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Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 3

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The epic conclusion to the New York Times bestselling original graphic novel series from superstar and critically acclaimed duo Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette is here! Diana, now queen of the Amazons, must assemble the disparate Amazonian tribes for the first time in a millennium. Max Lord's assault on Paradise Island with his destructive A.R.E.S. armors is on the horiz The epic conclusion to the New York Times bestselling original graphic novel series from superstar and critically acclaimed duo Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette is here! Diana, now queen of the Amazons, must assemble the disparate Amazonian tribes for the first time in a millennium. Max Lord's assault on Paradise Island with his destructive A.R.E.S. armors is on the horizon, and in order to weather the war that is coming, Wonder Woman will need the full might of her sisters by her side! Can Diana finally bring her message of peace to Man's World, or will Max Lord's war burn the world and the Amazons to ashes? Continuing the tradition of the critically acclaimed Earth One tales that challenge the status quo of the comics industry, Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 3 is Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette's final installment of this visionary and enterprising graphic novel series.


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The epic conclusion to the New York Times bestselling original graphic novel series from superstar and critically acclaimed duo Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette is here! Diana, now queen of the Amazons, must assemble the disparate Amazonian tribes for the first time in a millennium. Max Lord's assault on Paradise Island with his destructive A.R.E.S. armors is on the horiz The epic conclusion to the New York Times bestselling original graphic novel series from superstar and critically acclaimed duo Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette is here! Diana, now queen of the Amazons, must assemble the disparate Amazonian tribes for the first time in a millennium. Max Lord's assault on Paradise Island with his destructive A.R.E.S. armors is on the horizon, and in order to weather the war that is coming, Wonder Woman will need the full might of her sisters by her side! Can Diana finally bring her message of peace to Man's World, or will Max Lord's war burn the world and the Amazons to ashes? Continuing the tradition of the critically acclaimed Earth One tales that challenge the status quo of the comics industry, Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 3 is Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette's final installment of this visionary and enterprising graphic novel series.

30 review for Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    After two notoriously dismal volumes, the conclusion to Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette's alternate-earth Wonder Woman story is somehow... really good? In fact, this may be the most thoughtful take on Diana in any medium in many years, and all it took Morrison and Paquette to achieve this is a few tonal tweaks, reining in on the horniness of the previous two books and having an actually good story to tell. In a way, Morrison is doing here what they did in All-Star Superman by taking all the c After two notoriously dismal volumes, the conclusion to Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette's alternate-earth Wonder Woman story is somehow... really good? In fact, this may be the most thoughtful take on Diana in any medium in many years, and all it took Morrison and Paquette to achieve this is a few tonal tweaks, reining in on the horniness of the previous two books and having an actually good story to tell. In a way, Morrison is doing here what they did in All-Star Superman by taking all the cool, weird and interesting stuff from Diana's mythos and combining it all to tell her ultimate final story. The result is genuinely moving and uplifting, making me wish this particular version of Diana and her philosophy of loving submission was actually real. The book isn't perfect though — for one, it took me a good 40 pages spread across three weeks to actually get into it (which may or may not be due to debilitating depression I've been going through lately), and just in general some of the writing here felt clunky. However, once it got going it really felt like Morrison giving it their all, and I managed to finish the rest of the book in just a couple of sittings. In the end, I'm glad I decided to give this final volume a chance even despite hating the first two books. If this really is one of Morrison's last books at DC, it's nice to know they're ending their time at the publisher on a good note.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    It's the war of the sexes with misogynist Maxwell Lord declaring war on Queen Diana and the Amazons. The ending is pretty much a foregone conclusion from the onset that Diana's philosophy of loving submission will win out. In typical Morrison fashion, he brings Wonder Woman's William Moulton Marston's proclivities to the forefront of the story. This book is more straight forward, lacking the cheesecake factor of the previous volumes. Paquette's art is glorious. It's the war of the sexes with misogynist Maxwell Lord declaring war on Queen Diana and the Amazons. The ending is pretty much a foregone conclusion from the onset that Diana's philosophy of loving submission will win out. In typical Morrison fashion, he brings Wonder Woman's William Moulton Marston's proclivities to the forefront of the story. This book is more straight forward, lacking the cheesecake factor of the previous volumes. Paquette's art is glorious.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    This is better that the last volume. A decent conclusion to the Earth One Wonder Woman series. It was really the only way it could end. This is not my favourite incarnation of Wonder Woman. I do like the Greek mythology element of this book, the artwork works well with this, over done men are the enemy I do not. A war of the sexes has been declared. On the Amazons and all their allies. The world and it's leaders are determined to "put them in their place". Wonder Woman must unite her people to sta This is better that the last volume. A decent conclusion to the Earth One Wonder Woman series. It was really the only way it could end. This is not my favourite incarnation of Wonder Woman. I do like the Greek mythology element of this book, the artwork works well with this, over done men are the enemy I do not. A war of the sexes has been declared. On the Amazons and all their allies. The world and it's leaders are determined to "put them in their place". Wonder Woman must unite her people to stand against the world. Good artwork, the story is overly sexist but with good elements in it. Though it is a bit rushed in places, and too slow in others.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. It is not unlike writer Grant Morrison to shake up the status quo in the comic book industry, especially with the superheroes he gets to play around with. In the Earth One comic book line-up, various writers have had the chance to reimagine the origin stories of countless classic DC heroes, and Wonder Woman became his choice of predilection, and boy, did he have fun with this one so far. Choosing to approach this Amazonian princess in a provocat You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. It is not unlike writer Grant Morrison to shake up the status quo in the comic book industry, especially with the superheroes he gets to play around with. In the Earth One comic book line-up, various writers have had the chance to reimagine the origin stories of countless classic DC heroes, and Wonder Woman became his choice of predilection, and boy, did he have fun with this one so far. Choosing to approach this Amazonian princess in a provocative fashion while embracing extreme positions drawn upon feminism and matriarchy, he at least offers an ending that doesn’t leave a too unpalatable taste for his readers. Teamed up once again with artist Yanick Paquette, legendary writer Grant Morrison delivers the finale to his Earth-One trilogy in an explosive fashion while drawing upon some of Wonder Woman’s best features, from her Greek mythology background to her sense of unrivaled leadership. What is Wonder Woman: Earth One (Vol. 3) about? As Diana Prince becomes the Queen of the Amazons, she now takes it upon herself to do the unimaginable: rally the disparate Amazonian tribes. With Max Lord looking to wage war on Paradise Island with his A.R.E.S. armoured army and looking to establish no matter the means the dominance of patriarchy over matriarchy, Wonder Woman will have to channel every bit of wisdom she has left to show Man’s World a new way of life founded on peace and love. With the answers she seeks not readily at her disposal, she will first have to look back on her own mythological history and culture to find direction to survive the impending war. If things are to change, she will have to show the world that they will need someone much more enlightened to pave the way towards utopia. Considering what writer Grant Morrison was trying to achieve with his Wonder Woman: Earth One trilogy, there weren’t many great exits possible for him to contemplate and luckily for readers, this one was the most adequate one, at risk from falling back onto the deluded, provocative, and controversial vision he began this trilogy with. This time around he utilizes Max Lord as the ultimate icon of evil patriarchy and infuses his character with a terrifying dichotomic vision that would constrain women to be perceived as submissive and inferior beings while men would always have the reins over any power structure within society. Fortunately, Wonder Woman is there to fight back in a revolution and impose a new philosophy to the world, a new vision that essentially turns the table around for a new age. However, the ultimate message behind this narrative isn’t one rooted in equality, as one would presume from movements of feminism, but one that simply gives power to matriarchy, going off on the assumption that women would now have all the right answers if we are to live in peace and love. Continuing the artistic vision that began in the first volume, artist Yanick Paquette maintains the vibrant and bombastic style expected to accompany this provocative series. Making an additional effort to show some character development through Wonder Woman’s garments, he also depicts the various characters in the best light. The panel structure continues to follow an unconventional layering during action-packed sequences and gives this series a unique signature. While the character designs are fantastic and striking, there is a relative staleness that captures an absence of dynamism and movement in these characters, especially during dialogue-heavy sequences. At least the excellent colouring by Nathan Fairbairn distracts you from overthinking most of these artistic details that restrain the artwork from being beyond exceptional. Wonder Woman: Earth One (Vol. 3) is a bombastic finale delivering a sensational war while advocating diversity and matriarchy in its core message. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I generally enjoy these "Earth One" graphic novels due to their being "updated" or generally speaking more "grounded" versions of the DC canon. This one, while gloriously illustrated and coloured, just felt so over-the-top it didn't really fit within my expectations. I'm glad I read it, though. I generally enjoy these "Earth One" graphic novels due to their being "updated" or generally speaking more "grounded" versions of the DC canon. This one, while gloriously illustrated and coloured, just felt so over-the-top it didn't really fit within my expectations. I'm glad I read it, though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    Endings are so hard to nail. I’m not sure I know how to view this one. Grant Morrison is full of big ideas, grand ways to tell them, and the ambition to pursue them, which is something few writers can do, all three of those. And, well, endings can be tough. The ending to the Wonder Woman Earth One trilogy is a fairly logical extrapolation of preceding volumes, but I’m not sure it reaches as far as it needed to, coming up with a fairly simplistic conclusion in opposition to a nuanced interpretation Endings are so hard to nail. I’m not sure I know how to view this one. Grant Morrison is full of big ideas, grand ways to tell them, and the ambition to pursue them, which is something few writers can do, all three of those. And, well, endings can be tough. The ending to the Wonder Woman Earth One trilogy is a fairly logical extrapolation of preceding volumes, but I’m not sure it reaches as far as it needed to, coming up with a fairly simplistic conclusion in opposition to a nuanced interpretation of the familiar origins. I don’t know what else to say about it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Dinges

    Hmmmm... Is it perfect? No. Is it heavy handed? Maybe at times. Is it effective? Yes. Is it a good Wonder Woman comic? Yes. Is it beautiful? Again, yes. Wonder Woman: Earth One has been one of the best series in the Earth One label (alongside Green Lantern, the only other one worth reading). It is an attempt by Morrison to bring Wonder Woman back to her William Moulton Marston imagined roots. The primary focus of all three books has been gender, feminism, the patriarchy, war, and violence. I promi Hmmmm... Is it perfect? No. Is it heavy handed? Maybe at times. Is it effective? Yes. Is it a good Wonder Woman comic? Yes. Is it beautiful? Again, yes. Wonder Woman: Earth One has been one of the best series in the Earth One label (alongside Green Lantern, the only other one worth reading). It is an attempt by Morrison to bring Wonder Woman back to her William Moulton Marston imagined roots. The primary focus of all three books has been gender, feminism, the patriarchy, war, and violence. I promise if you don't like progressive discussions about those things you're going to absolutely hate this and probably get real mad-online about what you read. If you approach with an open mind, maybe you'll see things from a new point of view. I'm honestly surprised DC is publishing this book, given people throw a fit when a comic book cover even mentions feminism. But here we are. I do not think this would have seen the light of day if being told as part of the Wonder Woman title that's part of the monthly DC line. While the first two volumes felt a bit uneven, I think Morrison found their way to an effective treatise on gender and love. I'm not sure if it was coincidence Morrison came out as non-binary around the time this was released but I'll admit it helped re-shape my feelings on the series while reading this conclusion. Previously, I'd felt a bit leery that this story was coming from an all-male creative team. Some of the superhero aspects feel a bit derivative (looking at you Amazon-hunting sentinels), but honestly the superhero stuff seems ancillary here. The art is absolutely wonderful. Yanick Paquette has been tucked away working on these books for a few years and when you dive in it's a reminder why he's one of the best in the business. The panel structure is unique and there are splash pages abound. There are pages that are full of dense philosophies but then Morrison will give Paquette 6 straight pages of action and the balance just feels right. Nathan Fairbairn brings wonderful colors to the table. Paradise Island is so bright and warm. If you liked the first two volumes, definitely stay for the finale. It's the best of the bunch. If you're looking for a good Wonder Woman comic, I think the 3 volumes of Earth One are about as on-par with anything that's come out in the previous decade or two. I'm not sure if my opinions about the book are too woke or not woke enough. *shrugs* I guess the point is that it got me thinking about them and super hero comics usually shy away from engaging in those discussions on more than a surface level.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Iain

    The artwork is stunning. The story isn't. There's definitely room for this sort of revisioning in comics, but this is too simplistic (all woman = amazing, all men = pure evil or stupid), and feels rushed with many characters given short shrift, and then other elements that are just plain bonkers. The artwork is stunning. The story isn't. There's definitely room for this sort of revisioning in comics, but this is too simplistic (all woman = amazing, all men = pure evil or stupid), and feels rushed with many characters given short shrift, and then other elements that are just plain bonkers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    This is one of those instances where I read something, and wondered if I just didn't get it. There have been other very popular novels and writers which have left me going , not my cuppa, etc. Generally I like Grant Morrison's work, but here I was left wondering... Did I just not get the joke? Was this intended as satire with a large dose of social commentary on the side? Because if it was, great then I did get it, and Morrison's take on some of society's ills and possible solutions are worth giv This is one of those instances where I read something, and wondered if I just didn't get it. There have been other very popular novels and writers which have left me going , not my cuppa, etc. Generally I like Grant Morrison's work, but here I was left wondering... Did I just not get the joke? Was this intended as satire with a large dose of social commentary on the side? Because if it was, great then I did get it, and Morrison's take on some of society's ills and possible solutions are worth giving some attention to (whether you agree or disagree, you know sometimes you should listen to the other side's comments before deciding that they are right, wrong etc.). Yes, I think this is an improvement on volume two no matter what, and a good way to end the series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jacob A. Mirallegro

    This is a very powerful book and a great conclusion to the trilogy. It honestly changes how I'll view other Earth One titles in the future because it's such a vast story it seems like it would be awkward to both ignore it and acknowledge it in another series. The world/philosophies that get established here feel so realistic and that's where the power in this story comes from. The idea's presented here, while works of extreme fantasy still have real life translations. The basic view that peace an This is a very powerful book and a great conclusion to the trilogy. It honestly changes how I'll view other Earth One titles in the future because it's such a vast story it seems like it would be awkward to both ignore it and acknowledge it in another series. The world/philosophies that get established here feel so realistic and that's where the power in this story comes from. The idea's presented here, while works of extreme fantasy still have real life translations. The basic view that peace and love triumph over war and anger is one that is particularly strong for me. The public's reactions to events and perspectives feel so honest and true to what they would probably be like in real life. There's a poetic rhythm in the narrative that makes this story have to be a comicbook, something not uncommon in Morrison's work, but its very special here. Yanick Paquette is at the top of his game with stunning artwork that's really moving and dynamic. Every two page spread in this is just jaw dropping. Grant has left their mark on Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman, the trinity of the DC universe, in a way no one else has or probably ever will. They have such a good interpretation of these character's and each one got the perfect stories to highlight their individual meanings. If this truly is one of Grant Morrison's last gifts to the DC Universe it is one as epic as it is peaceful, loving, and meaningful. Simply put; Grant Morrison is wonderful.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    As expected, an even bigger pile of misandrist garbage then the first two volumes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chewish

    I for one welcome my Amazonian dominatrix girlboss overlords

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    Umm.mmm GM, baby, what is you doin'? Umm.mmm GM, baby, what is you doin'?

  14. 4 out of 5

    M

    The saga of Earth One's version of Wonder Woman concludes in the third and final volume from Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette. Set one thousand years in the future, Earth - known now as Gaia - has transitioned into a matriarchal government. The world capital of Harmonia is hosting a celebration honoring the end of war, yet doing so without their governatrix Arda Moore. Moore has been abducted by a radical group of men looking to return to their glory days of power as opposed to living in subse The saga of Earth One's version of Wonder Woman concludes in the third and final volume from Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette. Set one thousand years in the future, Earth - known now as Gaia - has transitioned into a matriarchal government. The world capital of Harmonia is hosting a celebration honoring the end of war, yet doing so without their governatrix Arda Moore. Moore has been abducted by a radical group of men looking to return to their glory days of power as opposed to living in subservient submission. As a suicide bomber interrupts the ceremony, the book flashes back to Wonder Woman's final encounter with Ares - who has adopted the mortal form of Max Lord in his attempt to destroy Themyscira. While the united Amazon front from all over the galaxy defeats Ares and his robotic soldiers in the past, the long-lived Diana reveals herself in the future to preserve the peace. A fascinating look at a female-centered society, Morrison grabs onto the message laid out by Wonder Woman's original creator and runs with it. William Moulston Marston would be proud to see that his ideals expounded upon under Morrison's pen, including feminine councils, acceptance, and female empowerment. The merger of Ares and Max Lord does offer a unique angle on the classic villains, but the rest of the book's cast seem to embody stereotypical figures. Cowardly science advisors, lascivious female fighters, and bland Amazons feel more like filler than actual characters. Yanick Paquette does a masterful job of highlighting the female form in his diverse cast, but does seem much more at home with the creeping shadows of Hades as opposed to the lighter looks of Harmonia. Wonder Woman Earth One: Volume Three is a fitting conclusion to the reimagined feminism agenda as seen here in Morrison's retelling of the DC myth.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I really debated how to rate this 3rd volume in the series, but am giving it 3 stars (really, another 2.75 as I did for Vol. 2). It was better than just okay and I generally liked it, although there some parts I had issues with. The whole multiverse / other world of Amazon paradise part was pretty confusing and seemed to come out of nowhere (I don't recall any set up for alternate worlds in the previous books). Also, Maxwell Lord being "possessed" by Ares seemed to be pretty obviously borrowed f I really debated how to rate this 3rd volume in the series, but am giving it 3 stars (really, another 2.75 as I did for Vol. 2). It was better than just okay and I generally liked it, although there some parts I had issues with. The whole multiverse / other world of Amazon paradise part was pretty confusing and seemed to come out of nowhere (I don't recall any set up for alternate worlds in the previous books). Also, Maxwell Lord being "possessed" by Ares seemed to be pretty obviously borrowed from Patty Jenkins' 2017 WW film and also made it seem like Lord wouldn't be enough of a bad guy by himself unless Ares was controlling him. Several other reviewers mentioned not liking the implication that "all men are evil warmongers" and need to be subdued / controlled by women who are "all good, peaceful, and loving (or at least the Amazonians are)." I don't know that I would have read it that way if I hadn't seen those reviews, I probably just would have assumed that the evil warmongering men in this story were Maxwell Lord and his cronies and not assumed all men were being depicted that way (Steve Trevor wasn't). Once again, Morrison also includes another bondage scene with an Amazonian bound and gagged by men, harkening back to Wonder Woman's problematic beginnings. All in all, Grant Morrison's writing continues to be hit or miss for me, as does the Earth One series in general - and unfortunately in both cases, more misses than hits. However, Yannick Paquette continues to deliver stunning and gorgeous art as always!

  16. 5 out of 5

    N

    Has the courage of its convictions, which is more than can usually be said about comics. Earth One is such a great opportunity to remake worlds in the image of the dominant philosophy of a character, rather than a moderate cop-out that is more realistic. That said, the execution is surprisingly flaccid and superficial. The evolution of present day E-1 to Harmonia is just never clear enough, inspiring enough, or organic enough to escape the trap of becoming a jarring expression of ideology rather Has the courage of its convictions, which is more than can usually be said about comics. Earth One is such a great opportunity to remake worlds in the image of the dominant philosophy of a character, rather than a moderate cop-out that is more realistic. That said, the execution is surprisingly flaccid and superficial. The evolution of present day E-1 to Harmonia is just never clear enough, inspiring enough, or organic enough to escape the trap of becoming a jarring expression of ideology rather than idea. Still, plotline aside, this is the best version of WW I've seen, and the one we deserved on the big screen, just maybe not the one we needed right now.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    Up until now I did not read such a piece of PURE hate, if hate has a comic book form it is WW Earth One vol. 3. This is just misandrism at it finest. Volumes 1 and 2 were really good reading, with nuance and more facets to each character, now all we see are caricatures, stereotypes, a poorly developed villain and a dissapointment in the script by Morrison and a corruption of the well adapted thinking of William Moulton Marston back in volume 1. The art and visual storytelling is fantastic as usua Up until now I did not read such a piece of PURE hate, if hate has a comic book form it is WW Earth One vol. 3. This is just misandrism at it finest. Volumes 1 and 2 were really good reading, with nuance and more facets to each character, now all we see are caricatures, stereotypes, a poorly developed villain and a dissapointment in the script by Morrison and a corruption of the well adapted thinking of William Moulton Marston back in volume 1. The art and visual storytelling is fantastic as usual, though.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Willie

    Grant Morrison's Wonder Woman is just... bizarre... its such a bizarre read. Even for Grant Morrison. The politics of what he is trying to say get muddled and lost or are a little problematic coming from a man... I can't even tell... But the artwork is gorgeous, all my questions from Volume 1 and 2 got answered , and it was better than the newest Wonder Woman movie. So all that was nice. Grant Morrison's Wonder Woman is just... bizarre... its such a bizarre read. Even for Grant Morrison. The politics of what he is trying to say get muddled and lost or are a little problematic coming from a man... I can't even tell... But the artwork is gorgeous, all my questions from Volume 1 and 2 got answered , and it was better than the newest Wonder Woman movie. So all that was nice.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Este me gusto más que el anterior. El libro se tomó la decencia de telegrafiar el final por si no quieres seguir leyendo. Es el Miracleman del feminismo. Este fue mucho mejor por la acción y las interesantes referencias a la mitología griega. Ya que por fin terminamos, debo decir que, hasta ahora, esta ha sido mi serie menos preferida escrita por Grant Morrison.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deane Hariss

    Pretty solid read conclusion. Wrapped in a nice little bow. Honestly though the real winner here for me is yet again Yanick Paquette’s art. I absolutely love his art style and the panels speedster by more than just black lines.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    So this one was better. The action picks up and the story has more sense to it, even if the ending totally negates one of the things that I love most about Wonder Woman. But, yeah. I still, as a whole, would not recommend this to any Wonder Woman fan. It just isn't really Wonder Woman. 2.5/5 So this one was better. The action picks up and the story has more sense to it, even if the ending totally negates one of the things that I love most about Wonder Woman. But, yeah. I still, as a whole, would not recommend this to any Wonder Woman fan. It just isn't really Wonder Woman. 2.5/5

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Maluck

    What I wanted from this title ever since Volume 1 was announced - it's about time! What I wanted from this title ever since Volume 1 was announced - it's about time!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pinky

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Hippolyta is dead and war is coming. Diana is now in charge and some don't trust her capability. Diana takes Ares on and beats him. Hippolyta is dead and war is coming. Diana is now in charge and some don't trust her capability. Diana takes Ares on and beats him.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    I really liked the first two volumes, but this one . . .? Not so much. Beautiful art by Yanick Paquette, though.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Book

    A touch arch, and the timeline jumps seem unnecessary. But pretty satisfying as far as conclusions go.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    The art, story, mythology...just quite wonderful.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    I mean Infinite Jest is a tough act to follow so I did take some time to consider what to read next and Grant Morrison, probably my favorite author and definitely my single greatest teacher in the mystic art of interacting with fiction, seemed like a safe bet. I remember hearing Grant Morrison talk about his plans for Wonder Woman Earth One years before it came out on an episode of Kevin Smith’s podcast and being immediately bewildered and that first volume definitely delivered. I read volume two I mean Infinite Jest is a tough act to follow so I did take some time to consider what to read next and Grant Morrison, probably my favorite author and definitely my single greatest teacher in the mystic art of interacting with fiction, seemed like a safe bet. I remember hearing Grant Morrison talk about his plans for Wonder Woman Earth One years before it came out on an episode of Kevin Smith’s podcast and being immediately bewildered and that first volume definitely delivered. I read volume two on the train to New York Comic Con several years ago but haven’t revisited it since. Need to mitigate that. Crazy that the saga is over now with volume three but it’s been an excellent and subversive ride. This is a book of ideas and philosophies and battle kangaroos. Now and again it may lean a little heard into its utopic vision for some readers but darn it sometimes the palette needs the antithesis of grit and cynicism and this is that in spades without sacrificing big, wild action. Finally, Yanick Paquette’s art here, assisted in colors by Nathan Fairbairn, is just astounding. This is auteur work. The design elements, the layouts, the motion and emotion, it’s all a real triumph. I look forward to rereading all three volumes in the future.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Martin-Thomas Côté

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Dube

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Kirby

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