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One of Us Buried

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In 1806, a fateful decision sends Eleanor Marling from the salons of London to a prison ship bound for New South Wales. She is put to work at the female factory of Parramatta; a place where the women’s only hope of food and lodgings is to offer their bodies to the settlement’s men. Nell is given shelter by Lieutenant Blackwell, a brooding soldier to whom she is inexplicabl In 1806, a fateful decision sends Eleanor Marling from the salons of London to a prison ship bound for New South Wales. She is put to work at the female factory of Parramatta; a place where the women’s only hope of food and lodgings is to offer their bodies to the settlement’s men. Nell is given shelter by Lieutenant Blackwell, a brooding soldier to whom she is inexplicably drawn. Despite warnings from the other women, Blackwell’s motives seem decent, and beneath the roof of a military officer, Nell sees a chance to become more than just a convict woman sent to the factory to be forgotten. But tensions are high in New South Wales, with the young colony teetering on the edge of a convict rebellion. And as Nell treads a dangerous line between obedience and power, she learns the role of a factory lass is to remain silent – or face a walk to the gallows.


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In 1806, a fateful decision sends Eleanor Marling from the salons of London to a prison ship bound for New South Wales. She is put to work at the female factory of Parramatta; a place where the women’s only hope of food and lodgings is to offer their bodies to the settlement’s men. Nell is given shelter by Lieutenant Blackwell, a brooding soldier to whom she is inexplicabl In 1806, a fateful decision sends Eleanor Marling from the salons of London to a prison ship bound for New South Wales. She is put to work at the female factory of Parramatta; a place where the women’s only hope of food and lodgings is to offer their bodies to the settlement’s men. Nell is given shelter by Lieutenant Blackwell, a brooding soldier to whom she is inexplicably drawn. Despite warnings from the other women, Blackwell’s motives seem decent, and beneath the roof of a military officer, Nell sees a chance to become more than just a convict woman sent to the factory to be forgotten. But tensions are high in New South Wales, with the young colony teetering on the edge of a convict rebellion. And as Nell treads a dangerous line between obedience and power, she learns the role of a factory lass is to remain silent – or face a walk to the gallows.

30 review for One of Us Buried

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Clarke

    What an excellent read! Johanna Craven is a great storyteller and transported me right back to New South Wales in 1806. Given my abysmal knowledge of Australian history, I felt a bit like Nell (the main character) and had absolutely no idea what to expect. And just as I had started to despair about the harsh lives of the women convicts, the elusive Lieutenant Blackwell arrived. Like every other character in the book, he is incredibly well-developed and comes with his own back story. I don't want What an excellent read! Johanna Craven is a great storyteller and transported me right back to New South Wales in 1806. Given my abysmal knowledge of Australian history, I felt a bit like Nell (the main character) and had absolutely no idea what to expect. And just as I had started to despair about the harsh lives of the women convicts, the elusive Lieutenant Blackwell arrived. Like every other character in the book, he is incredibly well-developed and comes with his own back story. I don't want to give away too much and spoil the reading experience, but - aside from being brilliantly researched - this book ticks all the boxes: love story, murder, political unrest, and enough twists and turns to keep you up way past your bedtime to find out what happens next. I blame my eyebags on this author!

  2. 4 out of 5

    T R

    What starts with the sentence, “I imagine I can still see the blood on my hands,” and moves right into a woman surrounded by men as they step into a courtroom of “anything but equals” has me intrigued about the story and where it’s headed. With heightened interest the pages move along at a rapid clip, full of fluid scenes that floated off the page into my imagination: the sea, bloodstained hands, the creaking and groaning ship, seamen, the redcoats, the factory, etc. Emotions from the pages stir What starts with the sentence, “I imagine I can still see the blood on my hands,” and moves right into a woman surrounded by men as they step into a courtroom of “anything but equals” has me intrigued about the story and where it’s headed. With heightened interest the pages move along at a rapid clip, full of fluid scenes that floated off the page into my imagination: the sea, bloodstained hands, the creaking and groaning ship, seamen, the redcoats, the factory, etc. Emotions from the pages stirred in my body. As the words changed from italicized beginning to regular print chapter one began in a Penal Colony New South Wales 1806 where Eleanor, Nel, landed after traveling from England on a prison ship. Put to work in a factory at a time when women had to prostitute themselves to survive, Nel boards with a seemingly decent military officer. What unfolds in this beautifully-written narrative with authentic time-appropriate dialogue and vividly crafted scenes flows from the pages smooth as silk as Nel navigates a woman’s place in a male-dominated society on the verge of political rebellion. Based on actual experiences this remarkable work of fiction brings home a history of the impact past events had on shaping the lives of women today. The historical detail and the heartfelt passages made this an effortless read I highly recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah B White

    Justice? In 1806, Eleanor Marling was given a life sentence and would be transported from England to the penal colony in New South Wales to serve a life sentence. She was never to return to England. Female prisoners were sent there to work in spinning and weaving factories and to provide women for the soldiers and other English men in the colony to marry. The new arrivals were encouraged to find places outside the factory to sleep and they also had to somehow provide their own food--even though t Justice? In 1806, Eleanor Marling was given a life sentence and would be transported from England to the penal colony in New South Wales to serve a life sentence. She was never to return to England. Female prisoners were sent there to work in spinning and weaving factories and to provide women for the soldiers and other English men in the colony to marry. The new arrivals were encouraged to find places outside the factory to sleep and they also had to somehow provide their own food--even though they had no money. Some slept in the factory, but outside the factories there were plenty of men offering space in their beds. Read this book to get more details about the life of these factory workers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark Morey

    As an Australian, although the descendent of goldrush-era free settlers, I do know some of Australia's convict past, told and re-told with none better than For The Term Of His Natural Life by Marcus Clarke. This novel, One Of Us Buried, perhaps for the first time, tells the story of the early settlement of the colony of New South Wales from the perspective of transported women, in this case the feisty Eleanor Marling, who very much has to survive by her wits outside of her class and even outside As an Australian, although the descendent of goldrush-era free settlers, I do know some of Australia's convict past, told and re-told with none better than For The Term Of His Natural Life by Marcus Clarke. This novel, One Of Us Buried, perhaps for the first time, tells the story of the early settlement of the colony of New South Wales from the perspective of transported women, in this case the feisty Eleanor Marling, who very much has to survive by her wits outside of her class and even outside of her culture. It is Eleanor who carries this story, flawed and stubborn but also strong, and it is Eleanor who will keep you reading until the very last page. One final comment, the research on this would have been extraordinary. All in all One Of Us Buried a great read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kat Drennan

    One of Us Buried is a gripping, raw story of love salvaged from the depths of despair, guilt, and a savage lust for revenge. Set in the British colony of New South Wales, Australia, Johanna Craven puts us at the risk of another Irish rebellion as she tells the story of survival of the women’s spirit against terrible circumstances. Her instantly recognizable style shines through as she takes the reader through this heart-wrenching story. Craven is a true master of characterization and storytellin One of Us Buried is a gripping, raw story of love salvaged from the depths of despair, guilt, and a savage lust for revenge. Set in the British colony of New South Wales, Australia, Johanna Craven puts us at the risk of another Irish rebellion as she tells the story of survival of the women’s spirit against terrible circumstances. Her instantly recognizable style shines through as she takes the reader through this heart-wrenching story. Craven is a true master of characterization and storytelling. I can never get enough.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Irwin

    It's a man's world Such a shame that women were convicted, hung or sent into slavery for the crime of hunger. and still would follow and even take a bullet for the men that victimized them. except for the main character in this story. she learned from her mistakes. really good book It's a man's world Such a shame that women were convicted, hung or sent into slavery for the crime of hunger. and still would follow and even take a bullet for the men that victimized them. except for the main character in this story. she learned from her mistakes. really good book

  7. 4 out of 5

    Davis Galimberti

    I'm generally not interested in reading historical fiction. But I really enjoyed this - it was page turner. Very interesting setting, involving a relatively unknown part of Australian convict history, strong complex characters and a fascinating story! I'm generally not interested in reading historical fiction. But I really enjoyed this - it was page turner. Very interesting setting, involving a relatively unknown part of Australian convict history, strong complex characters and a fascinating story!

  8. 5 out of 5

    margaret amato

    I loved this so much on my Kindle that I bought my mother a copy

  9. 4 out of 5

    karen

  10. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chris page

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rodney Ford

  13. 4 out of 5

    David

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stella Hislop

  15. 5 out of 5

    LaDonna J Daviscourt

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jane Jenkins

  17. 4 out of 5

    Darlene

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Hunt

  19. 4 out of 5

    carolyn puent

  20. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Perry

  21. 4 out of 5

    joann garber

  22. 5 out of 5

    Janet Walker

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary Baker daniels

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Say

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert Ridley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Helena

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rita Schwartz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maryann

  29. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

  30. 5 out of 5

    June Ward

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