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Home Ice Advantage

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Winning the Maple Cup has always been Sophie Fournier’s dream, ever since she was a little girl watching hockey in her grandparents’ basement. She isn’t satisfied after a season where she won hockey’s biggest prize. She wants to hoist the Cup again, in back-to-back seasons. She’s done it once before and, like any good hockey player, she knows to repeat a successful formula Winning the Maple Cup has always been Sophie Fournier’s dream, ever since she was a little girl watching hockey in her grandparents’ basement. She isn’t satisfied after a season where she won hockey’s biggest prize. She wants to hoist the Cup again, in back-to-back seasons. She’s done it once before and, like any good hockey player, she knows to repeat a successful formula in order to find success again. Only, this season is determined to be nothing like the last. Coach Butler breaks up not only the top line which drove their success, but he splits Sophie and Elsa. She’s cut off from her favorite winger on the ice and off it, Elsa begins to date, leaving Sophie on her own. And with this being a Winter Games year, their NAHL season is halted for international play. For the first time since becoming teammates, Sophie will compete against Elsa for a gold medal. It’s a year of change and Sophie hates it. She knows what worked to win the Cup the previous season. Now, with multiple factors working against her, including her own coach, she has to figure out a new way to win the Cup. If she can’t, it will be her shoulders the blame falls on.


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Winning the Maple Cup has always been Sophie Fournier’s dream, ever since she was a little girl watching hockey in her grandparents’ basement. She isn’t satisfied after a season where she won hockey’s biggest prize. She wants to hoist the Cup again, in back-to-back seasons. She’s done it once before and, like any good hockey player, she knows to repeat a successful formula Winning the Maple Cup has always been Sophie Fournier’s dream, ever since she was a little girl watching hockey in her grandparents’ basement. She isn’t satisfied after a season where she won hockey’s biggest prize. She wants to hoist the Cup again, in back-to-back seasons. She’s done it once before and, like any good hockey player, she knows to repeat a successful formula in order to find success again. Only, this season is determined to be nothing like the last. Coach Butler breaks up not only the top line which drove their success, but he splits Sophie and Elsa. She’s cut off from her favorite winger on the ice and off it, Elsa begins to date, leaving Sophie on her own. And with this being a Winter Games year, their NAHL season is halted for international play. For the first time since becoming teammates, Sophie will compete against Elsa for a gold medal. It’s a year of change and Sophie hates it. She knows what worked to win the Cup the previous season. Now, with multiple factors working against her, including her own coach, she has to figure out a new way to win the Cup. If she can’t, it will be her shoulders the blame falls on.

43 review for Home Ice Advantage

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    4.25 Stars. This was another excellent sports book. This is the fourth book in the Sophie Fournier series (plus a novella) and the series is as solid as ever. While this series can be a bit frustrating, it is super addictive and I don’t think I could stop reading even if I wanted to. Before I get any farther, I wanted to wish everyone who celebrates a Merry Christmas. I’m having a pretty low-key one due to covid but I did have too much wine and got some fun board games in so I can’t really compl 4.25 Stars. This was another excellent sports book. This is the fourth book in the Sophie Fournier series (plus a novella) and the series is as solid as ever. While this series can be a bit frustrating, it is super addictive and I don’t think I could stop reading even if I wanted to. Before I get any farther, I wanted to wish everyone who celebrates a Merry Christmas. I’m having a pretty low-key one due to covid but I did have too much wine and got some fun board games in so I can’t really complain. For whatever reason, maybe since this book takes place on ice, but I ended up enjoying finishing this book today and it kept me in the festive mood. After reading the novella, Glove Save and a Beauty, I feel like it gave this series a nice kick in the ass. It reenergized this series for me and I was really happy to spend even more time with the star of Glove Save, when her and Sophie played on a team Canada together. Knowing more about that other player added a level of depth that wasn’t in this series before. I even found myself rooting for Canada over the USA -if anyone brings this up I will deny it- just because I liked the players in these books so much. I know Collins is planning on writing more Sophie books, I just hope she will consider writing more staring other characters since branching out was so successful. This series actually has the slowest, slow-burn romance in the history of WLW books. These two characters care for each other and they keep acting out to get each other’s attention and they keep getting hurt, but they just can’t move forward. I don’t need a hot and heavy romance out of this series, this series is all about characters and hockey after all, but I hope Collins will stop teasing us eventually and give them some actually romance. I did mention this series is frustrating and it is in some ways. Sophie feels she needs to be perfect all the time and can’t rock the boat. It is so frustrating seeing her constantly undervalued and seeing her not stand up to people like her coach, father, and even the media. We do get to see Sophie get pushed a bit harder in this book but I want to see growth. This is a major series and it is only halfway done. That is a lot of time left and it means Sophie has to actually grow. She has grown as a player over four books but not much as a character and person and that is what I want to see out of this series. As a character driven reader, I need that growth. Hopefully, like the romance, Collins won’t wait too much longer too show that growth either. This series is really one of the best sports series I have ever read. The hockey scenes are incredible and the book is so gripping that it is very hard to put down. The romance is super slow and barely there so I can’t recommend this to romance fans. But, I can recommend this to people who like to read about women shattering glass ceilings and kicking ass in sports. A copy was given to me for a honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jude in the Stars

    Honestly, I do not understand why I love this series so much, what it is about it that keeps me captivated. It’s about a sport I have zero interest in, there’s barely any romance, and yet I can’t get enough. Which is lucky as only half of the series has been released so far, or will have been next week with this book. Sophie has won everything there is to win but she’s still not considered as valuable as male players. Home Ice Advantage opens on a rather strong and infuriating scene (which you ca Honestly, I do not understand why I love this series so much, what it is about it that keeps me captivated. It’s about a sport I have zero interest in, there’s barely any romance, and yet I can’t get enough. Which is lucky as only half of the series has been released so far, or will have been next week with this book. Sophie has won everything there is to win but she’s still not considered as valuable as male players. Home Ice Advantage opens on a rather strong and infuriating scene (which you can read on the publisher’s website), with Sophie arguing with her agent over how much to ask for and how many years when her contract is renewed. If she asks for too much, she’s ungrateful. If the amount she agrees to is too low, she’s making things more difficult for other female players. On this, she can’t win so she does her best. As she tells Lexie, “I’m the one who cracks the door. You, Elsa, Gabrielle, you’re the ones who kick it open”, referring to the other women playing on NAHL teams. Sophie’s careful facade on these issues comes down slightly more often now. She’s still as talented at not answering journalists’ questions, but she’s not as scared of the fallout. And she’s still one of the best players on ice, a smart captain who leads by example. I have no idea how the author managed to make me look forward to game descriptions, but she did. Beyond hockey, the focus of this fourth book is on Sophie’s relationship with Elsa. The shared bed, the snuggles, the closeness. No wonder some of their teammates think they’re together, especially after Sophie takes a powerful stance against any kind of homophobic trash talk in the locker room. Sophie laughs the rumours off but when Elsa brings a woman home, she’s faced with her jealousy and her contradictions. Basically, she’s okay knowing Elsa isn’t hers but she doesn’t want to share her, be it with teammates or lovers. That their coach messes up their line, leading to a lot less time together on the ice, or that they have to play opposite each other at the Winter Games in Helsinki doesn’t help. I loved seeing that side of Sophie, the vulnerable, human young woman. In the first books, Sophie had so much to prove, to others but also to herself, that she sometimes came across as cold, closed off. She was determined and driven in an almost hard way. As she grows older, more confident, not in her strengths but in the way she’s seen, she opens up. First to Dima, the Russian player the NAHL tried to pitch as her rival, then to some of her teammates, then to Elsa with whom she couldn’t wait to play. There’s something extremely touching in being allowed to witness that. And with the Games, she gets to experience – and the reader with her – what being part of a team where everyone is “like her”, a team of women feels like. She gets to play while entirely focused on her play, not on how a woman in a men’s game will be judged. She gets to have a taste of shared locker rooms, evenings spent cuddling with the team, kisses that convey respect and kindness. She gets to be herself. And I think I enjoyed this episode even more because I had the opportunity to read Gabrielle’s story a few weeks ago. Not only did it allow me glimpses of Sophie through someone else’s eyes, but it also – and mostly – introduced me to another character, a very different player and a very different person, another journey. I think I’ve written it in reviews before, I really love this series as much as it frustrates me. It’s only frustrating because I care so much about the characters. Beyond sports, beyond everything that’s on the surface, K.R. Collins writes in-depth, fascinating, endearing characters. For someone who’s as character-driven as I am, there’s nothing better. I received a copy from the publisher and I am voluntarily leaving a review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Agirlcandream

    If you are a sports fan and haven't read this series from Breaking the Ice stop reading this review. Sophie Fournier has been through too much to allow you to jump into this fourth book in the series and fifth novel by K.R. Collins involving women in hockey. It’s another tough year in the NAHL for Sophie Fournier, the first female hockey player to join an all male league and once again Captain of her Maple Cup winning Condors. She is a pioneer and a groundbreaker allowing other talented female p If you are a sports fan and haven't read this series from Breaking the Ice stop reading this review. Sophie Fournier has been through too much to allow you to jump into this fourth book in the series and fifth novel by K.R. Collins involving women in hockey. It’s another tough year in the NAHL for Sophie Fournier, the first female hockey player to join an all male league and once again Captain of her Maple Cup winning Condors. She is a pioneer and a groundbreaker allowing other talented female players to play at this elite level. Her first contract negotiations open this story and are some of the toughest pages to read in the series. Pure hockey soon follows so persevere. It's a Winter Olympics year and Sophie will be joining Gabrielle Gagnon on the Canadian women's team facing off against her linemate and best friend Elsa, who is representing Sweden at the Games. I did not play hockey as a kid but spent enough time at tournaments watching my son play to see a difference in the way the girls teams approach their games versus the boys. On the ice, hockey is hockey. The better coached teams with skilled skaters stand out and often win. The differences were noticeable when you watched the bench. The boys would be quiet and all business unless their team scored a goal. The girls teams would be chanting cheers, singing songs and supporting each other on and off the ice. We see that social side of women's hockey in Home Ice Advantage and it helps us understand Sophie Fournier and her need to be close (but not too close) to Elsa in their shared home. The Canadian team relaxes with a "cuddle pile" of blankets and bodies in a players hotel room. They braid each other's hair, they behave like women at a sleepover. It was so endearing, refreshing and supportive. Team building at its best. Don't get me started on the letters of encouragement Sophie writes to twelve year old Emily, a future star in the making. The scenes at the Olympics gave me all the warm fuzzies which was good because there are rough times ahead for the captain of the Condors. Back to the NAHL regular season, the uphill battle to prove herself continues for Sophie along with some frustrating conversations with her coach. The last few chapters are frustrating as it seems like the coach is sabotaging his own team. Now that I’m a diehard Condors fan, I can only hope the coach gets fired before next season. Poor Sophie could use a break. Love this series. Keep ‘em coming Ms Collins ARC received with thanks from NineStars Press for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Skip

    Yet another great instalment in this series. I find myself both loving the idea that this series is going to continue for some time as I enjoy the books so much, but also equally worried that we’re going to be kept waiting even longer for the thing I most want to happen! I enjoyed that the narrative of this book takes place both in the main hockey league and at the winter games, breaking things up a little and ensuring that we aren’t revisiting the same thing over and over. The hockey scenes are Yet another great instalment in this series. I find myself both loving the idea that this series is going to continue for some time as I enjoy the books so much, but also equally worried that we’re going to be kept waiting even longer for the thing I most want to happen! I enjoyed that the narrative of this book takes place both in the main hockey league and at the winter games, breaking things up a little and ensuring that we aren’t revisiting the same thing over and over. The hockey scenes are always written well and this hasn’t changed in this book. There’s plenty of action off the ice in this book too, which provides a nice interlude. I find Sophie’s feelings about her career, her family and Elsa both immensely frustrating and completely relatable. I love that whilst Sophie is an adult, with a high pressure career, she’s experiencing the feelings that many feel when discovering their sexuality as teenagers and it’s here where I most love Collins as a writer. Her writing about hockey is fantastic and also shines, but her ability to bring out Sophie’s feelings without making her appear as a whiny child are great. I love that Collins doesn’t write all of the characters to be the same, just because they are hockey players. She teases out parts of each of the women in the league so they are both great friends and foes for each other. I also really liked that this book explores the relationship Sophie has with her coach in more depth. I enjoyed the discussions about ensuring the locker room was inclusive and the addition of some bi representation as well as a gay male character. If you’re a fan of the series you’ll enjoy this instalment, and if you haven’t started this series yet - pick up Breaking the Ice as you’ll need to start at the beginning. I received an e-ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lexxi Kitty

    I've rather loved this series. Was quite excited when this book became available for me to read. The fourth book that follows Sophie Fournier; and fifth in the series. And . . . I started the book December 21, the date the book was published (I no longer get early review copies), and read 10%. Then stopped. For a month. Specifically because of that 3.5 book that followed Gabrielle instead of Sophie. There are some similarities between the two women. I mentioned the similarities and differences i I've rather loved this series. Was quite excited when this book became available for me to read. The fourth book that follows Sophie Fournier; and fifth in the series. And . . . I started the book December 21, the date the book was published (I no longer get early review copies), and read 10%. Then stopped. For a month. Specifically because of that 3.5 book that followed Gabrielle instead of Sophie. There are some similarities between the two women. I mentioned the similarities and differences in the prior book. Basically: Gabrielle comes across as a more fully formed, capable, strong, interesting character to follow. Having experienced Gabrielle, it's harder to "take" the way Sophie acts. I don't like how often Sophie is in her head about how much of an asshole her dad is and how spineless she is to him; how much of an asshole her coach is, but she has to not get on his bad side because . . . ; how much of an asshole her team is because of how they treat her, but she can't do anything different, or make waves because she's the first woman in the league, and therefore must show the best of women . . . which apparently involves being emotionless machines that obey their coaches and do not upset the public . . . at least in the public. So I read ten percent of the book, and then stopped reading for a month. I just . . . could not take that personality again. Especially not after seeing what a stronger woman could do in the hands of this writer (Gabrielle). Then I returned to the book and . . . still took me another three days to finish the book. This one seemed more all over the place compared to others. And, other than the statistics - the wins/losses/etc. - there doesn't seem much different between Sophie at the beginning of book one and the end of this book here. Older, slightly more crazed. Hasn't gained much self-knowledge about herself. Bah, I'm still not up to writing a review. Rating: 3.65 Review: February 9 2021

  6. 5 out of 5

    Della

    Growing up in a remote town in Northern Ontario, Canada, hockey was my life. Back then we only had 2 television channels reaching our antenna. Both were our national television station. One in English and one in French. Hockey Night in Canada was every Saturday night in the deep dark winters. If the television reception was producing a screen full of snow we would turn on our radios to listen to the game. Reading K. R. Collins’ Sophie Fournier series takes me right back to the days of listening Growing up in a remote town in Northern Ontario, Canada, hockey was my life. Back then we only had 2 television channels reaching our antenna. Both were our national television station. One in English and one in French. Hockey Night in Canada was every Saturday night in the deep dark winters. If the television reception was producing a screen full of snow we would turn on our radios to listen to the game. Reading K. R. Collins’ Sophie Fournier series takes me right back to the days of listening to the game on the radio. She lights up my imagination and I once again see players rushing into corners for the puck or taking a big hit to sacrifice themselves for the sake of a goal or the game. K. R. is the announcer’s voice in my head and she calls an awesome game. There is a balance to Home Ice Advantage with the Winter Olympics capturing some of the narrative. It felt good to just have women on the ice with the old USA verses CANADA rivalry. Playing hockey for most of my life helped to define who I was. I was always better because I was part of a team working towards one goal. Ms Collins understands the heartbeat of women in hockey, especially the ground breakers for those that came after. Brava! 4.5 ⭐️ only because it is time for Sophie to realize what everyone sees, she is in love with Elsa.

  7. 5 out of 5

    AMHH

    This is part of a series, so if you haven’t read the earlier installments, definitely do so, as Sophie’s journey as the first female hockey player in the NHL is immersive and will alternatively break your heart and soothe your soul. I am not a hockey person-- not even a sports person-- but the way the author describes the team dynamics and the intricacies of the plays somehow draws me in nonetheless. For me, however, the real heart of this novel, and the series as a whole, is Sophie herself: her This is part of a series, so if you haven’t read the earlier installments, definitely do so, as Sophie’s journey as the first female hockey player in the NHL is immersive and will alternatively break your heart and soothe your soul. I am not a hockey person-- not even a sports person-- but the way the author describes the team dynamics and the intricacies of the plays somehow draws me in nonetheless. For me, however, the real heart of this novel, and the series as a whole, is Sophie herself: her determination, her strength, and her ability to persevere in the face of deeply entrenched ignorance, bias, and misogyny. In this novel, Sophie is a successful team captain with championship cred. She just wants to be paid the salary she’s worth, have the respect she’s earned from her coach and team management, and find support from those who should be closest to her. She wants these things, and she deserves them, but she doesn’t get them-- her father, her coach, the press, and even members of the team she loves and leads so well let her down. Heartbreakingly, she even gets flak from Lexie, another woman in the league for not pushing hard enough, getting paid enough, or being taken seriously enough. There’s something poignantly awful about Lexie’s inability to recognize the ways she’s benefited from the battles Sophie has fought and keeps fighting, and it breaks me every time. It’s not all bad for Sophie, however-- she has hockey, which she loves, good teammates as well as bad, some true friends, and of course Elsa, the teammate, possibly soulmate, who bolsters her when she needs it the most. So even when things go bad (and they sometimes do, so brace yourself) she’s not alone, and she’s never truly defeated. I deeply love this series, and I cannot wait to see where it goes next. *I received an ARC of this book and voluntarily composed an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Valentine Wheeler

    I already loved this series, but this was ABSOLUTELY a cut above the previous installments. I adored every moment - getting to see Sophie challenged, struggling, and getting to contrast her with the other women in the league and out of it. I teared up at least three times. Also, this is the SLOWEST BURN ROMANCE IN HISTORY, I LOVE IT

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Let me preface this by saying that I have not read the other Sophie Fournier books. I just love hockey, books about hockey, and books about girls playing hockey, so I couldn't not pick this up. Now I'm curious enough to go back and read the rest of the series. For the similarly uninitiated, Sophie Fournier is a kick-ass hockey player, the first woman to break into the majors (known in this book as the NAHL - North American Hockey League), winning a Maple Cup (think Stanley Cup) the previous seaso Let me preface this by saying that I have not read the other Sophie Fournier books. I just love hockey, books about hockey, and books about girls playing hockey, so I couldn't not pick this up. Now I'm curious enough to go back and read the rest of the series. For the similarly uninitiated, Sophie Fournier is a kick-ass hockey player, the first woman to break into the majors (known in this book as the NAHL - North American Hockey League), winning a Maple Cup (think Stanley Cup) the previous season. She also comes into this book with a gold medal from the last Winter Games (as of the Olympic variety) and is gearing up for a back-to-back run. She is a consistent scoring leader, but a playmaker first and foremost. Drafted last overall, she is still playing with a bit of a chip on her shoulder, but has since been joined in the big leagues by three other women, including one on her own team. Not to mention, she is now the captain of her major league team, and to her surprise, finds herself captain of Team Canada going into the Winter Games as well. Home Ice Advantage opens with a frustrating contract negotiation (that honestly sounds like she is lining herself up against the Connor McDavids of the world, although that's maybe not where I would have pegged her comps and led to some initial puzzlement for me). While she sees her initial ask as conservative, her agent is preparing her to go for an offer closer to half of it--because she is woman and no one knows how she will "age." Asked if she would prefer to compromise on term or value, she chooses to favor term, yet ends up taking a substantial hit on both ends. Faced with a no-win situation with the media, where she is either holding up the process and jeopardizing a solid start to the season or undervaluing her worth and consequently ruining negotiations for the generation of women players who will follow her, the pressure is a lot. But eventually she signs and locks into the next six years in Concord, despite half-expecting to be dumped midway. While there is some discussion of what this cap space allows the team to do in other positions, that aspect quickly fizzles and we move into learning who Sophie is as a captain. Unsurprisingly, she is a cool-headed and affirming leader. Although her coach doesn't really seem to trust her on strategy and they only move further apart as the season progresses, she is a respected presence in a locker room where she is clearly an "other." The boys follow her lead and even enforcers new to the team are willing to drop the gloves for her over the most questionable of slashes. The locker room and media dynamics early on and throughout reminded me of Pitch, although all of Alex Baker's edginess clearly went to Lexie. I want to read more about her. As Sophie trains up the younger players and gets their confidence where it needs to be in preseason, her line can't seem to get the chemistry it needs to earn back-to-back Cups. Coach keeps messing with the lines, under the guise of "spreading out the talent," but it seems clear that he is out for her, or worse, Elsa. Off-the-ice, Sophie is secretly elated that Elsa has agreed to live with her again, but is trying to play it cool. As new players are welcomed, Sophie is working hard to keep the team vibes up, but it seems like her main skill in that regard is forcing them all to go out to a bar or club after a game. About mid-way through the book, the NAHL season is interrupted for the Winter Games -- well, officially for the men's Winter Games of course. I'm actually genuinely surprised that after all the emphasis at the beginning on contract negotiation, the issue of Sophie missing two NAHL games for the Winter Games was never brought up. Especially after the NHL refused to release players for the last Olympics and created a shitstorm of a CBA negotiation. But who knows, maybe the NAHL CBA accidentally covers releasing female players for the Winter Games because it never occurred to them to plan for it? But I still would have expected some discussion around whether she would be fined for missing the games. The NHL at least has made clear they place no value on patriotism. Ok, ok, I'll read the rest of the books before I wade too far into detailed complaints like this though. The awkward break for the Winter Games originally felt unnecessarily juxtaposed into a book that seemed primarily about Sophie's NAHL season. It felt like an extended tangent about women's team dynamics. I still think it maybe got more emphasis than it needed, although as part of a series, I recognize other players may have liked seeing familiar characters making an appearance. But by the end of the book, this apparent tangent bears a little more relevance when her dumbass coach puts his foot in his mouth with a journalist again and basically insinuates that women don't have the emotional or physical stamina to finish an extended season with multiple peaks. Guess he's never heard of multiple orgasms. (sorry, I'm a bit buzzed as I'm writing this up.) Honestly, I came for the hockey, but I stayed for super well-done demisexual representation that doesn't end in sex. Sophie and Elsa cuddle and banter and hang out the whole book and have zero sex and I AM HERE FOR IT. (well, ok, Elsa has sex with other people.) Sophie is starting to feel some pangs of jealousy as Elsa is looking to other people for support and fun, but isn't at all envious of her sexual relationships or looking to sex to create emotional intimacy between them. For her, their chemistry on the ice is all she could ever ask for, and a Maple Cup ring is the only ring she will ever want to wear. Some people may tell her that she just hasn't met the right person yet or whatever tired bullshit, but she knows better and I love it. I love that she and Elsa can have the kind of friendship they do and yet there is no pressure between them to have sex. Hockey is better than sex and provides all the intimacy and chemistry you could ever desire and it is glorious. More books like this please. I did feel like the team vibes were lacking in this book, especially under Sophie's leadership, although that was somewhat addressed. Maybe I'm just biased because my team has the best team vibes. But team vibes don't just appear because you all have weird pizza traditions and go to the club after games. You have to get upset over bad plays and work through that and learn to respect each others' high caliber play. You have to show up for each other in the rough times. You have to deliver better speeches to rookies than, "It's just hockey. You know how to do this." Team dynamics are a work of art, and that seems to be a lost one here. The women's team under Stewie seems to have much better team vibes and it just felt more authentic and real. Lastly, I don't really get the title of this book. I could go a few different ways with it (e.g., Sophie settles into Concord as her home as she signs a long-term contract, Sophie buys a house with the intent of making it a team hangout space, Concord seems to only be able to win at home in the post-season, etc.), but nothing really sticks out. Minor point, but it bugged me all the way through. Overall, solid hockey action, but if you're a hockey fan, you will find that the action cuts out just when it's getting good and that the most important details are glossed over. Character development seems to be mostly relegated to previous books, and I would have rated this much less highly as a standalone. But taken for what it is, hockey action is decent and demisexual representation is great and so needed. Sophie is annoying af sometimes, but she is a solid character and I really appreciate her. Will definitely be checking out the rest of these books. Much appreciation to NetGalley and NineStar Press for the eARC in exchange for the review. Live-tweeted reactions about this story here: https://twitter.com/leahreadshockey/s...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cariadne

    I love this series. The author has done such a great job in writing the hockey play by plays and creates such an outwardly controlled character with Sophie Fournier, readers -- just like the members of the media in the series -- are hungry to learn more. In this book, I could see where the storyline could open possibilities: 1) A set up for the Coach and Captain clash in the next book (possibly like Kelly Jamieson's Must Love Dogs... and Hockey) and 2) setting up for up-and-comers like Emily (pos I love this series. The author has done such a great job in writing the hockey play by plays and creates such an outwardly controlled character with Sophie Fournier, readers -- just like the members of the media in the series -- are hungry to learn more. In this book, I could see where the storyline could open possibilities: 1) A set up for the Coach and Captain clash in the next book (possibly like Kelly Jamieson's Must Love Dogs... and Hockey) and 2) setting up for up-and-comers like Emily (possibly another novella feature like her Glove Save and a Beauty). There was a lot of rehash of past topics, just written with new words on the same themes: Her continued struggle with men in authority/dad/coach/chauvinistic reporters, hockey-sexuality, leveling the playing field for all, lonely being the only, leadership. While the author wrote of external milestones, such as buying a house, there weren't as many insights to internal growth/milestones. I felt this book was a bridge for the next one, which should be a real showdown.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarita Chapdelaine

    This book was provided by the author via IndiGo Marketing & Design in exchange for an honest review. This is another amazing addition to the Sophie Fournier series and I loved it. Home Ice Advantage is beautifully written, had me fully engaged from the very first page to the last, the hockey action is thrilling and gritty, I love the characters and the storyline is wonderful. Every book in this series has me on the edge of my seat with the non-stop action and the equally intriguing interactions b This book was provided by the author via IndiGo Marketing & Design in exchange for an honest review. This is another amazing addition to the Sophie Fournier series and I loved it. Home Ice Advantage is beautifully written, had me fully engaged from the very first page to the last, the hockey action is thrilling and gritty, I love the characters and the storyline is wonderful. Every book in this series has me on the edge of my seat with the non-stop action and the equally intriguing interactions between Sophie and her teammates as well as other players, her coaches, the press and her family. She is inspiring, stubborn, amazingly talented and everyone puts so much pressure on her from her coach to her father that I am blown away by how well she handles everything that is thrown at her. Her relationship with Elsa is changing and Sophie is not sure how to deal with it. She is always expected to be better then everyone else and her position on the team is not guaranteed. With everything and everyone pushing at her from all sides she has to remain strong and capable no matter how she is really feeling. I love how she is continually improving her game as well as learning to lead her team in this story and I can't wait to read the next book in this exciting series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Matthew

    I received a copy from the publisher and I am voluntarily leaving a review. I don’t have much interest in Hockey but i love this Book Series very much and this installment was no different. I can’t help but be drawn in to the suspense of each game as the author brings them to life. I loved that Sophie comes into her own even more in the installment as she continues to thrive and shine under pressure and i can’t wait to read more of her growth on and off the ice, this is book 4 of 8 so we have a w I received a copy from the publisher and I am voluntarily leaving a review. I don’t have much interest in Hockey but i love this Book Series very much and this installment was no different. I can’t help but be drawn in to the suspense of each game as the author brings them to life. I loved that Sophie comes into her own even more in the installment as she continues to thrive and shine under pressure and i can’t wait to read more of her growth on and off the ice, this is book 4 of 8 so we have a ways to go. The side characters are well written and their interactions with Sophie are interesting and engaging. I blew threw it and couldn’t put it down 5/5 my Favorite of the series so far….

  13. 4 out of 5

    aspeccharactersoftheday

    https://aspeccharactersoftheday.tumbl... https://aspeccharactersoftheday.tumbl...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mike Briggs

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Catie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Racheal

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ty

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vicky

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alba

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Cardott

  25. 4 out of 5

    Class Julie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  27. 5 out of 5

    Decoo

  28. 5 out of 5

    Riles En

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sébastien Paradis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gretal

  31. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lucky Luc

  33. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Matthew

  34. 5 out of 5

    Elena Zhuravleva

  35. 4 out of 5

    Constance Hamilton

  36. 4 out of 5

    Caro

  37. 4 out of 5

    C

  38. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  39. 4 out of 5

    Fredo

  40. 5 out of 5

    RNPride

  41. 5 out of 5

    Helen

  42. 4 out of 5

    Alex Robbins

  43. 4 out of 5

    ulibrarian

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