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How Google, Facebook and Amazon threaten our Democracy What is the impact of surveillance capitalism on our right to free speech? The Internet once promised to be a place of extraordinary freedom beyond the control of money or politics, but today corporations and platforms exercise more control over our ability to access information and share knowledge to a greater extent t How Google, Facebook and Amazon threaten our Democracy What is the impact of surveillance capitalism on our right to free speech? The Internet once promised to be a place of extraordinary freedom beyond the control of money or politics, but today corporations and platforms exercise more control over our ability to access information and share knowledge to a greater extent than any state. From the online calls to arms in the thick of the Arab Spring to the contemporary front line of misinformation, Jillian York charts the war over our digital rights. She looks at both how the big corporations have become unaccountable censors, and the devastating impact it has had on those who have been censored. In Silicon Values, leading campaigner Jillian York, looks at how our rights have become increasingly undermined by the major corporations desire to harvest our personal data and turn it into profit. She also looks at how governments have used the same technology to monitor citizens and threatened our ability to communicate. As a result our daily lives, and private thoughts, are being policed in an unprecedented manner. Who decides the difference between political debate and hate speech? How does this impact on our identity, our ability to create communities and to protest? Who regulates the censors? In response to this threat to our democracy, York proposes a user-powered movement against the platforms that demands change and a new form of ownership over our own data.


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How Google, Facebook and Amazon threaten our Democracy What is the impact of surveillance capitalism on our right to free speech? The Internet once promised to be a place of extraordinary freedom beyond the control of money or politics, but today corporations and platforms exercise more control over our ability to access information and share knowledge to a greater extent t How Google, Facebook and Amazon threaten our Democracy What is the impact of surveillance capitalism on our right to free speech? The Internet once promised to be a place of extraordinary freedom beyond the control of money or politics, but today corporations and platforms exercise more control over our ability to access information and share knowledge to a greater extent than any state. From the online calls to arms in the thick of the Arab Spring to the contemporary front line of misinformation, Jillian York charts the war over our digital rights. She looks at both how the big corporations have become unaccountable censors, and the devastating impact it has had on those who have been censored. In Silicon Values, leading campaigner Jillian York, looks at how our rights have become increasingly undermined by the major corporations desire to harvest our personal data and turn it into profit. She also looks at how governments have used the same technology to monitor citizens and threatened our ability to communicate. As a result our daily lives, and private thoughts, are being policed in an unprecedented manner. Who decides the difference between political debate and hate speech? How does this impact on our identity, our ability to create communities and to protest? Who regulates the censors? In response to this threat to our democracy, York proposes a user-powered movement against the platforms that demands change and a new form of ownership over our own data.

30 review for Silicon Values: The Future of Free Speech Under Surveillance Capitalism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    At times “ Silicon Values” is an interesting treatise on the how power has become concentrated in the hands of a few Silicon Valley elites and how these companies have ended up working with governments around the world to censor opinion and information. Unfortunately, the treatise later descends into a series of ad hominem attacks on Israel (equating Zionism with Marxism, for example) and a lot of inside chatter about events in Libya and Egypt minus context. If you are looking for a straightforw At times “ Silicon Values” is an interesting treatise on the how power has become concentrated in the hands of a few Silicon Valley elites and how these companies have ended up working with governments around the world to censor opinion and information. Unfortunately, the treatise later descends into a series of ad hominem attacks on Israel (equating Zionism with Marxism, for example) and a lot of inside chatter about events in Libya and Egypt minus context. If you are looking for a straightforward analysis of Big Tech and censorship, this book simply loses its focus.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Руслан

    This will be difficult to read for many. I can assume that there will be criticism about the political part of the book, but I understand why Jillian York put these examples. Yes, censorship, politics, geopolitics, economic interests are often intertwined, and the book shows how this is reflected. I know the author from her time in Global Voices and I can say that she is one of the few experts in the field who know exactly what they are talking about. The book is worth reading, even if you disag This will be difficult to read for many. I can assume that there will be criticism about the political part of the book, but I understand why Jillian York put these examples. Yes, censorship, politics, geopolitics, economic interests are often intertwined, and the book shows how this is reflected. I know the author from her time in Global Voices and I can say that she is one of the few experts in the field who know exactly what they are talking about. The book is worth reading, even if you disagree with some of the theses.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Viola

    https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/4969... Who Should Decide? On January 7, following the violent white supremacist riots that breached the US Capitol, Twitter and Facebook both suspended President Donald Trump from their platforms. The next day, Twitter made its suspension permanent. Many praised the decision for preventing the president from doing more harm at a time when his adherents are taking cues from his false claims that the election was rigged. Republicans criticized it as a violation of T https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/4969... Who Should Decide? On January 7, following the violent white supremacist riots that breached the US Capitol, Twitter and Facebook both suspended President Donald Trump from their platforms. The next day, Twitter made its suspension permanent. Many praised the decision for preventing the president from doing more harm at a time when his adherents are taking cues from his false claims that the election was rigged. Republicans criticized it as a violation of Trump’s free speech. Silicon Values by Jillian C. York 304 pages / published by Verso March 2021 / ISBN 9781788738804 It wasn’t. Just as Trump has the First Amendment right to spew deranged nonsense, so too do tech companies have the First Amendment right to remove that content. While some pundits have called the decision unprecedented—or “a turning point for the battle for control over digital speech,” as Edward Snowden tweeted—it’s not: not at all. Not only do Twitter and Facebook regularly remove all types of protected expression, but Trump’s case isn’t even the first time the platforms have removed a major political figure. Following reports of genocide in Myanmar, Facebook banned the country’s top general and other military leaders who were using the platform to foment hate. The company also bans Hezbollah from its platform because of its status as a US-designated foreign terror organization, despite the fact that the party holds seats in Lebanon’s parliament. And it bans leaders in countries under US sanctions. At the same time, both Facebook and Twitter have stuck to the tenet that content posted by elected officials deserves more protection than material from ordinary individuals, thus giving politicians’ speech more power than that of the people. This position is at odds with plenty of evidence that hateful speech from public figures has a greater impact than similar speech from ordinary users. Clearly, though, these policies aren’t applied evenly around the world. After all, Trump is far from the only world leader using these platforms to foment unrest. One need only look to the BJP, the party of India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi, for more examples. Though there are certainly short-term benefits—and plenty of satisfaction—to be had from banning Trump, the decision (and those that came before it) raise more foundational questions about speech. Who should have the right to decide what we can and can’t say? What does it mean when a corporation can censor a government official? Facebook’s policy staff, and Mark Zuckerberg in particular, have for years shown themselves to be poor judges of what is or isn’t appropriate expression. From the platform’s ban on breasts to its tendency to suspend users for speaking back against hate speech, or its total failure to remove calls for violence in Myanmar, India, and elsewhere, there’s simply no reason to trust Zuckerberg and other tech leaders to get these big decisions right. Repealing 230 isn’t the answer To remedy these concerns, some are calling for more regulation. In recent months, demands have abounded from both sides of the aisle to repeal or amend Section 230—the law that protects companies from liability for the decisions they make about the content they host—despite some serious misrepresentations from politicians who should know better about how the law actually works. The thing is, repealing Section 230 would probably not have forced Facebook or Twitter to remove Trump’s tweets, nor would it prevent companies from removing content they find disagreeable, whether that content is pornography or the unhinged rantings of Trump. It is companies’ First Amendment rights that enable them to curate their platforms as they see fit. Instead, repealing Section 230 would hinder competitors to Facebook and the other tech giants, and place a greater risk of liability on platforms for what they choose to host. For instance, without Section 230, Facebook’s lawyers could decide that hosting anti-fascist content is too risky in light of the Trump administration’s attacks on antifa. This is not a far-fetched scenario: Platforms already restrict most content that could be even loosely connected to foreign terrorist organizations, for fear that material-support statutes could make them liable. Evidence of war crimes in Syria and vital counter-speech against terrorist organizations abroad have been removed as a result. Similarly, platforms have come under fire for blocking any content seemingly connected to countries under US sanctions. In one particularly absurd example, Etsy banned a handmade doll, made in America, because the listing contained the word “Persian.” It’s not difficult to see how ratcheting up platform liability could cause even more vital speech to be removed by corporations whose sole interest is not in “connecting the world” but in profiting from it. Platforms needn’t be neutral, but they must play fair Despite what Senator Ted Cruz keeps repeating, there is nothing requiring these platforms to be neutral, nor should there be. If Facebook wants to boot Trump—or photos of breastfeeding mothers—that’s the company’s prerogative. The problem is not that Facebook has the right to do so, but that—owing to its acquisitions and unhindered growth—its users have virtually nowhere else to go and are stuck dealing with increasingly problematic rules and automated content moderation. The answer is not repealing Section 230 (which again, would hinder competition) but in creating the conditions for more competition. This is where the Biden administration should focus its attention in the coming months. And those efforts must include reaching out to content moderation experts from advocacy and academia to understand the range of problems faced by users worldwide, rather than simply focusing on the debate inside the US. As for platforms, they know what they need to do, because civil society has told them for years. They must be more transparent and ensure that users have the right to remedy when wrong decisions are made. The Santa Clara Principles on Transparency and Accountability in Content Moderation—endorsed in 2019 by most major platforms but adhered to by only one (Reddit)—offer minimum standards for companies on these measures. Platforms should also stick to their existing commitments to responsible decision-making. Most important, they should ensure that the decisions they make about speech are in line with global human rights standards, rather than making the rules up as they go. Reasonable people can disagree on whether the act of banning Trump from these platforms was the right one, but if we want to ensure that platforms make better decisions in the future, we mustn’t look to quick fixes. +++++++ Jillian C. York is the Director for International Freedom of Expression at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. She is also a founding member of the feminist collective Deep Lab and a fellow at Centre for Internet & Human Rights. She was named by Foreign Policy as one of the top 100 intellectuals on social media. She has written for the Guardian, Al Jazeera, and Vice. She is based in Berlin

  4. 4 out of 5

    Venky

    Following closely in the footsteps of Rebecca Mackinnon and Shoshana Zuboff, Jillian York in her interesting, upcoming and provocative work, “Silicon Values”, distills the various anomalies involved in “content moderation” that is practiced (or abdicated) by the giants of technology such as Google, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. Ms. York brings to bear her formidable experience with and exposure to content moderation and platform intricacies in alluding to various hits and misses that both disti Following closely in the footsteps of Rebecca Mackinnon and Shoshana Zuboff, Jillian York in her interesting, upcoming and provocative work, “Silicon Values”, distills the various anomalies involved in “content moderation” that is practiced (or abdicated) by the giants of technology such as Google, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. Ms. York brings to bear her formidable experience with and exposure to content moderation and platform intricacies in alluding to various hits and misses that both distinguish and tarnish Big Tech. A writing style that is bereft of pretentiousness and hesitancy makes Silicon Values a riveting read. Ms. York bemoans the fact that the most aspired for and valued attribute, in the form of freedom of speech is controlled and curbed by a handful of gargantuan personalities striding the very pinnacle of Big Tech and whose actions are influenced by and beholden to powerful political connections, financial prospects and influential lobbying. Tweets and posts of influential and award winning activists such as Wael Abbas, that not just expose, but also educate the people about police brutality and other abuses in Egypt, are thus take down by the social media sites after succumbing to intense ‘back room’ pressure exerted by either the concerned Government or people wielding power. These actions resorted to by the social media sites go against the very grain of freedom of expression, a fundamental right that has been recognised from time immemorial. As Ms. York educates her readers, isegoria, a concept that allowed all male citizens in Athens, to address the democratic assembly irrespective of the fact as to whether such citizens were rich or poor, was given total prominence. The only lacuna here being the disservice meted out to women. Ms. York although chastising all the social media sites, reserves her ire for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg. The company has content moderation staff spread across three tiers. The staff at the lowest level, namely Tier 3, have a thankless task. They are forced to spend entire days viewing gruesome imagery and making instantaneous decisions to take down or leave in place a post. With a meagre paycheck totaling US$28,800 a day and as pitiful as US$6 a day in India, these employees receive negligible to no training not to mention an absolute lack of mental health support. This has the unfortunate consequence of posts of import and gravity being mistakenly taken down. In order to minimize such acts and to preserve the basic ethos of human rights across the globe, the Global Network Initiative (“GNI”) was incorporated. Yahoo!, along with Google and Microsoft were the founding members and a bevy of NGOs, academic institutions and shareholder groups joined the organisation. However, as Ms. York illustrates, a reliance on a multi-stakeholder model has rendered GNI, more or less, ineffective. Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter, then joined together to form the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (“GIFCT”). The objective of GIFCT was “disrupting terrorist abuse of members’ digital platforms.” Due to a deficiency in the definitions of the word terrorism etc, the work of GIFCT has also left a lot to be desired. Ms. York also highlights other notable perils of the content moderation evil such as the takedown of posts by sex workers following the promulgations of the SESTA and FOSTA acts by the United States Government. Many of these sex workers who were reliant on their connections formed across the online network for information on client screening and other safety measures found themselves in the lurch. Another area of concern is technology assisted content moderation. Using tools of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, Big Tech attempts content moderation, but sometimes with hilarious outcomes. Thus, the residents of the English town of Scunthorpe find their accounts taken down or even refused registration because the word lying between the alphabets S and h represents a common profanity. London’s Horniman Museum found its own spam filters blocking it since the filters perceived “Horniman” as akin to “horny man.” Another problem innate with content moderation is lack of expertise with regional languages/vernacular. Luganda the most widely spoken language in Uganda with more than 8 million users hardly finds content moderation experts, proficient to analyse acceptable and offensive posts. Similarly, there seem to be divergent standards for allowing and rejecting “hate speech” and exhortations to violence. This is where Ms. York’s book is a huge let down. Her concentration seems to be so fixated only on the misdeeds and misguided philosophies of the extreme right, that a person who is unaware of her stellar credentials might be forgiven for believing her to be an integral part of a cabalistic left wing group. Whether it be waxing eloquent on the consequences of Brandenburg v Ohio decision, the misplaced rants of Donald Trump, or the “Hindutva” extremism in India, Ms. York seems to harbour an obtuse illusion that violence is the sole preserve of the right. Hence there is no reference to the merciless and systematic killing (and not just persecution) of the minorities in Pakistan, the planned elimination of right wing campaigners by the Left Government in the Indian state of West Bengal and a myriad other relevant scenarios. On the whole, Silicon Values in an invigorating, insightful and incisive distillation of the surveillance imposed upon free speech by the bastion that is Big Tech in the digital world. (“Silicon Values” will be released by Verso Books (US) on the 2nd of March 2021)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cav

    Silicon Values fields a timely subject matter, but sadly, Jillian York's telling of this story left much to be desired for me... Author Jillian C. York is a writer whose work has been published in a number of publications, including The New York Times, Motherboard, The Washington Post, Die Zeit, The Conversationalist, and Buzzfeed. Jillian York: For a book about social media, the internet and free speech, there was an overwhelming torrent of superfluous, hyper-partisan leftist speech, jarg Silicon Values fields a timely subject matter, but sadly, Jillian York's telling of this story left much to be desired for me... Author Jillian C. York is a writer whose work has been published in a number of publications, including The New York Times, Motherboard, The Washington Post, Die Zeit, The Conversationalist, and Buzzfeed. Jillian York: For a book about social media, the internet and free speech, there was an overwhelming torrent of superfluous, hyper-partisan leftist speech, jargon and rhetoric in here. Early alarm bells triggered for me when York repeatedly refers to black people only as "marginalized", and makes many snide remarks about white men, and men in general. She also manages to include many disparaging remarks about Israel somehow, as well as drops many other irrelevant snark little partisan asides throughout the book. York describes the deaths of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown in a politically charged manner; calling the shooting of Martin a "particular act of brutality". "...another young unarmed Black man named Michael Brown was killed by a police officer" is how she describes the death of Michael Brown. Aside from both of the above statements being overtly dishonest and slippery appeals to emotion, I'm not sure why they (or the many comments about "white men") were even included in this book in the first place... They were not at all relevant to the broader story here. Indeed, the addition of ridiculous partisan rhetoric like this is usually a good barometer to the degree of the author's ideological possession. I don't know why authors who are naked partisans think others will appreciate their shit political takes being inserted where they are not even relevant. Absolutely terrible... There is a somewhat ridiculous chapter about the efforts to censor sex, sex workers and pornography from social media sites. She seemingly can't wrap her head around why platforms that are used by children would want to censor those things. LMAO. Ok, then... She then laments: "I cannot help but think about what was lost when the Nazis seized power, decimating the freedoms that had flourished in the Weimar Republic..." The naive reader might want to do some reading on the excesses of Weimar Germany to get an appreciation of what was "lost": widespread sexual promiscuity, prostitution (including child prostitution), books about pedophilia and bestiality, drug abuse, and general lax and deviant moral standards were all commonplace in Weimar Germany. Whether the destruction of these things constitutes a "loss" I guess depends on your moral compass... York also assumes that the above qualities would of course be objectively "good" for the long-term health and prosperity of any society. Ridiculous "reasoning". Also not realized by the author, apparently, is that the very same culture described above produced a strong backlash; contributing to a right-wing strongman like Adolph Hitler coming to power in the first place. York repeatedly mentions the rise of right-wing extremism and the "far-right" here, but doesn't once mention the danger of the rise of self-described Communists, Anarchists, and other assorted far-leftist groups who hold staunchly anti-Western, anti-American and anti-police sentiments, or the ~6+ months of rioting, burning, looting and associated murders by those same groups, that destroyed large swaths of numerous American cities in the summer of 2020. She dismisses the politically motivated censorship of conservative voices as no more than an irrelevant fairy tale, concocted by those on the "far-right". Imagine being so oblivious... The book started off OK, but then got progressively worse as it went; culminating in a full-court press of screeching leftist nonsense in the conclusion. I don't honestly know how this book got published without the editors reigning her in. They probably should have, as a lot of the partisan rhetoric she spews here was completely unrelated to the broader topic of the book. Finally; despite having extremely interesting subject matter to work with here, York's writing didn't bring this story to the reader in either an engaging or enjoyable fashion, IMHO. The addition of her irrelevant and unnecessary political rhetoric aside, York did not do this timely and important story proper justice. Maybe this was a subjective thing, but I didn't even like the overall style this book is written with. I'm not sure how she's managed to land so many writing gigs, because the writing here was not very good. Too bad, as I was excited to start this one... I rarely ever rate a book 1 star, but this one was *so* bad, that I feel it is deserving of just that. Thankfully, it was not any longer, or I would have put it down. Remind me to never read any more books, articles, or other writing by this author ever again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Silvia

    I think this book* tried too cover too much and when that happens you end up reading a little about this and that and you know almost nothing solid about a single topic. I liked the fact that the author says somewhere in the beginning what the book is not and what books you might want to read. Basically it talks about how social media works with some local governments not for the people or the people's right to have access to information but to be in good relations with everyone while censoring a I think this book* tried too cover too much and when that happens you end up reading a little about this and that and you know almost nothing solid about a single topic. I liked the fact that the author says somewhere in the beginning what the book is not and what books you might want to read. Basically it talks about how social media works with some local governments not for the people or the people's right to have access to information but to be in good relations with everyone while censoring almost everything that might be suspicious. One thing that I don't agree, as the author says somewhere is that you can't be without social media. The author says something along the lines of restaurants that have to use facebook to promote their business to individuals that have to use certain online networks in their work. I fully believe we all have a choice. Not every restaurant or any business for that matter has to have a fb page (I heard an interesting story about someone who said that if a restaurant or cafe had a Instagram account they wouldn't enter it) and people can choose to work in places that don't require a fb account or twitter or sth else. The fact that some people continue to work moderators for fb despite the low pay is because of its fame (it's one thing to say to a stranger, at a party, that you work for facebook and it's a whole different thing to say you work for XYZ-that-nobody-knows-network). Social media is useful, as the author also said, for gathering people for local protesting. Still, I wonder if the price people pay for these services isn't too big. At the same time, the social networks might have a stronger presence in individualistic societies. There are situations, many probably, when friends and family are spread around on 1000+ km. Living in a smaller community as I do and from what I'm seeing some people tend to choose this more this days, makes it superfluous to use social media. When work is 5 minutes from home and the people you care about are 5-10 minutes away, when the beautiful things in life happen offline do you really need facebook? I doubt it. * - thank you to the publisher for offering me this ARC in exchange of an honest review

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yarub Khayat

    صدر هذا الكتاب خلال شهر مارس 2021، متناولا وضع استخدام بعض أدوات الانترنت وكذلك وسائل التواصل الاجتماعي ومتضمنا معلومات وآراء مثيرة للكثير من الجدل بل وعدم الاتفاق معها، ومع ذلك فإن رأيي أنه كتاب جدير بالقراءة لمعرفة توجهات مؤلفته وأسلوبها في عرض أفكارها التي تنادي بقيم عالمية وأخلاقية متجانسة موحدة في استخدام الإنترنت ووسائل التواصل الاجتماعي وذلك بالرغم من اختلاف الثقافات والمجتمعات ! يستعرض الكتاب كيف اصبحت جوجل وأمازون وفيسبوك، ووسائل التواصل الاجتماعي المملوكة لها مثل يوتيوب وانستجرام وغيرها صدر هذا الكتاب خلال شهر مارس 2021، متناولا وضع استخدام بعض أدوات الانترنت وكذلك وسائل التواصل الاجتماعي ومتضمنا معلومات وآراء مثيرة للكثير من الجدل بل وعدم الاتفاق معها، ومع ذلك فإن رأيي أنه كتاب جدير بالقراءة لمعرفة توجهات مؤلفته وأسلوبها في عرض أفكارها التي تنادي بقيم عالمية وأخلاقية متجانسة موحدة في استخدام الإنترنت ووسائل التواصل الاجتماعي وذلك بالرغم من اختلاف الثقافات والمجتمعات ! يستعرض الكتاب كيف اصبحت جوجل وأمازون وفيسبوك، ووسائل التواصل الاجتماعي المملوكة لها مثل يوتيوب وانستجرام وغيرها - قيودا على الحرية الشخصية وأدوات لسيطرة الشركات الرأسمالية بشراسة وذلك فضلا عن انتشار المعلومات المغلوطة، وكل ذلك يتم باستخدام شبكة الإنترنت التي بدت في بداياتها أداة للحرية الزائدة بعيدا عن سيطرة رؤوس الأموال وألاعيب السياسة، وأن هذه السلبيات المذكورة تتم من خلال سلطة غير منضبطة ولاحدود لها من قبل شركات ومستثمرين يربحون الكثير. استغرق تأليف هذا الكتاب 4 سنوات من كاتبته التي أوردت فيه أمثلة تؤيد مزاعمها المذكورة، وكذلك لتحكم تلك الشركات فيما يصل للجمهور في بعض الدول بناء على تصورات مسبقة لصور نمطية منتشرة عن تلك الجماهير، وذلك تحت غطاء "أبحاث تسويق منتجاتها"؛ وهذا ما تراه الكاتبة وصاية لا مبرر لها وغير أخلاقية وغير عادلة تمارسها تلك المواقع على مستخدميها، وأن كل ذلك يصب فقط في مجال قيامهم بحصد الأرباح الطائلة بدون أدنى اعتبار للآثار السلبية الناجمة عن ذلك !؟ ركزت الكاتبة في كتابها على فيسبوك (وما تملكه من وسائل مثل واتس أب وانستجرام)، موضحة أن سلبياته أكثر من تويتر وذلك لاختلاف أسلوب إدارته وطريقة اتخاذ القرار فيه. ترى المؤلفة أن الموضوع متشابك ومعقد وأن وسائل التواصل الاجتماعي ليست كلها عيوبا ولكنها ليست خالية منها، وأنه ليس سهلا وضع حلول عملية لسلبياتها التي تراكمت وترسخت على مدار سنوات، وترى الكاتبة بأنه قد آن الأوان للتحرك الدولي الأخلاقي المدعوم بقوة من المستخدمين، لإصلاح المجتمعات ولمواجهة سلبيات استخدام وسائل التواصل الاجتماعي مع وضع قواعد جديدة لامتلاكها لمعلومات مستخدميها واستفادتها منها، مع التزام الشركات المالكة لها بدعم تلك الجهود والإنفاق على إعادة هيكلة أسلوب عملهم بقدر اجتهادهم على حصد الأرباح والتوسع في أعمالهم ! مرفق رابط لفيديو لقاء مع المؤلفة لاستعراض أهم محتويات كتابها ومناقشتها في بعض آرائها، وفي رأيي أن هذا الفيديو هو أيضا جدير بالمشاهدة بعناية. https://youtu.be/3mFYsNuqK2Q

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Harrison

    I enjoyed Jillian C. York's "Silicon Values," which is filled with in-depth reporting about how major tech platforms are struggling with content moderation and censorship. York's coverage is especially good when it comes to the challenges in the Middle East, exposing how Silicon Valley has allied itself with the powers-that-be to benefit the corporate bottom line even at the cost at repressing free expression. Because York has been covering content moderation for so long, she was able to include I enjoyed Jillian C. York's "Silicon Values," which is filled with in-depth reporting about how major tech platforms are struggling with content moderation and censorship. York's coverage is especially good when it comes to the challenges in the Middle East, exposing how Silicon Valley has allied itself with the powers-that-be to benefit the corporate bottom line even at the cost at repressing free expression. Because York has been covering content moderation for so long, she was able to include several historical examples that reveal how in the "early days" social media companies were often making up the rules on an ad hoc basis. For example, she shares stories of interacting with young Facebook employees and how the early results were often decided by "who you knew" at the company. I was particularly moved by the examples of how content moderation is deleting the footage that we have of war crimes and could lead to us having these massive historical gaps. There were a few points in the book where I wished York could include more characterizing details about the leaders in Silicon Valley, like Nicole Wong who was "the Decider" as Google's vice president and deputy general counsel. But most of all, I was impressed by how many critical issues York was able to weave into the book, including the recent Coronavirus response by Silicon Value companies, and how York consistently and passionately argued the case in favor of free expression over censorship.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Boutté

    I'm always reluctant to read books about criticisms of social media platforms because it's an extremely important topic, but many authors don't do the topic justice. I've read quite a few books that seem to drag on and not really make strong arguments, but Jillian York did an amazing job with this book. She has years of experience in activism and holding social media companies accountable, and she's also an amazing story teller. I'm not as familiar with global issues as I'd like to be, so someti I'm always reluctant to read books about criticisms of social media platforms because it's an extremely important topic, but many authors don't do the topic justice. I've read quite a few books that seem to drag on and not really make strong arguments, but Jillian York did an amazing job with this book. She has years of experience in activism and holding social media companies accountable, and she's also an amazing story teller. I'm not as familiar with global issues as I'd like to be, so sometimes the stories are confusing, but Jillian was able to explain them in a comprehensive way that I could understand.  This book dives into a variety of topics that I hadn't even thought of. Sure, we often talk about how addictive social media is or how the platforms use our data, but this book has a variety of new angles. It discusses how governments manipulate the platforms to silence activists, how sex workers are oppressed on the platforms, and much more. I think my favorite thing about Jillian's writing is that she addresses that these are difficult, nuanced subjects that need a lot of conversation. For example, she discusses hate speech and censorship and how her views of the topics have evolved over the years. If nothing else, Silicon Values will make you more aware and get you thinking about these topics in a new way.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Pilz

    I just reviewed Silicon Values by Jillian C. York. #SiliconValues #NetGalley Regulation of speech on the internet is probably one of the topics on every ones mind, latest since the election, rise of OAN and ONAN and a president continuously sharing false and misleading information. Jillian C. York picks up this challenge, but misses to discuss this in the context of our American society, moves the discussion towards other areas of society which are not exactly on the forefront of American minds: I just reviewed Silicon Values by Jillian C. York. #SiliconValues #NetGalley Regulation of speech on the internet is probably one of the topics on every ones mind, latest since the election, rise of OAN and ONAN and a president continuously sharing false and misleading information. Jillian C. York picks up this challenge, but misses to discuss this in the context of our American society, moves the discussion towards other areas of society which are not exactly on the forefront of American minds: the right of sex workers to a LinkedIn profile, classification of terrorist groups and some of the voluntary efforts of social media giants to control what we can see and what not. I think the book has some illuminating aspects to it, but the discussions do not need to be removed so far from our home yard. The introduction was horrible. Instead of setting the tone of the book and what is there to come, Jillian opens up with a bunch of disclaimer that read so disappointing that I almost stopped reading right there, I am glad that I continued as the book was really well written, and the stories interesting. What I did not like was the samples she picked and what she wrote about.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    How do our social media habits can shape democracy? or yet, how can they shape the way we see the world through blindspot in algorithms, slow policy and censorship. York makes a very valid study about the two major social media platforms at the moment (facebook, twitter) and how their policy has changed through the years. Thank you NetGalley and Verso Books for this arc copy of Silicon Values in exchange of an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Very good albeit lacking a broader perspective.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Niklas Pivic

  14. 4 out of 5

    F.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sim

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jadey (the Bookish)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vev

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hannah May-Powers

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

  20. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barry

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom Blackburn

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nils

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colby

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  27. 5 out of 5

    Micah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Avery Zimmerman

  29. 4 out of 5

    Felicity

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

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