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War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches features stories by the brightest stars in the science fiction firmament. One of the most startlingly original and entertaining SF anthology concepts in years, perfectly preserving the spirit of H. G. Wells's classic. H. G. Wells's immortal novel The War of the Worlds describes an invasion from Mars through the fictional dispatches of a War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches features stories by the brightest stars in the science fiction firmament. One of the most startlingly original and entertaining SF anthology concepts in years, perfectly preserving the spirit of H. G. Wells's classic. H. G. Wells's immortal novel The War of the Worlds describes an invasion from Mars through the fictional dispatches of a London newspaper reporter. Yet we have been able to see only one segment of the global catastrophe - until now. Here is the Martian invasion that might have been, from the Earthlings best prepared to tell the tale. Besides the struggle in England, the reporter mentions similar battles taking place all over the planet. From Teddy Roosevelt in Cuba to the Dowager Empress in China, we see our fellow humans encounter the Martian menace through the eyes of science fiction luminaries: --In Providence, Rhode Island, an eight-year-old H. P. Lovecraft bravely seeks communion with an alien intelligence - and a return to his long-lost home; --In Russia, a letter by Count Leo Tolstoy describes the coming of the ultimate revolution; --In a dark woods outside of Zurich, a heroic Albert Einstein finds himself trapped inside a Martian craft, where survival itself is relative; --In Amherst, Massachussetts, Emily Dickinson leaves poetic evidence that she encountered the Martians eleven years after her death; --In Paris, a young artist named Pablo Picasso is inspired by the Martian carnage to create his most shocking and disturbing masterpiece. Contents: **(H. G. Wells): Foreword (War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches) • essay by H. G. Wells *(Teddy Roosevelt): The Roosevelt Dispatches [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Mike Resnick *(Percival Lowell): Canals in the Sand [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Kevin J. Anderson *(Dowager Empress of China): Foreign Devils [War of the Worlds] (1996) / novelette by Walter Jon Williams *(Pablo Picasso): Blue Period [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Daniel Marcus *(Henry James): The Martian Invasion Journals of Henry James [War of the Worlds] (1996) / novelette by Robert Silverberg *(Winston Churchill and H. Rider Haggard): The True Tale of the Final Battle of Umslopogaas the Zulu [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Janet Berliner *(Texas Rangers): Night of the Cooters [War of the Worlds] (1987) / shortstory by Howard Waldrop *(Albert Einstein): Determinism and the Martian War, with Relativistic Corrections [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Doug Beason *(Rudyard Kipling): Soldier of the Queen [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Barbara Hambly *(Edgar Rice Burroughs): Mars: The Home Front [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by George Alec Effinger *(Joseph Pulitzer): A Letter from St. Louis [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Allen Steele *(Leo Tolstoy): Resurrection [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Mark W. Tiedemann *(Jules Verne): Paris Conquers All [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Gregory Benford and David Brin *(H. P. Lovecraft): To Mars and Providence [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Don Webb *(Mark Twain): Roughing It During the Martian Invasion [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Daniel Keys Moran and Jodi Moran *(Joseph Conrad): To See the World End [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by M. Shayne Bell *(Jack London): After a Lean Winter [War of the Worlds] (1996) / novelette by Dave Wolverton *(Emily Dickinson): The Soul Selects Her Own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Connie Willis **(Jules Verne): Afterword: Retrospective (War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches) (1996) • essay by Gregory Benford and David Brin. .


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War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches features stories by the brightest stars in the science fiction firmament. One of the most startlingly original and entertaining SF anthology concepts in years, perfectly preserving the spirit of H. G. Wells's classic. H. G. Wells's immortal novel The War of the Worlds describes an invasion from Mars through the fictional dispatches of a War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches features stories by the brightest stars in the science fiction firmament. One of the most startlingly original and entertaining SF anthology concepts in years, perfectly preserving the spirit of H. G. Wells's classic. H. G. Wells's immortal novel The War of the Worlds describes an invasion from Mars through the fictional dispatches of a London newspaper reporter. Yet we have been able to see only one segment of the global catastrophe - until now. Here is the Martian invasion that might have been, from the Earthlings best prepared to tell the tale. Besides the struggle in England, the reporter mentions similar battles taking place all over the planet. From Teddy Roosevelt in Cuba to the Dowager Empress in China, we see our fellow humans encounter the Martian menace through the eyes of science fiction luminaries: --In Providence, Rhode Island, an eight-year-old H. P. Lovecraft bravely seeks communion with an alien intelligence - and a return to his long-lost home; --In Russia, a letter by Count Leo Tolstoy describes the coming of the ultimate revolution; --In a dark woods outside of Zurich, a heroic Albert Einstein finds himself trapped inside a Martian craft, where survival itself is relative; --In Amherst, Massachussetts, Emily Dickinson leaves poetic evidence that she encountered the Martians eleven years after her death; --In Paris, a young artist named Pablo Picasso is inspired by the Martian carnage to create his most shocking and disturbing masterpiece. Contents: **(H. G. Wells): Foreword (War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches) • essay by H. G. Wells *(Teddy Roosevelt): The Roosevelt Dispatches [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Mike Resnick *(Percival Lowell): Canals in the Sand [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Kevin J. Anderson *(Dowager Empress of China): Foreign Devils [War of the Worlds] (1996) / novelette by Walter Jon Williams *(Pablo Picasso): Blue Period [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Daniel Marcus *(Henry James): The Martian Invasion Journals of Henry James [War of the Worlds] (1996) / novelette by Robert Silverberg *(Winston Churchill and H. Rider Haggard): The True Tale of the Final Battle of Umslopogaas the Zulu [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Janet Berliner *(Texas Rangers): Night of the Cooters [War of the Worlds] (1987) / shortstory by Howard Waldrop *(Albert Einstein): Determinism and the Martian War, with Relativistic Corrections [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Doug Beason *(Rudyard Kipling): Soldier of the Queen [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Barbara Hambly *(Edgar Rice Burroughs): Mars: The Home Front [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by George Alec Effinger *(Joseph Pulitzer): A Letter from St. Louis [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Allen Steele *(Leo Tolstoy): Resurrection [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Mark W. Tiedemann *(Jules Verne): Paris Conquers All [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Gregory Benford and David Brin *(H. P. Lovecraft): To Mars and Providence [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Don Webb *(Mark Twain): Roughing It During the Martian Invasion [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Daniel Keys Moran and Jodi Moran *(Joseph Conrad): To See the World End [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by M. Shayne Bell *(Jack London): After a Lean Winter [War of the Worlds] (1996) / novelette by Dave Wolverton *(Emily Dickinson): The Soul Selects Her Own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective [War of the Worlds] (1996) / shortstory by Connie Willis **(Jules Verne): Afterword: Retrospective (War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches) (1996) • essay by Gregory Benford and David Brin. .

30 review for War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    April 2009 Although eyewitness accounts of the Martian invasion in The War of the Worlds were limited to England, there were some hints that the destruction took place on a much larger scale. Here, in War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches, editor Kevin J. Anderson gathers a collection of other stories of the devastation: historical reports from all over the globe, from people as diverse as Kipling, Einstein, Jack London, Twain, Tolstoy, H. P. Lovecraft, and many others. It's quite a fun collection April 2009 Although eyewitness accounts of the Martian invasion in The War of the Worlds were limited to England, there were some hints that the destruction took place on a much larger scale. Here, in War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches, editor Kevin J. Anderson gathers a collection of other stories of the devastation: historical reports from all over the globe, from people as diverse as Kipling, Einstein, Jack London, Twain, Tolstoy, H. P. Lovecraft, and many others. It's quite a fun collection, though slightly flawed (more on that in a moment). My biggest worry on starting this was that the stories would be shallow echoes of Wells' original, with the predictable three-act arc of the Martians' arrival, attacks, and downfall, with little variation. A few of the stories were limited to that, but most of the authors realized that the strength of the characters, and their individual reactions to the attacks, were what best propelled the stories: from Theodore Roosevelt, whose first instincts on encountering a Martian is to kill it and then commission a more powerful hunting rifle from Winchester in order to kill the next ones more efficiently; to Tolstoy, who takes charge of a refugee camp as the rest of Russia falls; and from the Texas sheriff with a score to settle ("These things done attacked citizens in my jurisdiction, and they killed my horse."); to Joseph Conrad, who watches the world end in an unexpected way, and many others. Expect enough humor sprinkled throughout to keep the despair at bay, and if nothing else, check out Connie Willis's hilarious Emily Dickinson essay ("The Soul Selects Her Own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective"). Some of the best stories were those that unflinchingly portrayed the horror of the war, such as the total destruction of St. Louis as witnessed by a newspaperman committed to his duty, as well as the long-term effects of the invasion, from Russia's recovery to the way China and India take advantage of Europe's power vacuums to rebuild and become independent powers in their own right fifty years early. H. G. Wells may not have explored the long-term repercussions in his novel, but the stories in this anthology (at least, some of the superior ones) make it clear that a worldwide catastrophe costing millions, perhaps hundreds of millions of lives, would have both terrible and unexpected impacts on the next century. It's a mixed bag, and I feel a bit hesitant giving this four stars, but that favorable rating is based more on the strength of the better stories than any of the weaker ones. There really aren't any "bad" stories in the collection (although I wouldn’t recommend the Churchill story, "The True Tale of the final Battle of Umslopogaas the Zulu"), I only have one complaint: the collection is a bit too inconsistent. Pablo Picasso's and Jules Verne's accounts of the attacks on Paris contradict heavily, and the Verne account contradicts almost blasphemously with Wells; Winston Churchill's encounter with the Martians during the Boer War is jumbled and confused; "Mars: The Home Front," an Edgar Rice Burroughs-inspired tale, feels rather out of place despite its setting; and Percival Lowell’s location varies from story to story. Although the foreword to this collection recognizes these inconsistencies and attributes them to "the great turmoil of the time," both foreword and afterword make it clear that these accounts are supposed to chronicle the same worldwide invasion, and therefore connect to tell a larger story. It does attempt that, but the result is not as strong or as satisfying as I would have liked. Still, I don't wish to discourage anyone from reading this: as I mentioned above, a number of the stories are very good, and manage to stand well on their own while remaining faithful to the original. The inconsistency between tales will really only bother the most nitpicky of readers (hello!), so how to view the collection on that note is really up to individual taste. Overall, it's a fun collection for any fan of Wells’s original novel--or just someone curious to see what happens when Mars invades Texas.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Otherwyrld

    When I reviewed The War of the Worlds a while back I bemoaned the fact that the action was set in one small corner of England, and that there is little mention of what is happening in the rest of the world. This collection of short stories tries to rectify this by showing events from a wide variety of perspectives. The literary conceit here is that each story is written by a modern Science Fiction author in the style of someone who would have been alive at the time of the Martian invasion. On th When I reviewed The War of the Worlds a while back I bemoaned the fact that the action was set in one small corner of England, and that there is little mention of what is happening in the rest of the world. This collection of short stories tries to rectify this by showing events from a wide variety of perspectives. The literary conceit here is that each story is written by a modern Science Fiction author in the style of someone who would have been alive at the time of the Martian invasion. On the whole its a pretty good collection, though I can't say with any certainty if the writers here manage to accurately depict the voices of the person they are writing about. The following notes are brief guides to each story, with title, persona and author in that order. The Roosevelt Dispatches Teddy Roosevelt Mike Resnick - one of the weaker stories, it tells in letter form about Roosevelt' s encounter with Martians in the jungles of Cuba. It certainly sounded like Teddy's bombastic style, but I was rather hoping that the final letter would be "I regret to inform you..." Canals in the Sand Percival Lowell Kevin J. Anderson - Percival Lowell is determined to welcome friendly Martians by providing them with a sign that they would be welcomed. Lowell comes across quite poorly in this one and it is something that leads to his death in the Sahara. Well written though. Foreign Devils Guangxu Emperor and Empress Dowager Cixi Walter Jon Williams - one of the best of the stories, combining political intrigue in the court of the Chinese Emperor, with the Martian Invasion seen by the Emperor as a means to rid them of another foreign devil in the form of the Western powers. Powerfully written. Blue Period Pablo Picasso Daniel Marcus - Picasso is a fish out of water here as he unfortunately was in Paris at the time of the Martian invasion rather than in his native Spain. Bit of a dull story as he uses his experience to paint something different from hos usual style, and that's all he does. The Martian Invasion Journals of Henry James Henry James Robert Silverberg - rather a departure in that this story actually has H.G.Wells in it, and ends up with Henry James rather than Wells writing War of the Worlds. The True Tale of the Final Battle of Umslopogaas the Zulu Winston Churchill and H. Rider Haggard Janet Berliner - rather an odd little story which tries to combine the mysticism of Haggard's African stories with the more realistic tone of Winston Churchill, and doesn't quite succeed. Night of the Cooters The Texas Rangers Howard Waldrop - the Martians land in Texas. The Texans shoot them. The end. Determinism and the Martian War, with Relativistic Corrections Edwin Hubble and Albert Einstein Doug Beason - Albert Einstein becomes a superhero and single handedly downs a Martian fighting machine with a rope, in a play copied from The Empire Strikes Back. It's a pity that this story misses the point that Wells was making, in that humanity is helpless against the Martians, and that humble bacteria saves us instead of our own might. Otherwise this is an entertaining story. Soldier of the Queen Rudyard Kipling and Mohandas K. Gandhi Barbara Hambly - Kipling and Gandhi make a rather odd couple as they try and keep India safe from the Martians by using guerilla warfare. Another story that uses the invasion as a background for social change, and does it rather well. Mars: The Home Front Edgar Rice Burroughs Kevin J. Anderson - possibly the only failure in the whole book, this story tries unsuccessfully to marry the conflicting stories of Wells Martians with the Barsoom of Burroughs. It's entertainingly written and the style is accurate, but it just didn't work for me. A Letter from St. Louis Joseph Pulitzer Allen Steele - the story of the Martian invasion as it might have been told by a reporter at the time. The story is not really about Pulitzer though, and his fate is well deserved. Resurrection Leo Tolstoy and Joseph Stalin Mark W. Tiedemann- this one rather amusingly consigns Stalin to anonymity whilst painting Tolstoy as the hero of the hour, as he struggles to save as many peasants as possible from both Martians and starvation. Paris Conquers All Jules Verne Gregory Benford and David Brin - this one suffers from being the second story set in Paris, especially given here that the Martians don't destroy the Eiffel Tower, they (view spoiler)[ try to mate with it (hide spoiler)] which rather lessens the impact of the story. Jules Verne really doesn't play much of a role her, which is a pity. To Mars and Providence H. P. Lovecraft Don Webb - does well to imitate the style of Lovecraft, who is still a child here, but ultimately a silly story that strays too far from the original. Roughing it During the Martian Invasion Mark Twain Kevin J. Anderson and Jodi Moran - a bathetic story of an elderly Mark Twain trying to capture living Martians in a dead New Orleans. To See the World End Joseph Conrad M. Shayne Bell - a third story about a conquered people using the invasion to throw off the shackles of their fellow men, this is a profound story and one of the best in the book. After a Lean Winter Jack London Kevin J. Anderson - good use is made of the cold of the far north in this story. The fight between the sled dogs and a Martian is nasty and just what probably would have happened. The Soul Selects her own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective Emily Dickinson Connie Willis - sorry but this one did nothing for me, no matter how well written it was. Rather an odd way to end the book. This edition rather oddly misses a story about Nikola Tesla, which I would have liked to read. Otherwise this was a good collection.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches is an entertaining collection of short stories that are purportedly by historical figures who would have been alive to witness the landing of the Martians as described in Wells's The War of the Worlds. The stories are, of course, ghostwritten by current SF authors. The historical figures included Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, Theodore Roosevelt, Edgar Rice Burroughs, H.P. Lovecraft, Percival Lowell, Mark Twain, Jack London, and even Emily Dickinson. The latt War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches is an entertaining collection of short stories that are purportedly by historical figures who would have been alive to witness the landing of the Martians as described in Wells's The War of the Worlds. The stories are, of course, ghostwritten by current SF authors. The historical figures included Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, Theodore Roosevelt, Edgar Rice Burroughs, H.P. Lovecraft, Percival Lowell, Mark Twain, Jack London, and even Emily Dickinson. The latter was the subject of my favorite, the absolute funniest entry, entitled "The Soul Selects her own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective." The story, by Connie Willis, was a satire on literary criticism mixed with some gentle mockery of Dickinson, and had me howling in laughter throughout. It won a Hugo in 1997. My second favorite was the story "by" Edgar Rice Burroughs ("as told to" George Alec Effinger), who recounted another visit from his uncle, John Carter. Effinger captured the atmosphere of the sublimely ridiculous Barsoom books so well that I wished he had extended his story further; it was only about 15 pages. Several of the stories are award-winning, and almost all are intensely creative. I highly recommend this book to science fiction fans.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Denis

    An excellent idea for a collections of stories. I loved every one of them. "War of the Worlds" not simply England vs Mars or in films, America vs Mars in the 50's or with Tom Cruise with Hummers and high tech weapons and such. This is China, Kongo, Russia, France, the Amerian south, and even literary icons dealing with this invasion during a time when the world was on the brink of a major technological leap forward (sound familiar) at the dawn of the 20th century. High lights? You be the judge. Fo An excellent idea for a collections of stories. I loved every one of them. "War of the Worlds" not simply England vs Mars or in films, America vs Mars in the 50's or with Tom Cruise with Hummers and high tech weapons and such. This is China, Kongo, Russia, France, the Amerian south, and even literary icons dealing with this invasion during a time when the world was on the brink of a major technological leap forward (sound familiar) at the dawn of the 20th century. High lights? You be the judge. Forward -- H. G. Wells (Kevin J. Anderson) The Roosevelt Dispatches -- Teddy Roosevelt (Mike Resnick) Canals in the Sand -- Percival Lowell (Kevin J. Anderson) Foreign Devils -- Guangxu Emperor and Empress Dowager Cixi (Walter Jon Williams) Blue Period -- Pablo Picasso (Daniel Marcus) The Martian Invasion Journals of Henry James -- Henry James (Robert Silverberg) The True Tale of the Final Battle of Umslopogaas the Zulu -- Winston Churchill and H. Rider Haggard (Janet Berliner) Night of the Cooters -- The Texas Rangers (Howard Waldrop) Determinism and the Martian War, with Relativistic Corrections -- Albert Einstein (Doug Beason) Soldier of the Queen -- Rudyard Kipling and Mohandas K. Gandhi (Barbara Hambly) Mars: The Home Front -- Edgar Rice Burroughs (George Alec Effinger) A Letter from St. Louis -- Joseph Pulitzer (Allen Steele) Resurrection -- Leo Tolstoy and Joseph Stalin (Mark W. Tiedemann) Paris Conquers All -- Jules Verne (Gregory Benford and David Brin) To Mars and Providence -- H. P. Lovecraft (Don Webb) Roughing it During the Martian Invasion -- Mark Twain (Daniel Keys Moran and Jodi Moran) To See the World End -- Joseph Conrad (M. Shayne Bell) After a Lean Winter -- Jack London (Dave Wolverton) The Soul Selects her own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective -- Emily Dickinson (Connie Willis) Afterward: Retrospective -- Jules Verne (Gregory Benford and David Brin) This was all good. Loved it all. So glad I came across this. Thank you so much Mr. K. J. Anderson.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Patrick DiJusto

    This is a brilliant idea for a book. What if H.G. Wells's "War of the Worlds" was not a novel, but journalism about an actual Martian invasion of the earth in 1898? How would the invasion have looked to other prominent writers of the time? Various contemporary science fiction authors were invited to write stories of Wells's Martian invasion in the style of people like Joseph Conrad (reporting from his job as riverboat captain in the Belgian Congo), Jack London (reporting from the Klondike), Jules This is a brilliant idea for a book. What if H.G. Wells's "War of the Worlds" was not a novel, but journalism about an actual Martian invasion of the earth in 1898? How would the invasion have looked to other prominent writers of the time? Various contemporary science fiction authors were invited to write stories of Wells's Martian invasion in the style of people like Joseph Conrad (reporting from his job as riverboat captain in the Belgian Congo), Jack London (reporting from the Klondike), Jules Verne (reporting on the invasion of Paris), Theodore Roosevelt (reporting from the war in Cuba), and so on. Some of the stories are hit out of the ballpark, others are misses, but the sum total of them is a fascinating take on one of the greatest science fiction works of all time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Tobolski

    One of the few books in my collection that I cannot help but read every couple of years. And after recently reading about Twain, Teddy, and a few other historical personalities, this week seems to be a perfect time for it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is an intriguing book to say the least. I was on my travels and yes there may have been a book shop involved and well I discovered this book which caught my eye. H G Wells Wars of the worlds was one of the first books I chose to read in class - and it amazed me. I guess this was the start of my love of science fiction. Anyway on to this book - a modern anthology of stories written by various famous authors in the genre who in turn told stories from around the world of the Martian invasion - This is an intriguing book to say the least. I was on my travels and yes there may have been a book shop involved and well I discovered this book which caught my eye. H G Wells Wars of the worlds was one of the first books I chose to read in class - and it amazed me. I guess this was the start of my love of science fiction. Anyway on to this book - a modern anthology of stories written by various famous authors in the genre who in turn told stories from around the world of the Martian invasion - the twist being is that they told those stories from the eyes of famous people - some fictitious others real. And this is where I would say my unease starts to grow. Yes its wonderful that you get the invasion from other perspectives and its fun to see other modern authors explore this world - but really do we need to name drop famous people in to the narratives. Could we not have the USA tell their story or African continent give up its tales, no we have to have famous historical characters litter the landscape as if they are there to give a level of credibility. I guess the use of famous historical characters never really sits well with - yes fictional ones are fine, its always fun to be allowed to explore someone elses sandbox but to use historical characters almost feels like its a cheap way of setting the scene. Why provide detail when you can mention Einstein or Verne since such names instantly give a frame of reference. Do not get me wrong the stories are wonderfully crafted - just would they have had the same impact if the lead characters where given a less famous name. So yes I am torn over this book and its stories there are some amazing stories I am just not sure we needed so many names dropped?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    You can understand the thinking: HG Wells told us what happened in Britain, but there is certainly an interest in imagining how the Martian invasion might also have affected less important parts of the planet. Not that the contributors are obliged to maintain total consistency with each other's accounts, or even Wells' (which in one of the better stories ends up not even being by Wells) - but for the idea to maintain any coherence, they have to retain some, and there the problems begin. Because You can understand the thinking: HG Wells told us what happened in Britain, but there is certainly an interest in imagining how the Martian invasion might also have affected less important parts of the planet. Not that the contributors are obliged to maintain total consistency with each other's accounts, or even Wells' (which in one of the better stories ends up not even being by Wells) - but for the idea to maintain any coherence, they have to retain some, and there the problems begin. Because in every story, either the heroic forces do better against the Martians than the British military (cheesy), or they don't and the Martians eventually die of a sniffle (predictable). Add to that the further constraint that all the stories* are told as if by notables of the era, an act of ventriloquism which proves way beyond many of these writers (the lowest of several resulting low points comes when Einstein discovers relativity in a Newton's apple moment occasioned by Martians stopping his train). Some writers, scattering seeds which would grow much truer in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen's second volume, also intersect other fictional characters with the invasion. Ultimately, the stories which worked best for me were two of the oddities - Walter Jon Williams' viewpoint character is the Dragon Empress, whose words do not survive in the same falsifying volume as the other avatars', and his take on her is massively revisionist, but also makes for a good tale. And then Connie Willis takes the piss out of the whole project, and academia, by facing the invaders with a resurrected Emily Dickinson. *Except Howard Waldrop's; as I understand it, he often tends to veer off the brief in anthologies, and is allowed because generally he's that good. Sadly, his contribution here isn't.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    Using the premise that HG Wells' Martian invasion happened not simply in England but around the world, this is an original and entertaining anthology. The events are seen through the eyes and words of Emily Dickinson (who had pre-deceased the event so her version is no mean feat), as well as Jules Verne, Albert Einstein, Pablo Picasso, Mark Twain, HP Lovecraft, and others who lived during that time and might've been involved in one of the invasions. Writing in their styles, Robert Silverberg, ed Using the premise that HG Wells' Martian invasion happened not simply in England but around the world, this is an original and entertaining anthology. The events are seen through the eyes and words of Emily Dickinson (who had pre-deceased the event so her version is no mean feat), as well as Jules Verne, Albert Einstein, Pablo Picasso, Mark Twain, HP Lovecraft, and others who lived during that time and might've been involved in one of the invasions. Writing in their styles, Robert Silverberg, editor Kevin J. Anderson, et al., have created a unique set of stories. Some are better than others. A few, such as the Edgar Rice Burroughs offering seem almost non-relatable to the premise, that story referring to events which seem to happen in another John Carter story. Mark Twain's version has that sarcastic tilt the writer used in Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. Some of the stories draw on characters created by that specific narrator as well as his own novels, such as Joseph Conrad working on Heart of Darkness and struggling to save his manuscript during the invasions. Well-written, innovative, and thoroughly enjoyable, each story give a different view of the invasion as well as the Martians themselves, most while keeping within the Wellsian premise of their eventual defeat.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian Beatty

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm writing a short review of each story as I go, just to ensure I treat them fairly. I'll write a summary review of the collection at the end. The Roosevelt Dispatches, by Mike Resnick I liked this, especially for its careful details regarding Roosevelt's connections to the AMNH and people there. The author clearly did his homework in getting the right people mentioned in the right contexts, and in believable situations (aside from the alien invasion side of things). Canals in the Sand, by Kevin J I'm writing a short review of each story as I go, just to ensure I treat them fairly. I'll write a summary review of the collection at the end. The Roosevelt Dispatches, by Mike Resnick I liked this, especially for its careful details regarding Roosevelt's connections to the AMNH and people there. The author clearly did his homework in getting the right people mentioned in the right contexts, and in believable situations (aside from the alien invasion side of things). Canals in the Sand, by Kevin J. Anderson What an enjoyable story! It definitely has a bit of the worrisome hubris of Lovecraftian tales. Foreign Devils, by Walter Jon Williams Great story, could be an epic movie. The best part is the limited point of view of the ruling people, you can get a sense for how such an invasion would really play out in Chinese culture in the early 20th C Blue Period, by Daniel Marcus From the point of view of Pablo Picasso, it seems historically accurate and a fun way to imagine the invasion in Paris. But otherwise not amazing. The Martian Invasion Journals of Henry James, by Robert Silverberg An interesting story about James suffering the invasion with H. G. Wells. The references to connections among authors of the time is fun. The True Tale of the Final Battle of Umslopogaas the Zulu, by Janet Berliner The point of view of Winston Churchill was interesting, but not the most thrilling of the bunch. The story about Umslopogaas seems almost mystical. Night of the Cooters, by Howard Waldrop Maybe my favorite story, mainly for the character development of the Texas Ranger narrating. Determinism and the Martian War, with Relativistic Corrections, by Doug Beason What a terrific story! The way that Einstein's thoughts on relativity develop due to the invasion are brilliant, and the novel idea of the way in which the aliens wait for help when in distress is one of the most creative ideas I've read in a while. Wow!! Soldier of the Queen, by Barbara Hambly This story may be my least favorite, if only because of the difficulty in following the storyline. Mars: The Home Front, by George Alec Effinger A nice surprise of an Edgar Rice Burroughs story of John Carter fighting martians on Mars! Very cool!! A Letter from St. Louis, by Allen Steele A bit of a boring tale of the invasion in St. Louis. The involvement of Pulitzer is not as interesting as it sounds like it should be. Resurrection, by Mark W. Tiedemann The Tolstoy story wasn't my favorite, but they did manage to capture some of the very Russian aspects of what I'd expect. Paris Conquers All, by Gregory Benford and David Brin The Jules Verne story was fun, especially his commentary about Wells. To Mars and Providence, by Don Webb What a fantastic job of making a story about young Lovecraft's connection to the Martian invasion! The parts of WotW that are already eerily similar to Lovecraft's cosmic mythos are enhanced here. Roughing it During the Martian Invasion, by Daniel Keys Moran and Jodi Moran Perhaps I spoke too soon about earlier ones being my favorites. I love Twain, and the feeling captured in this story is terrific. To See the World End, by M. Shayne Bell Less about the WotW, and more about Joseph Conrad, but still fascinating. After a Lean Winter, by Dave Wolverton The absolute best when it comes to relating the scientific aspects of the Martian defeat by disease, and also a great way of relating to the harshness of the arctic characters in it. The gruesome battle at the end reminds me of The Thing, and only makes the story better. The Soul Selects her own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective, by Connie Willis The footnotes are a little irritating, and generally this story as a review of poetry was not very enjoyable to me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Not a bad collection of short stories. Some not so good others pretty good. If you are a fan of the "War of the Worlds" story by H. G. Wells then this is overall recommended. Not a bad collection of short stories. Some not so good others pretty good. If you are a fan of the "War of the Worlds" story by H. G. Wells then this is overall recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Clay Davis

    The best short stories from excellent authors based on a classic literary work.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hicks

    Worth reading, and worth commissioning. The stories aren't great, perhaps because we know the outcome (well, in most cases ...) I really enjoyed rediscovering Howard Waldrop's wonderfully colorful style. Who else would start with "Sheriff Lindley was asleep on the toilet ..."? Who writes "the town was as still as a rusty shovel" or "it was as hot as under an upside-down washpot on a tin shed roof"? Connie Willis, as always, writes a wry and amusing piece, but spoils it by firing off all the firew Worth reading, and worth commissioning. The stories aren't great, perhaps because we know the outcome (well, in most cases ...) I really enjoyed rediscovering Howard Waldrop's wonderfully colorful style. Who else would start with "Sheriff Lindley was asleep on the toilet ..."? Who writes "the town was as still as a rusty shovel" or "it was as hot as under an upside-down washpot on a tin shed roof"? Connie Willis, as always, writes a wry and amusing piece, but spoils it by firing off all the fireworks at once. A story that would be great with 20 jokes in it has about 60. Clever, but it's more "look how clever I am" than "ya wanna know what happened then?" And yes, as always, she did great buckets of research, and made sure it ALL made it into the story. Just not my taste. Others varied, in creativity and in faithfulness to the style of the targeted author. But all in all, it was worth reading.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm Cox

    I’m not the greatest fan of the original H. G. Wells story, it’s not aged well and the story is very dry in the telling. I had hoped that these different authors could inject some life into it. Unfortunately, for the most part, they chose to stick to Wells’s narrative style without bringing any new material to the theme. This became really repetitive and I only kept going in the dwindling hope that the next story would be better. The one stand-out was told from John Carpenter’s point of view as I’m not the greatest fan of the original H. G. Wells story, it’s not aged well and the story is very dry in the telling. I had hoped that these different authors could inject some life into it. Unfortunately, for the most part, they chose to stick to Wells’s narrative style without bringing any new material to the theme. This became really repetitive and I only kept going in the dwindling hope that the next story would be better. The one stand-out was told from John Carpenter’s point of view as he thwarted the Martian’s efforts on their home turf (which was why they sent such a small army). If you enjoyed the original, this may be for you, but otherwise give it a miss.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Larry Wegman

    Assuming H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds happened, several famous people of that day have their stories told by some of the top names in today's science fiction. All are at least pretty good; some are great! Assuming H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds happened, several famous people of that day have their stories told by some of the top names in today's science fiction. All are at least pretty good; some are great!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Booth

    Enjoyed this romp through the classical sci-fi world of HG. Fresh and original stories from the time of the Martian invasion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Hammer

    like most collections I liked some and not others.

  18. 4 out of 5

    TRISTAN ATKIN/ LISA ATKIN

    Great! An awesome collection of short stories from the Martian invasion. Lots of variety and plenty of black humour make this a fascinating read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eric Winter

    Great fun.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wyatt Trunk

    A delightful collection, but not for everyone.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Florin Pitea

    Stories inside this anniversary anthology were good and very good, but Ms. Connie Willis takes the crown for a hilarious piece of metafiction that had me roaring with laughter. Recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Critchfield

    delightful

  23. 5 out of 5

    Faith Justice

    As with most anthologies, this one has hits and misses, but many more of the former. The theme or conceit of this one is that well-known people, all over the world (but mostly in the US and Europe) write up their personal accounts of the Martian Invasion chronicled by H. G. Wells in his The War of the Worlds. The accounts are written by today's most talented science fiction authors "in the style of" the historical figures providing an interesting writing challenge to provide a compelling story i As with most anthologies, this one has hits and misses, but many more of the former. The theme or conceit of this one is that well-known people, all over the world (but mostly in the US and Europe) write up their personal accounts of the Martian Invasion chronicled by H. G. Wells in his The War of the Worlds. The accounts are written by today's most talented science fiction authors "in the style of" the historical figures providing an interesting writing challenge to provide a compelling story in someone else's well-known voice. Some strayed from this formula: Howard Waldrop wrote a rousing Western from the perspective of "Texas Rangers"; Allen Steele in "A Letter from St. Louis" used a fictional reporter with Joseph Pulitzer as a character, rather than in Pulitzer's style; and Connie Willis provided a witty analysis in the form of a fictional Ph.D thesis (complete with footnotes) that the aliens disturbed Emily Dickinson's sleep (death) and were scared off by the disturbing almost rhyming schemes in her poems. Several authors used the "missing document" trope to discover the work of Henry James (Robert Silverberg), Winston Churchill (Janet Berliner), Leo Tolstoy (Mark W. Tiedemann) and others. Some wrote the stories with the historical character in the third person, others wrote in the first. The stories that stood out (for me) for best capturing the fictional author's voice included Teddy Roosevelt (Make Resnick), Edgar Rice Burroughs (George Alec Effinger), and Jack London (Dave Wolverton). Also like some theme anthologies, the theme can become repetitive. My eyes started to skim over the descriptions of the aliens, their machines, and the horrible destruction they wreaked on the land and people. It's hard to come up with twenty different ways to describe the same thing--and I don't think the authors got to compare notes on what each other said. One of the more poignant aspects of several stories were the social and moral themes of invasion, colonization, and enslavement explored in the height of Empire (European, Russian, Chinese) leading to an alternate 20 Century in which WWI and II didn't happen and the humans across the globe joined forces to build a more humane society in the aftermath of the Martian Invasion. I've learned that I enjoy these types of books when I read them in short chunks, two or three stories at a time, over several days rather than in a marathon read. Altogether, this was an interesting read, more than a satisfying one, but well worth the time of SF fans and 19 C classics readers.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ebenmaessiger

    "The Roosevelt Dispatches," by Mike Resnick (1996): 7.25 - Seems intelligent to capture multiple genre audiences in one fell swoop: fan fic, Wells fans, alt history, etc. Most interesting to me though, and somewhat the most unnecessary and difficult , and least likely to be appreciated, is the good old Pastiche form. Are these appealing to the same crowds? Here, we get Teddy Roosevelt setting up our North American narrative, doing some Teddy R. things, i.e. hunting and masculining and traipsing "The Roosevelt Dispatches," by Mike Resnick (1996): 7.25 - Seems intelligent to capture multiple genre audiences in one fell swoop: fan fic, Wells fans, alt history, etc. Most interesting to me though, and somewhat the most unnecessary and difficult , and least likely to be appreciated, is the good old Pastiche form. Are these appealing to the same crowds? Here, we get Teddy Roosevelt setting up our North American narrative, doing some Teddy R. things, i.e. hunting and masculining and traipsing around protecting our monroe-enveloped neighbors. A pleasant opening , matching or setting the standard for what i can only imagine is a book aiming for the selfsame measure of cozy catastrophe conveyed through historical celebrities whose temperaments and deeds have largely been environmentally imbibed by a public that doesn't actually need to really know much about them to get the reference (good luck with the H. James).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Kevin J. Anderson has assembled an enjoyable collection of short stories written by some of the genre's most intriguing authors. Using the events of the legendary H.G. Wells "War of the Worlds" as the blue print, each story is from the point of view of some of the great man’s fellow writers of the time, such as Jules Verne, M.R James and Jack London. There are many standout moments and very few all wide of the mark. Using famous people from the Victorian era is a great idea; as their points of Kevin J. Anderson has assembled an enjoyable collection of short stories written by some of the genre's most intriguing authors. Using the events of the legendary H.G. Wells "War of the Worlds" as the blue print, each story is from the point of view of some of the great man’s fellow writers of the time, such as Jules Verne, M.R James and Jack London. There are many standout moments and very few all wide of the mark. Using famous people from the Victorian era is a great idea; as their points of view are varied. The stories using authors as protagonists are written in the style they used in their own works of the time. Rudyard Kipling's tale “Soldier of the Queen” ” by Barbara Hambly, Edgar Rice Burroughs in George Alec Effinger's "Mars: The Home Front" and the Jules Verne tale "Paris Conquers All" by Gregory Benford and David Brin, are the best examples of this. Other highlights for me included "Roughing it During the Martian Invasion" by Daniel Keys Moran and Jodi Moran, "Foreign Devils" by Walter Jon Williams and "The Martian Invasion Journals of Henry James" by Robert Silverberg. The only misfire for me was "The Soul Selects Her Own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective" by Connie Willis which was equally as baffling as the title. It felt like a review laced with bizarre comments. The poems in question were apparently written after Emily Dickinson’s death, which only adds to the confusion as there is no explanation of how this was possible. There were comical annotations, many of the jokes flew right over my head I'm afraid, but that may just have been my own personal interpretation. As a whole, this is a well-balanced collection of stories that were respectful to the people involved and one of the better "War of the Worlds" spin-offs I've read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clark

    Interesting idea.... other authors and famous people from the time give their versions of HG Wells recounting of the circa 1900 Martian invasion. Really liked the Twain, the Kipling, the Edgar Rice Burroughs, and the Teddy Roosevelt stories. The Emily Dickinson mock scholarly essay was also a hoot. And the final summation by Jules Verne was both funny and resonant. So, it was fun... but the nature of this sort of round-robin work means that the reader is going to be reading essentially the same Interesting idea.... other authors and famous people from the time give their versions of HG Wells recounting of the circa 1900 Martian invasion. Really liked the Twain, the Kipling, the Edgar Rice Burroughs, and the Teddy Roosevelt stories. The Emily Dickinson mock scholarly essay was also a hoot. And the final summation by Jules Verne was both funny and resonant. So, it was fun... but the nature of this sort of round-robin work means that the reader is going to be reading essentially the same events over and over, just recounted by different voices. Some of the writers are more successful at making this engaging than others are. The challenges of the actual writers of these stories (many currently famous folks among them like David Brin, Gregory Benford, and Robert Silverberg) are essentially: 1. Adopting the voice of the writer, artist, or historic personality of whom they have chosen to masquerade. and 2. Faithfully sticking to the blue-print of the events as set out in Wells original novel. The stories to a great degree actually do this fairly well. But, since it's a collaborative collection of stories and some are far better than others, I only gave it three stars, even though a couple of the stories, individually considered, I would have rated higher. If you are a "War of the Worlds" fan you'd probably really enjoy it. I did.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    A series of stories written as letters from individuals who experienced it from around the world. Each story is a chapter in length (30 min in audio) and when the chapter ends, it moves to the next individual. It sounds promising, but honestly it was boring. There is no continuing story, or build up, or one story somehow leading to another. literally a story starts with Martians landing, and end with them getting sick and dying. After the 20th time you get pretty sick of it. A couple writers hav A series of stories written as letters from individuals who experienced it from around the world. Each story is a chapter in length (30 min in audio) and when the chapter ends, it moves to the next individual. It sounds promising, but honestly it was boring. There is no continuing story, or build up, or one story somehow leading to another. literally a story starts with Martians landing, and end with them getting sick and dying. After the 20th time you get pretty sick of it. A couple writers have some gems hidden in there, but they are about 1/4 at best of the book. In my opinion this would be am awesome series in an online publication. Where every issue you get a different pov story. But as a book it's repetitious and boring. The publisher could easily have cut 1/2 the stories out for being sub-par, but they went for bulk and a list of names as a selling point.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Max

    This collection is interesting, but I think the execution could be a lot better. Some of the stories are quite good, like the Lovecraft story, while some are merely okay albeit interesting, like the Jack London story. However, the final story in the collection, about Emily Dickinson, is just a horribly unfunny attempt at humor that is completely out of place amongst the relatively serious stories in the rest of the collection. The other issues I have with the book is that the stories tend to tak This collection is interesting, but I think the execution could be a lot better. Some of the stories are quite good, like the Lovecraft story, while some are merely okay albeit interesting, like the Jack London story. However, the final story in the collection, about Emily Dickinson, is just a horribly unfunny attempt at humor that is completely out of place amongst the relatively serious stories in the rest of the collection. The other issues I have with the book is that the stories tend to take liberties with their depiction of the Martians, and there is no attempt to make the stories all fit together, which is what I was expecting to happen. In summary, if you like War of the Worlds, you will probably enjoy this collection, but it is generally a mixed bag.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I loved the premise of this book: the story of the Martian invasion of The War of the Worlds told by well known science fiction writers from the perspective of famous historical figures of the era. Overall, it was good but there were too few standouts for me to go higher than 3 stars. My favorites were "The Dowager Empress of China" by Walter Jon Williams and "Mark Twain" by Daniel Keys Moran and Jodi Moran. "Jack London" by Dave Wolverton was the darkest and most gripping but the fight scene wa I loved the premise of this book: the story of the Martian invasion of The War of the Worlds told by well known science fiction writers from the perspective of famous historical figures of the era. Overall, it was good but there were too few standouts for me to go higher than 3 stars. My favorites were "The Dowager Empress of China" by Walter Jon Williams and "Mark Twain" by Daniel Keys Moran and Jodi Moran. "Jack London" by Dave Wolverton was the darkest and most gripping but the fight scene was so grisly I had to fast forward through it. "Emily Dickinson" by Connie Willis was unexpectedly hilarious. Definitely worth checking out for fans of the original.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    In H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds, Martians invade England, spreading havoc and death wherever they go. Now Global Dispatches tells readers how the rest of the world fared in the fight against the alien invaders. These dispatches are told from the perspectives of the leading men of the age - Teddy Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Jules Verne, Mark Twain and a dozen other luminaries. Most tell their story as one of the hunted, fleeing the devastation of the enemy. But some enjoy a more assertive role In H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds, Martians invade England, spreading havoc and death wherever they go. Now Global Dispatches tells readers how the rest of the world fared in the fight against the alien invaders. These dispatches are told from the perspectives of the leading men of the age - Teddy Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Jules Verne, Mark Twain and a dozen other luminaries. Most tell their story as one of the hunted, fleeing the devastation of the enemy. But some enjoy a more assertive role, as hunters of the dread invaders.

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