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Indestructible Object

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Perfect for fans of What If It’s Us and Mary H. K. Choi, this stunning coming-of-age novel from Printz Honor author Mary McCoy follows a Memphis teen whose quest to uncover the secrets of love reveals new truths about herself. For the past two years, Lee has been laser-focused on two things: her job as a sound tech at a local coffee shop and her podcast “Artists in Love,” w Perfect for fans of What If It’s Us and Mary H. K. Choi, this stunning coming-of-age novel from Printz Honor author Mary McCoy follows a Memphis teen whose quest to uncover the secrets of love reveals new truths about herself. For the past two years, Lee has been laser-focused on two things: her job as a sound tech at a local coffee shop and her podcast “Artists in Love,” which she cohosts with her boyfriend Vincent. Until he breaks up with her on the air right after graduation. When their unexpected split, the loss of her job, and her parent’s announcement that they’re separating coincide, Lee’s plans, her art, and her life are thrown into turmoil. Searching for a new purpose, Lee recruits her old friend Max and new friend Risa to produce a podcast called “Objects of Destruction,” where they investigate whether love actually exists at all. But the deeper they get into the love stories around them, the more Lee realizes that she’s the one who’s been holding love at arm’s length. And when she starts to fall for Risa, she finds she’ll have to be more honest with herself and the people in her life to create a new love story of her own. Funny, romantic, and heartfelt, this is a story about secrets, lies, friendship, found family, an expired passport, a hidden VHS tape, fried pickles, the weird and wild city of Memphis, and, most of all, love.


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Perfect for fans of What If It’s Us and Mary H. K. Choi, this stunning coming-of-age novel from Printz Honor author Mary McCoy follows a Memphis teen whose quest to uncover the secrets of love reveals new truths about herself. For the past two years, Lee has been laser-focused on two things: her job as a sound tech at a local coffee shop and her podcast “Artists in Love,” w Perfect for fans of What If It’s Us and Mary H. K. Choi, this stunning coming-of-age novel from Printz Honor author Mary McCoy follows a Memphis teen whose quest to uncover the secrets of love reveals new truths about herself. For the past two years, Lee has been laser-focused on two things: her job as a sound tech at a local coffee shop and her podcast “Artists in Love,” which she cohosts with her boyfriend Vincent. Until he breaks up with her on the air right after graduation. When their unexpected split, the loss of her job, and her parent’s announcement that they’re separating coincide, Lee’s plans, her art, and her life are thrown into turmoil. Searching for a new purpose, Lee recruits her old friend Max and new friend Risa to produce a podcast called “Objects of Destruction,” where they investigate whether love actually exists at all. But the deeper they get into the love stories around them, the more Lee realizes that she’s the one who’s been holding love at arm’s length. And when she starts to fall for Risa, she finds she’ll have to be more honest with herself and the people in her life to create a new love story of her own. Funny, romantic, and heartfelt, this is a story about secrets, lies, friendship, found family, an expired passport, a hidden VHS tape, fried pickles, the weird and wild city of Memphis, and, most of all, love.

30 review for Indestructible Object

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    Messy bisexuals, this one’s for you. ❤️ One of my favorite things to read about is flawed main characters. Characters who make mistakes–mistakes they really knew better than to make, but they did it anyways. I can’t stand negative reviews of books based on the protagonist having flaws, which is making me want to gather this book up to my chest and defend it from those negative reviews I can see looming. Lee is lost, she’s messy, and she’s hurt people–but she’s also finding herself and trying to w Messy bisexuals, this one’s for you. ❤️ One of my favorite things to read about is flawed main characters. Characters who make mistakes–mistakes they really knew better than to make, but they did it anyways. I can’t stand negative reviews of books based on the protagonist having flaws, which is making me want to gather this book up to my chest and defend it from those negative reviews I can see looming. Lee is lost, she’s messy, and she’s hurt people–but she’s also finding herself and trying to work her way through them, and I am firmly in her corner. It also has a polyamorous main character, which is still very rare in YA! My heart hurt for when she finally realizes what she really wants out of her life and she tears up because it’s “too much to want,” an impossible dream–at least, that’s what it seems to her. I appreciated this passage, as she admits to cheating to a queer friend who tells her she’s enacting a negative stereotype: “That’s not fair,” I say. I’m not trying to defend what I’ve done, but I also don’t think I should be expected to model ideal bisexual behavior–whatever that is–at all times. When straight people cheated, they weren’t failing the whole straight population. They were just failing one person. I also thought Max’s subplot, the queer friend mentioned earlier, was fascinating. He has two queer parents, one of whom is non-binary, and when he came out as gay, they were–unsurprisingly–supportive, especially of his relationship with an idyllic boyfriend. Now, though, he has experienced sexual fluidity, falling for a girl, and he has picked up a punk aesthetic from her. His parents don’t approve, and he feels rejected now that he’s an “untidy queer” instead of what he refers to as a “Love, Simon gay.” This is a complicated queer story, which I am always here for. Full review at the Lesbrary.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Romie

    so not only is this cover gorgeous, but the story is also sapphic? we're winning in 2021. so not only is this cover gorgeous, but the story is also sapphic? we're winning in 2021.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Iva-Marie Palmer

    As a reader of anything Mary McCoy I can get my hands on, I can say with authority that Indestructible Object is the latest proof that she just keeps getting better and better. From page one, Lee is -- like all great artists -- thoughtful, compelling, and more than a little messy. It's impossible to stop reading as she examines the nature of love -- right down to whether love even exists -- and what it means to declare your desires, to yourself and to the world. I loved this book. As a reader of anything Mary McCoy I can get my hands on, I can say with authority that Indestructible Object is the latest proof that she just keeps getting better and better. From page one, Lee is -- like all great artists -- thoughtful, compelling, and more than a little messy. It's impossible to stop reading as she examines the nature of love -- right down to whether love even exists -- and what it means to declare your desires, to yourself and to the world. I loved this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    This was such a messy book because of how messy the main character is, but I really liked it. I thought it was a pretty unique concept and I enjoyed the podcast parts and the format. I really really love that this book had poly rep because that is so hard to find! This character is definitely not an ideal representation of what it means to be poly but I also think those parts were pointed out well. Even though this character cheats and that is a huge stereotype for bisexual and polyamorous peopl This was such a messy book because of how messy the main character is, but I really liked it. I thought it was a pretty unique concept and I enjoyed the podcast parts and the format. I really really love that this book had poly rep because that is so hard to find! This character is definitely not an ideal representation of what it means to be poly but I also think those parts were pointed out well. Even though this character cheats and that is a huge stereotype for bisexual and polyamorous people, but that stereotype is pointed out and it's clear from the characters that this isn't supposed to be a positive representation of that group. I also really loved Max and thought he was a great character to stabilize what was going on with Lee! Content Warnings Graphic: Infidelity Minor: Racism and Homophobia

  5. 4 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Rating: 4.5 Stars For the past two years, Lee knew what her future looked like. Then her boyfriend broke up with her, her parents finally called it quits, and she sort of lost her job. Feeling adrift, she chained herself to a new project, a podcast called “Objects of Destruction”. In her pursuit of determining if love really existed, Lee discovered some family secrets, while also discovering more about herself. The way Lee embraced her art to help her make sense of the world was fantastic. Each st Rating: 4.5 Stars For the past two years, Lee knew what her future looked like. Then her boyfriend broke up with her, her parents finally called it quits, and she sort of lost her job. Feeling adrift, she chained herself to a new project, a podcast called “Objects of Destruction”. In her pursuit of determining if love really existed, Lee discovered some family secrets, while also discovering more about herself. The way Lee embraced her art to help her make sense of the world was fantastic. Each step she took, each truth she uncovered kept me chomping at the bit for more. Though the main focus was love, McCoy explored many other topics and issues. There was a lot of food for thought presented throughout the story as Lee tried to come to terms with her life, her future, and who she was. She was messy, and she made mistakes. I know there are people, who will not approve of some of the choices Lee made, but I appreciated that it was all part of her journey. This book left me with tears in my eyes. Not because it was profoundly sad, but because it was so honest. It was the exploration of love that had me feeling so much. How complicated and messy it can be. I guess good adjectives to describe this story would be bittersweet and thoughtful. There are these moments of joy, but they all seemed to be wrapped in a sort of loss due to the bulk of this tale spent trying to figure out where love went wrong. A little sad, but beautiful and hopeful too. Overall: An emotional and satisfying examination of love. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vee

    i am obsessed with this cover

  7. 4 out of 5

    Annika Klein

    This is a gorgeous book about life and love and how messy they are.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gretal

    Yeah, I didn't really like any of this book. Didn't like the main character, didn't care about the plot, didn't care about the setting or the other characters. Just bleh. Yeah, I didn't really like any of this book. Didn't like the main character, didn't care about the plot, didn't care about the setting or the other characters. Just bleh.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Llyr Heller-Humphreys

    Often I rush through books, but I really tried to take my time with this one, savor it. Loved the realistic characters and the setting was wonderful. I felt like I was there, eavesdropping at a table nearby. Thank you for the beautiful book that went down like a delicious glass of water.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marina

    unfortunately, this book was such a let down to me. i picked it up because the premise seemed interesting enough. the exploration of love and relationships, i missed it. idk if it’s because i haven’t read romance in a while or what, but i just couldn’t get into it. from the first pages i knew i won’t connect with the characters and i contemplated a few times if i should dnf the book. and honestly i should’ve just done that because i didn’t gain anything out of it, not even a mere satisfaction of unfortunately, this book was such a let down to me. i picked it up because the premise seemed interesting enough. the exploration of love and relationships, i missed it. idk if it’s because i haven’t read romance in a while or what, but i just couldn’t get into it. from the first pages i knew i won’t connect with the characters and i contemplated a few times if i should dnf the book. and honestly i should’ve just done that because i didn’t gain anything out of it, not even a mere satisfaction of finishing something. that being said, i can’t even state that the writing was awful, because it was quite the opposite, it had some beautiful and quotable moments. but other than that, idek what this book has going for itself. since i wrote down my little rants while i was reading, it would be a shame if they had to go to waste, so i might as well leave them here. 🚨 non major spoilers below 🚨 — throughout the book the author slides in some interesting facts about other famous people/celebrities and i feel like it might backfire because these little facts may be more interesting than our characters’ story. — i’m not sure about the podcast idea. it just doesn’t seem interesting or like something that would be popular and people would listen to. i guess it’s for a really niche audience or local people who are really noisy and want to be in other people’s business. — also i’m not buying the chemistry between lee and vincent. i don’t understand why they even would be into each other. and he just seems like a wrong choice for her, not to mention his parents. i can’t see lee going for that vibe at all. she is a one night stand kinda girl and seems in touch with her sexuality, but vincent and her never had anything more than kisses. how did they even manage for two years? they just seem like such an unlikely couple! idgi — the more i read the more i find the mc annoying. i can’t understand her choices. is she really snooping around her parents’ stuff instead of just asking them about their love story? and then even planning to spill all the beans on the internet!! i bet if they looked through her diary she would be screaming privacy!!! it seems like she can’t really communicate her emotions, even though she’s from the family of artists who are supposedly so in touch with their feelings. go figure. — that vincent guy? ugh you’re getting on my nerves, dude! who changes their mind so frequently?! like do we really need all that drama and a rollercoaster of emotions? just make a decision or even better let lee go and don’t hold her back! — lee too is so inconsistent! i understand her feelings about being the 2nd best and not good enough, like she’s just an accompaniment to her bf and always in his background. so i think it’s better for them to be apart. i hope they’re still broken up in the end. — and she is a cheater too!????? it’s like the author is setting lee swan up to be the least likeable character on the planet!! — the problem is every other character in this book is more interesting than our main heroine. i would love to read more about max’ or sage’ story. even vincent has something to say! but all lee has is other people’ stories. — okay never mind! the minute i complimented max on his galaxy brain he had to go and be judgemental, saying that lee cheating on vincent with a girl is making her look like a bad bisexual. like what?! if anything it just makes her look like an asshole. no need to be biphobic here. “When straight people cheat, they aren’t failing the whole straight population. They are just failing one person.” — i love how max always calls lee out on her bs and keeps her in check. god knows she needs it. — honestly it’s very hard to feel bad for lee when all her dirty business is leaked. she always makes questionable decisions and doesn’t want to own up to them. — after reading for a while i started to think that the author doesn’t know how else to progress the plot other than to make all her characters cheat on each other. — tbh i don’t even have any conclusive thoughts. i think it was a mistake to make the story revolve around the most unlikable and annoying character in the book. like i said all the other characters had something more interesting going for them. literally any other perspective would be better.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Starr ❇✌❇

    I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: cheating, divorce/separation 3 Lee has her life worked out- a popular podcast with her boyfriend and a future with him at her side- up to the point where she and her boyfriend break up. It's a mature break up on the surface, but inside Lee is reeling. When her parents decide to separate for real, something they'd been dragging their feet on, it means her mother leaving for a while and her father's friends coming to stay and get him moved out. Finding two ite I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: cheating, divorce/separation 3 Lee has her life worked out- a popular podcast with her boyfriend and a future with him at her side- up to the point where she and her boyfriend break up. It's a mature break up on the surface, but inside Lee is reeling. When her parents decide to separate for real, something they'd been dragging their feet on, it means her mother leaving for a while and her father's friends coming to stay and get him moved out. Finding two items that feel at odds with the story she's always known about her parents, and still wondering how they could have ben in love once, and why they stayed together so long, Lee and her dad's friend's son, Max, combine forces to get the answers she needs, and make a podcast that is her own. That is, if anyone's willing to actually talk about the past. There's a lot to get interested in in this book. There's a conversation on polyamory I wish was handled a little better but is new enough in YA to be really cool, and plenty of mystery to keep you reading. The mixing of medias, like traditional novel with podcast, doesn't always work for me, but it did work well here. The main mystery is if Lee's parents were ever in love and why they stayed together- basically, if she trapped them by being born- but it quickly turns to romantic entanglement. It actually turns into something like a YA Mamma Mia for a good chunk of the book, which I thought was cool. The pacing isn't always ideal, but you do want to keep reading because so much doesn't stack up, and you want to follow the line figure out if any of their conspiracy theories are really true. The other main thread of the story has to do with do with queer identity. Lee is bisexual and mostly not out, so seeing her explore that side of her openly is interesting, especially with the addition o Max, who has always ID'd as gay and found himself interested in a girl. You rarely get to see stories where someone comes out as bi and didn't previously identify as straight, so I loved being able to have that kind of arc on page, along with the messiness and confusion it involves without straight out biphobia. Also, as I mentioned, Lee realizes in the story that she's polyamorous, which is something you almost never see in YA and is interested to get to explore on page. I also appreciate seeing a nonbinary adult on page! The problem is, Lee is incredibly messy. And that means the representation is really messy too. Not all things should be perfect and polished, so it's hard to judge, but I personally feel like Lee being a cheater and self absorbed throughout the entire story doesn't create great representation for bi people or polyam people. And the romance between Lee and Risa only makes it more uncomfortable for me. While Risa does at first seem like a good character and their romance is cute in the beginning, Risa constantly shares negative stereotypes. She says that her and fellow lesbians talk about "bi girls to watch out for" and acts like Lee is only experimenting with her, two real world prejudices that bi girls actualy do face, and she's never once called out for it. While the podcast stuff is interesting, it also felt over the top for me. The way everyone avoids talking about what happened, the idea of making it into a podcast in the first place, it didn't feel realistic. Not to mention, by the end there's no satisfying conclusion. Parts of it worked for me, but a lot of it also didn't. And finally, I really didn't like Lee, so it was hard to get invested in general. Actually, I didn't like most of the characters. When so much of this story revolves around Lee and her feelings you would expect an actual arc, but there isn't really one. A lot of this is watching Lee make the same bad choices over and over and again and barely learning, which makes you want to disengage instead of wait it out. This book keeps you reading with its complicated family mystery, and I enjoy the representation, but it wasn't one I found myself really liking.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emma Mitchell

    Where do I even begin? 14+ Toxic main character. Boring plot. Weird scenes. Uncomfortable. Beautiful cover, bad story. Lee is an imperfect girl who works open mics and is a barista with her friend. She also has a podcast with her boyfriend but one day, they call it quits. She makes out with a guy one day after and another girl soon after that. Her dads best friends son stays at her house and they become best friends. At one point i thought they were falling in love. It wasn’t super inappropriate but Where do I even begin? 14+ Toxic main character. Boring plot. Weird scenes. Uncomfortable. Beautiful cover, bad story. Lee is an imperfect girl who works open mics and is a barista with her friend. She also has a podcast with her boyfriend but one day, they call it quits. She makes out with a guy one day after and another girl soon after that. Her dads best friends son stays at her house and they become best friends. At one point i thought they were falling in love. It wasn’t super inappropriate but did have make out scenes and all of them were weird. No sex but almost. This is my honest review. At first, I thought this book was going to be like Kind of A Big Deal by Shannon Hale but it wasn’t even in the same ballpark! This book is about a girl trying to figure out herself and I just don’t even know what to say. It is perfectly fine to have flaws, everyone does! But when they get toxic, that’s when you gotta stop. I don’t recommend. This was my least favorite read ever. I did appreciate Max and Risa for being great friends through all of people’s hard times! A big thanks to the author for gifting me a free copy in exchange for an honest review!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trigger Warning Database

    Trigger & Content Warnings Cheating

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    "Apologies aren't about who is right. They are about who is sorry." - Indestructible Object, Mary McCoy <*insert heart emoji here*> "Apologies aren't about who is right. They are about who is sorry." - Indestructible Object, Mary McCoy <*insert heart emoji here*>

  15. 5 out of 5

    Page

    I have a lot of thoughts about this book that I didn’t expect to have. Admittedly I went into this in a little bad faith expecting the portrayal of Memphis to be extremely whitewashed, overly critical, or overly idealistic and it was definitely all of those things all at once. The author is someone who clearly has a lot of love for a very specific part of the city, and that’s fantastic. But it is also very evident that the time she spent in Memphis was very contained in a very affluent, very gen I have a lot of thoughts about this book that I didn’t expect to have. Admittedly I went into this in a little bad faith expecting the portrayal of Memphis to be extremely whitewashed, overly critical, or overly idealistic and it was definitely all of those things all at once. The author is someone who clearly has a lot of love for a very specific part of the city, and that’s fantastic. But it is also very evident that the time she spent in Memphis was very contained in a very affluent, very gentrified part of town. There are also segments of narration that lead me to believe that she thinks racism and queerphobia are only problems in the south and there are parts that feel like asides to the reader going “this place is cool but everyone is a racist Bible thumper except for my characters.” Again, it’s totally possible that this is a bad faith reading of the text and I accept my own personal bias as someone who grew up in Memphis but not the part of town she’s interested in. I will say though, I like a lot of the themes she’s working with in this book. Identity as a fluid and ever evolving part of a person. Relationships with endings and complications. Parent child relationships that are built on secrets, lies, and half truths. I think had this book not reminded me that it was set in memphis on every other page it would have gotten rated higher.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I'm excited to read this in general but after finding out that the author is a librarian, I (a librarian) am going to devour this book in one sitting :+) I'm excited to read this in general but after finding out that the author is a librarian, I (a librarian) am going to devour this book in one sitting :+)

  17. 4 out of 5

    ˗ˏˋ saoudia! ˎˊ˗

    SO GLAD I DONT HAVE TO WAIT A LONG TIME (ONLY 2 MONTHS AND A FEW WEEKS) FOR THIS BECAUSE IT IS SO UP MY ALLEY

  18. 5 out of 5

    JKH

    Hmm... ok first off, right off the bat: I LOVED the writing. Went absolutely feral for it and gosh I tabbed it so many times. You'd think that would warrant 5 stars, right? WRONG. Plot: it was there but like weak and the ending was confusing and literally didn't accomplish anything. Characters: I HATED the MC. She lied about cheating to the very face of her ex who caught her- girl what the fuck. You being poly and bi doesn't mean that you can just break your partner's trust and then throw yoursel Hmm... ok first off, right off the bat: I LOVED the writing. Went absolutely feral for it and gosh I tabbed it so many times. You'd think that would warrant 5 stars, right? WRONG. Plot: it was there but like weak and the ending was confusing and literally didn't accomplish anything. Characters: I HATED the MC. She lied about cheating to the very face of her ex who caught her- girl what the fuck. You being poly and bi doesn't mean that you can just break your partner's trust and then throw yourself a pity party and call yourself an 'untidy queer'. Then, she butted and snooped around in another person's life despite all their requests for her not to. Now, let's talk about Max. NO ONE IS GOING TO OPPRESS YOU FOR LIKING THE OPPOSITE GENDER. This dude started dating girls when his parents thought he was gay and changed his style completely and then he complained his parents didn't accept him like hello? Why don't you fucking talk to them instead of ignoring them? Representation: No. If I had to guess, the author if this book is either a 'woke white person' or a BIRACIAL bisexual. All the BIPOC in this book were biracial and the two main characters were bisexual. Now, the 2 main bisexual characters isn't where the issue lies. It's with how she represented the OTHER queer characters. The author wrote in 2 lesbians and within like the first couple of chapters, it is revealed that the lesbian is actually QUEER not a lesbian. OK, fine. The 2nd lesbian said author wrote talked about talking with other lesbians about bisexuals to watch out for- newsflash, lesbians don't do that and it perpetuates a bad stereotype that all lesbians are biphobic or now lesbians who ARE biphobic, which is so untrue. Next, lets talk about the poly MC. We only find out that she's poly in the last 100 pages or so and there is no development of that. This book ends with a 2 partner relationship and doesn't really go into depth about being poly and dating as a poly bisexual in a church town. Not to mention, this also conveyed negative stereotypes about poly people. The majority of polysexuals know the importance of communication and respect their partners boundaries: polysexuals and bisexuals are not sex addicts who will cheat on you/cross your boundaries. OK, I'm done. Sorry, just have a lot of mixed emotions about this book (and even though I did focus on the negative, there were a lot of good stuff). In conclusion, I would suggest that you read it just so you can experience it with me and I will most def be checking out Mary McCoys other books. Happy readings!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Calliope

    Synopsis: For the past two years, Lee has been laser-focused on two things: her job as a sound tech at a local coffee shop and her podcast “Artists in Love,” which she cohosts with her boyfriend Vincent. Until he breaks up with her on the air right after graduation. When their unexpected split, the loss of her job, and her parent’s announcement that they’re separating coincide, Lee’s plans, her art, and her life are thrown into turmoil. Searching for a new purpose, Lee recruits her old friend Max a Synopsis: For the past two years, Lee has been laser-focused on two things: her job as a sound tech at a local coffee shop and her podcast “Artists in Love,” which she cohosts with her boyfriend Vincent. Until he breaks up with her on the air right after graduation. When their unexpected split, the loss of her job, and her parent’s announcement that they’re separating coincide, Lee’s plans, her art, and her life are thrown into turmoil. Searching for a new purpose, Lee recruits her old friend Max and new friend Risa to produce a podcast called “Objects of Destruction,” where they investigate whether love actually exists at all. But the deeper they get into the love stories around them, the more Lee realizes that she’s the one who’s been holding love at arm’s length. And when she starts to fall for Risa, she finds she’ll have to be more honest with herself and the people in her life to create a new love story of her own. Review: Hmm. I'm a little conflicted on how to rate this. There were some things about it that I really didn't like, but overall, I felt it was a solid story that I enjoyed reading. The characters were overall pretty good, aside from Lee, the main character. Lee is where I had most of my problems. Honestly, Lee felt like the stereotype of a bisexual person, which I really didn't like. It didn't seem to be written from a place of any knowledge about being bi, and it felt a little disrespectful. However, that is made up for by Risa! I loved Risa. She was an artist, similarly to Lee, but she actually felt like a person that could be realistic. The story/setup was the reason that I picked this up. It's a very good story, I like the podcast idea, and the romance. The formatting where it switches between podcast episodes and first person narration was supper cool! I didn't really like Lee as a narrator, so I was glad to have a break from her voice. The writing was also very good! Engaging, funny, and sometimes a little bit pretentious. I loved how the chapters were titled, which is something that almost no one does anymore, haha! Overall, I feel like this is going to be one of my shortest reviews, because, unfortunately, this book has not that much content, so I've already covered everything that happens. It feels like a very enjoyable book that I'll completely forget about in 2 weeks. Anticipation:4: Cool premise! Enjoyment: 3.5: That was an average romantic comedy. --> 3.5 stars

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yael

    Thank you to both Goodreads and Simon & Schuster for hosting the giveaway that allowed me to receive a finished copy of this book! It's a 4.5. Maybe even higher than that. But it doesn't feel right to give it a five star. I'm pretty particular about those. Lee is a flawed protagonist. A "messy bisexual." As a bisexual, I freaking hate that term. (view spoiler)[ It can be hard to like a protagonist who gives your entire sexuality a bad rap. I get that that's the point. I respect Lee's polyamoury. W Thank you to both Goodreads and Simon & Schuster for hosting the giveaway that allowed me to receive a finished copy of this book! It's a 4.5. Maybe even higher than that. But it doesn't feel right to give it a five star. I'm pretty particular about those. Lee is a flawed protagonist. A "messy bisexual." As a bisexual, I freaking hate that term. (view spoiler)[ It can be hard to like a protagonist who gives your entire sexuality a bad rap. I get that that's the point. I respect Lee's polyamoury. When I noticed that this book had been tagged polyamorous, I was so excited. And I liked that part. If you have any polyamorous book recs (especially if they're YA) please send them my way. I've just had some bad experiences with literally to my face being told I'll probably cheat on any partners I have because I'm bi. So I struggle with Lee. (hide spoiler)] Also, I'm not really into the pretentious artist thing, but it really wasn't so bad here, especially after the first chapter when I thought that would be half the book. I really like all the family dynamics in this book. Lee's family, both her parents and also their friends, seems so loving and realistically flawed. It was one of my favorite aspects of the book, as it often is. Max and Risa were my favorite characters. Max was obviously so cool and Risa could have been super interesting if just a little more focus had been put on her. Lastly, podcasts in books are apparently a thing I love. Obviously, I LOVE Radio Silence and I read the first chunk of Sadie. (I'll probably finish it one day.) The podcast sections were my favorite parts of the book. If you know any books with podcasts in them (ideally not thriller) please recommend so to me as well. Thank you! :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    R

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was an interesting story about love and creating podcasts. Lee and her boyfriend of two years, Vincent, created a podcast of their love story, Artists in Love, But it ended when they broke up during the last podcast. They loved each other but Vincent was going to college in Washington DC while Lee was staying in Memphis. During their two year relationship, Vincent never wanted to have sex. So Lee cheated on him several times with Claire, her coworker, and was eventually outed as a liar and This was an interesting story about love and creating podcasts. Lee and her boyfriend of two years, Vincent, created a podcast of their love story, Artists in Love, But it ended when they broke up during the last podcast. They loved each other but Vincent was going to college in Washington DC while Lee was staying in Memphis. During their two year relationship, Vincent never wanted to have sex. So Lee cheated on him several times with Claire, her coworker, and was eventually outed as a liar and cheater.While she was going through her own emotional upheaval, her parents who were married for twenty years, were also breaking up. Lee, with the help of her friends, wanted to find out more about her parents’ own love story and along the way, learned some things about herself. I liked the idea of the story but not so much the characters. They all seemed to have some kind of hidden agenda except Risa, who seemed to be the most genuine and caring of the characters.The others seemed to be self absorbed. It seemed like Vincent and Lee both used each other as did Lee and Max. I liked the idea of using the podcast to explore love stories, but not the way the characters went about it. It didn’t feel right since some of those stories were not their truth to share. Overall, even though I didn’t like the teenage characters, it was an interesting storyline about personal discovery such as being a polygamous bisexual and owning up to the truths: past and present. An ARC was given for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I've been reading so many dark books and thrillers that I was looking forward to something a little less heavy and couldn't wait to dig into Indestructible Object. It's not what I would consider a light beach read, but it's earnest, thoughtful, and heartfelt. Lee Swan and her boyfriend, Vincent, produce a podcast called Artists in Love which has to sadly end because they're breaking up. He's going to Washington, D.C. for college and she's going to remain in Memphis. Lee's artistic parents are al I've been reading so many dark books and thrillers that I was looking forward to something a little less heavy and couldn't wait to dig into Indestructible Object. It's not what I would consider a light beach read, but it's earnest, thoughtful, and heartfelt. Lee Swan and her boyfriend, Vincent, produce a podcast called Artists in Love which has to sadly end because they're breaking up. He's going to Washington, D.C. for college and she's going to remain in Memphis. Lee's artistic parents are also separating which makes her own breakup that much worse. Throughout the book, Lee grapples with the meaning of love and the best way for her to make sense of it is by asking people, starting with her own parents. She recruits a visiting friend, Max, as well as a new one, Risa, to put together a podcast called Objects of Destruction. They know love is messy, but Lee discovers she may be the messiest one of all. She struggles with her feelings for both Risa and Vincent. I loved Lee's complexity and idealism. She's indecisive yet painfully self-aware at the same time. Much more than I ever was as a teen. Every character was well-developed, but my favorites, aside from Lee, were Max, Risa, and Claire. The adults in the book were just as enjoyable to read about as the teens, and I appreciated that her parents were constantly fighting yet obviously still very much in love. It's realistic and honest. I loved the mixed media with the podcast transcript. Overall, I absolutely adored this book and recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading about art or who loves love.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kym's Open Books

    “…when you want someone to like you, there’s this thing where you start being YOU as hard as you can, like you’re trying to push your essential being at this person, but cramming it through a pinhole of human interaction, and it builds and builds, until suddenly, it comes exploding out in a messy, unexpected spray.” Lee has graduated high school and is in that awkward yet endearing stage of life where you’re trying to figure yourself out and what direction to go. Lee is a very ingenuine person wh “…when you want someone to like you, there’s this thing where you start being YOU as hard as you can, like you’re trying to push your essential being at this person, but cramming it through a pinhole of human interaction, and it builds and builds, until suddenly, it comes exploding out in a messy, unexpected spray.” Lee has graduated high school and is in that awkward yet endearing stage of life where you’re trying to figure yourself out and what direction to go. Lee is a very ingenuine person who is selfish and is too self aware without watching what her actions do to others. She’s not a very likeable person and I had a hard time with her as the POV. Ultimately, the story just didn’t grab me. There was not enough going on to keep me interested. The drama she was going through felt trite and I was not interested. Contemporary YA is hit and miss with me and while the writing was done well, this was a miss. Thank you to Simon Teen for the gifted copy in exchange for an honest review. Check my blog for the content review! https://www.theopenbooks.net/2021/06/...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris G.

    Lee knew exactly what life after graduation was going to be like, and then it fell apart. After years of discontent, her parents are finally getting a divorce. She’s asked to take a break from the work she loves as the “sound guy” at a small cafe/music venue. Her boyfriend of two years changes his mind about staying in Memphis and continuing to work on their podcast, Artists in Love. Instead he’s heading for Howard University and a summer internship at NPR. A group of her parent’s close college f Lee knew exactly what life after graduation was going to be like, and then it fell apart. After years of discontent, her parents are finally getting a divorce. She’s asked to take a break from the work she loves as the “sound guy” at a small cafe/music venue. Her boyfriend of two years changes his mind about staying in Memphis and continuing to work on their podcast, Artists in Love. Instead he’s heading for Howard University and a summer internship at NPR. A group of her parent’s close college friends and their family members come to town to support them both during the breakup, including Max, who is Lee’s age. Mourning the loss of her podcast, Lee begins a new podcast project with Max, focused on the mystery of why her parents got married and which of the group of friends is her biological father. In the process, both Lee and Max come to grips with what it means to be honest in relationships, to forgive, and to reconcile. Teen and adult characters are multi-faceted, narration is interspersed with the transcripts of the podcasts, and issues of prejudice, sexual preference, gender identity, and racism provide a very worthwhile read. EARC from Edelweiss.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Indestructible Object is the story of Lee, a recent high school graduate, podcast host, and sound tech who thinks she has her life figured out. That is, until her boyfriend dumps her on their podcast, she is asked to take a leave of absence from her job, and her parents announce their separation. Lee attempts to find herself again through a new podcast project, attempting to solve a family mystery, and maybe even a new love interest. Indestructible Object is a unique and engaging book, and one t Indestructible Object is the story of Lee, a recent high school graduate, podcast host, and sound tech who thinks she has her life figured out. That is, until her boyfriend dumps her on their podcast, she is asked to take a leave of absence from her job, and her parents announce their separation. Lee attempts to find herself again through a new podcast project, attempting to solve a family mystery, and maybe even a new love interest. Indestructible Object is a unique and engaging book, and one that I finished in less that 24 hours. The book addresses a host of relevant topics, including race, sexuality, relationships, and acceptance, both on an individual and community scale. Lee is a complex main character who is wise beyond her years, while simultaneously naive in certain aspects of her life. I really liked all of the supporting characters surrounding her; everyone had their own quirks and intricacies that added a lot to the plot. Indestructible Object is a thoughtful and detailed YA book and one that is sure to spark many discussions upon completion. Thanks to Netgalley and Simon and Schuster Children's Publishing for this ARC; this is my honest and voluntary review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Caitie

    This was so disappointing for me, I really wanted to like this, but I just couldn't get into it. I found Lee, the main character, to be somewhat insufferable. She's feeling badly about her life--and admittedly things aren't going well, her parents are getting a divorce literally right after she graduates high school, her boyfriend dumped her live on their podcast--and suddenly love doesn't exist, or she's questioning whether or not it exists. I get things are hard right now, but it doesn't mean This was so disappointing for me, I really wanted to like this, but I just couldn't get into it. I found Lee, the main character, to be somewhat insufferable. She's feeling badly about her life--and admittedly things aren't going well, her parents are getting a divorce literally right after she graduates high school, her boyfriend dumped her live on their podcast--and suddenly love doesn't exist, or she's questioning whether or not it exists. I get things are hard right now, but it doesn't mean that good things can't happen and that her parents don't love her. But mostly I was just bored because Lee's quest didn't feel genuine to me. Things happened to suddenly and I didn't get a true sense of what Lee's plans were, other than moving in with her boyfriend....I guess. Life doesn't stop because you want it to or because bad things happen to you. Her parents clearly have awful timing and didn't really consider Lee's feelings and Vincent (Lee's ex) shouldn't have essentially led her on about not wanting to continue their life together as a couple. Life shouldn't be planned out when you're 18 anyway.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

    Got an advance copy, and it's such a beautiful and engrossing book. Memphis is as much a character in the book as the people are; the story is really grounded in a specific place, a place that feels like home to some, a location to escape as soon as possible for others. The teens who are the focus of the story struggle to figure out who they are, what it means to love someone, and the joy and pain that come from growing up, and the difficult truths we have to face sometimes in order to grow and Got an advance copy, and it's such a beautiful and engrossing book. Memphis is as much a character in the book as the people are; the story is really grounded in a specific place, a place that feels like home to some, a location to escape as soon as possible for others. The teens who are the focus of the story struggle to figure out who they are, what it means to love someone, and the joy and pain that come from growing up, and the difficult truths we have to face sometimes in order to grow and be honest about who we are. There aren't any anti-heroes here, just flawed but loving young people trying to navigate the transition to their new lives after high school. I loved Lee, the main character - she's smart but not unbelievably so, and struggles to admit who she is and what she needs from the people she loves. She and her friends are a lot cooler than I was at that age, but still, the issues they're dealing with resonated with me. Somehow the book touches on race, sexuality, polyamory, art, and more, all without seeming preachy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Received advanced reader copy from publisher via Baker & Taylor book supplier. When Lee’s boyfriend breaks up with her on their podcast and her boss asks her to “take a break” from her sound tech job, Lee’s life is sent into a spiral. Searching for purpose, next steps, and an answer to whether love really exists, Lee begins a new podcast and finds her old friend Max and new friend Risa have a lot to say about her life, love, and what comes next. Sometimes a book is all about timing. I was definit Received advanced reader copy from publisher via Baker & Taylor book supplier. When Lee’s boyfriend breaks up with her on their podcast and her boss asks her to “take a break” from her sound tech job, Lee’s life is sent into a spiral. Searching for purpose, next steps, and an answer to whether love really exists, Lee begins a new podcast and finds her old friend Max and new friend Risa have a lot to say about her life, love, and what comes next. Sometimes a book is all about timing. I was definitely not in the mood for an angsty, my-life-sucks-and-my-parents-divorce-sucks-more novel. Was it good? Yes. Despite my mood, the author’s rock-solid writing and desire to know the answer to Lee’s question about her parents’ marriage kept me reading. The deep-dive into Lee’s life as a sound tech and podcast author is sure to peak the interest of other readers & keep them engrossed. The representation was vast: nonbinary, bisexual, polyamory, and racial diversity. The story opens the door to thought, discovery, and discussion on all of those as well as parental divorce.

  29. 5 out of 5

    bailee duke

    “stories are supposed to have villains. stories are supposed to have people who do the right thing and people who fuck up. stories are supposed to have wronged parties and people who get what’s coming to them, people you cheer for and people for whom you only wish bad things. stories are supposed to have a romance where two people find each other and live happily ever after. so… what i ask myself is: do i want a story, or do i want the truth?” i am absolutely in love with this book, with lee’s st “stories are supposed to have villains. stories are supposed to have people who do the right thing and people who fuck up. stories are supposed to have wronged parties and people who get what’s coming to them, people you cheer for and people for whom you only wish bad things. stories are supposed to have a romance where two people find each other and live happily ever after. so… what i ask myself is: do i want a story, or do i want the truth?” i am absolutely in love with this book, with lee’s story of love and art and self-discovery. at first, what drew me into this book was the prose. i thought the writing was so beautiful and it had me hooked right away. but as i kept reading, i fell in love with lee and her story and her messiness. i read this book in a day, and this was one of those books where i got completely lost in the story. i hadn’t realized how much time had passed until i was suddenly reading the acknowledgments. absolutely amazing, 5/5 stars, cannot recommend this book enough.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    DNF @ 48% I was really excited to read another novel by Mary McCoy. Her book "I, Claudia" is one of my all-time favorites. Her previous novels have low ratings here on Goodreads so I was excited to try a new book. But I had a feeling this particular story wasn't going to resonate with me in the same way as "I, Claudia," and I was right. This book is severely lacking in "plot." Nothing is happening and I'm not really invested in the characters, especially our main character Lee. Even the most inte DNF @ 48% I was really excited to read another novel by Mary McCoy. Her book "I, Claudia" is one of my all-time favorites. Her previous novels have low ratings here on Goodreads so I was excited to try a new book. But I had a feeling this particular story wasn't going to resonate with me in the same way as "I, Claudia," and I was right. This book is severely lacking in "plot." Nothing is happening and I'm not really invested in the characters, especially our main character Lee. Even the most interesting part of the story, her parents' pasts, becomes dull once she sits the adults down for podcast interviews. I know if I kept going this book would end up with a 2-star rating based on other reviews I've read. So I'm just going to end it here and not rate it. I'll still read more from Mary McCoy because of my deep love for "I, Claudia."

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