web site hit counter Hell of a Book - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Hell of a Book

Availability: Ready to download

An astounding work of fiction from a New York Times bestselling author, both incredibly funny and honest, that goes to the heart of racism, police violence, and the hidden costs exacted upon Black Americans, and America as a whole In Hell of a Book, an African-American author sets out on a cross-country book tour to promote his bestselling novel. That storyline drives Jason An astounding work of fiction from a New York Times bestselling author, both incredibly funny and honest, that goes to the heart of racism, police violence, and the hidden costs exacted upon Black Americans, and America as a whole In Hell of a Book, an African-American author sets out on a cross-country book tour to promote his bestselling novel. That storyline drives Jason Mott's novel and is the scaffolding of something much larger and more urgent: since his novel also tells the story of Soot, a young Black boy living in a rural town in the recent past, and The Kid, a possibly imaginary child who appears to the author on his tour. Throughout, these characters' stories build and build and as they converge, they astonish. For while this heartbreaking and magical book entertains and is at once about family, love of parents and children, art, and money, there always is the tragic story of a police shooting playing over and over on the news. Who has been killed? Who is The Kid? Will the author finish his book tour, and what kind of world will he leave behind? Unforgettably powerful, an electrifying high-wire act, ideal for book clubs, and the book Mott says he has been writing in his head for ten years, Hell of a Book in its final twists truly becomes its title.


Compare

An astounding work of fiction from a New York Times bestselling author, both incredibly funny and honest, that goes to the heart of racism, police violence, and the hidden costs exacted upon Black Americans, and America as a whole In Hell of a Book, an African-American author sets out on a cross-country book tour to promote his bestselling novel. That storyline drives Jason An astounding work of fiction from a New York Times bestselling author, both incredibly funny and honest, that goes to the heart of racism, police violence, and the hidden costs exacted upon Black Americans, and America as a whole In Hell of a Book, an African-American author sets out on a cross-country book tour to promote his bestselling novel. That storyline drives Jason Mott's novel and is the scaffolding of something much larger and more urgent: since his novel also tells the story of Soot, a young Black boy living in a rural town in the recent past, and The Kid, a possibly imaginary child who appears to the author on his tour. Throughout, these characters' stories build and build and as they converge, they astonish. For while this heartbreaking and magical book entertains and is at once about family, love of parents and children, art, and money, there always is the tragic story of a police shooting playing over and over on the news. Who has been killed? Who is The Kid? Will the author finish his book tour, and what kind of world will he leave behind? Unforgettably powerful, an electrifying high-wire act, ideal for book clubs, and the book Mott says he has been writing in his head for ten years, Hell of a Book in its final twists truly becomes its title.

30 review for Hell of a Book

  1. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This is one of the most creative novels I’ve read about being black in America circa 2021. What I found is that there is no pontification, no white shaming. What I found is a deeply personal novel about a fictional man who is a fictional author who is in a bit of emotional crisis. And through the navigation of his crisis, we get to see his inner struggles in being a successful author and a man. From the start, the protagonist, a nameless successful author, is on a book tour(the book’s title: “Hel This is one of the most creative novels I’ve read about being black in America circa 2021. What I found is that there is no pontification, no white shaming. What I found is a deeply personal novel about a fictional man who is a fictional author who is in a bit of emotional crisis. And through the navigation of his crisis, we get to see his inner struggles in being a successful author and a man. From the start, the protagonist, a nameless successful author, is on a book tour(the book’s title: “Hell of a Book”, and he alerts the reader that he has “a condition”. This condition makes it difficult for him to understand what is real and what is a figment of his imagination. Something happened to him in his past that brought on this condition that brings out his creativity and allows an “alternative” universe to occur. Yes, it’s silly, but just go with it. This condition gets him into lots of trouble as you can imagine. Author Jason Mott, in a You tube interview he said that he wanted to answer the difficult questions of what it means to be black in America. He felt that those discussions are wrought with tension. He wanted to “show” not tell what it means. One of the main ideas that he offers, which I found moving, is that a major side character, a young boy named Soot, has parents who want him to learn how to be invisible. If Soot can be invisible, he’ll be safe. His parents felt it was too traumatic to have “the discussion” about what it means to be black. They didn’t want to frighten him that the police are to be feared, that he can be shot just for the color of his skin. So instead, Soot’s dad used to play a game of “hands up!” and Soot would try to beat his record of how fast he can get those hands in the air. His dad wanted Soot to have a knee-jerk reaction to the command, “hands up”. Dang, that broke my heart. But I digress. Our unnamed narrator gets himself into many hilarious fixes. He gets out of them, of course. None involve the police. It’s almost mad-cap what happens to him on his book tour. He also has to contend with his publisher who keeps at him to write his second book. We still don’t know what his first book is about. But we do know that when he’s on tour, the main question he gets is “why aren’t you writing about the black experience?” Meanwhile, his agent tells him NOT to write about being black. It’s publishing suicide. Chapters about Soot are dispersed through the narrative. Our unnamed narrator has a constant companion, an invisible boy named “The Kid”. The Kid tells the author that only he, the author, can see him. The kid can pick and choose who can see him and who cannot. The author chats with The Kid all the time. He realizes he has to fake talk into his phone while chatting with The Kid, otherwise people around him would think he’s unhinged. Well, the reader wonders that as well. The unnamed narrator is one of the most unreliable narrators out there. What is real? What is part of “his condition”. What happened to him that caused this condition? The unnamed author has very interesting handlers on tour. Mott uses them to add to the mad-cap part of the story. Without them, this would be a heavy story with no release. For me, I find the most profound writing can be hidden in silly scenes. It’s those messages that strike when one is open that end up being the most affecting. Soot’s backstory is profound. His skin color made all the children, black especially, not like him. He was bullied. His parents did their best to raise him to be a good boy and to be safe, to be invisible. This story is referred to as a moving meditation on being Black in America. I enjoyed the creativity that Mott chose in writing his story. This is a strange story that is silly, tragic, and emotionally moving. I believe Mott succeeded in his mission to be part of those difficult discussions on being black in America.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    Jason Mott's Hell of a Book won't just make my best-of-the-year books list. We're not too far into the decade, but I'd be willing to bet that it will show up on my best-of-the-decade list for the 2020s. I read Hell of a Book in two days, and I resented every moment when I couldn't be reading it. Once in, I wanted to stay there. Hell of a Book involves a dark version of magical realism and a fair bit of sarcasm, but none of this undercuts the real-world truths that Mott confronts readers with. I d Jason Mott's Hell of a Book won't just make my best-of-the-year books list. We're not too far into the decade, but I'd be willing to bet that it will show up on my best-of-the-decade list for the 2020s. I read Hell of a Book in two days, and I resented every moment when I couldn't be reading it. Once in, I wanted to stay there. Hell of a Book involves a dark version of magical realism and a fair bit of sarcasm, but none of this undercuts the real-world truths that Mott confronts readers with. I don't, however, want to say a lot about the book's contents in this review because I don't want to influence others' reading of it. The novel is grounded in the frequent police use of lethal force that inspired the Black Lives Matter movement and the long history of that violence that predates our particular historical moment. The chapters of Hell of a Book move among the experiences of three (or more? or fewer?) Black men—actually two boys and one man. The boys' lives have been irrevocably altered by police violence. The man, an author who has difficulty separating the real and the imaginary and who travels the country on a seemingly endless book tour, wants to do all he can to ignore the situation of these boys and others like them, even as story after story after story of their lives and others' dominates the news. Read this book. Read it. Read it when you have few enough interruptions that you can immerse yourself in its world and live there for a while. I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher; the opinions are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Hager

    When I read that author Jason Mott has wanted to write the story in “Hell of a Book” for many years, I wasn’t at all surprised. It shows in his brilliant and thoughtful writing style, which is unlike anything I have read before. This powerful novel is a timely exploration into what it means to be a Black man living in America. It’s a beautiful story about family love and dedicated to finding out who we are. The book has two parallel storylines. In one, there is an unnamed Black author on a book When I read that author Jason Mott has wanted to write the story in “Hell of a Book” for many years, I wasn’t at all surprised. It shows in his brilliant and thoughtful writing style, which is unlike anything I have read before. This powerful novel is a timely exploration into what it means to be a Black man living in America. It’s a beautiful story about family love and dedicated to finding out who we are. The book has two parallel storylines. In one, there is an unnamed Black author on a book tour through contemporary America. In the other, a young Black boy named Soot is growing up in the American South. The unnamed author is funny. Reality blurs as he experiences bizarre moments on tour and continues to encounter another unnamed character, “the kid.” Meanwhile, in Soot’s story we read about the injustices and fears faced by a young Black boy growing up in the South. “Hell of a Book” by Jason Mott is original, heartbreaking, poignant and in moments, hilarious. On one page, you will weep and in the same breath Mott will have you laughing out loud. I think this book will lead to some incredible conversations about race and racism in our country. It opens the door for readers to learn about someone else experiences through their eyes and approach issues they may not understand through a new lens.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Giveaway Win!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    Would it be too cheesy to say that this is a hell of a book? :) I really enjoyed this story about writing, publishing, race, and growing up in the South. These topics are never easy to talk about and the book shows that struggle in such a real way that I found myself thinking about them long after I finished the last page. The story follows two plots: one of a debut author on tour and the other of a young black boy trying to grow up in a small Southern community. Their stories range from heartwa Would it be too cheesy to say that this is a hell of a book? :) I really enjoyed this story about writing, publishing, race, and growing up in the South. These topics are never easy to talk about and the book shows that struggle in such a real way that I found myself thinking about them long after I finished the last page. The story follows two plots: one of a debut author on tour and the other of a young black boy trying to grow up in a small Southern community. Their stories range from heartwarming to heartbreaking, but overall show the different ways people struggle with topics of race no matter the age, location, or personal background. When following the author, the writing takes on an almost stream-of-consciousness style that really allows you to dive deep into the author's psyche and immerse yourself in his journey to . The young boy's story has a more whimsical tone to it that separated me enough to know his story wasn't mine, but allowed me to be charmed by his actions and try to empathize with his struggles. It's really hard to talk about this book without spoiling it, but just know that it's a great book that I highly recommend to anyone who wants to read about race as well as those who are interested in the struggles of getting your first book published. **Read thanks to an ARC from Dutton**

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mocha Girl

    An unnamed author of a best-selling novel entitled, Hell of a Book, is on a national book tour when he randomly (or so it seems) encounters a boy who exudes a surreal sense of familiarity. The child mysteriously reappears (unescorted) and engages in thought-provoking conversation at key points throughout his travels around the country. The reader is forewarned by the author himself that he has "a condition" - an overly active imagination where he sometimes has difficulty discerning what and who An unnamed author of a best-selling novel entitled, Hell of a Book, is on a national book tour when he randomly (or so it seems) encounters a boy who exudes a surreal sense of familiarity. The child mysteriously reappears (unescorted) and engages in thought-provoking conversation at key points throughout his travels around the country. The reader is forewarned by the author himself that he has "a condition" - an overly active imagination where he sometimes has difficulty discerning what and who is real or not - thereby making him a questionable narrator. However, an incident in the story is grounded in realism -- within this world, the news headlines yet another story about an unarmed child shot and killed by police. There are national protests and heavy media coverage documenting the demands for justice. The gravitas and frequency of this tragedy (the senseless, recurring loss of an unarmed youth at the hands of law enforcement) awaken ghosts from the past that exacerbate anger, fear, hate, and angst addling the author's already delicate mental state. Prepare yourself because this book has heavy themes: colorism, system/institutionalized racism, generational trauma, police violence, discrimination within the workplace, mental illness, internalized self-hate, need for optimism, self-love, etc. Although disturbing on many levels - I was all-in early on and wanted to understand if and how the shooting, the author, and the boy eventually come to a reckoning and to see if there were any connections among the three seemingly unrelated threads. I was not disappointed. I think fans of Paul Beatty, Mat Johnson, Colson Whitehead will appreciate the style/form and humor. ****************************************************************************************** Thank you to NetGalley and Penguin/Dutton Books for allowing me access to this book. This book review will be posted on NetGalley, NCBC’s blog, and Goodreads.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbara White

    I’ve been a Jason Mott fan since reading his debut, THE RETURNED. Jason writes with the beauty of a poet, and his stories make me think. And keep me thinking. His latest, HELL OF A BOOK, is a powerhouse of a novel: heartbreaking and hilarious; magical and raw. The protagonist, an unnamed Black author diagnosed at fourteen with “a day dreaming problem,” shot to fame by writing a hell of a book. According to this guy, “Reality as a whole—past or present—just isn’t a good place to hang out.” When we I’ve been a Jason Mott fan since reading his debut, THE RETURNED. Jason writes with the beauty of a poet, and his stories make me think. And keep me thinking. His latest, HELL OF A BOOK, is a powerhouse of a novel: heartbreaking and hilarious; magical and raw. The protagonist, an unnamed Black author diagnosed at fourteen with “a day dreaming problem,” shot to fame by writing a hell of a book. According to this guy, “Reality as a whole—past or present—just isn’t a good place to hang out.” When we meet the nameless author, he’s crisscrossing the country on an exhausting book tour, and running through a hotel corridor, naked, being chased by the husband of a woman he’s just slept with. And yet the person he’s really running from is himself. He wants to be liked, to be a good person; to stop feeling lonely and alone. To be hugged. To avoid grief. His publicist styles the author in sports jackets and tells him to not write about being Black, because activism is murder on book sales. (He’s crunched the numbers to prove it.)  Meanwhile, the agent piles on high-profile out-of-town gigs, while hounding the author to deliver his next book. Which he hasn’t started, despite a hefty advance. Each of his chapters begins with humor, perfectly balancing the second storyline: a gut-wrenching tale about a young Black boy trying to become invisible to stay safe. A boy who’s nicknamed Soot by bullies on the school bus. A boy who sees his father, returning home from a run, gunned down by a cop outside their family home. The two stories weave together when the author hallucinates a young Black kid. Lines blur between fact and fantasy; we know only that both survived trauma and tragedy. Is the kid Soot, or a younger version of the author himself? As the pace of the book tour intensifies, the author moves closer to his hometown in rural Carolina. Meanwhile, a constant news cycle of shootings plays in the background. Or maybe it’s the same shooting. If so, who is the victim? There’s a strong sense of sadness and loss as the story reaches the end, but also empathy and hope that lingers. Ultimately, it’s about self-love, about not running away. Reading the compassion of the last ten pages was a humbling experience for a middle-class white woman, who has never had to teach her son about being Black or poor. Typing this, I find myself in tears, because I can’t leave behind the question: When does it end? In an interview, Jason said he hopes that the novel becomes outdated and irrelevant. Until then, if you only read one novel on race, let it be HELL OF A BOOK.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joelle Egan

    Is an individual of a marginalized group obligated to speak out and take responsibility for creating change? How can an author shine a unique light on recurring messages that no one seems to want to receive? Jason Mott’s Hell of a Book delivers its crucial message by using meta-fiction and humor in a refreshing way. The unnamed author of a sudden bestseller is forced to travel around “performing” to enhance sales. What he has learned is that America only accepts watered-down and innocuous storie Is an individual of a marginalized group obligated to speak out and take responsibility for creating change? How can an author shine a unique light on recurring messages that no one seems to want to receive? Jason Mott’s Hell of a Book delivers its crucial message by using meta-fiction and humor in a refreshing way. The unnamed author of a sudden bestseller is forced to travel around “performing” to enhance sales. What he has learned is that America only accepts watered-down and innocuous stories, even at the expense of the work’s original purpose. Unpalatable realities are best delivered in a way that assuages guilt so potential buyers won’t be too uncomfortable. He also describes his life-long “imagination condition” which causes him to experience hallucinations. He can never really trust his own perceptions of the world, yet now he is expected to be a carefully managed representative of his race. This interesting plot is enhanced by an interweaving story of a young boy nicknamed “Soot” due to his unusually dark skin. Soot is an outcast, tormented by blatant racism even within his own community. His over-protective parents had tried to buffer the realities of racial inequity, police brutality and violence. They convinced the boy that he must “become invisible” to remain safe. The author encounters and befriends the boy, but he is the only one who can see him. Hell of a Book takes on many timely themes and topics and delivers them indirectly through the voices of its two wonderful characters. From their stories, the reader might be vulnerable to receiving a lesson on societal problems as they are distracted by also being entertained. The anonymous narrator discovers the purpose of his own book and his connection with Soot, and readers will be tremendously moved and enlightened to join in this journey as well. Thanks to the author, Penguin and Library Thing for an ARC in exchange for an unbiased review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: January 17, 2021 Publication date: August 10, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of Date reviewed/posted: January 17, 2021 Publication date: August 10, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. An astounding work of fiction from a New York Times bestselling author, both incredibly funny and honest, that goes to the heart of racism, police violence, and the hidden costs exacted upon Black Americans, and America as a whole In Hell of a Book, an African-American author sets out on a cross-country book tour to promote his bestselling novel. That storyline drives Jason Mott's novel and is the scaffolding of something much larger and more urgent: since his novel also tells the story of Soot, a young Black boy living in a rural town in the recent past, and The Kid, a possibly imaginary child who appears to the author on his tour. Throughout, these characters' stories build and build and as they converge, they astonish. For while this heartbreaking and magical book entertains and is at once about family, love of parents and children, art, and money, there always is the tragic story of a police shooting playing over and over on the news. Who has been killed? Who is The Kid? Will the author be able to finish his book tour, and what kind of world will he leave behind? Unforgettably powerful, an electrifying high-wire act, ideal for book clubs, and the book Mott stated that he has been writing in his head for ten years, Hell of a Book in its final twists truly becomes its title. This is not a casual read - it is far and wide a BOOK CLUB BOOK and literature vs a "book". We used to have a member in my book club who would stick her nose up and snootily state "I don't read novels" - we reminded her that there was a Pulitzer and Nobel Prize for literature many times before she left us for "smarter people"! SHE would love this book and so would many members of my book club. Why did I not simply adore it? I have news burnout - what happens in this book is true and it was a reverberation of everything that goes every time I turn on the news: Racism. Insurrection. Death. Murder. Police misuse of power. I read to get away from the news....but that is me. It is an incredibly written book and you might give it a perfect rating but I stopped at four stars as it was too triggering.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    You must read this book. I was very impressed with Mott's book The Returned but this is even better. Some people will not like it because you have to think too much, too bad for them because its an amazing and important book. I think 50 years from now, college students will be writing papers about it. High school students might be answering essay questions about it if we progress far enough. Conservatives will not like this book, but should read it anyway if they want to understand the Black Liv You must read this book. I was very impressed with Mott's book The Returned but this is even better. Some people will not like it because you have to think too much, too bad for them because its an amazing and important book. I think 50 years from now, college students will be writing papers about it. High school students might be answering essay questions about it if we progress far enough. Conservatives will not like this book, but should read it anyway if they want to understand the Black Lives Matter movement. There is nothing in the book about the experience of being a black man that I havent read before but I think the book is so engaging that maybe, I hope, a few people will have their eyes open. And if you are black or an ally, just read it because it really is a hell of a book. I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for my honest review

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joefel

    A book that talks about book, Jason Mott’s Hell of a book is straight in the list of my best reads for 2021. This book is certainly exceptional that it wrangles and explores love, loss, friendship and the racial violence in America. The nameless author in the story is on a book tour across the United States, promoting the novel called Hell of a Book, shifting to different places to do interviews. As the mystery follows, there’s this imaginary Black kid whom he talks and appear whenever the author A book that talks about book, Jason Mott’s Hell of a book is straight in the list of my best reads for 2021. This book is certainly exceptional that it wrangles and explores love, loss, friendship and the racial violence in America. The nameless author in the story is on a book tour across the United States, promoting the novel called Hell of a Book, shifting to different places to do interviews. As the mystery follows, there’s this imaginary Black kid whom he talks and appear whenever the author is. Along with his improbable friendship with THE KID, the author descriptions to the following chapters is the story of Soot, who is being bullied in a small town on the reason of his very dark skin and he was also tested with tragic situations. This book feels heavy, as the nameless author were puzzled with the situation he has and how he digested it. The switch chapters between the author and Soot viewpoint unfolds revelations I knew that will happen but it was tinge with unexpected twists. As such, Jason Mott’s writing style is outstanding and impactful. This book touches fears, questions, and mourning that will make you cry and at there’s this point that will make you laugh as well. Hell of a Book will keep you invested in reading the entire entries and will definitely lingers in your head. (Massive thanks to PRH International for providing an eARC edition of this book my way.)

  12. 4 out of 5

    BookNightOwl

    Hard to write about what I thought of this book. 🤔 I found it okay. C-

  13. 4 out of 5

    Crystal (Melanatedreader) Forte'

    Interesting concept. I can truly understand why people would enjoy this book. This book is definitely a conversation starter and holds accountability for a community of people that are sometimes over looked.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    I have conflicting feelings towards this book,that make it hard to judge how much I really liked it. There were times it amused me,followed soon after by times I could tell it was being funny,but I didnt find it so. Times I was a bit lost,and times I really felt for the characters. So,I'll give it three stars. I'm glad I read it,as I think it's going to be talked about a lot,but I'm not sure I'd be recommending it enthusiastically. I have conflicting feelings towards this book,that make it hard to judge how much I really liked it. There were times it amused me,followed soon after by times I could tell it was being funny,but I didnt find it so. Times I was a bit lost,and times I really felt for the characters. So,I'll give it three stars. I'm glad I read it,as I think it's going to be talked about a lot,but I'm not sure I'd be recommending it enthusiastically.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Geonn Cannon

    This is a wild book. Almost but not quite stream of consciousness, almost impossible to categorize. Definitely a great, weird, tragic, dark, worthwhile read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    Surreal, wickedly funny, incredibly dark, this book skewers the publishing industry, and comments on white America's inability to deal with its history of slavery. And its current situation of widespread bigotry and inequality, resulting in the brutal treatment and murders of African Americans by police and others. Surreal, wickedly funny, incredibly dark, this book skewers the publishing industry, and comments on white America's inability to deal with its history of slavery. And its current situation of widespread bigotry and inequality, resulting in the brutal treatment and murders of African Americans by police and others.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ginny Harple

    It’s literally a hell of a book. Amazingly written and woven together.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    Hell of a Book by Jason Mott is a unique narrative that follows an unnamed African American author on a book tour, a young black boy called Soot, and a possibly imaginary boy known as The Kid. The book addresses racism, police brutality, mental health, and the publishing industry. I would absolutely recommend this book to fans of Kurt Vonnegut. The style and structure of Hell of a Book remind me of Vonnegut's writing. I would say this book is to racism what Slaughter-House Five is to war (hopeful Hell of a Book by Jason Mott is a unique narrative that follows an unnamed African American author on a book tour, a young black boy called Soot, and a possibly imaginary boy known as The Kid. The book addresses racism, police brutality, mental health, and the publishing industry. I would absolutely recommend this book to fans of Kurt Vonnegut. The style and structure of Hell of a Book remind me of Vonnegut's writing. I would say this book is to racism what Slaughter-House Five is to war (hopefully that makes sense to other readers!). With that said, I am not a Kurt Vonnegut fan, and I also wasn't a fan of this book. I appreciate what Mott is doing in this book, and I believe it will likely become a highly regarded novel, but I just don't enjoy reading this style of writing. Thank you to NetGalley and Penguin Group/Dutton for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for a review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Winn

    Hell of a waste of time book! I don't know what even kept me reading the whole book. Probably because it was Jenna's book of the month pick for July. Throughout it was hard to keep up with his constantly switching from reality to the voices in his head. Was even one sentence in the book real or was every sentence the voices in his head? Who knows! Seriously the strangest book I've ever read Sorry I wasn't able to give it a better review. Hell of a waste of time book! I don't know what even kept me reading the whole book. Probably because it was Jenna's book of the month pick for July. Throughout it was hard to keep up with his constantly switching from reality to the voices in his head. Was even one sentence in the book real or was every sentence the voices in his head? Who knows! Seriously the strangest book I've ever read Sorry I wasn't able to give it a better review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linda Beilstein

    Borrowed from library. Did not finish. The story sounded interesting but the writing was basically incoherent. I couldn’t follow the story at all. It just wasn’t worth my time to finish it. Too many books, too little time to waste it on one you are not enjoying.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Barsanti

    Well-constructed satire of the book industry's publicity machine, but its unreliable narrator conceit ultimately falls somewhat short of the revelatory insight Mott appears to be striving for. Well-constructed satire of the book industry's publicity machine, but its unreliable narrator conceit ultimately falls somewhat short of the revelatory insight Mott appears to be striving for.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura Phelps

    This is a book that is going to stay with me for a long time. Reading it feels at times like following a dream sequence, but at other times it is so sharply in focus that it hurts.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Judy Mertens

    No words to be said other than it was an amazing story, that will stay with me forever!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Deja Roden

    This “book club pick” will only continue to divide. A hell of a waste of time. Not to mention the writing is terrible.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book. It’s hard to describe this book except to say……it’s a hell of a book. I won this as a Goodreads Giveaway and didn’t know what to expect. The writing style is unique but captivating. The characters are meaningful and you feel a real connection to them. And then there is deeper, underlying meaning that leaves you really thinking out the culture in our country. Another book that has quickly become one of my favorites this year.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Wow! What did I just read??? I will need some time to process. At times hilarious and the next thought-provoking or heartbreaking. A satirical yet sometimes funny, often painful look at the Black Experience in America. It captured me from page 1. I think that this book would be best served as a book club or buddy read in order to have conversations.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    “Hell of a book” is actually just as it’s title proclaims-a hell of a book. It is one of the best books I have enjoyed and I read constantly. The moment I finished the heart warming first chapter I knew I was in for a treat. The book is about family love, race, and growing up black in America. The author uses the stories of an author and two young boys to tell the story. How he tells their stories is unique and in my opinion genius. I want to keep this spoiler free so I will not divulge more abo “Hell of a book” is actually just as it’s title proclaims-a hell of a book. It is one of the best books I have enjoyed and I read constantly. The moment I finished the heart warming first chapter I knew I was in for a treat. The book is about family love, race, and growing up black in America. The author uses the stories of an author and two young boys to tell the story. How he tells their stories is unique and in my opinion genius. I want to keep this spoiler free so I will not divulge more about the characters. I will tell you while the first chapter warmed my heart there is also heart breaking moments as well. I really encourage everyone to read “Hell of a Book”. It is a work of art. I received this book in a gracious giveaway on Goodreads by Dutton Books.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    It is honestly one hell of a book. It pulled me in very quickly. An amazing story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessikah Chautin

    Five stars is not enough for this incredible book. I read this one in a matter of hours.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    “I’m sorry. I haven’t introduced myself. I’m an author. My name is __________. Maybe you’ve heard of me and maybe you haven’t, but you’ve probably heard of my book. It seems to be selling pretty well. It’s called Hell of a Book. And, according to the reviews, it’s a hell of a book...But I’m not here to talk about my book. Not just yet. Everything has to begin somewhere first.” “In one iteration of this, he is a boy who goes on to become a writer who tours and drinks and dreams. In another iterat “I’m sorry. I haven’t introduced myself. I’m an author. My name is __________. Maybe you’ve heard of me and maybe you haven’t, but you’ve probably heard of my book. It seems to be selling pretty well. It’s called Hell of a Book. And, according to the reviews, it’s a hell of a book...But I’m not here to talk about my book. Not just yet. Everything has to begin somewhere first.” “In one iteration of this, he is a boy who goes on to become a writer who tours and drinks and dreams. In another iteration, he is a child who dies and, yet, somehow finds a way to go on. In another still, he is a child who goes on to become a writer who hides so deeply in his character is that the stories he tells of them become muddled in the story he fears to tell himself.” “The key takeaway here is that if you’re going to write...Always tell a love story…Maybe that’s still true, just not in the way that I expected. Maybe the love story here is more reflective...like maybe Narcissus has spent his whole life hating himself before that one day when he saw his own beauty, his own worth... “Laugh all you want, but I think learning to love yourself in a country where you’re told that you’re a plague on the economy, that you’re nothing but a prisoner in the making, that your life can be taken away from you at any moment and there is nothing you can do about it--learning to love yourself in the middle of all that? Hell, that’s a goddamn miracle.”

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...