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Dawn of Fire Book 2 As the Indomitus Crusade spreads across the Imperium Sanctus, the cardinal world Gathalamor is caught in the grip of war – but when an ancient evil is unearthed, the entire crusade is threatened… READ IT BECAUSE With the crusade in full flow, get your first look at the full scale of the horrors inflicted upon the Imperium and the determination of Guilliman Dawn of Fire Book 2 As the Indomitus Crusade spreads across the Imperium Sanctus, the cardinal world Gathalamor is caught in the grip of war – but when an ancient evil is unearthed, the entire crusade is threatened… READ IT BECAUSE With the crusade in full flow, get your first look at the full scale of the horrors inflicted upon the Imperium and the determination of Guilliman to defeat them and reunite the Emperor's realm. THE STORY As the Indomitus Crusade begins, fleets of mighty warships leave Terra on a vital quest to stabilise Imperium Sanctus in the wake of the Great Rift. The returned primarch, Roboute Guilliman, leads a huge force towards the shrine world of Gathalamor, where stable warp routes will allow the flotilla to spread across the beleaguered southern half of the Imperium. But grave tidings reach the Imperial Regent’s ears. Warnings from an ancient race, and eerie silence from the army tasked with holding Gathalamor until his arrival, lead Guilliman to send a reconnaissance mission to the world, at its head, Shield-Captain Achallor of the Adeptus Custodes. Achallor discovers a world on the brink: a beaten Imperial force and sinister agents of Abaddon the Despoiler who have unearthed an ancient evil – a weapon that when harnessed not only threatens the primarch, but perhaps the holy Throne of Terra itself…


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Dawn of Fire Book 2 As the Indomitus Crusade spreads across the Imperium Sanctus, the cardinal world Gathalamor is caught in the grip of war – but when an ancient evil is unearthed, the entire crusade is threatened… READ IT BECAUSE With the crusade in full flow, get your first look at the full scale of the horrors inflicted upon the Imperium and the determination of Guilliman Dawn of Fire Book 2 As the Indomitus Crusade spreads across the Imperium Sanctus, the cardinal world Gathalamor is caught in the grip of war – but when an ancient evil is unearthed, the entire crusade is threatened… READ IT BECAUSE With the crusade in full flow, get your first look at the full scale of the horrors inflicted upon the Imperium and the determination of Guilliman to defeat them and reunite the Emperor's realm. THE STORY As the Indomitus Crusade begins, fleets of mighty warships leave Terra on a vital quest to stabilise Imperium Sanctus in the wake of the Great Rift. The returned primarch, Roboute Guilliman, leads a huge force towards the shrine world of Gathalamor, where stable warp routes will allow the flotilla to spread across the beleaguered southern half of the Imperium. But grave tidings reach the Imperial Regent’s ears. Warnings from an ancient race, and eerie silence from the army tasked with holding Gathalamor until his arrival, lead Guilliman to send a reconnaissance mission to the world, at its head, Shield-Captain Achallor of the Adeptus Custodes. Achallor discovers a world on the brink: a beaten Imperial force and sinister agents of Abaddon the Despoiler who have unearthed an ancient evil – a weapon that when harnessed not only threatens the primarch, but perhaps the holy Throne of Terra itself…

30 review for The Gate of Bones

  1. 5 out of 5

    AA_Logan

    The Avenging Son *felt* important- gathering the forces required for the Crusade, mustering support for the new undertaking, wandering around Terra; these are Significant-with-a-capital-S. Clarke has a trickier job here; he’s telling a largely brand-new story here, so can be forgiven for making the reading feel events are Significant in the same way largely by stating that they are. We know all along that the Chaos forces are going to be thwarted- Guilliman is due to star in another dozen books The Avenging Son *felt* important- gathering the forces required for the Crusade, mustering support for the new undertaking, wandering around Terra; these are Significant-with-a-capital-S. Clarke has a trickier job here; he’s telling a largely brand-new story here, so can be forgiven for making the reading feel events are Significant in the same way largely by stating that they are. We know all along that the Chaos forces are going to be thwarted- Guilliman is due to star in another dozen books after all, so it is full credit to the author that he managed to imbue the story with the degrees of peril that he does. The focus of the book mirrors the cover; the returned Primarch is not the focus of this book, and one’s expectations should match this fact. As I’ve said, the scope of this novel is less grand than the previous, but we do get good character work. The Mordian Iron Guard make, by my reckoning, their third ‘lead’ appearance in a BL novel or novella and are very human; far more than just sticklers for well-pressed uniforms- the regimental and possibly planetary psyche is explored, and they are distinct from other Astra Militarum regiments. Clarke has written Battle Sisters before, and arguably better in Celestine, but those we do meet here are very much led by their faith. Likewise, he’s written Knights before, and demonstrates once again a good feel for these- their duels with an increasingly warped heretic tank squad in particular stand out. A book like this will never feature the Chaos antagonists to the extent that I’d like, but the Word Bearers and Iron Warriors are both great fun, and the book has some of the best descriptions of warp-infused technology since the original Word Bearer trilogy. The characters carried over from book one are presented consistently, and some big hitters from other series make appearances. Primaris marines are given distinct personalities from their firstborn brethren, which adds an interesting dimension- Lucerne, in particular, is a really interesting character. It’s not wall-to-wall action either; we get characters musing on the inherent hypocrisies that sustain the Imperium, as well as the chaotic nature of Chaos and futility and ennui of the Long War. Unusually for a BL novel, it had me consult a dictionary on several occasions; Clarke drops beautifully obscure words incredibly well- prate being a personal favourite. Overall, a solid continuation of BL’s latest series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Bradley

    Damn good piece of writing. Avenging Son floundered a little from being mired in set-up and not having an overall lead physical conflict driving things. Gate of Bones takes all the set up done in the preceding book and delivers and excellent self-contained story that slots into the overarching narrative perfectly. What feels like too many viewpoints and characters to start with crystallises about a quarter of the way in to give a wonderful multilayered and contrasting view of the battle for Gath Damn good piece of writing. Avenging Son floundered a little from being mired in set-up and not having an overall lead physical conflict driving things. Gate of Bones takes all the set up done in the preceding book and delivers and excellent self-contained story that slots into the overarching narrative perfectly. What feels like too many viewpoints and characters to start with crystallises about a quarter of the way in to give a wonderful multilayered and contrasting view of the battle for Gathalamor, in a way few Black Library books do. The way the viewpoints and voices of the warriors on the traitor side contrast with the loyalists throughout the book as they race towards their inevitable, final in-person confrontation is incredibly satisfying and, without exception, legitimately surprising in their resolution, and I’m loathe to mention any characters by name for fear of spoiling those moments of shock. I genuinely hope we see some of these characters again throughout the Dawn of Fire series because it’d be a shame for them to linger in obscurity after the excellent character work. As much as I enjoyed Andy Clark’s previous Black Library work in the Knightsblade / Kingsblade series I think he’s definitely hit a new high with Gate of Bones Addressing the obvious comparison to Black Library’s previous ongoing long-form series, Avenging Son and Gate of Bones are leagues ahead of the opening books of The Beast Arises in I Am Slaughter and Predator, Prey. It’s very hard to compare with Horus Rising and False Gods, simply because of the expectations and excitement around the opening books of the Horus Heresy and the momentous events therein, but as individual books I’d say while Dan Abnett deftly blended set-up and action in Horus Rising in a way that Avenging Son failed to do, but Gate of Bones is every bit as (or even more) entertaining and well-written as False Gods, even if it lacks anything that impacts the overarching narrative on the same level as Horus’ temptation or Magnus doing nothing wrong.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dale Thompson

    The Gate of Bones is the second book of Black Libraries newest major series “A Dawn of Fire”, this is being toted as the Indomitus Crusades version of the Horus Heresy series and I’m super excited to see what we get from a brand-new storyline that doesn’t contain as much pre-existing Lore. The first book, Avenging Son, was a fantastic entrance to the series, introducing us properly to Roberte Gulliman, which was a massive bonus for those that haven’t paid a massive amount of attention to Games W The Gate of Bones is the second book of Black Libraries newest major series “A Dawn of Fire”, this is being toted as the Indomitus Crusades version of the Horus Heresy series and I’m super excited to see what we get from a brand-new storyline that doesn’t contain as much pre-existing Lore. The first book, Avenging Son, was a fantastic entrance to the series, introducing us properly to Roberte Gulliman, which was a massive bonus for those that haven’t paid a massive amount of attention to Games Workshop newest story arc (such as myself), introducing the new Primaris Marines in all their glory, and setting the grandeur and scale for the task that was being taken by the Imperium. I would recommend reading up a little on the events that happened just before this however it isn’t fully necessary – https://warhammer40k.fandom.com/wiki/.... I always find it interesting reading these mega series from Black Library because you often get a different author each time, not only taking the resources of previous books, reintroducing old characters, and sharing story arcs as they become canon, but you also tend to get in some cases very different writing styles. Guy Haley and Andy Clark are both in my opinion very good at character development, both books did incredibly well at building the humanity behind the godlike figures that walk among us and delivering the absolute despair and grimdark nature of regular humans, both writing interesting POVs that don’t leave you bored when reading someone other than your favourite, and honestly that’s hard to do, especially when you look at the scope of these stories and the amount of time and space that they tend to cover. The Gate of Bones was my first story containing the Astarte Custodes, described as the children of the Emperor in the way the Space Marines are children of their Primarch’s, they share the Emperor’s blood line, they are in all ways more Impressive than the regular Astartes and Andy did a really impressive job of showing this. He managed to really show the difference between the Custodes and the Space Marines, up till this point there had been nothing in 40k that really made me see the Space Marines as anything but the almost invincible warriors they are. If the Space Marines are the Angels of Death, what are the Custodes? On top of these demi-gods Andy had to write characters from the side of Chaos which is always such a stark contrast from the Emperor loving Imperium forces, you get to see their hatred for the so-called Corpse God and what drives them towards their end goals. We also got a full Lance of Knights, the mini-Titans of the 40k universe, the fanatical Sisters of Battle and fantastic characters coming from the classic Imperial Guard that just bring the levelling needed so you remember the grimdark nature of 40k even with beautiful Golden Gods that stride across the fields of battle. Andy’s writing style made this book a lot more of an interesting read for me over Avenging Son, the first book at times felt full of very unnecessary prose that just felt a little over the top, I understand it’s a hard balance because the world of 40k really does need the grandeur to properly explain it sometimes, Gulliman striding into a room demands the attention to detail that is warranted by a Primarch and Guy Haley did a fantastic job of writing Gulliman and the people surrounding him, but that isn’t maybe needed at every turn. Andy felt a lot more to the point, sparing no detail when needed but instead spending more time focusing on the plot and character development, this led to me feeling no inclination to skim over paragraphs like I did in the first book. He also did a great job of writing a tense and exciting plot, which I imagine is a struggle when your main character has full plot protection and a already summarised ending to the Era Indomitus supplied by Games Workshop codex’s, so to still write in a way that gives the reader concern’s about what might happen to Gulliman and to the crusade as a whole is something I find really impressive, and in general this is always something the Black Library authors have done so well, writing something that feels fresh and exciting when you already know the end game really shows the talents of these writers. This book really had everything needed to meet the demand of the Black Library standard, tons of incredible action but also plenty of really strong character development that never felt boring or like you were being pulled away from the excitement. I can’t wait for the next story in this saga and will continue to follow the Dawn of Fire series eagerly. Give Black Library a chance, regardless for your interest in the tabletop game the stories themselves are so good that they deserve the attention, and I can almost promise you will not be disappointed. Also, if it makes it helps, as far as I’m aware there are zero love triangles in any of the 40k books and if that isn’t a reason to read it I don’t know what is.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James Green

    The Indomitus Crusade is finally underway. But as Fleet Primus sets sail a warning is given to the Primarch. A warning that is given by a farseer of the xenos species the aldari. If this warning is to be believed then there is a threat ahead of the crusade, a threat to the Primarch himself and hence the entire Imperium. In an age of demi-gods it is nice to have a book focusing on the mortals. Though that was largely true of the previous book in this series too, it's perhaps even more the case her The Indomitus Crusade is finally underway. But as Fleet Primus sets sail a warning is given to the Primarch. A warning that is given by a farseer of the xenos species the aldari. If this warning is to be believed then there is a threat ahead of the crusade, a threat to the Primarch himself and hence the entire Imperium. In an age of demi-gods it is nice to have a book focusing on the mortals. Though that was largely true of the previous book in this series too, it's perhaps even more the case here. While a Custodes and a Primarius Marine (the first time they have been let off the leash on their own) do have 'speaking roles' it is a Mordian Iron Guard general, a mortal human who has the staring role as he tries to defend the Cardinal world of Gathalamor from a mixed force of Iron Warriors, Word Bearers and Dark Mechanicum. The latter two are up to something more than just a simple mission of conquest. A fun bit of military sci-fi that perhaps doesn't move the main story on quite as much as I would like.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Henry Raj

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The storyline was great, I loved the characters and where this book is taking the dawn of fire series. However, the way that the Custodians were written, to me, really felt like their power and the superhuman nature of their physiology was completely nerfed, especially in the end chapters where the final confrontation took place. A certain one of these characters deaths I thought was completely unwarranted other than for the purpose of the custodies narrative that seems to be developing in the s The storyline was great, I loved the characters and where this book is taking the dawn of fire series. However, the way that the Custodians were written, to me, really felt like their power and the superhuman nature of their physiology was completely nerfed, especially in the end chapters where the final confrontation took place. A certain one of these characters deaths I thought was completely unwarranted other than for the purpose of the custodies narrative that seems to be developing in the series - they had to kill said custodies so that they could make the point of custodians disagreeing with the religious zealotry of the 41st millennia Imperium, but see that it has value and power, as well as a galvanising effect it has within the 40K universe. I see that they needed to do this for the plot, but the custodian in question would most definitely have won the fight had it taken place outside the context of the story ark.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nevada Dru

    For the full review, please head over to Bits & Pieces - https://bitsandpieces.games/2021/03/1... Dawn of Fire, Warhammer 40,000‘s epic new series of novels, finally has a follow up with The Gate of Bones by Andy Clark. If you missed my review of the first book, Avenging Son, go and read that because it lays a lot of the groundwork for the events and characters in The Gate of Bones. However, unlike other instances, I don’t think you need to have read Avenging Son to enjoy The Gate of Bones. Inste For the full review, please head over to Bits & Pieces - https://bitsandpieces.games/2021/03/1... Dawn of Fire, Warhammer 40,000‘s epic new series of novels, finally has a follow up with The Gate of Bones by Andy Clark. If you missed my review of the first book, Avenging Son, go and read that because it lays a lot of the groundwork for the events and characters in The Gate of Bones. However, unlike other instances, I don’t think you need to have read Avenging Son to enjoy The Gate of Bones. Instead, it holds up as a stand-alone story and as part of a wider narrative. The big question, though, is whether this series is shaping up to become a worthy addition to the Warhammer canon? For me, The Gate of Bones is a difficult book. On one hand, it does a lot right. We have interesting and relatable human characters, the Custodes are hulking demi-gods that barely resemble humanity and the Chaos characters are more than moustache-twirling villains. All of which I love. However, for all of that, The Gate of Bones is about as standard a Warhammer 40,000 story as you can get. The basic premise of the narrative is that Chaos has taken hold of a world, the Imperium doesn’t like that and wants to rid it of this corruption. At which point there’s a lot of shooty bangs, dead characters and honourable last stands. It’s very safe and never strays too far from the expected path. This feels like a massive shame because it meant that the twists weren’t really twists and the turns felt more like the author was turning to the reader saying “You know that thing that happens in most Warhammer fiction? Well that’s what’s going to happen here”. And I’m not saying every book needs to be some earth-shattering revolution, but The Gate of Bones rarely put its own stamp on the 40k universe.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Burhans

    4.5, but Goodreads won't let me rate it that. Coming in right off the first Dawn of Fire book, I wasn't as impressed. Don't get me wrong, Andy Clark is a good writer, but clearly, the first third of the book was just setting up new lore. A huge reason to read this series is that it's supposed to be doing that, much of this book is dedicated to pushing the narrative forward without the usual 40K lore already being established like in most Warhammer books. Once you push through some of the expositio 4.5, but Goodreads won't let me rate it that. Coming in right off the first Dawn of Fire book, I wasn't as impressed. Don't get me wrong, Andy Clark is a good writer, but clearly, the first third of the book was just setting up new lore. A huge reason to read this series is that it's supposed to be doing that, much of this book is dedicated to pushing the narrative forward without the usual 40K lore already being established like in most Warhammer books. Once you push through some of the exposition though, The Gate of Bones really comes into its own. I can already tell I'm going to love the next 7 books. Whatever else is planned for Warhammer 40K 9th Edition and beyond, I'm interested and ready for the ride.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James Wetherill

    I absolutely loved this second instalment in the Dawn of Fire series, it was an excellent continuation to the series about the Indomitus crusade. There was a lot to love here, and for once I found the Sisters of Battle characters very well written, something I have found lacking in previous BL outings. The enemy Iron Warriors and Word Bearers were suitably villainous, and they didn’t fall into some of the comic book villain tropes found in other works. All in all a lot to love here, and I am excite I absolutely loved this second instalment in the Dawn of Fire series, it was an excellent continuation to the series about the Indomitus crusade. There was a lot to love here, and for once I found the Sisters of Battle characters very well written, something I have found lacking in previous BL outings. The enemy Iron Warriors and Word Bearers were suitably villainous, and they didn’t fall into some of the comic book villain tropes found in other works. All in all a lot to love here, and I am excited for the series to continue on

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mathew Thomas

    Absolutely loved it! It's a self contained book which does lead on from Avenging Son which had the harder task and setting out the story. Andy Clark has done a fantastic job here of building on that. Some great characters and development, my personal favourite being General Dvorgin and the Order of the Argent Shroud battle sisters. Some very suspenseful moments and a great setting. Can't wait for the next installment. Absolutely loved it! It's a self contained book which does lead on from Avenging Son which had the harder task and setting out the story. Andy Clark has done a fantastic job here of building on that. Some great characters and development, my personal favourite being General Dvorgin and the Order of the Argent Shroud battle sisters. Some very suspenseful moments and a great setting. Can't wait for the next installment.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    A crazily and unexpectedly awesome epic story of the Indomitus Crusade! The action went crazy! The plot was easy to follow and the characters were super relatable. I want to see them again. I sincerely hope this line continues to progress the setting and be as awesome as the Horus Heresy line.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joel Harris

    Great book. Even better than the first one in the series. Can't wait to read the next one. Would tell my friends to purchase, well written and worth the money. Great book. Even better than the first one in the series. Can't wait to read the next one. Would tell my friends to purchase, well written and worth the money.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bergard

    By the Emperor this was such a great read 😍😍😍 Oh, how I enjoyed it. Thank you GW for awesome books and lore you people provide and thank you Mr. Andy Clark for this awesome book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mihnea Tomosoiu

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daan Eggen

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peter Green

  16. 5 out of 5

    Skywatcher Adept

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Ratcliffe

  18. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kieran McAllister

  20. 4 out of 5

    Peter Ek

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike Kellermeier

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Mountain

  23. 5 out of 5

    Murad

  24. 4 out of 5

    Beekay

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jo Turner

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gábor Schäffer

  27. 4 out of 5

    Griff

  28. 5 out of 5

    Travis Guty

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  30. 5 out of 5

    David

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