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Big Girls, Vol. 1

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When men become giant monsters destroying the world, only girls can stop them -- BIG GIRLS. Meet Ember, she writes poetry, loves to read, she's 300 feet tall and her full time job is killing monsters! Her and the other girls are all that stand in the way of our world's complete annihilation! Critically acclaimed artist JASON HOWARD (TREES) takes the full creative reins, wr When men become giant monsters destroying the world, only girls can stop them -- BIG GIRLS. Meet Ember, she writes poetry, loves to read, she's 300 feet tall and her full time job is killing monsters! Her and the other girls are all that stand in the way of our world's complete annihilation! Critically acclaimed artist JASON HOWARD (TREES) takes the full creative reins, writing and drawing a tale that could be described as a cross between JOHN WICK & GODZILLA by way of HBO's GIRLS. Collects BIG GIRLS #1-6


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When men become giant monsters destroying the world, only girls can stop them -- BIG GIRLS. Meet Ember, she writes poetry, loves to read, she's 300 feet tall and her full time job is killing monsters! Her and the other girls are all that stand in the way of our world's complete annihilation! Critically acclaimed artist JASON HOWARD (TREES) takes the full creative reins, wr When men become giant monsters destroying the world, only girls can stop them -- BIG GIRLS. Meet Ember, she writes poetry, loves to read, she's 300 feet tall and her full time job is killing monsters! Her and the other girls are all that stand in the way of our world's complete annihilation! Critically acclaimed artist JASON HOWARD (TREES) takes the full creative reins, writing and drawing a tale that could be described as a cross between JOHN WICK & GODZILLA by way of HBO's GIRLS. Collects BIG GIRLS #1-6

30 review for Big Girls, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Scientists created a machine that can furiously embiggen fruit and vegetables, which is pretty great for solving all forms of food crises, but also leads to gigantic children being born. That is, I think they're born as 'normal' babies, but then start to grow exponentially, first being giant children (larger than most adults), and if they're male, they start to mutate and turn into gigantic kaiju-like monsters. If they're female, they grow to be equally gigantic women. The monsters are a problem, Scientists created a machine that can furiously embiggen fruit and vegetables, which is pretty great for solving all forms of food crises, but also leads to gigantic children being born. That is, I think they're born as 'normal' babies, but then start to grow exponentially, first being giant children (larger than most adults), and if they're male, they start to mutate and turn into gigantic kaiju-like monsters. If they're female, they grow to be equally gigantic women. The monsters are a problem, they tend to attack the cities and kill people. The huge women form the defense, also known as the titular Big Girls, with their own uniforms and huge weapons! I'm guessing not all little children become huge people, but when a baby boy starts mutating, it has to be terminated, which is a thing not every parent would agree to. There's also a faction that believes the embiggened creatures are the next evolutionary step or something, I'm not entirely clear on that. Anyway, they're terrorists, and they terrorise. Our main character is called Ember, she's one of three Big Girls in this book. We get to know a bit about her past, how she became a Big Girl. Thing is, there's some fun ideas in this book, and Jason Howard's art is good, but the story doesn't really go anywhere, and has few suprises (if any, really). Starts good, then peters out. :( (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    In the near future, a virus has caused some boys to mutate into giant kaiju nicknamed "Jacks" while the girls sometimes grow to gargantuan proportions as well. The Big Girls protect what's left of a city from being destroyed by the Jacks. There's also some psychopaths on both sides of this causing things to escalate out of control. There's a lot left unexplained here that could have made the story tighter. It often just devolved into giants fighting through a city. Still, it was alright. Received In the near future, a virus has caused some boys to mutate into giant kaiju nicknamed "Jacks" while the girls sometimes grow to gargantuan proportions as well. The Big Girls protect what's left of a city from being destroyed by the Jacks. There's also some psychopaths on both sides of this causing things to escalate out of control. There's a lot left unexplained here that could have made the story tighter. It often just devolved into giants fighting through a city. Still, it was alright. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  3. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    “You are defending monsters!” “No... but what if I’m becoming one?” I really didn’t expect the book about giantesses punching monsters to end up being such a masterpiece of storytelling... but it apparently is. What’s it about? A virus has spread! It’s a very deadly virus that sadly makes men turn into giant monsters ready to destroy everything. It also can infect women but it only makes them powerful giantesses! Now a team of said giantesses (called “big girls”) are trying to defend a city from tho “You are defending monsters!” “No... but what if I’m becoming one?” I really didn’t expect the book about giantesses punching monsters to end up being such a masterpiece of storytelling... but it apparently is. What’s it about? A virus has spread! It’s a very deadly virus that sadly makes men turn into giant monsters ready to destroy everything. It also can infect women but it only makes them powerful giantesses! Now a team of said giantesses (called “big girls”) are trying to defend a city from those monsters (referred to as “jacks”). Problems arise once Ember (a big girl) starts to question whether or not she’s doing the right thing... and whether or not the jacks are truly beyond hope of not being monsters anymore. Why it gets 5-stars: The story is pretty fantastic! It’s a very well executed mix of drama, science fiction and action. The description says it’s like “Godzilla meets John Wick and HBO’s Girls” which while I can’t say regarding HBO’s Girls (might watch it if it’s like this!), I don’t see many similarities to John Wick (though perhaps a few). I would more likely describe this as Godzilla meets District 9 with giantess protagonists (which seriously if that doesn’t sound awesome to you, I don’t understand how your head works TBH). The artwork is pretty cool. At first I’ll admit I was somewhat unsure about it but overall I think it’s pretty cool. It is unique and not what I’m used to. It also fits the tone of this book very well and looks pretty cool. The characters are very well written. They all have their own unique personalities, motives, thoughts, etc. which I was pleasantly surprised by. Looking at the plot you could see why stories like this may have bland characters but not this particular story! It’s not even just good guys or bad guys, nothing in this book’s world is completely black and white. There’s piles of action scenes and they are very exciting! If you’re a fan of monster movies but wanted more substance, that’s kinda what the action scenes in this help deliver. There’s brief, well done moments of comic relief in dialogue between characters. There’s definitely a lot of suspense. The twists start coming pretty early and don’t expect them to stop coming! It’s very unpredictable throughout and goes a lot of surprising directions. There’s a lot of social commentary in layers and brilliant metaphors. It’s main subject that this is commentary on seems to be sexism and feminism which is approached in such a great way. I don’t wanna give spoilers but you can kinda see early on that the big girls are kinda like feminists if jacks are misogynists (even comparing sexism to a disease) and Ember wondering if she’s doing the right thing by killing jacks immediately or if they might actually not be completely hopeless. I think shows how feminism is no longer a black and white issue (I mean I have some reviews that praise feminism, others that trash it, I think I might see things the same way Ember did in this metaphor!). There’s a lot more to it as the story goes on and I don’t wanna just tell you guys everything but I love this book’s deep metaphors that may go over some reader’s heads but hopefully make most readers think, I’m possibly gonna end up re-reading this before volume 2 starts up (if we get a volume 2 which we hopefully will) just to refresh my mind and see what I may have missed, there’s so much. There are very few comics I’ve read that go this damn deep into metaphors and social commentary, especially as well done as this. It’s obviously making people think too as I have seen a few misogynists and misandrists alike get upset by this comic. The dialogue is very good. It’s where many emotional parts and character chemistry shine! So I had seen people talking about this aspect of the comic and I should probably comment on it: some of the giantess community got excited for this. Now to be clear this is NOT a fetish comic, if you ain’t into the kink you will still likely enjoy this and there is no sexual content... however with that being said, it’s still plenty cute for those of us who do like a pretty giantess (Ember is a new addition to my mental list of comic book crushes!) The ending is a good one. It sets up a second volume while also being a decent ending for the first part (and of course giving a great pro-gender equality message). Overall: I followed this in single issues. I am still waiting for my physical copy of issue 6 at the time I am writing this review but ended up reading the Kindle edition of that issue so I can make sure I’m caught up. It is that fucking good! Kaiju stories are a bit hit or miss for me, many are just kinda cheesy and ridiculous but not this one. This is a genius story layered in brilliant social commentary with good action scenes, very well written characters, tons of suspense and cool artwork. Highly recommended to all fans of science fiction! 5/5

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Big girls verse big boys that are ugly monsters. Simple. No really, that is the storyline. Basically the government is using these huge girls who can combat these Kaiju sized boys who've become monsters when they grew. It's a war against the creatures as the girls work together to fight back. But what happens when the girls begin to do the dirty walk of the government...who's the real monster!? It's a fine story. It's not great but it is fun. The fights, the overall atmosphere, feels pretty on p Big girls verse big boys that are ugly monsters. Simple. No really, that is the storyline. Basically the government is using these huge girls who can combat these Kaiju sized boys who've become monsters when they grew. It's a war against the creatures as the girls work together to fight back. But what happens when the girls begin to do the dirty walk of the government...who's the real monster!? It's a fine story. It's not great but it is fun. The fights, the overall atmosphere, feels pretty on par with things like Pacific Rim. I enjoyed watching the fights a lot and even had some good emotional bits spread throughout. The characters are pretty decent though cliche as good be. And the ending is more like "There might be more...if we sold enough" Type ending. So for now it's a 3 out of 5 series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Still not convinced I've got my head around this one, if I'm honest. The pitch is simple enough: giant women defending humanity from giant-er monsters. And maybe it was just that, that image suddenly coming to Howard and catching his attention, with the rest worked out from there. But equally, the way the rupture from the world that was is the Mistake, the mention of how life was suddenly defined by a whole new terminology...that feels quite Event, with stuff like 'Behemic Initiator' standing in Still not convinced I've got my head around this one, if I'm honest. The pitch is simple enough: giant women defending humanity from giant-er monsters. And maybe it was just that, that image suddenly coming to Howard and catching his attention, with the rest worked out from there. But equally, the way the rupture from the world that was is the Mistake, the mention of how life was suddenly defined by a whole new terminology...that feels quite Event, with stuff like 'Behemic Initiator' standing in for the R number or protein spikes. Then there's the horribly topical (though when isn't it?) angle about how men are the problem, because the same mutation which makes women into giant defenders turns men into those monsters, horrible spiky things I (perhaps wrongly) hesitate to call kaiju because I don't think of kaiju as being this ugly. This in a comic by someone previously best known for his work with Warren Ellis, a man who was last year unveiled as a problem. I am not privy to Howard's thought processes, I don't even know the development timeline of this series, so are either set of resonances intended, or just an accident of timing, evocative synchronicity? I can't say. Beyond which, there are the issues that often crop up when an artist turns writer-artist, a sense that the book looks strong but the skeleton might not all connect. Characters are a little too close to types; there's a big twist which manages to be stupid and overfamiliar all at once; the final fight tries to rush through as much plot as the rest of the book combined in between punching. Above all, much of the dialogue could have done with another pass. Yes, maybe I am thinking in particular of the line "Similar is not the same. A poodle and a wolf are similar, but you act different if facing a hungry one." Where I would absolutely be as wary of a full-size poodle who was hungry enough (because those guys are big, and smart) as I would liable to tell a merely peckish wolf that he was a very good boy and would be provided with tasty treats because look at all that fluff. (Edelweiss ARC)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carol Flores

    Big girls fighting against creatures that look like Kaijus? Sign me in! We see three big women (and I mean that literally) fighting against monsters who devour humans, preventing them to destroy everything in their way. Later on, we find out that people were infected with a virus but only men turned into those creatures, and women, well, they just got big. The women work for an organization who is trying to protect the people in the new city but the fact is that their methods do not allow any co Big girls fighting against creatures that look like Kaijus? Sign me in! We see three big women (and I mean that literally) fighting against monsters who devour humans, preventing them to destroy everything in their way. Later on, we find out that people were infected with a virus but only men turned into those creatures, and women, well, they just got big. The women work for an organization who is trying to protect the people in the new city but the fact is that their methods do not allow any conscience whatsoever. What if they’re turning into monsters just like the Jacks? Are they just justifying their means? Eventually they figure out what really happened with the monsters and try to find a common ground. Perhaps killing each other is not the solution, but rather an easy way out. Truth is, these Jacks still have a little bit of conscience and they can be persuaded into a truce. Now, what I really liked about this was the action scenes and though we’ve seen the same conflict in different stories (I mean big creatures fighting against each other in the city), it’s always entertaining to see women kicking ass! I hope we get to see the next volume soon enough! I received an e-book ARC in exchange for an honest review via Diamond Comic Distributors.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam M

    This falls into a group of graphic novels for me that sting: Interesting premise so I pick it up; starts with decent energy so I'm optimistic; starts getting a little thin or trope-y 1/2 way through; cannot live up to it's own premise by the end/thinks itself too smart. This had me for a while, started to lose me then had a twist (that like I probably should have seen coming) which got me back. The problem is that it didn't have a lot of places to go because we had limited characters who we reall This falls into a group of graphic novels for me that sting: Interesting premise so I pick it up; starts with decent energy so I'm optimistic; starts getting a little thin or trope-y 1/2 way through; cannot live up to it's own premise by the end/thinks itself too smart. This had me for a while, started to lose me then had a twist (that like I probably should have seen coming) which got me back. The problem is that it didn't have a lot of places to go because we had limited characters who we really cared about. "Monsters" abound in this story of all shapes and sizes, but by the end it didn't seem to matter a whole lot. The stakes got too big to really worry about, so at some point I wasn't attached anymore. Jason Howard obviously left the door open for more story, but it was a SUPER ham-fisted ending. I don't care enough to come back because we weren't given a reason to. Human sized people didn't matter in this book so who cares about 3 "big girls" and monsters in the next one? Seemingly nothing is on the line and without that this is just a bunch of Jason Howard drawings of people with perfectly round or perfectly square heads.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Big, bad science has clearly got bigger and badder. Something has changed some people's DNA, making them grow to skyscraper size. The problem with that is that all the males also turn into cancerous, evil-minded monsters, one further down the "Hulk! Smash!!" scale of subtlety from the big green one himself. Luckily, a bullish militaristic type has procured a part of the city, got some sharp-shooting skyscraper women to defend it on behalf of all us normal-sized folk, and pledged to keep all kind Big, bad science has clearly got bigger and badder. Something has changed some people's DNA, making them grow to skyscraper size. The problem with that is that all the males also turn into cancerous, evil-minded monsters, one further down the "Hulk! Smash!!" scale of subtlety from the big green one himself. Luckily, a bullish militaristic type has procured a part of the city, got some sharp-shooting skyscraper women to defend it on behalf of all us normal-sized folk, and pledged to keep all kind of male growth spurts out of his world. But is his the right way to go about things? Well, obviously not, as we quickly and regularly see in this book, which of course is not about big, bad science. Nor is it about monsters. No, on top of the usual accept-others-for-what-they-are saw we get a really good look at the parental spirit, how we might see the child before the monster, or the regular human that might have come to be under other circumstances. And I really liked all that – the moral of the piece with the motherly spirit being the thing to grasp on to was done really well, and not too heavily. Some of the scenes here just seemed to be fighting and shouting for the sake of fighting and shouting, but this manages the small as well as it does the humongous, and I think it's a success as a result.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2.625 Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2.625

  10. 5 out of 5

    Trike

    Time to put on your big girl panties and fight some kaiju... who just happen to be skyscraper-sized mutated boys. Pretty sure this is all an allegory about how we as a society are responsible for raising toxic men, but it works just fine for that. Time to smash some cities and then maybe hug it out.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    3.75 Kaiju are always something of an interest at one point or another. Now combine Attack On Titan with huge factionalism for bigger action. It's a very straightforward series about giant girls fighting monsters who are mutated boys. They're taken and groomed by government operatives to be the thing that defends the preserve. The only problem, everyone in charge is so broken they only want to tear everything down or preserve what can't be fixed. Because at the end of the day, it's never about su 3.75 Kaiju are always something of an interest at one point or another. Now combine Attack On Titan with huge factionalism for bigger action. It's a very straightforward series about giant girls fighting monsters who are mutated boys. They're taken and groomed by government operatives to be the thing that defends the preserve. The only problem, everyone in charge is so broken they only want to tear everything down or preserve what can't be fixed. Because at the end of the day, it's never about surviving and thriving, but dominance. Just look at how the power structure is. Most of the military is unironically led by men and the leader is a trigger happy dictator caricature. What does having a leader like Tannik say about the state of things? His opposition is really no better. Both sides are willing to smear and scapegoat anybody who gets in their way. No one in power ever really cares about humanity, they just find excuses to dominate and propagate. Despite the Big Girls being the thing that protects humanity, they're told not to think and hold no real power. Because at the end of the day, they barely even count as soldiers, just assets. The biggest problem is how everything happens so fast in pacing no one has room to breathe. A raid on an enemy base? How and why did that happen? Because the plot demanded it, not because characters messed up. There's a lot of energy from start to finish, but that's also what makes it feel like its limited.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily Rainsford

    This one was just okay for me. Some kind of science mistake leads some boys to grow into giant monsters and some girls to grow into giant humans who fight the monsters. No one knows why or how, which is kind of convenient I guess lol. Some humans are kept safe in a city called The Preserve, the Big Girls have to keep the monsters out of the city. There's a bad guy and some politics and stuff. I thought there were some interesting ideas here, but nothing really felt explored deeply enough. The en This one was just okay for me. Some kind of science mistake leads some boys to grow into giant monsters and some girls to grow into giant humans who fight the monsters. No one knows why or how, which is kind of convenient I guess lol. Some humans are kept safe in a city called The Preserve, the Big Girls have to keep the monsters out of the city. There's a bad guy and some politics and stuff. I thought there were some interesting ideas here, but nothing really felt explored deeply enough. The ending felt a bit abrupt and a little too kumbaya after the brutality of the whole story. None of the characters felt developed enough for me to care too much about them. I think the concept had potential but somehow it just fizzled out a bit.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gabby

    Very interesting concept. A gene that affects both men and women, causing some to grow “big” but turns only the men into vicious monsters. Gives me zombie survival story vibes but with large monstrous creatures instead. Are they completely mindless, or do they still have some humanity inside them? It very much reminded me of the comic Green Class. I loved the morally grey characters and love how this volume ended. The art style was very unique; sketchy and shape-y. I still have a lot of questions Very interesting concept. A gene that affects both men and women, causing some to grow “big” but turns only the men into vicious monsters. Gives me zombie survival story vibes but with large monstrous creatures instead. Are they completely mindless, or do they still have some humanity inside them? It very much reminded me of the comic Green Class. I loved the morally grey characters and love how this volume ended. The art style was very unique; sketchy and shape-y. I still have a lot of questions but I can’t wait to pick up the next volume. I received an e-copy of this graphic novel from Diamond Book Distributors in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Very good post-apocalyptic comic series. The premise behind this series is that a scientific experiment results in the creation of over-sized human beings i.e. the Big Girls. They are faced with guarding their home against other creatures. There's far more to it than that and the main characters are well-depicted. The artwork is exciting and the whole concept is quite original. Good stuff - and evidently there's more to come. Very good post-apocalyptic comic series. The premise behind this series is that a scientific experiment results in the creation of over-sized human beings i.e. the Big Girls. They are faced with guarding their home against other creatures. There's far more to it than that and the main characters are well-depicted. The artwork is exciting and the whole concept is quite original. Good stuff - and evidently there's more to come.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Imogene

    Okay, so for the first five issues, I felt like I was reading one thing. Issue six completely took the rug out from under me. I can see why, for story purposes the creative team have gone this way, but wow, I wish that they had had the courage to follow through!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Xroldx

    A nice American twist on Japanese Kaji stories. I don't know if there's a reason to go for another volume but this one is okay for what it is: a fast blockbuster of a comic with lots of action and very big girls fighting big monsters. A nice American twist on Japanese Kaji stories. I don't know if there's a reason to go for another volume but this one is okay for what it is: a fast blockbuster of a comic with lots of action and very big girls fighting big monsters.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katkatyap

    Great story! You can broaden your audience by publishing your story on Novel Star Mobile App.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Big Girls felt like a title in search of a story. The world never felt fully built and the characters never felt fully formed despite Howard's solid art the story was just never there. Big Girls felt like a title in search of a story. The world never felt fully built and the characters never felt fully formed despite Howard's solid art the story was just never there.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    Really enjoyed this one, very pacific rim.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Review submitted to Diamond Bookshelf for potential professional publication.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vasilis Fotsinos

  22. 5 out of 5

    J.J.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Damien Bamford

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rose Del Vecchio

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chaz4488

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laurian Vega

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alican Kunt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Phil

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