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“And through these ages untold, the river did act as the lifeblood of all those things alongside it.” Jonah Hargrove is celebrating his thirteenth birthday by avoiding his abusive father, when a girl named River stumbles into his yard, injured and alone. The teenager has stolen thousands of dollars’ worth of meth from her murderous, drug-dealing boyfriend, but lost it somew “And through these ages untold, the river did act as the lifeblood of all those things alongside it.” Jonah Hargrove is celebrating his thirteenth birthday by avoiding his abusive father, when a girl named River stumbles into his yard, injured and alone. The teenager has stolen thousands of dollars’ worth of meth from her murderous, drug-dealing boyfriend, but lost it somewhere in the Neches River bottoms during her escape. Jonah agrees to help her find and sell the drugs so she can flee East Texas. Chasing after them is John Curtis, a local drug kingpin and dog fighter, as well as River’s boyfriend, the dangerous Dakota Cade. Each person is keeping secrets from the others—deadly secrets that will be exposed in violent fashion as all are forced to come to terms with their choices, their circumstances, and their own definition of God. With a colorful cast of supporting characters and an unflinching violence juxtaposed against lyrical prose, River, Sing Out dives deep into the sinister world of the East Texas river bottoms, where oppressive poverty is pitted against the need to believe in something greater than the self.


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“And through these ages untold, the river did act as the lifeblood of all those things alongside it.” Jonah Hargrove is celebrating his thirteenth birthday by avoiding his abusive father, when a girl named River stumbles into his yard, injured and alone. The teenager has stolen thousands of dollars’ worth of meth from her murderous, drug-dealing boyfriend, but lost it somew “And through these ages untold, the river did act as the lifeblood of all those things alongside it.” Jonah Hargrove is celebrating his thirteenth birthday by avoiding his abusive father, when a girl named River stumbles into his yard, injured and alone. The teenager has stolen thousands of dollars’ worth of meth from her murderous, drug-dealing boyfriend, but lost it somewhere in the Neches River bottoms during her escape. Jonah agrees to help her find and sell the drugs so she can flee East Texas. Chasing after them is John Curtis, a local drug kingpin and dog fighter, as well as River’s boyfriend, the dangerous Dakota Cade. Each person is keeping secrets from the others—deadly secrets that will be exposed in violent fashion as all are forced to come to terms with their choices, their circumstances, and their own definition of God. With a colorful cast of supporting characters and an unflinching violence juxtaposed against lyrical prose, River, Sing Out dives deep into the sinister world of the East Texas river bottoms, where oppressive poverty is pitted against the need to believe in something greater than the self.

30 review for River, Sing Out

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jovana (NovelOnMyMind)

    DNF-ed at 40% Didn't like the narrator, way too dramatic. The whole time I felt like someone was yelling at me. It was very distracting, I couldn't focus on the story at all. 40% into the book, I just gave up. I almost never DNF, but this was just too much. Why should I bother when all it does is annoy me? However, my review applies only to the audio version of this book. For all I know, the story might be well worth the read. It did seem really well written. Also, just wanted to stress out that me DNF-ed at 40% Didn't like the narrator, way too dramatic. The whole time I felt like someone was yelling at me. It was very distracting, I couldn't focus on the story at all. 40% into the book, I just gave up. I almost never DNF, but this was just too much. Why should I bother when all it does is annoy me? However, my review applies only to the audio version of this book. For all I know, the story might be well worth the read. It did seem really well written. Also, just wanted to stress out that me not liking the narrator is just my own personal opinion. I can totally see people listening this book and thinking his voice was just very expressive. It just wasn't for me. But, the little I did listen - do check the trigger warnings before reading this book. It gets very violent and dark. Otherwise, I might have tried to just physically read the rest of the book. Thank you to the #NetGalley and to the author and publisher for providing me with an audiobook version of River, Sing Out by James Wade in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    As soon as I finished reading River, Sing Out, I sat there completely awash in the journey I just took. The end is as the beginning, and the beginning is as the end. And for this reader, the bar for poetic prose excellence was just raised to heights unknown. Describing this story, or even the style of this story, is going to be difficult. I can still feel the story as much as I can feel my most vivid dream. But trying to describe it? I’ll do my best. The storyline is complex simplicity. The story As soon as I finished reading River, Sing Out, I sat there completely awash in the journey I just took. The end is as the beginning, and the beginning is as the end. And for this reader, the bar for poetic prose excellence was just raised to heights unknown. Describing this story, or even the style of this story, is going to be difficult. I can still feel the story as much as I can feel my most vivid dream. But trying to describe it? I’ll do my best. The storyline is complex simplicity. The story follows Jonah, a teen in East Texas. The time is the year of record rainfall and flooding. Jonah lives in a trailer out in the boonies near the river - the Neches River - with his father, an oil rigger. His father is gone to work for weeks at a time, leaving Jonah on his own. One day, a twenty-something women, River - she called herself, happens upon Jonah’s trailer. She is running for her life from drug runners. Jonah ultimately makes it his mission to keep River safe. The two plot lines - one being Jonah and the other being the drug runners - are apparent from the very beginning. They stay separate for most of the story, except for a few quick skirmishes when they intersect, but finally come fully together in the climax. The river is like a mysterious character in the story. We know it’s there, but what lurks above or below it remains in darkness until the story is ready to reveal it. What really impressed me in this book is how James Wade told the story. The whole story reads almost like poetry. If it is possible for a book to have feng shui - as in the balance of yin and yang - it would have to be this book. Practically every paragraph seems to be balanced in some type of perfect way. I can just imagine author James Wade jumbling the words of a paragraph in his mind, teasing the words and the meanings until they are all perfectly blended and balanced. I don’t know how else to describe it. This story is not just a story to be read. It is a story to be experienced. By the time you’re finished reading, you will indeed feel the humidity of the Texas heat as rain comes and goes, yet the heat remains. You will feel the mud of the river between your toes. You will hear the raindrops on a tin roof. This author knows how to open a reader’s being and flood it with description that plucks on the senses like a harpist plucks the strings, and also fills the void with an abundance of so many emotions. The imagery used is just stellar. “The old man watched a memory as it bobbed atop the surface of the river then disappeared.” If I provided all of these examples, I’d pretty much be giving you the entire story. Technically, the book sits on a high shelf with few peers. The pacing of the story is slow and deliberate, like the current of the river. But it never stalls. The character arcs are also slow to form, but form they do. The editing is flawless. Although this is the first book by James Wade that I’ve read, he has immediately become one of my favorite and most respected authors. If you believe in the magic of the written word and what can become of it, you need to read this story. You need to read this author. You will enjoy both very much!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rowena Hoseason

    'River, Sing Out' has obvious echoes of modern classics like Winter’s Bone. In East Texas, a young lad reaches beyond the loveless boundaries of his white-trash background. His initial exploration of the bigger world beyond the backwoods might turn out to be his last – he risks everything by sheltering a young woman on the run from a gang of drug dealers. She’s an opportunistic thief and a junkie; the men hunting her are strung-out scum. Their boss is a manipulative monster, a clear-eyed killer, 'River, Sing Out' has obvious echoes of modern classics like Winter’s Bone. In East Texas, a young lad reaches beyond the loveless boundaries of his white-trash background. His initial exploration of the bigger world beyond the backwoods might turn out to be his last – he risks everything by sheltering a young woman on the run from a gang of drug dealers. She’s an opportunistic thief and a junkie; the men hunting her are strung-out scum. Their boss is a manipulative monster, a clear-eyed killer, and he’s in thrall to a remorseless cartel. Addicted and abused, she stole her chance for freedom… which happens to look a lot like a backpack stuffed with crystal meth. And now both she and young Jonah may have to pay in blood. What lifts River Sing Out far beyond the ordinary is its exquisite, elegant writing which concisely confronts the ugly truth of rural poverty. Souls are stripped bare with mesmerising intensity. The incessant rain, the oppressive heat and the river itself saturate the story. Author James Wade eloquently captures the brutal, beautiful reality of coming of age; first love, deceit, betrayal and rejection, and he weaves all these themes into a nail-biting plot that would do Hollywood proud. It can be hard-going at times as Wade explores just how bleak and brutal this world can be. Yet ultimately this is a celebration of the strength of the human spirit. It is relentless at times and it should be shocking, but River Sing Out also illustrates the strength of quiet conviction with poetic grace and understated compassion. 9/10 Find more of my recommendations, reviews (and an oocasional book you might want to swerve) at http://www.murdermayhemandmore.net

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leslie aka StoreyBook Reviews

    If I could only use one word to describe this book, I think it would be poetic. The words flow seamlessly from one subject to another and the imagery fits East Texas to a T. There are several plots in this story that meld together. There is a young boy, Jonah, that is just trying to survive despite abject poverty. River, a young woman that has lost her way but is determined to find her path, and John Curtis and Cade, local drug dealers and thugs who believe they are above the law. This novel is g If I could only use one word to describe this book, I think it would be poetic. The words flow seamlessly from one subject to another and the imagery fits East Texas to a T. There are several plots in this story that meld together. There is a young boy, Jonah, that is just trying to survive despite abject poverty. River, a young woman that has lost her way but is determined to find her path, and John Curtis and Cade, local drug dealers and thugs who believe they are above the law. This novel is gritty and while has some happy moments, shows us the true underbelly of the drug world and the ruthlessness of those involved. "How much of this life is truly your choice?" This line resonated with me because I believe that we all make choices in our lives. Those choices may not always be the right ones, but every situation can be a learning experience. Of course, there are people and circumstances that create situations not of our choosing or making, but those are the times that one can learn from it and I think that is what happens with River and Jonah at different times throughout the book. "You've made yourself the world's victim and you'll do the same with this." Jonah may be just 13, but he has seen a lot in his young life. His mother left him and his father is not a kind man. Plus his living situation isn't wonderful but thankfully there is the kindness of a neighbor that looks out for him and gives him food when Jonah visits. This may be Jonah's saving grace in life from a horrible life and abusive father. Jonah realizes that he wants more from life than what he has and seeks to find a better life for himself. "He was her lifeline in so many ways. And he was kind to her. More kind than any human had ever been." I think my favorite character might have been River. She realized (albeit a bit too late perhaps) that a life wrapped up with drugs and thugs may not be the best for her. There was quite a little twist near the end that was quite the surprise. Her life was possibly never going to be all her own. However, her time with Jonah helped her see the good in people and strive harder to change her circumstances. "We all come to appreciate those things lost to us. The sweetest breath of the day not realized until the night. Such is our reckoning as men. And how do you keep going, when something so meaningful is taken from you? How do you move forward? How do you move at all?" This introspective quote gave me a lot to ponder. We all have losses in our lives and it is the hope for a better tomorrow that keeps us moving forward. I think that is what River and Jonah discover in their short time together. There is even a moment for John Curtis where I thought that he might want to change his life but it might have been too late for him. This book will paint a picture of a world many of us are not subjected to but it gives us a glimpse into the lives of these characters and how they adapt and adjust to what life has thrown at them. The ending is both sad and joyful at the same time. We give this book 4 paws up.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maryann

    River, Sing Out certainly lives up to the praise it has received so far. The beauty of the language is stunning, and the author’s ability to reflect the minds of the various characters with such precision was one of the best parts of the book for me. From the young boy, Jonah, to John Curtis, and to the old man at the cabin, the differences in voice and characterization were sharp and each came across as such a believable person. I enjoyed the narrator’s voice, as well. His section always present River, Sing Out certainly lives up to the praise it has received so far. The beauty of the language is stunning, and the author’s ability to reflect the minds of the various characters with such precision was one of the best parts of the book for me. From the young boy, Jonah, to John Curtis, and to the old man at the cabin, the differences in voice and characterization were sharp and each came across as such a believable person. I enjoyed the narrator’s voice, as well. His section always presented in italics. And this quote was so revealing as to the mind of an old man experiencing his last days upon the earth as he lies in bed, listening to a young man building a coffin. “And to awaken each day is to be reborn as an old man, and to have a life lived over in the split second it takes to wipe away at half-flung eyes. And such eyes offering a bleak recounting of the world – a reminder of what waits outside of dreams. As if in some immeasurable flash, the brain must give an accounting of every breath ever taken, so as to bring to consciousness those memories lost each night.” Going into that goodnight, is perhaps the hardest thing, and the essence of that is captured so profoundly in the mind of this old man. At first, the reader doesn’t know who this narrator is. Could it be the River itself? Is it the man who helps Jonah? That not knowing, and wanting to know, kept me reading long past times when I should have stopped, and when it finally becomes clear, that understanding is sweet. In addition to great narrative, the dialogue in the story is terrific. I highlighted many sections that had made me smile when reading, including this exchange between Jonah and River. This is about mid-way into their quest to find the lost drugs, and River is lamenting about some of the bad choices she’s made. “God I’m an idiot.” she says. “No you’re not.” “Well then I’ve been acting real convincingly like I am.” Jonah is a tragic hero, but also the one true “good” in this story, despite the things he does to survive. He captured my interest right away when I started reading the book, and that interest never faltered. I worried with him about the constant rain and the river rising, adding a another sense of impending doom just below the surface of the other dangers from his father and John Curtis. The threat of being taken out by the river, heightened the suspense and the drama, and I was always waiting for the next terrible thing that would happen to Jonah. I loved this book and recommend it to readers who like to be entertained by lyrical writing, as well as have a story with depths of characterizations and truths to ponder.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    River, Sing Out is set in fictional Neches County, Texas, in the East Texas bottomland. It's a hardscrabble existence for many folks, and Jonah Hargrove is no exception. His father works on an oil rig, so the days he's gone on the job are days Jonah doesn't have to duck his blows. In spite of his seemingly bleak existence, though, Jonah has a good heart. So when River, a teenage girl, stumbles into his sphere, injured and running scared after stealing a backpack full of meth from local drug lord River, Sing Out is set in fictional Neches County, Texas, in the East Texas bottomland. It's a hardscrabble existence for many folks, and Jonah Hargrove is no exception. His father works on an oil rig, so the days he's gone on the job are days Jonah doesn't have to duck his blows. In spite of his seemingly bleak existence, though, Jonah has a good heart. So when River, a teenage girl, stumbles into his sphere, injured and running scared after stealing a backpack full of meth from local drug lord John Curtis, Jonah feels like he should help her. This book is a fascinating contrast. On the one hand, you've got the violent life of the drug trade and the grinding poverty in which Jonah lives. On the other, you've got the author's lyrical turns of phrase like, "That night he dreamt the earth was water alone and he floated atop it and from the center of the endless sea rose enormous a single oak and upon its bark and branches clung thousands of gray and green tree frogs and none moving or trilling yet all somehow calling to him and the boy spoke in a voice they understood." As an editor and proofreader, that really, really long sentence makes me a little crazy. But what amazing imagery. Can't you just see that lone oak in your mind's eye? The book is full of vivid, musical word pictures that make you feel almost like you're right there with Jonah and River. As the title would suggest, the river is an important part of the story. It offers Jonah and River shelter and a means of escape at times. It rises and falls, and sometimes floods, bringing destruction as the waters crest and then recede. The river may not be alive in the sense of a sentient existence, but it has its mysteries and changes and moods, much like a person would. Ultimately, I thought the book was about the resilience of the human spirit and the struggle to maintain faith, even in the face of indifferent nature and the sometimes brutal realities of life. And here, it felt like indifferent nature maybe cared just a little, that nature thought it time to wash a few old wounds clean, and perhaps make room for, if not complete healing, then at least growth. Given the difficult subject matter, it wasn't always an easy read, but it's a story I'm glad I read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Rosenblum

    Most reviews of this book mention the two storylines running parallel. I however feel like there is a third – water/river. The influence of water and the impact it has on all the characters, as well as the changes it makes to the environment, plays a major role. It is a constant and persistent character and action throughout the entire work. Interspersed with the gritty storylines is an almost lyric approach to the background. The author worked hard and was largely successful in transporting the Most reviews of this book mention the two storylines running parallel. I however feel like there is a third – water/river. The influence of water and the impact it has on all the characters, as well as the changes it makes to the environment, plays a major role. It is a constant and persistent character and action throughout the entire work. Interspersed with the gritty storylines is an almost lyric approach to the background. The author worked hard and was largely successful in transporting the reader into the area and all of the environmental aspects. You could smell the river, hear the rain and feel the dampness that gets into your bones when trying to survive those conditions. You could feel the fatigue and the slight glimpses of joy. With a majority of the story centering around Jonah, a thirteen year old boy/man, the other characters are an authentic response to his life. Jonah has a hard life. There are glimpses of nurturing and care but mostly, he is in survival mode. Even so, he manages to have a kind heart. Unfortunately, kindness can cause pain and Jonah will endure a lot. I enjoyed the loops of plot lines all centering back to Jonah and his life. The side stories of drug dealers, con men, killers and other people living on the edges of society gave the story a singular feel of real life. I rarely comment on covers but this one stands out. The grace of the scene depicted is a direct contrast to the awkward intensity of the characters' lives. Perfect juxtaposition.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristine Hall

    I finished this audio book ages ago, and I kept waiting to rate it so I would have time to write the perfect review and do the book justice. Time is an elusive thing. This book is dark, gritty, and painfully realistic in its depiction of a world that (fortunately for me) exists outside my bubble. The book is about contrasts: nature and those living in it; the calm and the chaotic, and it manages to be raw -- base or crass, even -- but it is fine literary fiction. Author Nick Wade is an immensely I finished this audio book ages ago, and I kept waiting to rate it so I would have time to write the perfect review and do the book justice. Time is an elusive thing. This book is dark, gritty, and painfully realistic in its depiction of a world that (fortunately for me) exists outside my bubble. The book is about contrasts: nature and those living in it; the calm and the chaotic, and it manages to be raw -- base or crass, even -- but it is fine literary fiction. Author Nick Wade is an immensely talented writer, and the world of RIVER, SING OUT will keep dragging me back for a long time to come. The audio book narration by Roger Clark is perfection. That accent! I have forgotten the term for it, but he drops that final 'g' from words with 'ing' endings and has readers hangin' on Wade's every word. Clark's style is a mix of campfire storyteller and riveting preacher, and it perfectly complements Wade's story. I expect this one is going to be on more than a few awards lists over the next year. Don't miss it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Strassner

    James Wade once again pulls off a breath taking novel of poetic beauty. He weaves a tapestry of brutality, wonderment, innocence and hope into an absolutely compelling plot that you can't stop reading. I found a new favorite author. I can't wait until his next book. James Wade once again pulls off a breath taking novel of poetic beauty. He weaves a tapestry of brutality, wonderment, innocence and hope into an absolutely compelling plot that you can't stop reading. I found a new favorite author. I can't wait until his next book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    James Wade can write! I’m drained and yet not…..what prose, violence, grit, and the ethereal as well. Do yourself a favor and read James Wade. Please keep writing Mr. Wade.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Darcia Helle

    I’m looking for the right words to tell you how I feel about this book, but what I have is a handful of adjectives and an onslaught of emotions. River, Sing Out is beautiful, dark, heartbreaking, uplifting, and real. James Wade’s writing has transformative power. Setting is a living entity that’s somehow both claustrophobic and expansive. The characters are all complex people who are flawed and dangerous and hopeful and scared. Their journey becomes ours, and we arrive at our destination with emot I’m looking for the right words to tell you how I feel about this book, but what I have is a handful of adjectives and an onslaught of emotions. River, Sing Out is beautiful, dark, heartbreaking, uplifting, and real. James Wade’s writing has transformative power. Setting is a living entity that’s somehow both claustrophobic and expansive. The characters are all complex people who are flawed and dangerous and hopeful and scared. Their journey becomes ours, and we arrive at our destination with emotional scars, yet stronger somehow despite the hardships. This book feels classic in its importance, literary in its writing, and contemporary in its content. James Wade is a rockstar storyteller, and I am an unabashed fan. *I received a free copy from Blackstone Publishing.*

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jules

    River, Sing Out is a story of an abused boy with a heart of gold. Jonah Hargrove steps up to help a teenage girl on the run. She doesn’t offer her name, so Jonah dubs her River. Their tale starts out slowly, and both the story tension and plot pace quickly ramp as the threat to Jonah and River increases. Author James Wade’s writing style is Hemingway-esque in its crisp, concise sentences. Mr. Wade’s writing perfectly portrays the desolate setting in Texas. The desperation, struggle and poverty ar River, Sing Out is a story of an abused boy with a heart of gold. Jonah Hargrove steps up to help a teenage girl on the run. She doesn’t offer her name, so Jonah dubs her River. Their tale starts out slowly, and both the story tension and plot pace quickly ramp as the threat to Jonah and River increases. Author James Wade’s writing style is Hemingway-esque in its crisp, concise sentences. Mr. Wade’s writing perfectly portrays the desolate setting in Texas. The desperation, struggle and poverty are overwhelming. The point-of-view changes primarily from Jonah’s struggle for survival to Curtis’ battle with the cartel that controls his supply chain. There are some interesting messages about choices and consequences that are presented by an unnamed character that felt like the embodiment of death (a Grim Reaper of sorts). This story of good and evil, of struggle and survival is honest, violent and doused with caring. In this regard, Mr. Wades writing made me think of Flanner O’Conner. I couldn’t put it down, and it left me thinking about the philosophical questions presented. I received an advance copy of the book in exchange for my honest review. For more reading recommendations, visit Book Junkie Reviews at www.abookjunkiereviews.wordpress.com

  13. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

    I received this book via NetGalley to give an honest review. Jonah seems to come from a household of no love, but that doesn't take away his sweetness and helpfulness. When River comes to his place as she is running, he ends up with a crush and is willing to put himself in danger to help her get away from the bad guys. As the story unfolds, we see that Jonah is willing to risk everything to help her become free not only from her addiction but from the guys that hunt her. He grows up a lot quicker I received this book via NetGalley to give an honest review. Jonah seems to come from a household of no love, but that doesn't take away his sweetness and helpfulness. When River comes to his place as she is running, he ends up with a crush and is willing to put himself in danger to help her get away from the bad guys. As the story unfolds, we see that Jonah is willing to risk everything to help her become free not only from her addiction but from the guys that hunt her. He grows up a lot quicker than most teenagers his age. I really liked his neighbor, who doesn't ask many questions but is willing to give a helping hand if needed. In some ways, the book reminded me of Where The Crawdads Sing. I am not sure if it is because of the setting or kids growing up way too fast, but I got that same vibe when I read that story. Sometimes in the backwoods of the river or swamp, things have a way of coming full circle; Jonah and River will learn this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brady Hanson

    James Wade has a gift. I absolutely fell in love with his debut and picked up “River, Sing Out” as soon as it came out, diving in without even reading the synopsis. Although quite the departure from the “Western” style of his first, it was still an absolute pleasure the read, beginning to end. The characters felt real and the plot was thought provoking and engaging. The author can piece a story together and bring about thought provoking topics and ideas seamlessly. I highly recommend this story James Wade has a gift. I absolutely fell in love with his debut and picked up “River, Sing Out” as soon as it came out, diving in without even reading the synopsis. Although quite the departure from the “Western” style of his first, it was still an absolute pleasure the read, beginning to end. The characters felt real and the plot was thought provoking and engaging. The author can piece a story together and bring about thought provoking topics and ideas seamlessly. I highly recommend this story to anyone wanting a good, engrossing, lyrical, albeit dark, journey. “…what alternative is there? What option is given to these children of the pines? Raised by parents of a likemind, worshipping in great, towering churches but sent to decaying schools. Raised to use the land but not respect it. No, the choice is little and less and I pity every last one of them as they disappear down the same well-worn path, believing they are living free. Rebels, all of them, in their own caged minds.”

  15. 5 out of 5

    Conner Horak

    I fell in love with James Wade's debut novel, ALL THINGS LEFT WILD last year and I dove into his sophomore novel RIVER, SING OUT with no questions asked. I didn't know the first thing about it, but I knew I was going to love it and I have never been more right in my entire life. RIVER, SING OUT is the quintessential American novel. It is simultaneously a beautiful homage to classic genres of books past and a bright new voice that is completely unique. Through the eyes of a thirteen year old boy I fell in love with James Wade's debut novel, ALL THINGS LEFT WILD last year and I dove into his sophomore novel RIVER, SING OUT with no questions asked. I didn't know the first thing about it, but I knew I was going to love it and I have never been more right in my entire life. RIVER, SING OUT is the quintessential American novel. It is simultaneously a beautiful homage to classic genres of books past and a bright new voice that is completely unique. Through the eyes of a thirteen year old boy who lives in a trailer with his abusive father and a teenage girl on the run from a notorious drug lord in east Texas with thousands of dollars of stolen meth in her backpack, we see how poverty, drugs, and corruption tear a community apart. It's violent, heart- racing, and hopeful and I quite literally could not put it down. Fans of Cormac McCarthy will fall in love with this book, but it's really for anyone who loves to feel their heart ache at just how gorgeous literature can be.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Kelley

    This book has quite the cast of characters in it with most of them having bad intentions. This story takes place in Neches County, Texas. There is Jonah Hargrove a 13 year old boy who is someone who is pure and with no friends from a broken home and lives out in the sticks in a dump of a trailer with a father that is rarely there who is also abusive and a drunk. There is a girl that has the nickname of River who decides to steal something that does not belong to her but may provide a way out of This book has quite the cast of characters in it with most of them having bad intentions. This story takes place in Neches County, Texas. There is Jonah Hargrove a 13 year old boy who is someone who is pure and with no friends from a broken home and lives out in the sticks in a dump of a trailer with a father that is rarely there who is also abusive and a drunk. There is a girl that has the nickname of River who decides to steal something that does not belong to her but may provide a way out of the current situation she is in. She is being chased by a couple of war time buddies who along with their minions are the biggest dealers in the the Neches County who have their own troubles with their business partners in Mexico. This is a quick read with plenty of turns follow along to see if a young boy who thinks he's learning about love can save the girl. Can the girl get away ? Or will the bad guys who run rough shod over the area will win. There are some triggers in this book if you might have missed somethings in the description. There is drug use, brief description of dog fighting to name a few. But overall this is a solid read. Thank you to Netgalley and Blackstone Publishing for an ARC for a fair and honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Micah Powell

    Equal parts poetic and page-turner. Wade makes you feel at home in the thick of Texas’ Piney Woods and compels you to care deeply about every character. A gripping read from beginning to its thrilling conclusion and leaves you feeling both satisfied and wanting more. Favorite read so far in 2021.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    Jonah is a 13 year old who has not had a good life. Then it gets really complicated when River shows up with a tale of meth stolen from Dakota, her abusive boyfriend, who works for John Curtis. She lost the meth in the Neches River and she's got to find it. This is a chase/quest novel told from multiple perspectives. These are not good people (except for Jonah and his neighbor Mr. Carson) and this is a dark novel. There's bad choices, violence, and despair. Wade has a way of describing the lands Jonah is a 13 year old who has not had a good life. Then it gets really complicated when River shows up with a tale of meth stolen from Dakota, her abusive boyfriend, who works for John Curtis. She lost the meth in the Neches River and she's got to find it. This is a chase/quest novel told from multiple perspectives. These are not good people (except for Jonah and his neighbor Mr. Carson) and this is a dark novel. There's bad choices, violence, and despair. Wade has a way of describing the landscape- as gritty as it is- in a way that makes it come alive. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. It's more thoughtful than you might think on the face of it and more urgent. A very good read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ruthie Jones

    Read my review at Lone Star Literary Life. Read my review at Lone Star Literary Life.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maureen Mayer

    3.5 stars I enjoyed this book for the most part, but mainly because of characters like Jonah and River. For someone who had been shown so little love by the mother who abandoned him and the abusive father who stuck around, I was amazed by how resilient and kind hearted Jonah became. The world needs more people like him! I thought the premise of the book was good but ended up not enjoying the chapters that focused on John Curtis and Dakota Cade. I know they were needed for the progression of the pl 3.5 stars I enjoyed this book for the most part, but mainly because of characters like Jonah and River. For someone who had been shown so little love by the mother who abandoned him and the abusive father who stuck around, I was amazed by how resilient and kind hearted Jonah became. The world needs more people like him! I thought the premise of the book was good but ended up not enjoying the chapters that focused on John Curtis and Dakota Cade. I know they were needed for the progression of the plot, but they didn’t grab my attention as much as I had hoped they would. I’m also not one to expect a perfect or happy ending, but I was so brokenhearted by the end of this book that it just didn’t sit well with me. Not sure if I would recommend this one, but I’m sure there are others who would enjoy it more than I did. *I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.*

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Brody

    I think it's just me but I was not in the mood for this book's choppy sentences, violent narrative and the regular changing of topics. Sometimes I actually search for books with these attributes but now isn't the time. I read half way through the novel and just put it down. I loved the author's last book and was hoping I'd get another fix of his writing with this one, but the two novels are very different. Perhaps it's because of covid. I want something lingering and with continuity. I couldn't f I think it's just me but I was not in the mood for this book's choppy sentences, violent narrative and the regular changing of topics. Sometimes I actually search for books with these attributes but now isn't the time. I read half way through the novel and just put it down. I loved the author's last book and was hoping I'd get another fix of his writing with this one, but the two novels are very different. Perhaps it's because of covid. I want something lingering and with continuity. I couldn't find it with this novel.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Poppe

    RIVER, SING OUT is a gripping and intricate story set in East Texas, where life is difficult and brutal, even to children. This novel is chock-a-block full of characters, literarily and figuratively. Each character, without exception, is wholly developed and a clear individual, from the characters who may only been in one or two scenes, to the main characters of Jonah, River, and John Curtis. My heart went out to Jonah, who at 13 years old, is basically left to raise himself by his absent father RIVER, SING OUT is a gripping and intricate story set in East Texas, where life is difficult and brutal, even to children. This novel is chock-a-block full of characters, literarily and figuratively. Each character, without exception, is wholly developed and a clear individual, from the characters who may only been in one or two scenes, to the main characters of Jonah, River, and John Curtis. My heart went out to Jonah, who at 13 years old, is basically left to raise himself by his absent father. Jonah counting how many days of food he has left at one egg per day was pure anguish for me and my daily eggs for breakfast habit. I didn’t connect with River, to be perfectly honest. She’s making decisions and living a life I cannot begin to understand. But through Mr. Wade’s writing, I can begin to see how difficult her life has been. John Curtis is one of the most distinct characters I’ve ever read. He’s an orator, a snake-oil salesman, and an apex predator. It doesn’t pay to cross him. Or to be a trusted friend, either. His character gave me goose bumps every time he was in a scene. Mr. Wade’s writing style is lyrical, visual, and a pleasure to read. From the mundane (a haircut for Jonah) to the extreme (River’s detox), each word is in its proper place, carefully thought out and planned. Descriptions are riveting; dialog is emotional and heart-felt. (Mr. Wade uses the word tarpaulin, instead of tarp. That’s an example of writing that I would have never even considered.) The different plot lines flow along like smaller tributaries until they all converge into the larger river. Two scenes in the novel really stood out for me. The first is a dog fight scene and the second is a frog gigging scene. Both scenes read like Mr. Wade has had personal experience in these subjects. Or did some serious interviewing and\or research. I could hear all the dogs barking and frogs croaking in my mind while I listened to the narration. I was also squirming from the graphic details. As Bud, one of the giggers, states while his slicing up the frogs: “Like taking his little ole pants off, ain’t it?” I’ll spare you the pliers and other details of that quote! Make no mistake, RIVER, SING OUT is gritty. If you are triggered by subject matters in books, this book probably has them (violence, drugs, and murder amongst the subjects here). I wouldn’t so much say I enjoyed reading this (it’s no LOL romantic comedy, that’s for sure!). But I listened attentively, anxious for the next twist of the plot, hopeful that Jonah and River get out of the messes they are in and get to see the ocean at the end of their trip. The audio narration by Mr. Clark was captivating, sonorous, and a proper accompaniment to Mr. Wade’s writing. The character voices are distinct and easy to follow. Mr. Clark shines, though, as the narrator of the novel. (I’d listen to Mr. Clark reading the dictionary!) I’ll certainly be looking for other books he’s narrated. The production is smooth and enjoyable. There were no quality issues with the recording. Overall, RIVER, SING OUT is engrossing and compelling, especially with Mr. Clark’s narration. The realistic characters, amazing descriptions, and absorbing dialog are worth investing the time in this novel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Book Hunter Beth

    Final Review -- 2.5 Stars River, Sing Out is Wade’s second novel, but I don’t think I enjoyed it as much as his first. There are gasps of Cormac McCarthy tucked away in the crevasses of Wade’s writing which is something I appreciate. As a big fan of McCarthy myself, it's fun to see his influence in modern literature. I like to see where Wade emulates and where he abandons those tools in order to birth something unique. Unfortunately, I feel that we often see too much of an attempt to mirror t Final Review -- 2.5 Stars River, Sing Out is Wade’s second novel, but I don’t think I enjoyed it as much as his first. There are gasps of Cormac McCarthy tucked away in the crevasses of Wade’s writing which is something I appreciate. As a big fan of McCarthy myself, it's fun to see his influence in modern literature. I like to see where Wade emulates and where he abandons those tools in order to birth something unique. Unfortunately, I feel that we often see too much of an attempt to mirror the inspiration behind the writing and not enough of Wade evolving in his own craft. The reason I say that is because there's something about McCarthy's writing that distinguishes itself more than his stream of consciousness writing style, in my opinion. It's his descriptions of landscapes. With his westerns specifically, McCarthy paints great pictures of perilous mountains, vast skies, stretches of rivers that are as wide as they are long, and great plains that act like oceans in which you might drown. Everything he accentuates makes his characters feel small and isolated. It gives McCarthy's narration a sense of loneliness even when there is more than one person on the page. Wade almost uses the inverse of McCarthy's technique when it comes to painting big things in small spaces. Where McCarthy uses geography, Wade uses time. The eons before, and the eons we presume will succeed us in the grand scale of an unfeeling universe, all of which help us realize that what we're reading is a small blip in the ocean of existence; important only because we bear witness to it. McCarthy makes you feel small and insignificant surrounded by all of the things that you can tangibly see. Wade using time makes everything abstract and, in my opinion, less impactful. The premise is in and of itself a good one, but one of the frustrating aspects of River, Sing Out was how divorced the events often feel from one another. Jonah and River are one single entity in this book, while Cade and John Curtis are another. We also have a revolving cast of the Sheriff, Curtis’ posse, Jonah’s abusive father, the Thin Man, the Old Man (can’t remember his name and as I listened to the audiobook I can’t backtrack to find it -- sorry!) and I honestly feel like I’m forgetting someone else. What each of these characters does that’s not directly associated with the plot doesn’t seem to tie into who they are at all. Furthermore, the novel wasn’t long enough or reflective enough for me to really feel like I knew these people enough to truly care about their struggles. Yes, their pasts are dark and as murky as the river that runs through this story, but we are rarely given the opportunity to dig deeper into why that is save for some surface-level dialogue. It's because of this I really didn’t care much about River escaping, or Jonah and his journey towards his inevitable loss of innocence. I didn’t think John Curtis was a terribly threatening villain, and I had a hard time grasping the depth of just how big of a problem the cartels and drug laundering affected this unnamed river town. If anyone held my interest, it was Dustin Cade. We learned the most about him, but in the end we got the least out of him. It was terribly disappointing, hoping he might have a redemptive arc for the amount of time he spent on the page only to meet his end at the hands of a betrayal we were told would be coming. And therein lies the book's biggest fault: River, Sing Out falls victim to the show don’t tell mantra. Too much is told to us, and not enough is shown. Wade writes a very pretty book with a great deal of poetic philosophizing that is certainly an accurate account of our time, but unfortunately, I didn’t feel much else while reading this. Again, like All Things Left Wild, there was potential here that feels missed. With all that said I need to take a moment to say that the narrator for this book was phenomenal. I may be saying that only because I loved Red Dead Redemption 2 and Arthur Morgan (played by Clark) is, in my opinion, one of the greatest video game characters of all time, but that voice coming through at times in this book made me feel like I was getting the DLC that Rockstar will never give fans of that game. His narration was phenomenal. Strong and dramatic, the range of his vocal abilities lent a distinct personality to every person in this book. I sincerely hope he does more narration work in the future. Edit: I needed to come back to make this point. Mr. Wade, I've noticed you're reading reviews on your book. If you've read this one and gotten this far I would like to point out that you have a terrible habit of using female characters as tools for men's growth and not as characters of their own. You did it here with River/Samantha and you did it in your last book with Charlotte. Please be mindful of this moving forward.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ariel Hess

    Rating :★★★★★
Disclaimer: This review is solely my opinion. I was provided a copy of a finished book from Lone Star Literary Life partner in exchange for my honest review. The comments in this review do not reflect the views of the author or the publisher. The copy used in this review is an advanced reader copy sent to me in exchange for my honest review. #partner #LSBBT
River, Sing Out is a recently published novel that takes you on a journey through drugs, poverty, abuse, and relationships. Th Rating :★★★★★
Disclaimer: This review is solely my opinion. I was provided a copy of a finished book from Lone Star Literary Life partner in exchange for my honest review. The comments in this review do not reflect the views of the author or the publisher. The copy used in this review is an advanced reader copy sent to me in exchange for my honest review. #partner #LSBBT
River, Sing Out is a recently published novel that takes you on a journey through drugs, poverty, abuse, and relationships. This high-stakes novel is based in East Texas River bottoms. The story begins with a thought-provoking epilogue before diving into the introduction of John Curtis and his act of redemption. We then are introduced to Jonah Hargrove and later Cade and River. We get a chance to get to know each character as their stories are written from their perspective. As the novel progresses, you feel as though you are transported into the mind of each character, noting that the narrators are the characters themselves. The story continues to unfold in a method that has you both feeling sad and sorry for the characters involved. We get to watch as each character's lives start to entangle and secrets start to be revealed. Who will leave this situation unscathed and will they ever truly escape? You are left with many thoughts after reading this book.
The author's writing style continuously allowed the reader to be encapsulated by the total storyline and engaged from page to page. The book gives off a gritty, motel 6, a drug deal gone bad vibe that has you hoping it gets adopted as a tv show. The twists and turns have you on the edge of your seat waiting to find out the outcome of the souls who were mixed up with the wrong crowd. Surprisingly, this book reminded me a bit of my childhood and the challenges that can arise when children get mixed up in Adult choices. My father was a drug addict and no one ever depicts the humanistic aspect of the addict itself and focuses on describing their characteristics. For me, this novel brought back a bit of nostalgia. The author does a great job with the descriptive text, writing style, transitional scenes, and character development. I highly encourage everyone to pick up this novel. You won't regret it. One being, for every action there is a reaction and for every reaction, there is a potential consequence.
I highly encourage this fast-read novel for any adult interested in a gritty, Texas-sized, high-stakes, action-packed novel that will keep you both entertained and on the edge of your seat awaiting the next move. Due to the violent scenes, sexual content, and language, I recommend this book for Young Adults and up. This book may contain content that could potentially be triggering for those who have experienced drug abuse in their past.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lori L (She Treads Softly)

    River, Sing Out by James Wade is a highly recommended, grim, violent novel set in the East Texas river bottoms. In an area plagued by poverty and abuse, River, Sing Out follows young Jonah Hargrove as he helps a teenage girl, River. River shows up at his trailer in bad shape. She had stolen a backpack full of crystal meth from John Curtis, head a local meth distribution empire and dogfighting ring. The two end up running from Curtis and Dakota Cade, his murderous enforcer, who, along with all the River, Sing Out by James Wade is a highly recommended, grim, violent novel set in the East Texas river bottoms. In an area plagued by poverty and abuse, River, Sing Out follows young Jonah Hargrove as he helps a teenage girl, River. River shows up at his trailer in bad shape. She had stolen a backpack full of crystal meth from John Curtis, head a local meth distribution empire and dogfighting ring. The two end up running from Curtis and Dakota Cade, his murderous enforcer, who, along with all their henchmen, are looking for her. At the same time Curtis is having problems with the cartel that controls his supplies. Jonah and River what they can to flee so River can sell the drugs for the money but their outlook for survival looks bleak. This is a very ominous, violent, bleak narrative where right from the start it is clear that there can be no redemption or good ending based on the characters. Everyone in this novel has secrets they are keeping from the other characters. Jonah is the only character, because of his age, that you will hope has a chance to overcome his situation and rise above his circumstances. Mr. Carson, an elderly neighbor who is Jonah's only real friend and support system helps Jonah as much as he can. It is better to enter into reading this novel knowing it depicts extreme poverty, brutality, and ruthlessness. The prose is almost lyrical at times, with discussions of nature, eternity, and God juxtaposed with the severity of their circumstances. The pace is measured at the beginning and slowly picks up as the threat to Jonah and River increases. The chapters switch points-of-view from different characters, mainly Jonah, Curtis, and a mysterious man. River, Sing Out is a hard book to read due to the haunting subject matter and the cruelty presented, which will need to be taken into consideration when you start it, however, it is definitely worth reading. Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of the publisher/author. http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2021/0...

  26. 4 out of 5

    A.Borroel

    A poetic and gruesome composition. That is how I am going to start off this review. I was fully enveloped by our author's words from the very beginning to the bitter end. Wade has a way of creating this life, filled with hope and sorrow, and writing it so beautifully. His words, the characters and the setting will keep you sucked in and you won't want to look away. Our characters are ones that you won't quickly forget. Each was created to showcase the good, the bad, the timid, the brave and the c A poetic and gruesome composition. That is how I am going to start off this review. I was fully enveloped by our author's words from the very beginning to the bitter end. Wade has a way of creating this life, filled with hope and sorrow, and writing it so beautifully. His words, the characters and the setting will keep you sucked in and you won't want to look away. Our characters are ones that you won't quickly forget. Each was created to showcase the good, the bad, the timid, the brave and the changed. From one of our villains, John Curtis, who doesn't seem to have an ounce of mercy in his body, to our main character, Jonah, who shows us what it means to have patience and overcome the day. These characters are uniquely written and no two people are exactly the same. As a reader, you'll become fully invested, cheering for the vindication for some characters and becoming angered at others and wondering how they'll ever survive in the cruel world that they were born into.  The world that we find ourselves in through this story can open anyone's eyes. Our characters live in a place where most animals have died out, water is wary and people are tragically mad. It's a world that is wonderfully written with every detail. It's also a world that I, nor I imagine, any other reader would want to live in.   The adventure we find out main characters is also unique and fun, yet suspenseful to read. You'll find yourself always hoping for the best and for our bad guys to never catch up. You'll hope that the kids find a new life to live and you won't look away from any of it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shay

    I spent most of this book waiting for it to end. I was very close to not finishing due to the constant exhausting overly earnest descriptions of the dang river, always imbued with unbearable philosophical weight. It felt very forced and I struggled to connect with what should have been some beautiful lyrical prose at the start of each chapter. After sitting on this review for a few days I think my main problem was the heavy-handed nature of these passages. American Dirt is a great example of a rec I spent most of this book waiting for it to end. I was very close to not finishing due to the constant exhausting overly earnest descriptions of the dang river, always imbued with unbearable philosophical weight. It felt very forced and I struggled to connect with what should have been some beautiful lyrical prose at the start of each chapter. After sitting on this review for a few days I think my main problem was the heavy-handed nature of these passages. American Dirt is a great example of a recent read that did this well - beautiful sentences dotted throughout the action that would make my breath catch, light as air and open enough for the reader to imbue them with their own meaning. The same passages in River, Sing Out felt heavy and overwrought and I frequently skimmed them waiting for the plot to progress. The story separate to the swathes of description beginning every chapter, was gripping and well crafted. The plot follows Jonah, a young boy navigating a life of abject poverty alongside a cruel and often absent Father. When he meets the mysterious River he joins her in her desperate escape from her own demons. River, Sing Out was gritty, harrowing in places, and very touching. It found humanity in unlikely places and made my heart ache. The characters were complex and well rounded and I felt connected to them. I just really wish the lengthy prose had been heavily edited.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Susan Obryan

    James Wade delivers as many twists as an East Texas river in "River, Sing Out," a coming-of-age novel filled with mystery, murder and mercy. Described as a southern gothic odyssey, it is filled with darkness, drugs and desperation. Living along the East Texas river bottoms, a boy name Jonah basically lives alone in a rundown trailer as he waits for his drunk, abusive dad to show up now and then. When a teenage girl stumbles into view, Jonah is determined to help her. She's on the run from local James Wade delivers as many twists as an East Texas river in "River, Sing Out," a coming-of-age novel filled with mystery, murder and mercy. Described as a southern gothic odyssey, it is filled with darkness, drugs and desperation. Living along the East Texas river bottoms, a boy name Jonah basically lives alone in a rundown trailer as he waits for his drunk, abusive dad to show up now and then. When a teenage girl stumbles into view, Jonah is determined to help her. She's on the run from local drug dealers after she makes off with a backpack full of methamphetamine. Chasing the dopers are the Mexican cartel and an assassin known as the Thin Man. These may sound like stereotypical characters, but Wade gives them a sense of humanity and humility through his words. They are pitied, yet admired. Strong, yet weak. The river is at the heart of Jonah's life. It's the only thing he can count on despite its flooding and dangers. It's his only escape from the violence and poverty that surrounds him. Through its power, Jonah comes to terms with living and loving within himself. Listen to the river; it has a lot to say. And just like the river, life is brutal, yet survivable. ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for my opinion.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I really enjoyed this fast moving, almost urgent, meth-driven story set in far East Texas. Very "Quentin Tarantino-esque" - and I mean this in a good way. Lots of cold blooded violence and peril, but also deep conversations popping up among very unlikely characters as they go about their unsavory business. In fact, the whole novel really tackles a lot "big picture" questions - destiny vs. free will and the consequences of our actions. Full disclosure - I went to an excellent book reading/signing I really enjoyed this fast moving, almost urgent, meth-driven story set in far East Texas. Very "Quentin Tarantino-esque" - and I mean this in a good way. Lots of cold blooded violence and peril, but also deep conversations popping up among very unlikely characters as they go about their unsavory business. In fact, the whole novel really tackles a lot "big picture" questions - destiny vs. free will and the consequences of our actions. Full disclosure - I went to an excellent book reading/signing/discussion held by the author at an indie bookstore in San Angelo, Texas, and was VERY impressed and pre-destined to want to like this book (so there we go...destiny or free will?) Among the things Wade discussed was the rating system for goodreads and other sites. With that in mind, I'm refraining from the 5 star rating I might be inclined to give, rounding down to 4 stars out of pure, brutal honesty. (Really, my only criticisms are that it was almost too short - there could have been much more back story, especially among some of the more minor characters, to give it a little more "depth"). Very highly recommended - I'm looking forward to reading more by this author.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tamara (CoffeeOnABookshelf)

    💭 ᴍʏ ᴛʜᴏᴜɢʜᴛꜱ: This was my second audiobook and it got better! I liked this one. The beginning was still a bit confusing for me to follow sometimes but the story was good and the narrator did really well. It's a story about Jonah, a 13 year old kid, and the drug-addict River trying to run from the bad and escaping to the ocean. It builds up the suspense slowly but definitely wanted to keep listening towards the end. There was a little bit too much violence and not really enough to the story for m 💭 ᴍʏ ᴛʜᴏᴜɢʜᴛꜱ: This was my second audiobook and it got better! I liked this one. The beginning was still a bit confusing for me to follow sometimes but the story was good and the narrator did really well. It's a story about Jonah, a 13 year old kid, and the drug-addict River trying to run from the bad and escaping to the ocean. It builds up the suspense slowly but definitely wanted to keep listening towards the end. There was a little bit too much violence and not really enough to the story for me. ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 🤓 ʀᴇᴀᴅ ɪꜰ ʏᴏᴜ ʟɪᴋᴇ: Short Chapters Ozark & Bloodline ꜱʏɴᴏᴘꜱɪꜱ: 𝘑𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘩 𝘏𝘢𝘳𝘨𝘳𝘰𝘷𝘦 𝘪𝘴 𝘤𝘦𝘭𝘦𝘣𝘳𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘳𝘵𝘦𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘩 𝘣𝘪𝘳𝘵𝘩𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘣𝘺 𝘢𝘷𝘰𝘪𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘣𝘶𝘴𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘢𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳, 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘢 𝘨𝘪𝘳𝘭 𝘯𝘢𝘮𝘦𝘥 𝘙𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘴𝘵𝘶𝘮𝘣𝘭𝘦𝘴 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘺𝘢𝘳𝘥, 𝘪𝘯𝘫𝘶𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘢𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘦. 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘦𝘦𝘯𝘢𝘨𝘦𝘳 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘴𝘵𝘰𝘭𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘥𝘰𝘭𝘭𝘢𝘳𝘴’ 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘩 𝘰𝘧 𝘮𝘦𝘵𝘩 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘮𝘶𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘴, 𝘥𝘳𝘶𝘨-𝘥𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘣𝘰𝘺𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥, 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘭𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘪𝘵 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘕𝘦𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘙𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘣𝘰𝘵𝘵𝘰𝘮𝘴 𝘥𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘦𝘴𝘤𝘢𝘱𝘦. 𝘑𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘩 𝘢𝘨𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘦𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘳𝘶𝘨𝘴 𝘴𝘰 𝘴𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘧𝘭𝘦𝘦 𝘌𝘢𝘴𝘵 𝘛𝘦𝘹𝘢𝘴. 𝘊𝘩𝘢𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮 𝘪𝘴 𝘑𝘰𝘩𝘯 𝘊𝘶𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘴, 𝘢 𝘭𝘰𝘤𝘢𝘭 𝘥𝘳𝘶𝘨 𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘱𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘥𝘰𝘨 𝘧𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘦𝘳, 𝘢𝘴 𝘸𝘦𝘭𝘭 𝘢𝘴 𝘙𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘳’𝘴 𝘣𝘰𝘺𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥, 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘴 𝘋𝘢𝘬𝘰𝘵𝘢 𝘊𝘢𝘥𝘦.

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