web site hit counter The Night Train to Berlin - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Night Train to Berlin

Availability: Ready to download

Two lost souls brought together by the chaos of war. A train journey into the past. A love that echoes through time. Paddington Station, present day A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and an old, well-read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when sh Two lost souls brought together by the chaos of war. A train journey into the past. A love that echoes through time. Paddington Station, present day A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and an old, well-read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when she meets fellow passenger Joe she feels like she has been given that rarest of gifts…a second chance. Paddington Station, 1944 Beneath the shadow of the war which rages across Europe, Alex and Eliza meet by chance. She is a gutsy painter desperate to get to the frontline as a war artist and he is a wounded RAF pilot now commissioned as a war correspondent. With time slipping away they make only one promise: to meet in Berlin when this is all over. But this is a time when promises are hard to keep, and hope is all you can hold in your heart. From a hidden Cornish cove to the blood-soaked beaches of Normandy in June 1944, this is an epic love story like no other.


Compare

Two lost souls brought together by the chaos of war. A train journey into the past. A love that echoes through time. Paddington Station, present day A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and an old, well-read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when sh Two lost souls brought together by the chaos of war. A train journey into the past. A love that echoes through time. Paddington Station, present day A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and an old, well-read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when she meets fellow passenger Joe she feels like she has been given that rarest of gifts…a second chance. Paddington Station, 1944 Beneath the shadow of the war which rages across Europe, Alex and Eliza meet by chance. She is a gutsy painter desperate to get to the frontline as a war artist and he is a wounded RAF pilot now commissioned as a war correspondent. With time slipping away they make only one promise: to meet in Berlin when this is all over. But this is a time when promises are hard to keep, and hope is all you can hold in your heart. From a hidden Cornish cove to the blood-soaked beaches of Normandy in June 1944, this is an epic love story like no other.

30 review for The Night Train to Berlin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    I was drawn to this book because of it’s partial World War 2 setting and, in particular, because elements of the story unfold en route to Cornwall.  I’m familiar with the line from London Paddington to Penzance on which Eliza and Ellie travel from my own holiday trips, although never on the sleeper service. The story unfolds in chapters that alternate between Eliza in 1944 and Ellie in the present day. The plot relies on large helpings of coincidence, requiring a belief in fate or destiny, and br I was drawn to this book because of it’s partial World War 2 setting and, in particular, because elements of the story unfold en route to Cornwall.  I’m familiar with the line from London Paddington to Penzance on which Eliza and Ellie travel from my own holiday trips, although never on the sleeper service. The story unfolds in chapters that alternate between Eliza in 1944 and Ellie in the present day. The plot relies on large helpings of coincidence, requiring a belief in fate or destiny, and bringing to mind the oft-quoted line, “Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into mine” from the film Casablanca. As it happens, the film is referenced several times in the book. The relationship between Eliza Grey and Alex Levine that begins after a chance encounter on a wartime train journey had a real fizz to it, even if Eliza’s initial reaction is less than promising. ‘She had never, in all of her life, met such an arrogant, self-opinionated, curt and, quite frankly, rude individual.’ As we learned from Pride and Prejudice, first impressions can be deceptive. On the other hand, Joe, whom Ellie meets in similar fashion, although pleasant enough, didn’t feel like a fully fleshed out character and I didn’t find myself as invested in their relationship as I did in that between Eliza and Alex. I found it easy to imagine the glamour of the 1940s sleeper train to Cornwall; less so its modern day equivalent which, I suspect, would be considerably more utilitarian even when dressed in its costume of 1940s themed party train. And with all due respect to car attendant, Rihanna, she’s no match for her 1940s equivalent, the stately Jeffries. I thought Eliza’s wartime story was by far the most successful element of the book so much so that, at times, the sections with Ellie felt like mere interludes. In fact, the main purpose of the modern storyline seemed to be to act as a framing device for telling Eliza’s story.  Even though the author injected some jeopardy into Ellie’s personal story, I felt the modern day timeline could have been shunted off to the sidings. Having said that, there were some neat parallels between the two timelines, such as the eavesdropping couple across the aisle of the railway carriage and Joe’s choice of costume. And was his fluffy canine companion a nod to WW2 RAF hero Wing Commander Guy Gibson, portrayed in the film The Dambusters by Richard Todd?  The wartime sections of the book include some memorable scenes such as when Eliza, deployed as a nursing auxiliary to a hospital ship on the South coast, records in her sketchbook the preparations for D-Day. Or when she experiences the heady days following the Allied liberation of Paris.  The author sheds a fascinating light on the role played by war artists and war correspondents in documenting conflict, and the risks they took in doing so. The hardships too, living alongside the troops in often spartan conditions. Eliza has conflicted feelings about her role as a war artist. Is she right to depict the truth of the atrocities she sees, or should she be mindful of their potential impact on morale back home and present a more ‘sanitized’ picture? Although compelling in parts, I felt The Night Train to Berlin spent a little too much time travelling along branch lines rather than speeding to its destination.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    3.5* ‘Ellie knew that life was not about the destination but the journey, and yet, tonight, the destination was all she could think of, and it was suddenly closing in on her far too fast.’ I was excited to read Melanie’s new book as I have so enjoyed her others. For this particular book, chapters alternate between Eliza in 1944 and Ellie in the present day. It investigates the parallels and synchronicity of the same train journey these two women take but separated by decades. ‘The roles we choose f 3.5* ‘Ellie knew that life was not about the destination but the journey, and yet, tonight, the destination was all she could think of, and it was suddenly closing in on her far too fast.’ I was excited to read Melanie’s new book as I have so enjoyed her others. For this particular book, chapters alternate between Eliza in 1944 and Ellie in the present day. It investigates the parallels and synchronicity of the same train journey these two women take but separated by decades. ‘The roles we choose for ourselves, which are interchangeable, don’t always suit our true character, which is not interchangeable...’ The two chance encounters on these train journeys are quite varied. Eliza and Alex in war torn Britain (and the story ventures off to Europe as well) is full of special moments against a tragic background. Comparatively, Ellie and Joe’s story does not carry the same spark yet Melanie does her best to create a meaningful connection. This modern encounter may have lacked enough detail and depth (difficult with two storylines) to fully engage the reader. ‘I think it’s about choosing to live life with an open heart and an attitude of hope rather than one of dread and fear. It’s about just knowing, I suppose, that all will be well…’ Eliza and Alex’s story was the classic wartime love affair and the better of the two tales. So much so, that I often regretted being dragged away to the present day as sweet as Ellie’s story may have been. It appeared to be there as the thread to draw parallels with the wartime story. There are also some well researched details from the war pertaining to time spent on a nursing auxiliary hospital ship or the sketches Eliza drew from D-Day and onwards. ‘It seems that there is no end to the unfathomable waste of human life our generation must witness.’ This brings me to the inclusion of the role of war artists and their desire in detailing, or wanting to detail, the awful reality that they saw and felt compelled to communicate to those back home. It raises the issue of whether or not seeing the imagery of such atrocities should be both documented and shared as it made it so much more real through confronting imagery. An interesting point to ponder. So whilst not my favourite book of Melanie’s, there are definite elements - the train travel, the frontline stories, the serendipity of encounters - that make it worth your while to read. ‘Perhaps your being on the train was …’ ‘Fate?’ he asked. ‘I was going to say destiny, but yes, fate.’ ‘Next stop Berlin, then?’ he said, releasing her hand. ‘Absolutely. Next stop Berlin.’ This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The quoted material may have changed in the final release.

  3. 4 out of 5

    theliterateleprechaun

    Toot! Toot! All aboard! A 1940s themed sleeper train car journey from London to Penzance? With champagne and silver service? Sign me up. This is an absolutely delightful dual timeline historical fiction featuring an epic romance set against the backdrop of WW2 and the rugged Cornish coast. Hop aboard! It’s a train journey into the past and you’ll be witness to love that echoes through time. Paddington station present day: As we journey along we’ll meet Ellie Nightingale, a woman in an emerald gree Toot! Toot! All aboard! A 1940s themed sleeper train car journey from London to Penzance? With champagne and silver service? Sign me up. This is an absolutely delightful dual timeline historical fiction featuring an epic romance set against the backdrop of WW2 and the rugged Cornish coast. Hop aboard! It’s a train journey into the past and you’ll be witness to love that echoes through time. Paddington station present day: As we journey along we’ll meet Ellie Nightingale, a woman in an emerald green vintage Christian Dior silk dress who meets romantic Joe Burton from Leeds. Having brought a book each to dinner thinking they’d rather be absorbed in a tale, they set aside their books and take a chance on conversation. It changes the direction of the rest of their life. Thinking they’d said their goodbyes on the train, they went their separate ways until fate and a note tucked away in an antique clock brought them together once again. Paddington station, 1944: The second story also begins on the Cornish Riviera, a sleeper train. A wounded RAF pilot, Alex Levine, takes a chance and strikes up a conversation with the lovely lady, Lady Arbuthnot, seated beside him at dinner. He soon finds out that she’s going to her cottage to paint and have time to make a life-changing decision. After disembarking in Penberth Cove, this couple, too, find a second chance at love. When war sends them into the battle as correspondents, the dream of meeting up again gives them the fortitude to continue. Stuffed full of emotion with rich, engaging characters (including strong, intelligent women) set against the backdrop of WW2, you won’t want to miss this read. It’s extremely obvious that the author has poured her heart and soul into the pages; in every chapter there’s a giant hug reaching out from the pages. This is one of those books that will stay with you for a long time. I took the whole first day of my week off to deliciously savour every word of this incredible book. It took forever for me to find the words to express myself...and even then, they aren’t adequate enough. You MUST read this book - it’s historical fiction at its finest! This is my first book by this author and I quickly added her to my 'auto-buy' list. If I could give this more than 5-stars, I definitely would do it. Thank you Melanie Hudson, HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter, and NetGalley for this spectacular advance copy. I received it for free and am voluntarily leaving my honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Blue

    This is the story about two beautiful souls and how their outlook changed due to the other, and the consequences of this change on their lives during WWII. Loved the Cornwall setting. Author brought it to life with her vivid descriptions. The past story takes place during WWII. Eliza, married to a lord, bound by conventions, not able to break boundaries, not able to live the life the way she wanted. She meets Alex on a train, both going to Cornwall to make some decisions, get some perspective. El This is the story about two beautiful souls and how their outlook changed due to the other, and the consequences of this change on their lives during WWII. Loved the Cornwall setting. Author brought it to life with her vivid descriptions. The past story takes place during WWII. Eliza, married to a lord, bound by conventions, not able to break boundaries, not able to live the life the way she wanted. She meets Alex on a train, both going to Cornwall to make some decisions, get some perspective. Eliza is full of optimism despite seeing atrocities of war on her job as a war nurse and a war artist. Alex was a pilot, scarred for life, holding a complete opposite view of Eliza. The stories of adventurous, fierce women in history who had created their own path have been included and they were an inspiration to Eliza. It was great learning about them as I’ve never heard of them bearing one or two. I’ve made a list to do further research as they all seemed to have led interesting and fearless lives. Eliza wasn’t a lovely character like you expect that heroines tend to be. She looked like someone you might encounter IRL. Sometimes she comes across as a calculating woman, determined, gifted artist, .... She couldn’t do what she wanted for being a woman in a world run by men but this hasn’t stopped her. The one side of Eliza made me dislike her, which was how she has disrespected her marriage. When one character questions Eliza’s behavior, love the answer Eliza gave, which was “Try not to judge someone until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes”. Apart from the above good points, I have some niggles with this book: It took me a while to warm up to the characters as the story took too much time in establishing these characters. Story picks up pace in the second half, but most of this part was dedicated to war efforts. It has made me feel like I was reading non-fiction not a fictional story based on real events. I couldn’t invest myself in the present story and found it a little boring. The ending isn’t neat and left to the reader's imagination. “Dear Rosie” was my favorite book by this author; hence I went to this book with high expectations. To me, this book isn’t on par with her previous book. Thanks to NetGalley and Harper Collins UK/One More Chapter for providing an advanced copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Duke-Wyer

    The action is set in two time periods, 1944 as World War II is nearing the end and present day. There are two protagonists, Eliza (aka Lady Arbuthnot) who is a painter with nursing ability and Eliza her granddaughter who is a violin player with a heart condition. The WWII Eliza’s story was more interesting; she is married to a much older man, but falls for Joe who is a journalist and their lives become a series of brief meetings but with the promise ‘to meet in Berlin’. Joe scoffs at Eliza’s pai The action is set in two time periods, 1944 as World War II is nearing the end and present day. There are two protagonists, Eliza (aka Lady Arbuthnot) who is a painter with nursing ability and Eliza her granddaughter who is a violin player with a heart condition. The WWII Eliza’s story was more interesting; she is married to a much older man, but falls for Joe who is a journalist and their lives become a series of brief meetings but with the promise ‘to meet in Berlin’. Joe scoffs at Eliza’s painting as he feels it has no depth and that she is not being true to herself. He encourages her to be brave and ‘tell the real story of the war with her paintings’. And so she does! Meanwhile back in the present, Eliza armed with her forebear’s notebook/diary and a green silk dress sets out on the night train to Cornwall. She has inherited the cottage that features large in her grandmother’s story and is visiting it for the first time. Strong links to the earlier story – is it fate that intervenes when she meets Joe a fellow passenger on the night train? I was more interested in the ‘WWII’ Eliza, but only just. It is true that Ms Hudson’s description of Eliza’s circumstances as a Lady resounds with the clang of privilege of that time, and the entre she had with the people that could help her cause. It is also true that there are details of the horror that doctors and nurses faced in the battlefield hospitals and nursing stations. It is also true that the descriptions of the concentration camps still horrifies. However, it did not resonate with me. I was not captivated by the romance; I was not spellbound by their love story. Sadly, I just didn’t care. As for our younger Eliza – I just found the whole train ride dreary. As for the lady who was serving drinks etc. – I pity the other passengers, they must have been sadly ignored whilst she hovered over Eliza and Joe. This story line just did not ring true to me. Having said all that, I cannot dispute that it is well-written. Sadly, and with apologies, I must just confess that it didn’t work for me – perhaps that says more about me than the book though. I do apologise Ms Hudson and I wish you great success. Thank you to the author, publishers and NetGalley for providing an ARC via my Kindle in return for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    '"Julian wasn't saying that bad things won't happen to you, she wasn't even saying that you won't come to a sticky end. I think she was saying that, no matter what is going on around one, all can be well within. I suppose if I believe in anything, it's in that kind of thing."' I was quite psyched to receive an ARC for this book as I love historical novels (especially set in WWI and WWII) as well as books with two timelines which are somehow connected. Now, after reading, I am left feeling a bit '"Julian wasn't saying that bad things won't happen to you, she wasn't even saying that you won't come to a sticky end. I think she was saying that, no matter what is going on around one, all can be well within. I suppose if I believe in anything, it's in that kind of thing."' I was quite psyched to receive an ARC for this book as I love historical novels (especially set in WWI and WWII) as well as books with two timelines which are somehow connected. Now, after reading, I am left feeling a bit disappointed. Sure enough, the book does a great job at setting the scene and making us get to know the characters in both timelines (some have said this made the start of the book feel slow, but it is what I actually enjoyed most). The scenes on the train, both with Eliza and Alex and with Ellie and Joe, are beautifully written and come to life easily. Unfortunately, where others seem to have enjoyed the second part of the book more, this is where it lost some of its glory for me. I felt the story was spiraling out of control quite quickly, with descriptions and story lines remaining somewhat superficial, giving me the idea I was reading a journalistic account rather than a historic novel. Maybe I've just read too many WWII novels of late to still be completely unbiased when picking up a new one. All in all, while perhaps not a favorite, there are numerous elements in the book that I enjoyed so much I would still recommend this one for a slightly lighter WWII novel: the synchronicity of the story lines in both timelines, elements popping up in both story lines, the beauty of train travel and the meet-cute that can happen whenever we open ourselves up to it, and above all, the faith of Alex and Eliza that all would be well. A big thank you to Harper Collins UK, One More Chapter and NetGalley for providing a complementary eARC of the book in return for an impartial review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alison Bradbury

    This cracking little story follows the lives of two different women, the daring Eliza in 1940, and the shy Ellie in present day. Though these women's lives are years apart, they both embark on their journeys in the same place with a book and a silk dress. Present Day: Ellie Nightingale boards a 1940's themed sleeper train to Penzance on the way to visit a cottage she has been left in her grandmothers will. Armed only with a vintage Christian Dior silk dress, her violin and a journal also left to This cracking little story follows the lives of two different women, the daring Eliza in 1940, and the shy Ellie in present day. Though these women's lives are years apart, they both embark on their journeys in the same place with a book and a silk dress. Present Day: Ellie Nightingale boards a 1940's themed sleeper train to Penzance on the way to visit a cottage she has been left in her grandmothers will. Armed only with a vintage Christian Dior silk dress, her violin and a journal also left to her, Ellie feels rather shy but has pledged to be 'Ellie Nightingale For One Night Only' and to take some risks that her life until now has prevented. On the train she meets the dashing Joe who is visiting Penzance for reasons of his own. They strike up a conversation on a trip that changes both of their lives. 1940's Eliza Grey flees her life as Lady Arbuthnot for adventure during the Second World War. A dedicated artist she yearns to be amongst the action and, thwarted by the authorities who don't want to send a female artist to the front lines, joins the nurses and is sent to the front lines anyway. On a final weekend away before leaving she boards the train to sleeper train to Penzance to stay at her family cottage. Wearing her lovely silk dress and carrying her book she meets former RAF pilot Alex. Alex is soon to be off to America to be a journalist but meeting Eliza changes the course of his life and the couple pledge to meet in Berlin. The main bulk of the story is set during WW2 and the sights and sounds are captured beautifully. The characters are wonderful and you feel sympathetic and despairing all at the same time. As the story focuses more closely on Eliza's story her character gets the most development and Ellie at times feels a little sidelined. However, this is a wonderful story and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lynn (Ellesea Loves Reading)

    A dual timeline novel. Night Train To Berlin ties together the history of an emerald green dress, a clock and a night train journey from London Paddington To Penzance. In 1944, Lady Eliza Arbuthnot (nee Grey), is a wartime artist and meets former RAF pilot, Joseph Alexander (Alex) Levine on the night train to Cornwall. Both are alone with tough personal decisions to make. They share a table in the dining car and over the course of the evening, they get to know one another. On arriving in Cornwall A dual timeline novel. Night Train To Berlin ties together the history of an emerald green dress, a clock and a night train journey from London Paddington To Penzance. In 1944, Lady Eliza Arbuthnot (nee Grey), is a wartime artist and meets former RAF pilot, Joseph Alexander (Alex) Levine on the night train to Cornwall. Both are alone with tough personal decisions to make. They share a table in the dining car and over the course of the evening, they get to know one another. On arriving in Cornwall, they part ways only to meet again and begin a heart-wrenching relationship set against the backdrop of WWII. Armed with her suitcase and violin, Ellie Nightingale boards the night train to Penzance. She is travelling to a cottage she has spent many childhood holidays. On-board, she meets Joe Burton from Leeds. Over the course of the journey, they realise a mutual coincidence, sparking the beginning of a tentative romance. The author skilfully weaves the past with the present as the links between the two couples are unravelled. The synchronisation of the train journeys makes it easy to follow important aspects of their stories. The strongest timeline is Eliza and Alex's in WWII which includes vivid descriptions depicting the horror of war particularly around the time of the D-Day landing and beyond. All the characters are likeable and relatable, although Eliza's attitude is questionable sometimes. Alex is a proud war hero, who takes risks. Ellie is sweet, in a fragile way. Joe is the one we don't learn so much about. The ending is satisfactory. Ellie and Joe are happy for now while Eliza and Alex's is ambiguous. It leaves the reader to contemplate what happens subsequently. Although it's difficult to fully grasp what the author intends for us to understand. Overall, a captivating novel with an encompassing, epic love story. ***arc generously received courtesy of 0ne More Chapter via NetGalley***

  9. 5 out of 5

    Debby*BabyDee

    I was delighted to receive this read from the publisher as I enjoyed the "The Last Letter from Juliet" written by author, Melanie Hudson. I am not fond of reading stories that toggle between two time periods, however I decided to give it a try. The story involves two couples and their love story...Ellie and Joe in the current day, and Eliza and Alex, from the past. What to say about this book...Only that I wished the pace would have been a bit faster in the beginning. I became bored early on and I was delighted to receive this read from the publisher as I enjoyed the "The Last Letter from Juliet" written by author, Melanie Hudson. I am not fond of reading stories that toggle between two time periods, however I decided to give it a try. The story involves two couples and their love story...Ellie and Joe in the current day, and Eliza and Alex, from the past. What to say about this book...Only that I wished the pace would have been a bit faster in the beginning. I became bored early on and by the fourth or fifth chapter I had to put it down. Although, the story itself seemed interesting from the description, I just couldn't get past the grammatical and run on sentences. The numerous mistakes clearly distracted me from enjoying the story at that point and detracted from the flow of it as well. In fairness to the author, I decided to continue the story and surprisingly it picked up and held my attention...especially the end that I truly found to be profound and loveable, Oh, there was a clock and hope of meeting the one you loved...whether in the past or in the future...there would be a meeting. It would be a meeting at the same place, same time and hoping to meet that same person that you loved. Thats when my heart warmed for Ellie and Joe but turned heartfelt for Alex and Eliza. I enjoyed the second half of this story more than the first. Not sure how to quantify my rating as there was parts that were good and some that were not so good. I believe my rating would have been a little higher had it not been for the editorial mistakes. There is still an interest in this author's works but hope to read something a bit different than historical war genre. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for this ARC for a fair and honest review. All opinions expressed are those of my own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Sinclair

    Who are you going to meet aboard The Night Train to Berlin? Anything is possible when you stroll down the train aisle, in a to die for emerald green gown. I absolutely loved this historical fiction novel, set in a dual timeline, present day, and 1944. Eliza a beautiful, independent young artist, also known as Lady Arbuthnot, is taking the night train to Cornwall. To have some down time, at her cottage along the sea. She meets Alex, a dashing bomber pilot, and the two hit it off. Creating a spark Who are you going to meet aboard The Night Train to Berlin? Anything is possible when you stroll down the train aisle, in a to die for emerald green gown. I absolutely loved this historical fiction novel, set in a dual timeline, present day, and 1944. Eliza a beautiful, independent young artist, also known as Lady Arbuthnot, is taking the night train to Cornwall. To have some down time, at her cottage along the sea. She meets Alex, a dashing bomber pilot, and the two hit it off. Creating a spark that cannot be extinguished, no matter how hard Eliza tries. Fast forward to present day. Ellie, a chronically ill, violinist, also on a train, bound for Cornwall. Is fighting her own battles, but hers are within her own body. Not being able to go out and experience what healthy people take for granted, She is off on a grand adventure! To her Great Grandmothers cottage, the exact same cottage Eliza was heading for in 1944. While sitting down for a 1940's style evening, she is sat with Joe. A man that catches her eye and her heart. The connections between these two women's lives makes the book even more enchanting, and the characters even more enjoyable. The book hooks you from chapter one, and you are flung back into the trenches of WWII. Melanie Hudson is able to capture not only the emotion that is plentiful, when faced with the horror of World War II. She is also able to capture a softer side to the horrors. A wonderful friendship and love that begins aboard a night train, between Eliza and Alex. Also, a best friend who knows Eliza inside and out, Nancy. Both strong, independent, courageous women. Who want to do all they can during the war, and become nurses. Everyone needs to get aboard, The Night Train to Berlin! It is a fascinating tale that keeps you riveted to the very last page, and keeps you wanting for more. I need more Eliza and Ellie in my life! Thank you to NetGalley for allowing me to review this amazing book!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    Alex and Eliza meet in 1944 on a night train to Paddington. There is an instant connection, but their timing is off. Joe and Ellie meet in 2019 on another night train to Paddington, this one a train celebrating the war with music, dance, food and costume. There is an instant connection between them, too, and their timing looks like it could be perfect. But Ellie has serious health issues and hesitates to commit to a future that might not be. There is an intriguing connection between Alex and Joe Alex and Eliza meet in 1944 on a night train to Paddington. There is an instant connection, but their timing is off. Joe and Ellie meet in 2019 on another night train to Paddington, this one a train celebrating the war with music, dance, food and costume. There is an instant connection between them, too, and their timing looks like it could be perfect. But Ellie has serious health issues and hesitates to commit to a future that might not be. There is an intriguing connection between Alex and Joe and between Eliza and Ellie. How has the past affected the present? The Night Train to Berlin paints a vivid picture not only of beautiful Cornwall but of the horrors of WWII and the roles people played. The danger and uncertainty, the hope battling the hopelessness, the fatigue, the pain, the love, the loss – all seem real. We get little glimpses throughout, starting with the prologue, that both raise and dash our hopes. In the present, things are going so well for Joe and Ellie, she is literally having the best time of her life, that you want to jump on the train and tell her to be brave, to go for it! The connections between all the characters seem almost magical. There’s the train to Paddington and Cornwall, of course, and a cottage and a journal and a clock. I wish the author had taken more advantage of these magical elements and connections and given us more details and glimpses into the lives of all four of these people, instead of more often providing vague and confusing hints that many times made this seem more like a mystery we are trying to solve with clues than an historical romance. Thanks to the author and Harper Collins UK One More Chapter for providing an advanced copy of The Night Train to Berlin via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. I enjoyed this book and do not hesitate to recommend it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shirley McAllister

    Unexpected Encounters A tale of two sets of lonely people. Both meet on the night train to Berlin. Ellie and Joe in present time, Alex and Eliza in 1944 during WWII. Both couples are escaping from their current life to find peace and make choices about their futures. Both couples fall in love and spend time in a cottage in Cornwall on the beach. As they ride the Night train they have a magical evening and fall in love. Circumstances will take them in different directions, but they end up finding Unexpected Encounters A tale of two sets of lonely people. Both meet on the night train to Berlin. Ellie and Joe in present time, Alex and Eliza in 1944 during WWII. Both couples are escaping from their current life to find peace and make choices about their futures. Both couples fall in love and spend time in a cottage in Cornwall on the beach. As they ride the Night train they have a magical evening and fall in love. Circumstances will take them in different directions, but they end up finding each other again. A broken clock figures in both stories and is a prominent part of the story. I liked the sentence used "Choosing to live a life with an open heart and an attitude of hope rather than one of dread and fear." as well as the phrase they used with each other "And All Shall be Well." The book was a good clean romance story, the conversations they had were insightful and meaningful. The description of the countryside both during and after the war were very descriptive. During the war scenes the story was rather real and true to life. I did like reading the story, especially that of Alex and Eliza. I liked how Eliza was strong and held up for her rights as a woman, good story. I felt sorry for Alex, it was very sad. I did not care for the ending, it rather left me hanging. I kept waiting to see what would happen....and the book was done. It was a good read and I would recommend it, but you have to make up your own ending, I made up a few different ones. Thanks to Melanie Hudson, Harper Collins U.K. , One More Chapter, and NetGalley for allowing me to read and advanced copy for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    The Night Train to Berlin has a very interesting premise. Dual timelines set on the Night Train to Cornwall. The first time period is 1944. Alex, a former pilot who survived the Battle of Britain with a scarred face meets Lady Eliza, an artist, in the dinner car when they are seated across from each other. The second time period is present day. Ellie, a violinist, is the great granddaughter of Eliza’s very good war-time friend Nancy meets Joe who owns a novelties shop on the night train. I thoug The Night Train to Berlin has a very interesting premise. Dual timelines set on the Night Train to Cornwall. The first time period is 1944. Alex, a former pilot who survived the Battle of Britain with a scarred face meets Lady Eliza, an artist, in the dinner car when they are seated across from each other. The second time period is present day. Ellie, a violinist, is the great granddaughter of Eliza’s very good war-time friend Nancy meets Joe who owns a novelties shop on the night train. I thought the premise of the train, the beach in Cornwall, two love matches on the train was interesting. I liked the idea of Eliza being stationed in France as a nurse and a sketch artist of the war from her perspective an interesting twist. Besides sketching scenes of what she saw. Eliza has another purpose given to her by Nora, Alex’s sister. Alex is in Europe as a journalist assigned to General Patton. The author gives he reader the feelings of what war is really like on a personal level. My problem with the book is that the end comes quickly and does not resolve Alex and Eliza’s story. Too much time was spent on scenes from the various times Alex and Eliza see each other for a few seconds and on the train with Ellie and Joe. I think a more concrete effort on the Epilogue would have been helpful. For me, it was as foggy as the steam coming from the train on the beautiful cover of the book. My thanks to Harper Collins UK -One More Chapter and NetGalley. The opinions in this review are my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    The cover alone evokes atmosphere and nostalgia! And then you open the book and become immersed in two timelines, one from the 1940s and one at the present time. A trip on the Orient Express is on my to do list so am always attracted to train stories. The author describes scenery, trains, historical bits and characters beautifully. Symbolism plays a key role, too. The time and clock ties are charming, as is the name Meadowsweet Cottage. This book is about loss, love and life. And hope. Eliza and The cover alone evokes atmosphere and nostalgia! And then you open the book and become immersed in two timelines, one from the 1940s and one at the present time. A trip on the Orient Express is on my to do list so am always attracted to train stories. The author describes scenery, trains, historical bits and characters beautifully. Symbolism plays a key role, too. The time and clock ties are charming, as is the name Meadowsweet Cottage. This book is about loss, love and life. And hope. Eliza and Alex meet in the 1940s during the war. I like that the horrors of war aren't glossed over as they are important to know about. Eliza is a married nurse and war artist. When she meets Joe her life is instantly changed. So is his. Ellie goes on an adventure and meets Joe on a night train in present day and they immediately click. But Ellie has a secret. They all do. And they also keep secrets from others in their lives. The characters of Eliza and Alex are described well but I didn't feel the same about Ellie and Joe, especially Joe. It seemed more energies were spent on the others, leaving him a little flat. Still a very enjoyable read! Women's Fiction and Historical Fiction fans ought to read this and other books by Melanie Hudson. My sincere thank you to HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter and NetGalley for the privilege of reading the e-ARC of this delightful book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa McCardle

    This book kept me on my toes from the first word until the last word. It is told in a dual timeline between 1944 and 2020. In 1944 we meet Eliza and Alex aboard the night train to Berlin. Eliza is on her way to her cottage in Cornwall when she meets Alex in the dining car. Eliza is dressed in a green silk gown and Alex joins her for dinner because there are no other seats available. He is an injured RAF pilot turned war correspondent and Eliza is a nurse and war artist. Eliza knows who he is imm This book kept me on my toes from the first word until the last word. It is told in a dual timeline between 1944 and 2020. In 1944 we meet Eliza and Alex aboard the night train to Berlin. Eliza is on her way to her cottage in Cornwall when she meets Alex in the dining car. Eliza is dressed in a green silk gown and Alex joins her for dinner because there are no other seats available. He is an injured RAF pilot turned war correspondent and Eliza is a nurse and war artist. Eliza knows who he is immediately because he criticized her drawings in the local paper as being all sunshine and happiness. And did not fit his definition of harsh war realities. When he finds out who she is he is embarrassed and doubts her because she uses her maiden name for her drawings. In 2020 we meet Eliza (Ellie) and Joe aboard the same night train for a reenactment of the 1944 trip. Ellie is a musician and Joe owns a curiosity shop in Leeds. Ellie is wearing the same silk green gown that Eliza wore and Joe is dressed as an RAF pilot. Ellie is on the trip because her great grandmother left her the train trip, green silk dress and Eliza's cottage in her will. This is such a wonderful book and left me wanting to know what happened to Eliza and especially Alex. This book is for anyone who loves historical fiction.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Paddington Station, present day A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and an old, well-read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when she meets fellow passenger Joe she feels like she has been given that rarest of gifts…a second chance. Paddington Station, 1944 Beneath the shadow of the war, which rages across Europe, Alex and Eliza meet by chance. She is a gutsy painter de Paddington Station, present day A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and an old, well-read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when she meets fellow passenger Joe she feels like she has been given that rarest of gifts…a second chance. Paddington Station, 1944 Beneath the shadow of the war, which rages across Europe, Alex and Eliza meet by chance. She is a gutsy painter desperate to get to the frontline as a war artist and he is a wounded RAF pilot now commissioned as a war correspondent. With time slipping away they make only one promise: to meet in Berlin when this is all over. This is the first book I’ve read of the author & I was drawn to it as it’s a dual timeline. I found it to be well written but the pace at the start was very slow & it took me a few days to read it in dribs & dabs. However I’m glad I did stick with it as the pace increased & I found myself captivated by the two love stories. I liked how the broken clock features in both stories. The characters were well portrayed but I would have preferred more depth of character. I also was left feeling that not everything was resolved & I wanted to find out what happened next My honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    The Night Train To Berlin by Melanie Hudson is a beautiful dual time-line love story that will lodge deep in your heart. The stories are set in 1944 and present day. There were parallels in the two time periods between the two couples who meet on a night train to Cornwall. The two females are linked by a friendship thread from 1944. The chapters alternate the action as present day is aiming to recreate the war period. It is romanticized. The reader hears about the true horrors of war as we follow The Night Train To Berlin by Melanie Hudson is a beautiful dual time-line love story that will lodge deep in your heart. The stories are set in 1944 and present day. There were parallels in the two time periods between the two couples who meet on a night train to Cornwall. The two females are linked by a friendship thread from 1944. The chapters alternate the action as present day is aiming to recreate the war period. It is romanticized. The reader hears about the true horrors of war as we follow a war artist from Britain to mainland Europe. Running alongside the love story in 1944 is the tremendous bravery of all those involved in the war effort – whether civilians or servicemen. It was a time of great sacrifice and courage. There are some truly dreadful scenes to be witnessed. Throughout it all the characters hang on to the hope that “all shall be well.” The Night Train To Berlin is beautifully written. The love radiates from the pages as we realise that true love never dies. I received a free copy of the book from the Facebook group OMC Blogger Community via Net Galley. All opinions are my own.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is an excellent story set across two time frames, one being 1944, the other being the present day. It tells a simple story, each based around a train journey originating at Paddington Station. Each ostensibly ending in Cornwall. How the book has the title Night Train to Berlin, I won't say because it would spoil the complicated yet exquisite journeys of the people involved. What I liked most about the book is the evocative quality of the writing. The descriptions of the sights, sound and pl This is an excellent story set across two time frames, one being 1944, the other being the present day. It tells a simple story, each based around a train journey originating at Paddington Station. Each ostensibly ending in Cornwall. How the book has the title Night Train to Berlin, I won't say because it would spoil the complicated yet exquisite journeys of the people involved. What I liked most about the book is the evocative quality of the writing. The descriptions of the sights, sound and places creates an enchanting atmosphere throughout. I have not read any previous books by Melanie Hudson. I chose this based on the historical history subject matter. I didn't realise it was such a romantic fiction novel. However the attention to detail regarding the historical fact means that the author is able to craft some excellent characters which is what gives this book it's charm. On the strength of this book I will certainly look out future Melanie Hudson books. I give my thanks to Netgalley and HarperCollins UK (One More Chapter) for an advance copy of this book in exchange for this review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    NetGalley Member Review Cover Image: The Night Train to Berlin The Night Train to Berlin by Melanie Hudson Pub Date: 22 Apr 2021 Review by jeanie m, Reviewer Last updated on 23 Mar 2021 My Recommendation With grateful thanks to netgalley and melanie hudson for an early copy in return for an honest opinion. Firstly can I say this is my first time reading this author and hopefully not my last. The night train to Berlin is a slow burning tale told with a twin timeline in the present day and in the 1940's. A Ta NetGalley Member Review Cover Image: The Night Train to Berlin The Night Train to Berlin by Melanie Hudson Pub Date: 22 Apr 2021 Review by jeanie m, Reviewer Last updated on 23 Mar 2021 My Recommendation With grateful thanks to netgalley and melanie hudson for an early copy in return for an honest opinion. Firstly can I say this is my first time reading this author and hopefully not my last. The night train to Berlin is a slow burning tale told with a twin timeline in the present day and in the 1940's. A Tale of love and loss and about taking opportunity's when you can, seize the moment as one never knows if it will ever return. The love between Eliza and Alex in the 40's and Joe from Leeds and Ellie present day. A clock not working stuck at 3.15 pm what is the significance and a wonderful journal with beautiful words and sketches and paintings what do they have in common. I absolutely adored this beautiful magical tale can highly recommend.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Isabella

    I must confess I have very mixed feelings about this book. It is undoubtedly very well written but it lacks of that little something that made me literally love The Wedding Cake Tree ( the characters are still with me and this is one of those books that I am going to read again and again, for comfort ). Would I recommend it? Of course I would, but I'm afraid it was a bit of a disappointment. Still, I appreciated the masterful description of the scenery, so vivid I swear I shivered with cold when I must confess I have very mixed feelings about this book. It is undoubtedly very well written but it lacks of that little something that made me literally love The Wedding Cake Tree ( the characters are still with me and this is one of those books that I am going to read again and again, for comfort ). Would I recommend it? Of course I would, but I'm afraid it was a bit of a disappointment. Still, I appreciated the masterful description of the scenery, so vivid I swear I shivered with cold when Eliza crossed the river; the details of both train journeys and the synchronicity of the story lines ( perhaps too many coincidences, which felt forced into the story line, rather too implausible even for fiction! ). The ending is another matter entirely. An open ending is not wrong per se, but it felt like the author rushed to end both story lines and the result isn't exactly satisfying. Nice read, but not outstanding. Many thanks to HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter, NetGalley and the author for an early copy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tamsin Preece

    I’ve always wanted to ride a sleeper train, so the opening chapters of this book grabbed me instantly. There are two stories told. Eliza and Alex, back in the 1940s and Ellie and Joe in present day. I liked both, but Ellie and Joe weren’t quite as fleshed out as Eliza and Alex- I didn’t feel as attached to them. Eliza and Alex meet on the train and begin a romance that spans countries and years. There are a lot of coincidences involved, but it’s a good, gripping tale and it is well paced and writ I’ve always wanted to ride a sleeper train, so the opening chapters of this book grabbed me instantly. There are two stories told. Eliza and Alex, back in the 1940s and Ellie and Joe in present day. I liked both, but Ellie and Joe weren’t quite as fleshed out as Eliza and Alex- I didn’t feel as attached to them. Eliza and Alex meet on the train and begin a romance that spans countries and years. There are a lot of coincidences involved, but it’s a good, gripping tale and it is well paced and written. For me, this book was let down by the ending. It felt rushed and rather like the author couldn’t make up her mind so left it ambiguous for the reader to draw their own conclusions. I find this incredibly frustrating and it ruined a good story for me. I wanted to know how the two couples were linked- I love dual timeline historical fiction but this was not completed well. It’s a good story and I’d read more by this author, but this one fell at the last hurdle. Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for my copy of this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Paddington Station, present day: A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and a well- read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when she meets fellow passenger Joe, she feels she's been given a second chance. Paddington Station, 1944: Beneath the shadow of the war, Alex and Eliza meet by chance. She's a gutsy painter desperate to get to the front line as a war artist and he i Paddington Station, present day: A young woman boards the sleeper train to Cornwall with only a beautiful emerald silk evening dress and a well- read diary full of sketches. Ellie Nightingale is a shy violinist who plays like her heart is broken. But when she meets fellow passenger Joe, she feels she's been given a second chance. Paddington Station, 1944: Beneath the shadow of the war, Alex and Eliza meet by chance. She's a gutsy painter desperate to get to the front line as a war artist and he is a wounded RAF pilot now commissioned as a war correspondent. They make a promise to each other: to meet in Berlin when the war is over. This story is told over a duel timeline - 1940's and the present day. This is a lovely historical romance story. A love story of two couples decades apart. The pace is slow to start but it does eventually pick up. The characters are likable. I absolutely love Cornwall, a beautiful setting for any story. The story is descriptively written. I would like to thank #NetGalley, #HarperCollinsUK #OneMoreChapter for my ARC of #TheNightTrainToBerlin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Cayley

    Eliza is an artist painting propaganda art during World War 2 and caught in an unhappy marriage with a much older wealthy husband. On the train to Penzance she meets Alex and her life and art change dramatically. In the present day, Ellie inherits a cottage in Cornwall: on a WW2 reminiscence journey she finds herself opposite Joe, and her life changes too. The weaker aspects of the book are clear. Joe is insufficiently characterised. Coincidences abound. The parallels between the two train journe Eliza is an artist painting propaganda art during World War 2 and caught in an unhappy marriage with a much older wealthy husband. On the train to Penzance she meets Alex and her life and art change dramatically. In the present day, Ellie inherits a cottage in Cornwall: on a WW2 reminiscence journey she finds herself opposite Joe, and her life changes too. The weaker aspects of the book are clear. Joe is insufficiently characterised. Coincidences abound. The parallels between the two train journeys strain credibility. But these weaknesses are more than made up for by a captivating book which holds the attention, and whose scope extends to the horrors of the invasion of France and the Battle of the Bulge. I had little difficulty suspending my disbelief in parts of the plot as I was swept along by story. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for letting me have an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gill

    I read the book to the end but it wasn’t really my kind of story. In all honesty I chose to read this because of the author. I have read all of Melanie Hudson’s books and enjoyed them which is why I wanted to read this one. Had it been written by any other author, it’s one that I probably would have overlooked as I just think everything there is to say about WW2 has been said now. It’s a dual time novel, set both in the present and towards the end of WW2 in 1944. I did feel that the setting durin I read the book to the end but it wasn’t really my kind of story. In all honesty I chose to read this because of the author. I have read all of Melanie Hudson’s books and enjoyed them which is why I wanted to read this one. Had it been written by any other author, it’s one that I probably would have overlooked as I just think everything there is to say about WW2 has been said now. It’s a dual time novel, set both in the present and towards the end of WW2 in 1944. I did feel that the setting during the war was somewhat incidental to the story, as it is, in essence, a romance and a rather sentimental one at that. It is purely down to personal taste as to why I didn’t enjoy it. As always the authors writing is excellent, really creating the atmosphere of the time and keeping up a reasonable pace. Hopefully her next book might be set in the present time because I do enjoy her writing, but this one was a little too heavy on the romance for me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Deborah J Miles

    I've previously read The Last Letter from Juliet by this author which I absolutely adored, and so I had high hopes for this story too. Sadly, I was quickly disappointed when I found I was not enjoying it as much as I'd expected. The blurb ticks all the boxes: WWII, duel time line, romance, coastal location... I was wrong-footed by the title. I thought the action would be aboard and around the night train heading for Berlin. Instead, for the greater part, it was a night train heading to Cornwall. I've previously read The Last Letter from Juliet by this author which I absolutely adored, and so I had high hopes for this story too. Sadly, I was quickly disappointed when I found I was not enjoying it as much as I'd expected. The blurb ticks all the boxes: WWII, duel time line, romance, coastal location... I was wrong-footed by the title. I thought the action would be aboard and around the night train heading for Berlin. Instead, for the greater part, it was a night train heading to Cornwall. I felt the pace was too slow at the begining, and that's probably a lot to do with why I struggled to get into it. When the pace did quicken, I wasn't sufficiently invested in any of the characters or their stories to become totally absorbed in the story. I managed to finish the book, but felt the ending was rushed. It left me without any satisfactory answers to my questions about the characters - how the two couples were linked and their stories were concluded.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Terry A.

    I thank Harper Collins USA and One More Chapter for allowing me this ARC via Netgalley. This story is a mashup of multiple genres: historical fiction, split time lines, WWII wartime action and politics, feminist career women in arts and journalism, discreet romance, a nod to reincarnation, coincidences and courage and tragedy. Yet all were on the “light” side that didn’t drive me to be invested in the characters. The theme of “seize the day and love” was overcome by the pressures of war and a rel I thank Harper Collins USA and One More Chapter for allowing me this ARC via Netgalley. This story is a mashup of multiple genres: historical fiction, split time lines, WWII wartime action and politics, feminist career women in arts and journalism, discreet romance, a nod to reincarnation, coincidences and courage and tragedy. Yet all were on the “light” side that didn’t drive me to be invested in the characters. The theme of “seize the day and love” was overcome by the pressures of war and a reluctance to break existing moral codes. The abrupt ending, leaving the reader to infer the fates of a number of leading characters, was not effective for me. I wish the author had committed to a clear focus, rather than trying to tick so many different genre boxes in search of story-telling success. Rounded up to 3 stars.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    It was OK, but not my favorite by the author (I loved "The Last Letter From Juliet.") The story moved very slow, especially the scenes on the train. The ones between Eliza and Alex and also Ellie and Joe. Wasn't a fan of any of the characters. Some parts of the book seemed very unrealistic and there was so much going on, primarily with Eliza. The spy aspect was definitely the one part that could have been left out. I didn't enjoy the epilogue at all. Ellie's reasons for rejecting Joe seemed sill It was OK, but not my favorite by the author (I loved "The Last Letter From Juliet.") The story moved very slow, especially the scenes on the train. The ones between Eliza and Alex and also Ellie and Joe. Wasn't a fan of any of the characters. Some parts of the book seemed very unrealistic and there was so much going on, primarily with Eliza. The spy aspect was definitely the one part that could have been left out. I didn't enjoy the epilogue at all. Ellie's reasons for rejecting Joe seemed silly. It was predictable what was going to happen with them. Not sure that's the right title for the book. Give the book a try. It just wasn't for me. I look forward to reading more books by the author. I received a complimentary copy of this book from HarperCollins UK, One More Chapter through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Webley

    Already a fan of this author, this fabulous fictional read - a dual timeline historical fiction romance fest - is set against the backdrop of WW2 and the rugged Cornish coast. Could anything be more wonderful for a weekend read? The story takes you into the past and will demonstrates how love binds people together no matter of time or distance. This book is absolutely dripping with emotion; warm, sentimental, yet strong, independent women who fight for what they want, are determined to make thin Already a fan of this author, this fabulous fictional read - a dual timeline historical fiction romance fest - is set against the backdrop of WW2 and the rugged Cornish coast. Could anything be more wonderful for a weekend read? The story takes you into the past and will demonstrates how love binds people together no matter of time or distance. This book is absolutely dripping with emotion; warm, sentimental, yet strong, independent women who fight for what they want, are determined to make things happen and don’t care if they go against the norm. I couldn’t get enough of each characters story; I feel I feared the inevitable and I should have just enjoyed and savoured every moment just as the characters all do. I love historical fiction and this book just caught me by the heart and journeyed me through time, I felt so caught up in the lives of these wonderful women that I was gutted when it came to the end. I wanted more! The ending is one you can draw so many conclusions from; I think I will opt for the nicer, romantic happy ever after.. Highly recommended. I cannot wait for more from the author.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cory Beyer

    Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC. 1944 - Lady Eliza, in a marriage of convenience, is riding a train to Penbrook where she has a cabin of her own. On this trip she meets Alex who immediately catches her attention. Eliza, a war artist and Alex, a member of the press have different orders but will one day meet again in Berlin. Present day, Ellie on the same train with a weekend reenactment of the 1940's, meets Joe. They too share life and love on this train while she explains the journal she ho Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC. 1944 - Lady Eliza, in a marriage of convenience, is riding a train to Penbrook where she has a cabin of her own. On this trip she meets Alex who immediately catches her attention. Eliza, a war artist and Alex, a member of the press have different orders but will one day meet again in Berlin. Present day, Ellie on the same train with a weekend reenactment of the 1940's, meets Joe. They too share life and love on this train while she explains the journal she holds so dear about a lady named Eliza. This book was yet another frustrating story of two people that so want to be together but keep passing due to the war but still a sweet read. #thenighttraintoberlin #melaniehudson #apr2021

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    In present day, Ellie's great-grandmother Nancy left her not only a cottage in Cornwall, but also the money for a train ticket on a sleeper car and instructions that she take a trip as a solo adventure. Eliza Grey, Lady Arbuthnot, took the same trip in 1944 during World War 2. She was an artist and an auxiliary nurse who had volunteered in London during the blitz. The dual timelines overlap in many ways. Both Ellie and Eliza have the same cabin on the train. And in both cases, a single gentleman In present day, Ellie's great-grandmother Nancy left her not only a cottage in Cornwall, but also the money for a train ticket on a sleeper car and instructions that she take a trip as a solo adventure. Eliza Grey, Lady Arbuthnot, took the same trip in 1944 during World War 2. She was an artist and an auxiliary nurse who had volunteered in London during the blitz. The dual timelines overlap in many ways. Both Ellie and Eliza have the same cabin on the train. And in both cases, a single gentleman is seated across from them for dinner. I was delighted by this unique take on historical fiction. It raised questions about war-time propaganda, hope, and censorship. And it made me think about destiny. Thank you to One More Chapter and NetGalley for this advanced reader copy. 4.5/5

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.