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November, Volume IV

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In a city where unseen and incomprehensible forces conspired to bring three strangers together over the course of one insane and violent night, daylight breaks and the fates of those strangers finally arrives. The conclusion to this noir quartet of graphic novellas is by MATT FRACTION (SEX CRIMINALS, ADVENTUREMAN) and ELSA CHARRETIER (The Infinite Loop, Windhaven) with Mat In a city where unseen and incomprehensible forces conspired to bring three strangers together over the course of one insane and violent night, daylight breaks and the fates of those strangers finally arrives. The conclusion to this noir quartet of graphic novellas is by MATT FRACTION (SEX CRIMINALS, ADVENTUREMAN) and ELSA CHARRETIER (The Infinite Loop, Windhaven) with Matt Hollingsworth and Kurt Ankeny.


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In a city where unseen and incomprehensible forces conspired to bring three strangers together over the course of one insane and violent night, daylight breaks and the fates of those strangers finally arrives. The conclusion to this noir quartet of graphic novellas is by MATT FRACTION (SEX CRIMINALS, ADVENTUREMAN) and ELSA CHARRETIER (The Infinite Loop, Windhaven) with Mat In a city where unseen and incomprehensible forces conspired to bring three strangers together over the course of one insane and violent night, daylight breaks and the fates of those strangers finally arrives. The conclusion to this noir quartet of graphic novellas is by MATT FRACTION (SEX CRIMINALS, ADVENTUREMAN) and ELSA CHARRETIER (The Infinite Loop, Windhaven) with Matt Hollingsworth and Kurt Ankeny.

30 review for November, Volume IV

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    "Oh it must have been something I did in the past. Don’t it just wanna make you laugh”--Lou Reed Surprise, surprise: Almost all reviewers disliked the first volumes of this crime series, and then--those that kept reading--finally loved it. Moral: Be patient, sometimes. Three intersecting stories of women that take place in the night, and in this last volume, we get the same story told--in Rashomon fashion--from the perspectives of each woman: Dee, an addict, approached in the first volume by a guy "Oh it must have been something I did in the past. Don’t it just wanna make you laugh”--Lou Reed Surprise, surprise: Almost all reviewers disliked the first volumes of this crime series, and then--those that kept reading--finally loved it. Moral: Be patient, sometimes. Three intersecting stories of women that take place in the night, and in this last volume, we get the same story told--in Rashomon fashion--from the perspectives of each woman: Dee, an addict, approached in the first volume by a guy to do some job involving being a go-between involving electronic transmissions, in exchange for a lot of money; a woman coming home to her apartment who finds a gun; and Kowalski, an overworked night-shift 911 dispatcher at a busy police precinct. And then, the explosive conclusion, where everything comes together, and violently! Such a carefully designed and executed noir series, sort of postmodernly elliptical (so I get some of the frustration), but it's a solid conclusion to Matt Fraction (writer), Elsa Charretier (artist), and Matt Hollingsworth's (coloring) work. This is work that calls attention to its style, versus typical realist noir where the style is subdued, but it is so well done, and what a conclusion!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A satisfying conclusion, though it does lack some of the kick of the previous volumes. And I'm not sure I ever made sense of all the intricacies of the criminal enterprise. A very good series overall. A satisfying conclusion, though it does lack some of the kick of the previous volumes. And I'm not sure I ever made sense of all the intricacies of the criminal enterprise. A very good series overall.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Dinges

    I'm not opposed to telling you to read this series of short graphic novels (graphic novellas?) for Elsa Charretier's art. It's a good looking book. This final volume in the series brings the story to a conclusion for all 3 primary characters. As the series went on it began to feel like the story was too compact. This volume has what amounts to a single issue's worth of story from 3 different point of views. It brings everything to a satisfying enough conclusion but my feeling upon completion is I'm not opposed to telling you to read this series of short graphic novels (graphic novellas?) for Elsa Charretier's art. It's a good looking book. This final volume in the series brings the story to a conclusion for all 3 primary characters. As the series went on it began to feel like the story was too compact. This volume has what amounts to a single issue's worth of story from 3 different point of views. It brings everything to a satisfying enough conclusion but my feeling upon completion is that November could have been more if there was more meat on the bone for each of the women's point of view. I have a feeling it would have read better had I gone through all 4 volumes at once rather than reading as they were released. Still, it was an ambitious story and the release schedule (80-90 page books released about every quarter) was one that I really could get used to. I'd like to see Fraction and Charretier team up on a new book with a similar format.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    Having now finished the epic vision Matt Fraction set out to tell about three women on a calamitous night in November, I confess I would need to reread the complete story (publishing began in 2019, and I haven’t yet done so for any volume; I got and read the final two in rapid succession) to fully appreciate it, but this is still a great conclusion. Crime comics, especially those modern efforts from the likes of Ed Brubaker, have always been a distinguished subgenre in the medium. Fraction’s tale Having now finished the epic vision Matt Fraction set out to tell about three women on a calamitous night in November, I confess I would need to reread the complete story (publishing began in 2019, and I haven’t yet done so for any volume; I got and read the final two in rapid succession) to fully appreciate it, but this is still a great conclusion. Crime comics, especially those modern efforts from the likes of Ed Brubaker, have always been a distinguished subgenre in the medium. Fraction’s tale is a cross between that and the kind of comics critics actually love, the intimate portraits that often have little plot involved and instead illustrate ordinary struggles. It could be a movie. If it were a movie, perhaps more people would care about the results. November is kind of like the movie Widows, insofar as Antony Johnston’s Coldest City is kind of like the movie Atomic Blonde (which in that case, is relevant because one is based on the other). The flashier one will receive more attention, but they both have keen selling points all the same. I don’t know, the minute I saw Entertainment Weekly give the rare comic book a spotlight, I wanted to read >I>November. I’m not a huge fan of Fraction; I have read a fraction of Fraction, in fact, although I always enjoy his work. I still would like to believe, as I think I may have suggested in my review of the first volume, that November could be his defining work. It’s the one, at any rate, that begs the least for attention, and perhaps deserves it most because of it. I think if you still don’t get it by this volume, you never will. And, well, it’d be your loss.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    I don't know if this is intentional or not, but this volume feels like it's almost all epilogue. It's not --- there's at least one really important scene that finishes several plotlines --- but the end result for me was a book that didn't really work as a book in itself. Also, some of the detail I wanted from the very beginning (vîs a vîs the mysteries set up in the first volume) is never given. Now, the story is much more about the three protagonists than how the shenanigans worked, but there w I don't know if this is intentional or not, but this volume feels like it's almost all epilogue. It's not --- there's at least one really important scene that finishes several plotlines --- but the end result for me was a book that didn't really work as a book in itself. Also, some of the detail I wanted from the very beginning (vîs a vîs the mysteries set up in the first volume) is never given. Now, the story is much more about the three protagonists than how the shenanigans worked, but there was so much emphasis on [spoilers reacted] that I wanted to know how the evil plans worked, and I never found that out.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Each volume, I was tempted to grab the previous volume but I could catch up after the first or second chapter. Great crime story (blahblahblah been done before I know) but the characters really cinched it for me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    3.5 stars. This series never really grabbed me, but I'm certainly not disappointed that I read them. And I can say that Charretier's art has hugely grown on me since the first book. 3.5 stars. This series never really grabbed me, but I'm certainly not disappointed that I read them. And I can say that Charretier's art has hugely grown on me since the first book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jake Nap

    At a loss for words. I loved all of these books so much. The format, the structure, the formalism, the characters, the art, the lettering, the writing. I love everything.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    The final book has the climax to this tale. The endings were some what happy, and overall a good series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alistair

    Stuck the landing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    D B JETT

    A great end to a great series. Still not a fan of the lettering; much too hard to read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    A solid conclusion to Matt Fraction, Elsa Charretier, and Matt Hollingsworth's limited neo-noir series. (e-galley from Edelweiss) A solid conclusion to Matt Fraction, Elsa Charretier, and Matt Hollingsworth's limited neo-noir series. (e-galley from Edelweiss)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Such an incredibly explosive (literally) final chapter. I have rarely been this satisfied by an ending.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Frances

    A beautiful finish to a fantastic story; a harsh neonoir story leavened with just enough hope to shine a little through the grime.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark Peaslee

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brad Wojak

  18. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Joseph

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Phillips

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Balkam

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 5 out of 5

    Costas Tsamis

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  29. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nick

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