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In her 2010 memoir, Affection, Krissy Kneen introduced readers to her unique family and the towering matriarchal figure of her grandmother. Stern, domineering, fiercely loving, Lotty Kneen—born Dragitsa—was always tight-lipped about her early life and family history. She rebuffed Krissy’s curiosity and forbade her from taking the trip back to the old country that might hav In her 2010 memoir, Affection, Krissy Kneen introduced readers to her unique family and the towering matriarchal figure of her grandmother. Stern, domineering, fiercely loving, Lotty Kneen—born Dragitsa—was always tight-lipped about her early life and family history. She rebuffed Krissy’s curiosity and forbade her from taking the trip back to the old country that might have satisfied it. When her grandmother died recently, Krissy finally felt at liberty to explore the questions that had nagged at her for so long. In The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen Krissy sets out with a box containing her grandmother’s ashes, intending to trace the old woman’s early life in Slovenia and Egypt, and perhaps locate some remnants of family. Along the way she uncovers the extraordinary story of the colony of Slovene women who became the nannies of choice for the wealthy Italians of pre-war Alexandria—and identifies as best she can the places where Lotty’s restless, demanding spirit will be at peace.


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In her 2010 memoir, Affection, Krissy Kneen introduced readers to her unique family and the towering matriarchal figure of her grandmother. Stern, domineering, fiercely loving, Lotty Kneen—born Dragitsa—was always tight-lipped about her early life and family history. She rebuffed Krissy’s curiosity and forbade her from taking the trip back to the old country that might hav In her 2010 memoir, Affection, Krissy Kneen introduced readers to her unique family and the towering matriarchal figure of her grandmother. Stern, domineering, fiercely loving, Lotty Kneen—born Dragitsa—was always tight-lipped about her early life and family history. She rebuffed Krissy’s curiosity and forbade her from taking the trip back to the old country that might have satisfied it. When her grandmother died recently, Krissy finally felt at liberty to explore the questions that had nagged at her for so long. In The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen Krissy sets out with a box containing her grandmother’s ashes, intending to trace the old woman’s early life in Slovenia and Egypt, and perhaps locate some remnants of family. Along the way she uncovers the extraordinary story of the colony of Slovene women who became the nannies of choice for the wealthy Italians of pre-war Alexandria—and identifies as best she can the places where Lotty’s restless, demanding spirit will be at peace.

30 review for The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Krissy Kneen’s latest memoir provided me with a wonderful reading experience. Part loving tribute to her fierce, secretive grandmother, and part genealogical mystery, it gave me an insight to a family quite different from my own and to a 20th century cultural phenomenon that I knew nothing about; the Aleksandrinke of the Goriška region of Slovenia. So close in life that Krissy called her grandmother ‘Mum’, it was only in death that Krissy felt able to delve into the past of her family’s formidab Krissy Kneen’s latest memoir provided me with a wonderful reading experience. Part loving tribute to her fierce, secretive grandmother, and part genealogical mystery, it gave me an insight to a family quite different from my own and to a 20th century cultural phenomenon that I knew nothing about; the Aleksandrinke of the Goriška region of Slovenia. So close in life that Krissy called her grandmother ‘Mum’, it was only in death that Krissy felt able to delve into the past of her family’s formidable matriarch. Throughout her childhood she’d been granted access to only the sketchiest details of her grandmother Lotty’s life - from Slovenia, lived and married in Egypt, escaped to Britain during the 1950s on account of her husband’s British passport, settled in Australia. Having developed her own theories, she starts with a DNA test, but the result simply widens the mystery. Accompanied by her life partner, Krissy arranges to travel to Slovenia for 3 months to dig deeper. Here she learns about the women of Goriška and the economic migration of the early 20th century, largely to Alexandria, that was so substantial it spawned a name for the participants - the Aleksandrinke. When a chance encounter provides her with the opportunity to travel safely to Egypt, she decides to take it, to see who and what else she can find there. I love a genealogical mystery, and reading this book was a bit like watching an extended and gripping episode of one of those TV shows where the celebrity discovers their origins. Krissy is smart and eloquent, but also extremely vulnerable as she goes on this emotional journey. It’s far from smooth sailing, and not all loose ends are neatly tied, but I was infinitely satisfied with what her research uncovered and what I learned along the way. I can only hope that she was somewhat satisfied too. Well done, Krissy! With thanks to NetGalley and Text Publishing for an eARC to read and review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cass Moriarty

    I have spent the last few days completely immersed in the life of my friend, author Krissy Kneen; eating her food, sitting with her family, traveling with her to foreign lands to try to understand her history. I have emerged from her memoir, blinking, like a mole too long underground. Reading this story is a meditative experience; her writing is transcendental and luminous. This book: The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen (Text Publishing 2021) is a magical, fantastical tale scaffolded by truth, lies I have spent the last few days completely immersed in the life of my friend, author Krissy Kneen; eating her food, sitting with her family, traveling with her to foreign lands to try to understand her history. I have emerged from her memoir, blinking, like a mole too long underground. Reading this story is a meditative experience; her writing is transcendental and luminous. This book: The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen (Text Publishing 2021) is a magical, fantastical tale scaffolded by truth, lies and fairy tales, anchored to the earth by solid research and real-life fact-finding missions, embellished by wondrous fictional interpretations of whatever Krissy couldn’t pin down, and supported by the history and lore and cultural stories of her ancestors. It is a marvellous work of art. It is, I think, perhaps her greatest achievement yet, partly because it is so well-written, so easy to read, so engaging, so interesting. (There is a first division lotto win, the 40-degree heat of the Australian bush, the roiling of her grandmother as a snake in her gut, a sideways birth on virgin snow, wild women with their feet on backwards, a divided cemetery, genetic testing, knives and science and maps, Beautiful Viga and Baba Yaga and folklore and papier-mache dinosaurs, bicycles, dreams and twins). But it is also astounding because it is her search for herself, and her quest to untangle the complicated threads of her grandmother and her maternal side of her family. This book IS Krissy. When I heard her speak recently at the launch, she was entirely comfortable, at ease in a way I have never seen her before. She talks about every aspect of the book – the unanswered questions, the unfamiliar journeys, the kind strangers, the new-found relatives, the dragons, the fairy tales, the secrets, the mystery, the grief and the food, always the food – she speaks about all these things as if she is a well-spring of words that may never dry up. She has stories about stories about stories. Her eyes shine as she shares her findings. This investigation into her family history has awakened something vital in her. Krissy Kneen is the same person and yet she is different, changed somehow. She is armed with knowledge of the previously unknowable, full with the weight of new friends and relations, comfortable with the pieces of her past that she has collected and sifted and sorted into some sort of order. She has indeed taken the threads of her grandmother’s life and woven a new tapestry. And it is something beautiful. The title (and the subtitle: Travels with my grandmother’s ashes) depict exactly the story within. Krissy had always been kept in the dark about the details of her maternal history. Her matriarchal grandmother was tight-lipped about her past, secretive about her ancestry, and strongly possessive of Krissy and her sister, binding them to her with a sort of magical power. The night of the launch, a massive storm opened the Brisbane skies and a deluge of heavy rain slowed traffic and soaked everyone attempting to travel to Avid Reader Bookstore. That is Lotty, we all thought, showing her displeasure. For there is no doubt she would have been displeased with Krissy’s curious and adventurous attempts to unravel the complex matrix of her life. But, and I believe this very strongly, I feel that she would also have been fiercely proud. Proud of how Krissy has honoured her life and her history by visiting those places, eating that food and interacting with those people that, added together, wipe away a little of the dust and smoke hiding her past, and allow us to really see her. We see her as a matriarch caring for her family and keeping them close the only way she knows how. We see her as a young woman, strong and independent and desperate to keep her family comfortable and safe. We see her as a child, alone and vulnerable and forced to survive on her wits and despite the intergenerational trauma suffered by not only herself but those before her. That is what this story is: an honouring. Krissy mourns her beloved grandmother – her cruel, exacting, secretive, loving, indomitable grandmother – by travelling the world to search for the best lasting resting places for her ashes. She finds three locations, each imbued with meaning. As we journey along with Krissy to Slovenia and to Egypt, as we uncover with her the amazing story of the Alexsandrinke, the Slovenian women who gave up their own children to nanny the progeny of wealthy Italians before the war, as we weep and rejoice and laugh with her throughout her impossible, improbable travels, full of bizarre coincidences, we find relief each time she identifies a place that her grandmother’s ‘restless, demanding spirit will be at peace’. This book is about terrible things – war, starvation, rape, sacrifice and grim determination. It is an engrossing, compelling story of isolation, ignorance, secrets and lies, power and control, trauma, grief and forced forgetting. But it is also indelibly woven with tender and beautiful things – stoicism, identity, belonging, love, family, the discovery of truth, and the comforting settling of familiarity and understanding. This is Krissy’s version of her story, her place in the world. It is her masterpiece.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer (JC-S)

    ‘Where does this story begin?’ Krissy Kneen’s grandmother Lotty (born Dragitsa) did not share much information about her early life and family history. Krissy always wanted to know more about her family but did not feel able to explore her history while her grandmother was still alive. Family histories are often complicated, especially if someone wants to forget or hide or escape from the past. Her grandmother did not want her to travel to Slovenia to explore the past. Who was Lotty Kneen, and wh ‘Where does this story begin?’ Krissy Kneen’s grandmother Lotty (born Dragitsa) did not share much information about her early life and family history. Krissy always wanted to know more about her family but did not feel able to explore her history while her grandmother was still alive. Family histories are often complicated, especially if someone wants to forget or hide or escape from the past. Her grandmother did not want her to travel to Slovenia to explore the past. Who was Lotty Kneen, and what shaped her life? And why was this quest so important to Krissy? ‘Names hold power. My own name is not my birth name, just as my grandmother’s name is not the one she was given.’ With a box containing her grandmother’s ashes, Krissy Kneen set out to trace her grandmother’s early life in Slovenia and Egypt. Perhaps she would find other family members as well. What follows is a complicated, partial unravelling of Lotty’s life. Three countries, three lives, three burials. Lotty belongs in Slovenia, in Egypt, in Australia. And, as Krissy Kneen undertook her journey, she learns more about her grandmother and her own history. This book is a journey of both discovery and memory. Krissy Kneen learns about her grandmother’s unknown past and remembers the woman she knew. The family dynamics are complex, the family history is full of mystery. Some facts emerge, but the reason behind some actions remains elusive. ‘Memory is all about overlapping versions of the truth. It is an unwinding.’ Reading this book, I gain an impression of Lotty Kneen of a strong, determined woman, keen to protect her family. Krissy Kneen has honoured her, by travelling back into the past and by consigning a portion of her ashes in countries where she lived and where her life was shaped. And now I want to read ‘Affection’ (Ms Kneen’s memoir published in 2010) to learn more about her family. Note: My thanks to NetGalley and Text Publishing for providing me with a free electronic copy of this book for review purposes. Jennifer Cameron-Smith

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Krissy Kneen’s grandmother Lotty ruled her family with an iron fist. Her two daughter and two granddaughters were controlled in every aspect of their lives and were never allowed to ask questions about the family's past, particularly not Lotty’s own past. Lotty had set up a tourist attraction called Dragonhall in Australia that no one ever visited, and the family lived pretty much in isolation. After Lotty’s death, Krissy Kneen felt freed to explore her grandmother's past and find answers to the Krissy Kneen’s grandmother Lotty ruled her family with an iron fist. Her two daughter and two granddaughters were controlled in every aspect of their lives and were never allowed to ask questions about the family's past, particularly not Lotty’s own past. Lotty had set up a tourist attraction called Dragonhall in Australia that no one ever visited, and the family lived pretty much in isolation. After Lotty’s death, Krissy Kneen felt freed to explore her grandmother's past and find answers to the questions that Lotty refused to answer. Her voyage of discovery and self-discovery takes her first to Lotty’s native Slovenia where she learns the history of the Aleksandrinkes, a term applied to the girls and women of the Goriska region who went to Egypt, in particular to Alexandria, to work primarily as nannies for the wealthy Egyptian and ex-pat community, often leaving their own babies and children behind, sometimes never seeing them again for decades. This is itself is a fascinating story, one I’d never heard of, and I was glad to find an excellent documentary on Vimeo – I recommend it. Lotty herself was one such Aleksandrinke, and this takes Krissy on yet another journey, as she continues to explore her family’s past and legacy. Krissy Kneen is a poet and sometimes I found her prose style overwritten, but once I’d settled into the book I found myself more and more drawn into the story, finding it compelling and often moving. Family secrets, trauma, the search for identity, inheritance and heritage, all are explored with insight and compassion to make this an absorbing and powerful read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tez

    For years, I've been hoping for Australian Gothic novels. I would not be so forward as to tell writers what to write, or even to suggest to them. Or, at least I wouldn't approach them one-on-one. Instead, I'll put it here: Krissy Kneen would be my perfect choice to write Australian Gothic novels. She understands the different kinds of people who populate this land. She understands setting. She understands language. She understands the importance of history and future. She understands the scientif For years, I've been hoping for Australian Gothic novels. I would not be so forward as to tell writers what to write, or even to suggest to them. Or, at least I wouldn't approach them one-on-one. Instead, I'll put it here: Krissy Kneen would be my perfect choice to write Australian Gothic novels. She understands the different kinds of people who populate this land. She understands setting. She understands language. She understands the importance of history and future. She understands the scientific and paranormal. Read THE THREE BURIALS OF LOTTY KNEEN, and you'll agree. Although it is memoir (or non-fiction? I'm not good at categorising), reading about Dragonhall and the family secrets... So, yeah. Just putting it out there: Krissy Kneen, Australian Gothic is totally your wheelhouse. Thank you.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Potaithlin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen by Krissy Kneen really intrigued me by the description. Family history is something that always intrigues me. I have not read Kneen’s previous work, Affection, but I do not think it is necessary as Kneen goes over the essentials in this book anyway. The book is divided into three parts, each representing a different journey for both Krissy and Lotty, spiritually and geographically; starting in Australia, travelling to Slovenia, and then ending in Egypt. I felt li The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen by Krissy Kneen really intrigued me by the description. Family history is something that always intrigues me. I have not read Kneen’s previous work, Affection, but I do not think it is necessary as Kneen goes over the essentials in this book anyway. The book is divided into three parts, each representing a different journey for both Krissy and Lotty, spiritually and geographically; starting in Australia, travelling to Slovenia, and then ending in Egypt. I felt like this was a book that was necessary for Krissy Kneen to write as a process of grief and it is a deeply personal story to her. As much as I loved the storytelling, the language, the descriptions and the myths in the first part of the book, the other two parts really declined. Part one of The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen held a lot of vivid imagery and many interesting aspects of storytelling, especially concerning fairytales and how such stories had such a deep impact on Krissy’s family life. Kneen describes how it was like growing up mostly around females (her grandmother, mother, aunt, and sister) with small mentions of her father and grandfather. Lotty Kneen was seen as a strict and protecting matriarchal figure, keeping everyone in her family protected and isolated from the world in a remote part of Australia. I wish Kneen had gone deeper into her family life here, as I feel like the information we were given was vague and the same elements were repeated. Similarly, I had hoped to learn more information with the male figures of the family and what had happened to them, how their presence impacted the household, but their presence was only mentioned in passing, and we never found out why Lotty Kneen wanted to avoid men for herself and her family. The Slovenian myths were extremely interesting and sprinkled throughout the book, adding a few more details every time they were mentioned, I also liked how Kneen speculated how her previous relatives must have lived in the past in a story-like manner. Kneen places a lot of attention on biology of the cells and the atoms that compose us; which I felt was unnecessary, if not a repeated theme that did not add much to the story. From part two onwards, in which Krissy Kneen herself embarks on a journey of self-discovery, the writing style drastically changes and it feels as if I was reading someone’s travel blog, with a few findings of her family history and line sprinkled throughout. I appreciate that this was also about Krissy as much as it was about Lotty, however, many of the comments of her travels I saw as unnecessary as they were thoughts on how well they had travelled or how the places made her feel. When Kneen does find anecdotes relating to her family, it feels as if it was information that she had already gathered. I did find it amazing however the luck that Kneen had in finding people that knew of or were actual blood relatives to her, and how they could expand on the mysterious family tree, but no new information about Lotty’s mysterious past was actually revealed. I did appreciate and found interesting the forgotten history of the Aleksandrinkes, Slovenian women who had to leave their country and families to be nannies for Egyptian women, specifically in Alexandria, to send money back to their families. The history of these women are rarely talked about, and it is interesting how they were painted in a negative way by those back in their homelands as they were seen to ‘abandon’ their families, when these women were the ones supporting their families. With this in mind, we find that Kneen’s great-grandmother was an Aleksandrike, who was able to bring her children to Egypt with her. However, we never find out anything about their personal story and how Lotty Kneen spent her formative years there, and why she never wanted to return or if she had any bad encounters. I’m disappointed because the first part of this book started out extremely strong, only to fall afterwards and never get back up. Once Kneen spreads the last few ashes of her grandmother in Egypt, she does not conclude on how this journey of self-discovery has made her feel, this being strange as this was the whole reason she went. It does not end on any reflective thoughts or changed views of her grandmother, maybe because in the end we still never really knew who Lotty Kneen was. I would recommend this book for people who share a similar history with Kneen about trying to connect pieces of their mysterious family members, or if someone is interested in the Aleksandrinke movement. Also to note, the pacing of the book can jump from the past, present, and to some small stories and myths, but I think this was done well and was not confusing. Yet I would only recommend part one as it was the most enjoyable and beautifully written part of this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Declan Fry

    Human history is a vast compendium of accounts concerning a certain storied and life-changing trip. Call it One Weird Trick to Discover Yourself: origin stories, hero’s journeys, odysseys, passages from innocence to experience. In Japan, the story of “Urashima Taro” tells of a young man who leaves his community; upon returning, everyone and everything he knows has gone (and perhaps there is a warning here about the dangers of leaving the community). In the white American story, the individual mak Human history is a vast compendium of accounts concerning a certain storied and life-changing trip. Call it One Weird Trick to Discover Yourself: origin stories, hero’s journeys, odysseys, passages from innocence to experience. In Japan, the story of “Urashima Taro” tells of a young man who leaves his community; upon returning, everyone and everything he knows has gone (and perhaps there is a warning here about the dangers of leaving the community). In the white American story, the individual makes themselves anew, sloughing off tradition and taboo to become a kind of song of themselves, the Whitmanesque inhabitant of a private-yet-eagerly-universalising world in which “every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you”. In Aboriginal Dreamings, we are told of what may come from forsaking one’s creators or progenitors – a metamorphosis occasionally reminiscent of Ovid. In 19th-century Western European story, a young provincial will duly undergo an immersion in experience and the Machiavellian realities of the urban heart: think of Dickens’ Pip, emerging almost from the grave into London in Great Expectations; Henry James’ Isabel Archer seeing her innocence vanish after travelling from America to Europe; or Stendhal’s Julian Sorel in The Red and the Black. Krissy Kneen’s second work of memoir is both an origin story – the author attempting to trace her Slovenian forebears through the dense woods of familial silence – and a tribute to her eponymous grandmother, of whom Kneen wrote a Thomas Shapcott Prize-winning poetry cycle in 2015. Kneen’s grandmother, in her severity, her desire to dissemble and evade the question of her past and identity, stands between Kneen and a journey into the past, that “fragile path towards who I really am”. Continues: https://www.theage.com.au/culture/boo...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Mackay

    Thank you to Text Publishing for my copy. I enjoyed reading about Krissy Kneen's journey of self discovery. What an interesting family history she has starting back in Slovenia, then going to Egypt and finally the harsh Queensland bush. I loved the folklore stories, fairy tales, the witches in the family, and also genetics. I could relate to her need to find out where she came from and can imagine if her grandmother and aunt weren't so tight lipped about their past that this story would be even m Thank you to Text Publishing for my copy. I enjoyed reading about Krissy Kneen's journey of self discovery. What an interesting family history she has starting back in Slovenia, then going to Egypt and finally the harsh Queensland bush. I loved the folklore stories, fairy tales, the witches in the family, and also genetics. I could relate to her need to find out where she came from and can imagine if her grandmother and aunt weren't so tight lipped about their past that this story would be even more interesting as Krissy would be able to tell the whole story. I have unanswered questions about my own heritage and also have hit brick walls when asking questions from tight lipped relatives so can understand why the author made the journey to find out the truth. The book is in three parts and the first part was a little confusing as it jumped all over the place, but I still found it interesting. The second and third parts flowed a lot better. Overall, an exciting read and I learnt some new parts of history I've never heard of before.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ~*kath*~

    This is a fascinating mix of memoir and history. It's not an easy read, Krissy Kneen's prose can be prickly and uncomfortable with great swathes of sadness, but she manages to be so with a sense of wonder and beauty underlying all the difficult-ness. Sometimes it is triggering, hearing of her painful upbringing that can evoke memories of ones own childhood littered with abuse and trauma. Not to mention her internalised fatphobia that winds like a ribbon throughout the whole book. But somehow it' This is a fascinating mix of memoir and history. It's not an easy read, Krissy Kneen's prose can be prickly and uncomfortable with great swathes of sadness, but she manages to be so with a sense of wonder and beauty underlying all the difficult-ness. Sometimes it is triggering, hearing of her painful upbringing that can evoke memories of ones own childhood littered with abuse and trauma. Not to mention her internalised fatphobia that winds like a ribbon throughout the whole book. But somehow it's still worth getting past all of the prickliness and discomfort, because she takes you places other authors don't, or can't. I do feel like I need a palate cleanser to read now, something fun and whimsical and light, but I am glad I read this book and feel like I've been shown something deeply private and meaningful while I did.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Janilyn Kocher

    It took me a while to sort out the story. In the beginning the author is all,over the place, deviating from the main narrative with side road siphons, which made the story choppy. Kneen’s family history is a snarled ball of yarn. The more she tugs on a loose end, the tighter the ball becomes. I was frustrated when members of her family refused to divulge family history. She had to travel thousands of miles to unravel the stories. I did like the book. Sleuthing for family history Is one of my fav It took me a while to sort out the story. In the beginning the author is all,over the place, deviating from the main narrative with side road siphons, which made the story choppy. Kneen’s family history is a snarled ball of yarn. The more she tugs on a loose end, the tighter the ball becomes. I was frustrated when members of her family refused to divulge family history. She had to travel thousands of miles to unravel the stories. I did like the book. Sleuthing for family history Is one of my favorite genres to read. Kneen’s family history is certainly diverse. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the advance read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    Krissy Kneen, a local Brisbane author, writes her late grandmother's untold story picking up threads and weaving them together to create a wonderful book. Krissy's writing is exceptional, she can get to the nub of things and she can also produce chapters which reek of magic. Magic is, after all, in her Slovenian blood. But that's not all the blood that runs through her veins; there are many components to the story. I loved this book. Krissy Kneen, a local Brisbane author, writes her late grandmother's untold story picking up threads and weaving them together to create a wonderful book. Krissy's writing is exceptional, she can get to the nub of things and she can also produce chapters which reek of magic. Magic is, after all, in her Slovenian blood. But that's not all the blood that runs through her veins; there are many components to the story. I loved this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    I envy this author who discovered the story of her family by taking a journey to the countries began and where they lived. This book was clearly very personal and a real discovery by the author as her family refused to tell her their story. Someday, I hope I can do something similar. Congratulations to the author for working so hard to find her family and their story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Larry D'librarian

    A warm and engrossing memoir of family and identity. A fascinating journey to Slovenia and Egypt as Kneen tries to find the truth of her Grandmother’s early life and make sense of her own upbringing and foibles

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    Just finished reading Krissy Kneen’s latest offering THE THREE BURIALS OF LOTTY KNEEN. I felt every emotion Krissy experienced in search of her family, her story, her belonging. My heart raced and pounded with hers at particular moments of discovery. Love it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leeann Nolan

    Reading this beautiful, poignant novel was as though someone was wrapping their arms around me, giving me a big warm hug, saying, ‘I know, I know ...’

  16. 5 out of 5

    Text Publishing

    The following reviews have been shared by Text Publishing - publisher of The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen 'This is an evocative and poignant exploration of memory and a fitting tribute to a cherished family member.’ Books+Publishing 'The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen is a generous, full-hearted, poetic attempt to understand the way we carry our ancestors within us, and how we might better know ourselves through knowing them.' Guardian 'An extraordinary tale…A paean to the enduring power of Lotty Kn The following reviews have been shared by Text Publishing - publisher of The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen 'This is an evocative and poignant exploration of memory and a fitting tribute to a cherished family member.’ Books+Publishing 'The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen is a generous, full-hearted, poetic attempt to understand the way we carry our ancestors within us, and how we might better know ourselves through knowing them.' Guardian 'An extraordinary tale…A paean to the enduring power of Lotty Kneen…who passed on the gift of storytelling to her granddaughter.' Australian Book Review 'Compelling and beautifully written. A road map filled with many women's voices, recipes and memories.' Chris Gordon, Readings

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia D. Murphy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Clare Stead

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anni Webster

  20. 5 out of 5

    Perpetual

  21. 5 out of 5

    andrew avramides

  22. 4 out of 5

    Loretta West

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  24. 5 out of 5

    K Mihai

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erica Bear

  26. 4 out of 5

    Inga

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anni

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Leeton

  29. 5 out of 5

    kate halliwell

  30. 4 out of 5

    Evan Clarry

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