to get used to which mean the story was hard for me to get invested in-not enough exposition. But I did like the characters and strong sense of family/relationships. Baillie Puckett/The Devil With Me- "I was possessed by the devil." A very short but memorable piece. Monique Quintana/The Throats of Neptune- MERMAIDS!! That's all I have to say in order to sell readers straight up front. There is a huge desire for more mermaid horror. Take note publishers/authors! Quintana brings a very soft, fairytale, lyrical quality to her storytelling that I enjoy. This tale moves and ebbs and flows with rhythm and purpose--sometimes a little ambiguous like poetry, but still has enough story elements to follow. E. Reyes/Behind the Mountain- I enjoyed the way this story aligned itself with cultural spirituality and superstition surrounding death and the afterlife. I've read a Santa Muerte horror story before and I really love the folklore surrounding The Lady of Holy Death A.E. Santana/Imperial Slaughterhouse- I love, love a good domestic/human monsters story and this one capitalizes on one of my favorite tropes- Family relationships can be so layered and complicated, especially when loved ones are so close to death-this one has a darkness to it that makes readers lean in and hope for the best. V. Castro/Pancho Claus Vs. Krampus- I skipped ahead and read this one first because I got this around Christmas time and wanted to jump right into holiday horror for the season! I was so surprised by the level of intricately plotted detail and folklore Castro was able to bring to this tale. I hope we see a return of this Latinx Christmas universe she built in just a manner of pages.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    Over the last few years, diversity in publishing has become a point of contention, particularly within the contents of authors and stories published in anthologies and the editor’s role in actively seeking diverse voices. For quite a long while, anthologies have been, largely, the domain of white male authors, particularly white male marquee, name-brand authors. Thankfully, times are changing and a growing number of minority creatives and open-minded editors are taking the reins of what used to Over the last few years, diversity in publishing has become a point of contention, particularly within the contents of authors and stories published in anthologies and the editor’s role in actively seeking diverse voices. For quite a long while, anthologies have been, largely, the domain of white male authors, particularly white male marquee, name-brand authors. Thankfully, times are changing and a growing number of minority creatives and open-minded editors are taking the reins of what used to be an old boy’s club, operating under the mantra of being the change they want to see. Add to this list, editors and authors V. Castro and Cynthia Pelayo, and their most recent anthology, Latinx Screams, a 100% Latinx through-and-through compilation of short stories from authors of diverse Latinx cultures. Hector Acosta kicks off the antho with his contribution, “Sangre Derramada,” which shines a spotlight on immigrant workers in a New Mexico chicken processing plant that was recently aided by ICE. After one of the plant’s frozen chicken packages is found to have contained a severed finger, an inspector is brought in to investigate. While Latinx Screams contains some hair-raising moments, one of the most prominent themes that stands out across this grouping of 12 stories is that of family. “Frijoles” by Laura Diaz de Arce follows a curse afflicting a soldier’s descendants across the generations, while Richie Narvaez’s “Galán” is a near-future sci-fi story of a family’s first robot examining the culture clash of tradition versus modernity. Across this anthology we get a strong sense of how important family is to these authors and how much familial identity and companionship forms the bedrock of these Latinx cultures. Acosta’s story documents the struggles of working a job as arduous as working in a chicken processing factory, and why so many immigrants are willing to take on such hard, thankless work. Sergio Gomez’s “Come, Play” is a story of friendship, and a morality tale involving a pair of kids who sneak out well past their bedtime to go on a midnight frog hunt. E. Reyes’s “Behind the Mountain” plays a bit like a Latin Pet Sematary as family members seek to have their lost loved ones resurrected. My personal favorite, though, was A.E. Santana’s “Imperial Slaughterhouse,” wherein Lucía returns home to visit her hospitalized father one last time. Santana balances and intertwines complex family drama and horror wonderfully, and while the element of selling one’s soul to a devil is of particular interest, the author reminds us once again that humans can be the most monstrous evil. V. Castro closes out the anthology with a fun Christmas story, “Pancho Claus vs. Krampus.” While Latinx Screams is not overly concerned with Christmas, or even holidays as a whole, the book’s Christmas Day release gives this peculiar inclusion its raison d’être. Castro briefly explores the network of Claus clans that help spread joy to kids every December 25, with Pancho handling those areas south of the equator. His first day of retirement doesn’t go quite as planned, though, as Pancho stumbles across the demonic Krampus while on vacation in Iceland. Castro does some deft worldbuilding in short order, communicating everything we need to know about Claus network in a few brief sentences, and she leaves the door open for some future X-Mas hijinks. To that, I can only say, bring it on! Latinx Screams certainly delivers on both its premise and its promise, and it’s a welcome addition to the growing canon of diverse horror anthologies.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    This anthology was a blast to read and I discovered some new-to-me authors who I definitely want to read more from. I enjoyed all of the stories, but my favorites were probably Come, Play by Sergio Gomez, Imperial Slaughterhouse by A. E. Santana, Pancho Claus Vs. Krampus by V. Castro, and Sangre Derramada by Hector Acosta. I also learned a little history and folklore that I didn't know while reading this curation of stories, which was an added bonus. It's a shorter anthology, so you can probably This anthology was a blast to read and I discovered some new-to-me authors who I definitely want to read more from. I enjoyed all of the stories, but my favorites were probably Come, Play by Sergio Gomez, Imperial Slaughterhouse by A. E. Santana, Pancho Claus Vs. Krampus by V. Castro, and Sangre Derramada by Hector Acosta. I also learned a little history and folklore that I didn't know while reading this curation of stories, which was an added bonus. It's a shorter anthology, so you can probably read it in a single sitting if you choose, or you can take your time like I did. Regardless, pick up a copy! You'll have fun.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    3.5 rounded up to 4 for Goodreads. Familiar, yet refreshingly different. This is the thought that kept scrolling through my mind, like the news ticker along the bottom of the screen when watching ESPN, while reading this anthology. Familial curses, devils, cosmic horror, revenants, demons, and even Krampus make any appearance within these pages. All of these stories had that vague sense of a place we have visited before but this time around we are experiencing it through a different lens. As the 3.5 rounded up to 4 for Goodreads. Familiar, yet refreshingly different. This is the thought that kept scrolling through my mind, like the news ticker along the bottom of the screen when watching ESPN, while reading this anthology. Familial curses, devils, cosmic horror, revenants, demons, and even Krampus make any appearance within these pages. All of these stories had that vague sense of a place we have visited before but this time around we are experiencing it through a different lens. As the title of the anthology suggests, LATINX SCREAMS, all of these stories were written by Latinx authors who have incorporated their viewpoints, upbringings, and cultures into the horrors on display. Again, it was all familiar yet slightly different. Now, I will be the first to admit that I can be more diverse in my reading. I do try and read more women authors, have I mentioned that this anthology was edited by V. Castro and Cina Pelayo, more POC, etc. but I can always do better. I love to learn about other places and cultures from around the world and what better way to do that than by reading. My favorite aspect of LATINX SCREAMS is the infusion of Mexican and Latin American folklore, values, myths, legends, and beliefs into these horror stories. Having an anthology solely composed of Latinx authors being able to tell the stories they want to tell and getting to use their own voices to do so had such a genuine feeling of authenticity to it.  Lurking deeper beneath the surface of the dark and bloody horrors are themes of strong family bonds, bits of racism, the generation gap, technology, tradition, death, and more. I am all for horror just for the fun of it but what I have come to learn about myself is that I really like horror when it has a bit more meat on its bones so to speak. Horror that has something of importance to say, some fat to chew on. Quite a few of the stories in this anthology tap into that for me. Lets touch a bit on all the stories collected here. Sangre Derramada by Hector Acosta - Immigrant workers toiling away in a sweltering chicken processing plant. An inspector has been called in after a severed finger was found in a pack of chicken. Blood. This might have been my favorite story in the entire anthology. Black Sheep by Sarah Davis - A reporter is covering the mysterious vigilante known as the Black Sheep who takes justice into their own hands. Morning of the Teeth by Rios de la Luz - Exorcism. Religion. Children and spirits of the forest.  Frijoles by Laura Diaz de Arce - A family curse that has consumed generation upon generation. Come, Play by Sergio Gomez - Two young friends go out past their bedtime to catch frogs. Didn’t your parents ever tell you never to talk to strangers? The Organometallic God by Arasibo Campeche - Witchcraft, black magic. A magical curing elixir. Galan by Richie Narvaez - The old versus the new. Abuela wants things done the traditional way but times are changing. No one likes change, but maybe change is a good thing. Or maybe it isn’t? The Devil With Me by Baillie Puckett - Waking up to a reflection that you don’t recognize. Puberty and family history. The monsters, or devils, within. The Throats of Neptune by Monique Quintana - Imprisoned mermaids, lullabies, and breaking free. Behind the Mountain by E. Reyes - Santa Muerta. Things dead and buried are best left that way. Imperial Slaughterhouse by A.E. Santana - Making deals with demons. Blood may not always be thicker. Pancho Claus Vs. Krampus by V. Castro - Just as the title suggests. The Claus clan versus their arch nemesis, Krampus. The pages of LATINX SCREAMS feel like they are stained with the blood, sweat, and tears of the authors. Channelling their collective voices through the pen, the words screaming to be heard. Full of horrors choked with dust and grit, tradition and myth, and even some frijoles in case you come with an appetite. I received an eARC from the editor of this book for review consideration. Video review: https://youtu.be/rZijR6kxkEM

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    I received a copy of this anthology for review consideration. My opinions are my own. LATINX SCREAMS is the latest offering from Burial Day Press, a dream team up with the multi-talented and driven Violet Castro, who edited this anthology. A collection of horror stories from an allstar Latinx lineup, with the dual purpose of illustrating how effective horror through different lenses is, and serving as an example to aspiring voices from marginalized communities. Yes, this genre is for you, and ye I received a copy of this anthology for review consideration. My opinions are my own. LATINX SCREAMS is the latest offering from Burial Day Press, a dream team up with the multi-talented and driven Violet Castro, who edited this anthology. A collection of horror stories from an allstar Latinx lineup, with the dual purpose of illustrating how effective horror through different lenses is, and serving as an example to aspiring voices from marginalized communities. Yes, this genre is for you, and yes, we want your stories. Castro has done a stellar job of curating a group of stories that cover the gamut of tone, subject matter, brutality and aesthetic. The anthology leads off with Sangre Derramada by Hector Acosta, which swung the pendulum between humor, the horror of the plight of immigrant workers in unsafe conditions, and deep down gritty body horror. The culmination is as effective as it is unexpected. Following Acosta’s act is Sarah Davis with Black Sheep, an intriguing premise written with the urgency of present tense. The reader is pulled along in Anessa’s wake as she investigates a bizarre string of assaults, and the pacing is pitch perfect. Morning of the Teeth by Rio de la Luz, is written in a frantic, fever dream style that brings the unreality of the supernatural elements to the forefront. There’s a particularly haunting scene of mourning that stuck with me long after I finished. Frijoles by Laura Diaz de Arce was one of my standout favorites, covering the ties and burdens of family, curses, and looming death in a way that beautifully built dread. Come, Play by Sergio Gomez handled a child’s point of view in an authentic and compelling fashion, the simple thrill of sneaking out at night, tying in horrific folklore elements that made my skin crawl. The Organometallic God by Arisabo Campeche starts off with one of the most viscerally disturbing opening lines I’ve ever read, and keeps the atmosphere up from there. Themes of dark magic and betrayal are rife within, and Campeche blends them to perfection. Richie Narvaez brings the tech horror with Galan, a story about the bond that forms between a robot and the family’s matriarch, to the downfall of some of the other family members. The Devil With Me by Baillie Puckett is a quick slice look at the other side of possession with a surprising outcome, meshed with believable and effective coming of age body horror and some lines that made me laugh out loud. Monique Quintana’s ethereal and beautiful tale of mythic women in captivity, The Throats of Neptune, is a haunting look at confinement, expectations and underestimation that stuck with me well after the story ended. Behind the Mountain by E. Reyes was one of the longer pieces of the bunch, woven with folklore, grief, and family, and bearing excellent comparisons with the best parts of Pet Semetary, though it is completely it’s own story. With Imperial Slaughterhouse, A.E. Santana thrusts the reader into scene setting so effectively done I felt like I was the one driving in the desert heat. Santana deftly defies our expectations about the nature of this homecoming trip, and at one point gives us dual storytelling as a character recalls an eerie ghost story on her way through a haunted slaughterhouse, a particularly effective and skin crawling device. The final entry to this powerhouse anthology is V. Castro’s Pancho Claus v. Krampus. I think I would have pegged this as V.’s story even without the byline, as it serves up her signature mix of modernized folklore, compelling characters and kickass fight scenes. I’d love to see this expanded into novella format, because the scope and the story is right there ready and waiting. This was a thoroughly enjoyable anthology from start to finish, a quick read, and a hell of an introduction to some voices that were new to me. Grab it and enjoy!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebeka Bergin-Schwarz

    I came to Latinx Screams for the horror fiction, but left with a lot more than scares. I’m a little less culturally ignorant for having read these stories, written by a host of diverse, talented writers from various Latinx cultures. There is something for every horror lover in this anthology; body horror, curses, demons, the devil, witchcraft, re-animation, folklore, the list goes on, but each of them are told in a different way to what you may be familiar with, which I found exciting. You'll al I came to Latinx Screams for the horror fiction, but left with a lot more than scares. I’m a little less culturally ignorant for having read these stories, written by a host of diverse, talented writers from various Latinx cultures. There is something for every horror lover in this anthology; body horror, curses, demons, the devil, witchcraft, re-animation, folklore, the list goes on, but each of them are told in a different way to what you may be familiar with, which I found exciting. You'll also get a glimpse of some of the real horrors the Latinx community faces too, such as racism, colourism, sexual abuse, poverty and awful treatment of immigrant workers, just to name a few. I recommend this anthology to everyone because, as I said, there is something in it for all of us and I believe we should all read more diversely. Read my full review at https://abitwordsy.blog/book-reviews/...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gerardo Pelayo

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rita

  9. 4 out of 5

    Donnie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Torres

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christine Christensen

  12. 5 out of 5

    shan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

  14. 5 out of 5

    The Grim Reader

  15. 5 out of 5

    Benito Corral

  16. 5 out of 5

    VIctoria Nations

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bark | Ladies Of Horror Fiction

  18. 4 out of 5

    Justin Lewis

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alexander C. Bailey

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richelle SheReadsHorror

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Anastasia Belle | IG: victoria.anastasia.belle

  23. 5 out of 5

    J.M. Horn

  24. 5 out of 5

    Roxie |The Book Slayer| Voorhees

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sonora Taylor

  26. 4 out of 5

    Madeleine Hernandez-g

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alicia (A Kernel of Nonsense)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Priscilla (Bookie Charm)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Guarino

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eve Harms

  31. 5 out of 5

    Blake Blanco

  32. 4 out of 5

    Stefano

  33. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

  34. 4 out of 5

    Tania Reads

  35. 4 out of 5

    Marilynn Montano

  36. 4 out of 5

    Amy Noire

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  38. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Yakel-Kuntz

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