web site hit counter Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process

Availability: Ready to download

In 24 fascinating lectures, Professor Francis Colavita offers a biopsychological perspective on the way we humans navigate and react to the world around us in a process that is ever-changing. Our experiences are vastly different today than they were when we were children and our senses and brains were still developing; and those experiences are becoming ever more different In 24 fascinating lectures, Professor Francis Colavita offers a biopsychological perspective on the way we humans navigate and react to the world around us in a process that is ever-changing. Our experiences are vastly different today than they were when we were children and our senses and brains were still developing; and those experiences are becoming ever more different as we age, when natural changes alert us to the need to compensate, often in ways that are quite positive. For example, children have many more taste receptors than adults, so they are more taste sensitive. Therefore it's both ironic and understandable that children often prefer bland food drawn from a small list of favorites to avoid being overwhelmed. Adults, on the other hand, lose taste receptors as they age, so getting older often moves us in the opposite direction, prompting us to try new varieties of ethnic cuisines and spicier foods. One of the delights of this course is the balance of the real-life examples Professor Colavita gives and the crisp presentation of the physiological systems that explain those examples. How do our sensory systems gather and process raw information from the world, enabling us to see, hear, smell, taste, or touch? How do we keep our balance? Or understand exactly where we are in space, so that we can reach for our morning coffee cup and not close our hands around empty space? How do our bodies create motor memories that allow us to learn and then automatically perform the most complex tasks—such as the laboriously practiced elements of a golf swing—in one smoothly executed motion, or run through a series of rapid gear shifts while driving on a winding mountain road? What sort of sensory system allows us to feel pain but also works to protect us from its most intense levels? Whether exploring the complex structures of the brain or inner ear, explaining with compassion the animal experiments that have given us so much knowledge of sensory systems, or using humorous personal anecdotes to illustrate a point, Professor Colavita delivers a course that informs, entertains, and even prepares us for the changes that lie ahead.


Compare

In 24 fascinating lectures, Professor Francis Colavita offers a biopsychological perspective on the way we humans navigate and react to the world around us in a process that is ever-changing. Our experiences are vastly different today than they were when we were children and our senses and brains were still developing; and those experiences are becoming ever more different In 24 fascinating lectures, Professor Francis Colavita offers a biopsychological perspective on the way we humans navigate and react to the world around us in a process that is ever-changing. Our experiences are vastly different today than they were when we were children and our senses and brains were still developing; and those experiences are becoming ever more different as we age, when natural changes alert us to the need to compensate, often in ways that are quite positive. For example, children have many more taste receptors than adults, so they are more taste sensitive. Therefore it's both ironic and understandable that children often prefer bland food drawn from a small list of favorites to avoid being overwhelmed. Adults, on the other hand, lose taste receptors as they age, so getting older often moves us in the opposite direction, prompting us to try new varieties of ethnic cuisines and spicier foods. One of the delights of this course is the balance of the real-life examples Professor Colavita gives and the crisp presentation of the physiological systems that explain those examples. How do our sensory systems gather and process raw information from the world, enabling us to see, hear, smell, taste, or touch? How do we keep our balance? Or understand exactly where we are in space, so that we can reach for our morning coffee cup and not close our hands around empty space? How do our bodies create motor memories that allow us to learn and then automatically perform the most complex tasks—such as the laboriously practiced elements of a golf swing—in one smoothly executed motion, or run through a series of rapid gear shifts while driving on a winding mountain road? What sort of sensory system allows us to feel pain but also works to protect us from its most intense levels? Whether exploring the complex structures of the brain or inner ear, explaining with compassion the animal experiments that have given us so much knowledge of sensory systems, or using humorous personal anecdotes to illustrate a point, Professor Colavita delivers a course that informs, entertains, and even prepares us for the changes that lie ahead.

30 review for Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process

  1. 4 out of 5

    HBalikov

    Francis Colavita is a researcher and psychological clinician. He has a lot to share in the 24 lectures that comprise Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process. The methodology is direct. You must understand the physiology (the brain, nervous system, etc.) to understand the psychology. Colavita is a well-prepared and good speaker with a wealth of interesting insights and anecdotes. However, this is not your usual survey course. There is a great deal of technical information and if you are short Francis Colavita is a researcher and psychological clinician. He has a lot to share in the 24 lectures that comprise Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process. The methodology is direct. You must understand the physiology (the brain, nervous system, etc.) to understand the psychology. Colavita is a well-prepared and good speaker with a wealth of interesting insights and anecdotes. However, this is not your usual survey course. There is a great deal of technical information and if you are short on preparation (did you take basic anatomy or psychology?) you will not find parts of this easy to assimilate. You will learn the significance of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the parietal lobe, the angular gyrus, Broca's area, agraphia, apraxia, proprioception, etc. Colavita does get into the aging process in a number of lectures but you should not be mislead by the title to think that this is his prime purpose. You will find out how the young differ from the elderly but integrating the bits and pieces is not what Colavita trying to accomplish. Well done, but not quite my dish.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Clif Hostetler

    These lectures provide a physiological approach to the study of psychology. In other words, the lectures explore what is going on inside our physical bodies that prompts various types of perception and behavior. It then describes how these change with the aging process. One significant observation made in the lectures is that old and young people live in different sensory worlds. And consequently, they also live in different perceptual worlds. The first 12 lectures in this course expand on the di These lectures provide a physiological approach to the study of psychology. In other words, the lectures explore what is going on inside our physical bodies that prompts various types of perception and behavior. It then describes how these change with the aging process. One significant observation made in the lectures is that old and young people live in different sensory worlds. And consequently, they also live in different perceptual worlds. The first 12 lectures in this course expand on the difference between a sensation and a perception and elaborate on the concept of the perceptual world. The functioning of the visual, auditory, and cutaneous systems, and the changes in functioning associated with the aging process, are also discussed. The last 12 lectures deal with the senses of pain, taste, smell, body orientation (balance), and "muscle feedback." Special categories of human perception, such as speech perception, face recognition, and person perception, are also be addressed. As in the initial 12 lectures, attention is paid to the role of the aging process. Mr. Colavita was an older man when he gave these lectures, and his lectures are filled with many interesting stories, many from his own life. This makes the lectures especially interesting and easy to listen to. The lectures on the elusive nature of pain were particularly interesting. Unfortunately, Mr. Colavita died earlier this year (2009). The following are some interesting facts that I picked up from this course: 1. A healthy human ear can sense the movement of an air molecule (sound wave) as small as half the width of a hydrogen atom. (In case you didn't know, that is very very small.) 2. Cats can do better. They can hear ultrasound and humans cannot. 3. But humans can see colors; cats cannot. 4. Dogs can smell things at concentrations 1,000 times weaker than humans can. 5. Bees can see ultraviolet light; humans cannot. 6. Likewise, some snakes can see infrared radiation; humans cannot. 7. Some behavioral differences among bees, cats, and humans are directly attributable to the fact that these species live in different sensory worlds while living in the same physical world. 8. The sensory differences and resulting differences in perception between young and old people explains the differences in behavior such as the willingness to take risks or roller coaster rides. 9. All sensory functions in humans degrade with age to some degree. However the learned perception that results from the senses can become wiser with age. For example, older people depend less on appearance than younger people when forming an opinion of others. 10. Another example of the difference between older and younger people is that older people are more interested in spicier foods because it compensates for they're having fewer taste receptors. This also explains why children, who have more taste receptors than adults, often prefer bland food.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Blackledge

    Really good course by a really good instructor, researcher and clinician Dr. Francis Colavita. The course answers the following: 1. How do sensory receptors translate data from the environment (i.e. light, sound, chemical, or tactile stimuli) into signals that the brain can utilize? 2. How does the brain integrate (bind) sense data into perceptions experienced as ‘reality’? 3. How does the aging process change our sensory world, and subsequently, our perceived ‘reality’? Some of the particularly ey Really good course by a really good instructor, researcher and clinician Dr. Francis Colavita. The course answers the following: 1. How do sensory receptors translate data from the environment (i.e. light, sound, chemical, or tactile stimuli) into signals that the brain can utilize? 2. How does the brain integrate (bind) sense data into perceptions experienced as ‘reality’? 3. How does the aging process change our sensory world, and subsequently, our perceived ‘reality’? Some of the particularly eye opening material in the course had to do with the differentiation Dr. Colavita made between sensation and perception. Sensation refers to ‘raw’ or so-called ‘bottom up’ input coming directly to the brain from the sensory organs. Perception refers to the ‘processed’ or so-called ‘top down’ explicit experience of the sensations. Sensation and perception change over a lifespan, eliciting analogous behavioral and personality change. It sounds terribly commonsensical in this form, but I found the argument to be particularly revelatory because of the many counterintuitive examples Dr. Colavia provided. Although I have had graduate level training in biological psychology, and a good amount of self study in neuroscience, the instructor’s argument and presentation of the materiel brought me to a much deeper, much different understanding of the way our sensory capacities contribute to our psychological experiences and behaviors. My previous training was focused on either a lower level organization e.g. biological form and function etc. or higher level organization e.g. cognition, emotion, motivation, behavior, pathology etc. This course did a nice job a spanning the gap. The course was really great in parts, but less great in others. Data has a shelf life. Neuroscience has made quantum leaps in the previous decade. Most of the data in the course was fresh, but some of the important data was a little on the stale side. So I’m dinging the course by 1 star, for an ultimately very respectable 4 star total. Don’t let that prevent you from getting the course. It’s quite good. Just be forewarned.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bob Nichols

    Colavita describes sensations as physical transfers of energy from the outside to the inside via vision, hearing, touch, taste, smell, vestibular sense (body orientation) and kinesthetic sense (motion). He describes how each works and also states that, in viewing a stimulus, we "see" it in a multi-sensory way as a unified gestalt. Perception involves the meaning we add to stimuli. A puff of smoke can mean a new pope has been chosen or that there's a fire at the Vatican. Beliefs are general perce Colavita describes sensations as physical transfers of energy from the outside to the inside via vision, hearing, touch, taste, smell, vestibular sense (body orientation) and kinesthetic sense (motion). He describes how each works and also states that, in viewing a stimulus, we "see" it in a multi-sensory way as a unified gestalt. Perception involves the meaning we add to stimuli. A puff of smoke can mean a new pope has been chosen or that there's a fire at the Vatican. Beliefs are general perceptual systems that guide behavior, whether true or not. While not a central point, Colavita sees our senses as not just receivers of stimuli, but as vehicles for inner need. For example, he says that "touch" is a need, and its absence is a loss or pain, and that pain forces the body to deal with it (seek out touching). On taste, we seek sweetness and resist bitterness. He also notes that we differ in biological make up. Two-thirds of us are tasters. One-third are not (not important). Some people have no capacity for visual imagery. Colavita also describes various physical deficiencies that affect seeing, language use and understanding. Among other functions, our cerebral cortex enables us to inhibit our actions but if deficient in certain body chemistry, our inhibitory capacity underperforms. Colavita puts willing, as intentional action, into our thought system, implying that only conscious thought involves willing. A dog, or other animal, might have a different perspective: I want food, I want this food and I don't want that food. The dog is not conscious of "I want/don't want" but nevertheless intentionally acts. Colavita notes in passing that various touch deprivation studies were "too extremely cruel" to perform on kids, so they were done on animals. There's something wrong here. The title of these lectures references "aging" but this topic was always thrown into the end of each lecture as an adjunct thought, always with the same message: as we age our senses decline.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ross Anderson

    Did you know that all mammals have a sweet tooth? Except for cats, because of a genetic mutation. You wouldn't think an audio series about the sense of smell or taste or hearing would be as interesting as it was. I really enjoyed the personal anecdotes that Colavita weaved into the fascinating facts about the human perception. The presentation of trivia and results of medical studies slowed down only infrequently. I would recommend this to anyone who has a nose, a tongue, or ears. Did you know that all mammals have a sweet tooth? Except for cats, because of a genetic mutation. You wouldn't think an audio series about the sense of smell or taste or hearing would be as interesting as it was. I really enjoyed the personal anecdotes that Colavita weaved into the fascinating facts about the human perception. The presentation of trivia and results of medical studies slowed down only infrequently. I would recommend this to anyone who has a nose, a tongue, or ears.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Teo 2050

    2015.11.18–2015.12.02 What a great guy! I loved his readiness to present information on our senses' workings with constant gesturing, as well as his smiling at his own stories; while animations wouldn't hurt, this is exemplary use of hands while talking. IMO, he met his "instructional goals for the course": 1. To expose us to enough sensory physiology that we could understand how our receptors take various forms of physical energy from the world and translate it into a language that the brain unde 2015.11.18–2015.12.02 What a great guy! I loved his readiness to present information on our senses' workings with constant gesturing, as well as his smiling at his own stories; while animations wouldn't hurt, this is exemplary use of hands while talking. IMO, he met his "instructional goals for the course": 1. To expose us to enough sensory physiology that we could understand how our receptors take various forms of physical energy from the world and translate it into a language that the brain understands. 2. To give us some insight into how the brain takes the sense data provided by our sensory systems and integrates it with our previous experiences and creates our perceptions which form our reality. 3. To share with us ways in which the aging process can change our sensory world and our perceptual world. 4. For us to have some fun during these lectures. Contents Colavita FB (2006) (24 x 00:30) Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process 01. Sensation, Perception, and Behavior 02. Sensation and Perception - A Distinction 03. Vision - Stimulus and the Optical System 04. Vision - The Retina 05. Vision - Beyond the Optic Nerve 06. Vision - Age-Related Changes 07. Hearing - Stimulus and Supporting Structures 08. Hearing - The Inner Ear 09. Hearing - Age-Related Changes 10. The Cutaneous System - Receptors, Pathways 11. The Cutaneous System - Early Development 12. The Cutaneous System - Age-Related Changes 13. Pain - Early History 14. Pain - Acupunture, Endorphins, and Aging 15. Taste - Stimulus, Structures, and Receptors 16. Taste - Factors Influencing Preferences 17. Smell - The Unappreciated Sense 18. Smell - Consequences of Anosmia 19. The Vestibular System - Body Orientation 20. The Kinesthetic Sense - Motor Memory 21. Brain Mechanisms and Perception 22. Perception of Language 23. The Visual Agnosias 24. Perception of Other People - Course Summary

  7. 4 out of 5

    Feng Ouyang

    Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process by Francis B. Colavita This book contains 24 lectures on human low-level cognition functionalities. The author started with sensors: vision, hearing, smelling, and touching. These lectures are fascinating in introducing how sensor cells and neurons work together to provide our brain access to the external world. For example, the author discusses how stimulants are "decomposed" into components, which are sensed by different sensing cells and recombined Sensation, Perception, and the Aging Process by Francis B. Colavita This book contains 24 lectures on human low-level cognition functionalities. The author started with sensors: vision, hearing, smelling, and touching. These lectures are fascinating in introducing how sensor cells and neurons work together to provide our brain access to the external world. For example, the author discusses how stimulants are "decomposed" into components, which are sensed by different sensing cells and recombined in the brain to form our impression of the world. The subsequent lectures are about perception. By that, the author means the next-level cognition capabilities, such as recognizing objects and human faces through optical inputs, understanding and producing languages, etc. These functions are performed by specific parts of the brain, with or without the conscious control. For each topic, there are some discussions on how aging affects the sensing and perception capabilities. Overall, aging is accompanied by sensing cell reduction and neural transmission slow-down. Aging affects vision and hearing the most while smelling and touching suffers degradation with less impact on life quality. The book is fascinating in biopsychology, which is the specialty of the author. However, the introduction is somewhat misleading. From the introduction, I thought the book's emphasis is how our picture of the world (perception) is affected by our sensing abilities and how such perception changes with aging due to sensor degradation. I was disappointed to find out later that "perception" is still low-level cognitions such as pattern recognition and language understanding. And the aging process was addressed as an afterthought. Therefore, I would say that the book does not deliver what is promised in the introduction.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Dr Colavito's lectures provide a clear, concise and fascinating set of lectures that plainly explains the differences between sensations and how we perceive (interpret) those sensations. Most of the lectures deal with the physiology of how we collect data via our sensory 'organs' (eyes, nose, fingers, etc.)...breaking down how these organs work. This takes up 20 of the 24 lectures. The last three or four lectures touch on how the sensations are transmitted to the brain and how different parts of Dr Colavito's lectures provide a clear, concise and fascinating set of lectures that plainly explains the differences between sensations and how we perceive (interpret) those sensations. Most of the lectures deal with the physiology of how we collect data via our sensory 'organs' (eyes, nose, fingers, etc.)...breaking down how these organs work. This takes up 20 of the 24 lectures. The last three or four lectures touch on how the sensations are transmitted to the brain and how different parts of the brain break down the sensations into perceptions. The good professor clearly points out that our perceptions might not always reflect reality (that's the job of our sensations), but rather reflect our interpretation of those sensations based upon our prior experiences with those stimuli. Another aspect of the course, one in which is incorporated into the title, is how sensations and their perceptions are influenced by the aging process. Well, no surprise here! As we age our sensational organs become less efficient...we see more poorly, hear less well, and often forget our Right Guard. But what about our perceptions...do we transition smoothly from 'wise guy' to 'wise man'...or does our brain deteriorate along with our senses? Or maybe it's a little of both. Good set of lectures...I like the kind that make you think...and have a bit of humor sprinkled in just for the fun of it. Review the course guide...it's pretty good. I thought the audio version was great...but since I didn't watch the video, I have no way of knowing which would be the better choice. I do know that this set is often on sale, and coupons can only add to that pleasant sensation of knowing that you saved some money.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    So many new things to not look forward to as I age. Yay.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    A wonderful set of lectures investigating the senses, and the effect of age on all of our sensory systems. Very well-done; fascinating. I will re-listen often.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jean Gonnella

  12. 4 out of 5

    John

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Smith

  15. 4 out of 5

    Iris Ang

  16. 5 out of 5

    Saleh

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dennistag

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karl Jenner

  20. 5 out of 5

    Silvia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kai Tinley

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ida Aasebøstøl

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. Falcone

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Milligan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phil Chenevert

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyung

  28. 4 out of 5

    Larry Hansen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amélie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.