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Ramses: The Lady of Abu Simbel

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Saga about ancient Egypt & the powerful struggle between Ramses & his enemies. Saga about ancient Egypt & the powerful struggle between Ramses & his enemies.


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Saga about ancient Egypt & the powerful struggle between Ramses & his enemies. Saga about ancient Egypt & the powerful struggle between Ramses & his enemies.

30 review for Ramses: The Lady of Abu Simbel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    this series is interesting in many ways. they are not books i find very engrossing but they lead me to reflect on various matters. one is culinary. often when i read i find i start to cook and eat in ways mentioned in the book. i particularly liked the honeyed spiced figs i made as my ramses tribute. the author is described as a foremost egyptologist. he may well be; he is certainly a great lover of ancient egypt. these novels seem to tell of an ideal society, where all people are valued, justice this series is interesting in many ways. they are not books i find very engrossing but they lead me to reflect on various matters. one is culinary. often when i read i find i start to cook and eat in ways mentioned in the book. i particularly liked the honeyed spiced figs i made as my ramses tribute. the author is described as a foremost egyptologist. he may well be; he is certainly a great lover of ancient egypt. these novels seem to tell of an ideal society, where all people are valued, justice is sought, and truth and virtue are rewarded. i am not sure this glamorised version is real. one story thread i found very interesting was that of moses and the exodus of the hebrews. i know the old testament story well and it is interesting to read a different perspective. and i am not entirely convinced. i can accept the naturalistic explanation for the plagues. an understanding of egypt could well have assisted moses. what lacks conviction within the context of the novel is ramses refusal to allow the hebrews to go. he speaks of them as totally free to as they choose. but he suggests a concern about their safety should they leave egypt. his concern is so strong he denies them their freedom. another weak point, is the way the egytptians react to moses faith. they polytheists with an elaborated religious life. i find it hard to believe in the cool rational manner they are said to show to moses. i have seen too much of the clash of faiths to believe in jacq's presentation. whay intersts me, is just what jacq's motives are for the style of the world he has created. does he really believe ancient egypt was like this, or is he deliberately creating an idealised world. the books strike me as suited to teenagers, who often enjoy reading about fantastic societies that help them develop their own ideas of what they want for their world. it may be this is jacq's purpose. in any event, these books are ones i would recommend for teenage readers. they are not very convincing as history, but are fun as a story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    This is getting boring....if it weren't for the fact that there were only one left in the series, I would thorw in the towel. Ramses's story could have been told in one book. A longer book...but one. Nice to hear about the author's interpretation, but how many times to we have to hear that Nefertari was the most beautiful woman in the world, but not as pretty as Iset...and even though Iset was in love with Ramses she knew she could not be his royal wife......etc. Blah blah.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I am fascinated by ancient times and Egypt's ancient civilization is one of the most advanced, thus so interesting. Yet with each successive book in this series, I am less enthralled. Partly because I think the translation was pretty poor. Too much contemporary language and jargon utilized, but the other is it historical fiction, magical realism or even fantasy? The bones of the book rests squarely in the historical fiction category following Ramses the Great from about his 10th-15th years of hi I am fascinated by ancient times and Egypt's ancient civilization is one of the most advanced, thus so interesting. Yet with each successive book in this series, I am less enthralled. Partly because I think the translation was pretty poor. Too much contemporary language and jargon utilized, but the other is it historical fiction, magical realism or even fantasy? The bones of the book rests squarely in the historical fiction category following Ramses the Great from about his 10th-15th years of his reign. But quite of few of the miracles described and attributed to Ramses & even his wife Nefertari & friend Setau seem to border on the fantasy. Throughout the series, he even is able to apparently "communicate" with animals, in particular his pet & fellow warrior, the Lion named Fighter. This story continues to revolve around the conflict between Ramses & his brother Shanaar at the local level and his war & subsequent negotiations with the Hittites. It is also the time period when Moses returns to Egypt to lead the Hebrews out of the country. Jacq counters the miracles of the plagues brought down by God through Moses with scientific explanations including the parting of the Sea of Reeds. And of the course the title refers to the beginning of the building of the temples at Abu Simbel. So enough history to keep me reading but some bad dialogue and eye-rolling moments to place it in the Ok category. I believe there is one more in this series. I'll need quite a bit of breathing space before going forward with it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aline

    This book is a SCANDAL ... can't describe how much i was diappointed in what i thought was a work based on years of researches ...ALAS the prophet MOSES was disgraced in this ....cant's say no more. -_- it has began in the second book, going to the third. first i thought it was a coicidence (maybe someone with the same name) but nooooooo; it went too far from the truth. ---------- i'm not going to finish reading the fifth book of this saga ....I'M DONE. ---------- BELKADI FATIHA.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Claverton

    I remember this book being better than it is, but then I did first read it over a decade ago. The characters are two-dimensional and the author likes to show off his Egyptian knowledge. The story of Moses is treated with contempt despite the magic of the Egyptians being rendered as truth. Disappointing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mandy Andersonn

    By now I'm reading this series simply to finish what I started.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rouslan Chimeea

    Totally loved this! Another great one to the series, already onto the 5th and last one of the saga. I discovered a new passion for historical fiction with these books; historical fiction because I learned much more about ancient Egypt than I ever did and visiting a museum in Berlin about ancient Egypt only accentuated my passion for it!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    read this while in Egypt and visiting the Abu Simbel temple! Wonderful!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Harun Bo

    Beyond history and reality.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I was not as much of a fan of this book as I have been of the previous three. However, I think the strength of the series overall is how it relates the Egyptian ideology not by stating fact, but by entwining those beliefs into the actions of the characters. Nerfertari is repeatedly hailed as the most beautiful, the most lovely, the most sweet. As if she were a goddess on earth. Which she absolutely was. For Egyptians. Even as Second Wife, Iset is never truly jealous of Nefertari. Because Ma'at i I was not as much of a fan of this book as I have been of the previous three. However, I think the strength of the series overall is how it relates the Egyptian ideology not by stating fact, but by entwining those beliefs into the actions of the characters. Nerfertari is repeatedly hailed as the most beautiful, the most lovely, the most sweet. As if she were a goddess on earth. Which she absolutely was. For Egyptians. Even as Second Wife, Iset is never truly jealous of Nefertari. Because Ma'at is the ultimate ruler, keeper of truth, balance, order, harmony, and justice, and to defy her by being selfish would cause unbalance. The law of Ma'at must be maintained. For the same reason, Ramses is remarkably tolerant of a monotheistic religion among his country's ardent polytheism. As long as it, in return, is tolerant. When it is not, the Hebrews must be expelled in order to maintain harmony within the two kingdoms, despite any personal feelings of either Moses or Pharaoh. As you read the story, this way of thinking sometimes seems over-exaggerated, or unrealistic. But that is simply because the reality of today differs from the reality that was Egypt. I tend to find their way of thinking perpetually fascinating.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    This one gets a bonus star for the whole section on the plagues of Egypt. Way back when I attended a C of E primary school. In the five years I was there, I think we covered most of the Bible (in a format suitable for small children, of course). One of the most popular areas was the whole story of Moses and the Egyptians, and the plagues. The Egyptians trembled in fear before the wrath of God as He sent one plague after another. Jacq has gone something of a different route, and it was brilliant. This one gets a bonus star for the whole section on the plagues of Egypt. Way back when I attended a C of E primary school. In the five years I was there, I think we covered most of the Bible (in a format suitable for small children, of course). One of the most popular areas was the whole story of Moses and the Egyptians, and the plagues. The Egyptians trembled in fear before the wrath of God as He sent one plague after another. Jacq has gone something of a different route, and it was brilliant. I won't spoil it by laying it out here, but it was a completely different take on a familiar story—sheer genius. The rest of the book is taken up with the ongoing situation with the Hittites and the internal conspiracies and attempts to remove Ramses from the throne. Ramses, meanwhile, is intent on building twin temples at Abu Simbel for Nefertari, who is suffering as she tries to deflect the attacks against her family. A few of the plotlines reach a conclusion, but there are still ongoing elements which (I presume) will continue into the next book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vinayak Malik

    This is probably the last book in the series i'll read. Ramses as a paragon of everything Egypt has become too much to bear. everyone else is just there to aid him or die opposing him

  13. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Book 4 in the Ramses series finds the Pharaoh fighting foes on both the physical and metaphysical levels. Evil walks the land of the Nile and won't rest until Pharaoh is destroyed! I've enjoyed this series not only because it's about Egypt and one of it's greatest rulers, but because it shows the human side behind the power. Ramses might be the most powerful man in the known world but that doesn't protect him from tragedy and personal loss. He still ages...new foes arise..and the burden to prote Book 4 in the Ramses series finds the Pharaoh fighting foes on both the physical and metaphysical levels. Evil walks the land of the Nile and won't rest until Pharaoh is destroyed! I've enjoyed this series not only because it's about Egypt and one of it's greatest rulers, but because it shows the human side behind the power. Ramses might be the most powerful man in the known world but that doesn't protect him from tragedy and personal loss. He still ages...new foes arise..and the burden to protect his people and culture is always on his shoulders. The author has written a story of the human spirit...and he has excelled at it!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dominika Košútová

    I found this book to be right in the middle, it is not too impressive but it was not that bad . One thing that quite annoyed me was how Nefertari was being described as this perfect woman she was like goddess. I know that the Egyptians used to believe that the pharaoh was a god but im not that kind of person who loves to read or hear idealised stories of historical figures. I´m much more interested in knowing what happened for real like how was their relationship in reality. Nefertari was never I found this book to be right in the middle, it is not too impressive but it was not that bad . One thing that quite annoyed me was how Nefertari was being described as this perfect woman she was like goddess. I know that the Egyptians used to believe that the pharaoh was a god but im not that kind of person who loves to read or hear idealised stories of historical figures. I´m much more interested in knowing what happened for real like how was their relationship in reality. Nefertari was never jealous of Ramesses second wife which is really hard to believe, she never had fights with her husband and their love life was like not from this world haha so nah only 3 stars for this one.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Organicearthful

    Read this realising I was joining mid story, which became evident, though the plot managed to keep together without too much problem for me. Another quite lightweight historical fiction. Lots going on at a grand scale, though not very much actually going on at a small scale. Much of the time is disjointed by bringing the story of characters further afield up to date, but little in the way of moment to moment continuity, which left me feeling still an observer rather than a participant in the sto Read this realising I was joining mid story, which became evident, though the plot managed to keep together without too much problem for me. Another quite lightweight historical fiction. Lots going on at a grand scale, though not very much actually going on at a small scale. Much of the time is disjointed by bringing the story of characters further afield up to date, but little in the way of moment to moment continuity, which left me feeling still an observer rather than a participant in the story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Prestoni

    Last book on the shelf kind of read. When you can't be bothered making the trip to the library..... Weird, disjointed ideas, in places it felt like it was written by a student, it seemed to vacillate between trying to retell history to science fiction and an attempt at romance thrown in and then abandoned. Didn't like it, won't be reading the others in the series that I have bought - luckily at a book fair, so no big money lost.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Nilsson

    If it hadn't been for all the religious stuff (it just becomes too much in these books!), I love to follow Ramses, his friends, and his enemies. But often it get's a bit silly, and over the top, too much about Gods and religiousness. I DON'T mind these things in moderate; I know that the Gods were very important in ancient Egypt, but sometimes the author takes it a bit too far. The moments in between tho' are exciting, fun and truly an enjoyment to read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    I like historical fiction and the Ramses Series definitely fits in that category. The story is continuing to move as I enter the 5th and last book. This particular book was simply more of the same. I guess I may be reading too much without a break in content. I'm just getting bored with the subject but am fanatical enough that I just have to finish the series now that I have started it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    The fourth book is a good continuation of the series. If you know Ramses history you know that he lived to be around 90 and outlived almost everyone he knew. This book takes the story up to the passing away of Nefertiti his Royal Wife. Solid book with some good reading. Makes me wonder what is left for the last book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Varvara

    One thing I don't quite get it's the store about Moses.It's smudged and a little bit different if to compare to the original story.But!The whole impression is very,very good!I like the series about Ramses, it's fantastic and impressive.Easy to read and grasp the whole meaning of the book,even if you don't know the foundations of the story and religion of the Ancient Egypt.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Russo

    A very entertaining historical (thriller) novel. I hadn't read any other books from the series, but it was easy to get into the spirit of Ancient Egypt. Generally the novel is full of action, expect some short descriptions, which are never too boring. Maybe towards the end it slowed a little, and the ending was quite rushed, to be honest (the "final battle" is dealt with in a couple of pages).

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alejandra Aristizábal

    The most tenderful sight of a man's sorrow facing the greatest loses of his life, while knowing he must not crumble because of the immensity of the burden he has upon his shoulders: the weight of the world.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This was an excellent book. The history was quite accurate as were the everyday activities. The characters were multi-dimensional unlike many historical fictions involving royalty. There was enough action and intrigue to interest all readers. The writing style was fantastic.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Guido Henkel

    Oh yes, what an entry in the series. Much more emotional than the previous parts, this book is a highlight in the series that keeps it interesting and intriguing. No question that I have to move on to the next - and sadly last - part of the series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alara

    I'm generally not one for historical fiction, I prefer my history unvarnished. But I do tip my hat to Christian Jacq, he did a more than respectable job at re-telling the story of Ramses with enough dramatic flair to keep the reader's attention.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zulayka.reidn

    I read this grown-up novel when I was 9 years old, and it is supposed to be rated PG. Even so, the story was vivid and I liked it. I love Egyptian history and myths on account of my name belonging to an ancient Egyptian queen.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Though still an interesting story from a historical point of view, it annoys me to no end that we have to hear in every sentence about Nefertari that she's beautiful and more so from day to day. Or how much her and Ramses' love for each other grows all the time.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katina stewart

    My review is the same as for the 1st book--wonderful series!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beth Snider

    A real page turner that will leave you enchanted with Egyptian history.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Very hard to put down.....and just couldn't wait to get on to the final installment!

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