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A wedding harpist disillusioned with love and a hopeless romantic cater-waiter flirt and fight their way through a summer of weddings in this effervescent romantic comedy from the acclaimed author of Today Tonight Tomorrow. Quinn Berkowitz and Tarek Mansour’s families have been in business together for years: Quinn’s parents are wedding planners, and Tarek’s own a catering A wedding harpist disillusioned with love and a hopeless romantic cater-waiter flirt and fight their way through a summer of weddings in this effervescent romantic comedy from the acclaimed author of Today Tonight Tomorrow. Quinn Berkowitz and Tarek Mansour’s families have been in business together for years: Quinn’s parents are wedding planners, and Tarek’s own a catering company. At the end of last summer, Quinn confessed her crush on him in the form of a rambling email—and then he left for college without a response. Quinn has been dreading seeing him again almost as much as she dreads another summer playing the harp for her parents’ weddings. When he shows up at the first wedding of the summer, looking cuter than ever after a year apart, they clash immediately. Tarek’s always loved the grand gestures in weddings—the flashier, the better—while Quinn can’t see them as anything but fake. Even as they can’t seem to have one civil conversation, Quinn’s thrown together with Tarek wedding after wedding, from performing a daring cake rescue to filling in for a missing bridesmaid and groomsman. Quinn can’t deny her feelings for him are still there, especially after she learns the truth about his silence, opens up about her own fears, and begins learning the art of harp-making from an enigmatic teacher. Maybe love isn’t the enemy after all—and maybe allowing herself to fall is the most honest thing Quinn’s ever done.


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A wedding harpist disillusioned with love and a hopeless romantic cater-waiter flirt and fight their way through a summer of weddings in this effervescent romantic comedy from the acclaimed author of Today Tonight Tomorrow. Quinn Berkowitz and Tarek Mansour’s families have been in business together for years: Quinn’s parents are wedding planners, and Tarek’s own a catering A wedding harpist disillusioned with love and a hopeless romantic cater-waiter flirt and fight their way through a summer of weddings in this effervescent romantic comedy from the acclaimed author of Today Tonight Tomorrow. Quinn Berkowitz and Tarek Mansour’s families have been in business together for years: Quinn’s parents are wedding planners, and Tarek’s own a catering company. At the end of last summer, Quinn confessed her crush on him in the form of a rambling email—and then he left for college without a response. Quinn has been dreading seeing him again almost as much as she dreads another summer playing the harp for her parents’ weddings. When he shows up at the first wedding of the summer, looking cuter than ever after a year apart, they clash immediately. Tarek’s always loved the grand gestures in weddings—the flashier, the better—while Quinn can’t see them as anything but fake. Even as they can’t seem to have one civil conversation, Quinn’s thrown together with Tarek wedding after wedding, from performing a daring cake rescue to filling in for a missing bridesmaid and groomsman. Quinn can’t deny her feelings for him are still there, especially after she learns the truth about his silence, opens up about her own fears, and begins learning the art of harp-making from an enigmatic teacher. Maybe love isn’t the enemy after all—and maybe allowing herself to fall is the most honest thing Quinn’s ever done.

30 review for We Can't Keep Meeting Like This

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    I love Ms. Solomon’s brilliant works so much! She nails both of adult and young adult genres and creates sweet, sensible characters you easily connect and writes remarkable stories of them. However this new book is a little different from her previous works. I loved her choice to approach sensitive subjects like mental diseases including OCD, depression and diversity issues including race, religion and LGTBQ. Those parts of the book and centering the story around two families work on wedding p I love Ms. Solomon’s brilliant works so much! She nails both of adult and young adult genres and creates sweet, sensible characters you easily connect and writes remarkable stories of them. However this new book is a little different from her previous works. I loved her choice to approach sensitive subjects like mental diseases including OCD, depression and diversity issues including race, religion and LGTBQ. Those parts of the book and centering the story around two families work on wedding planning business were creative strengths of the book. The realistic approach of MCs’ problems about adjusting themselves to be part of the adult world, the pressure they felt, their observations about their role models which shaped their opposite approaches to the romance were well developed. As our main character Quinn is sarcastic and cynical girl who hardly believes in romance because of her parents’ 6 month long separation process, Tarek is hopeless romantic who can write a book about creating unique grand gestures because he’s raised by extremely romantic couple who met under the Eiffel Tower reminds us of Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks’ characters’ meeting at Empire State Building at Sleepless in Seattle. The book is centered on two topics: Quinn is about to leave for the college and feels pressure of her parents who want her chase the same career choices they’ve made and work in family business which she doesn’t truly want to involve but she also doesn’t want to hurt their feelings. The other topic is her unrequited feelings about her long time crush and one of her best friend Tarek who left for college and ghosted her after she told her true feelings via an email. And now Tarek is back to work at their parents’ catering business in the summer which means they will stuck with each other throughout entire summer at several vivid wedding ceremonies including Quinn’s sister Asher. I have to admit: I found Quinn dislikable and whiny. She’s suffering from OCD which is troubling for her to deal with her insecurities but I didn’t find her problems so hard to deal. She may deal with family issues and come clean with them and her immature attitudes around Tarek were also annoying. I didn’t find their love story so intriguing like other characters the author created. Because the love story is not the main part of the book. This is mostly Quinn’s self discovery: it’s most about how she sees the inequality around genders, sexes, religion, race, how she looks for her passion, how she wants to explore her self. Tarek was lovely, sweet, romantic and more mature part. He deals with his own issues, trying to get approval of her loved ones but he was more sincere one of the relationship from the beginning. Overall: it was still good reading with thought provoking, genuine, realistic approach to the young adult problems which earned my four stars. ( it would be five if I resonated with the heroine ) Special thanks to NetGalley and Simon&Schuster Children’s Publishing for sharing this amazing digital reviewer copy with me in exchange my honest opinions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    literarylesbian

    Okay, so I liked a lot about this book originally—the Jewish representation and how the main character had OCD—but as the book went on, I started finding things that made me not enjoy the books as much. First off, the pacing was just kinda wonky at some times. It was hard to push through a lot of the parts. My biggest issue though was the questionable Muslim representation. (I was to preface this by saying I am NOT Muslim, therefore I can’t say what is and isn’t good representation. But I know the Okay, so I liked a lot about this book originally—the Jewish representation and how the main character had OCD—but as the book went on, I started finding things that made me not enjoy the books as much. First off, the pacing was just kinda wonky at some times. It was hard to push through a lot of the parts. My biggest issue though was the questionable Muslim representation. (I was to preface this by saying I am NOT Muslim, therefore I can’t say what is and isn’t good representation. But I know the author is not Muslim, which is why I will be critiquing this). While I enjoyed the sex-positive aspect of this book, it felt strange that the Muslim love interest is depicted as having sex, with two separate people as well. He engaged in a ‘friends with benefits’ arrangement with the main character. While I’m not Muslim myself, this stood out to me, but I invite anyone who is Muslim to give your thoughts in place of mine. I’ll edit this review as I see fit later to include thoughts from Muslim individuals on this situation! EDIT: someone linked a Muslim readers review so I suggest reading that! It generally touches on what I mentioned, but goes more in depth in explaining!

  3. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    **4.5-stars rounded up** Yet again you've succeeded sweeping me off my feet, Rachel Lynn Solomon. I see you and it's like you see me too. Quinn Berkowitz is the harpist for her parent's thriving wedding planning business. Tarek Monsour is a cater-waiter, and aspiring baker, whose family's catering business is frequently hired on by the Berkowitzs for events. Over the years, the two have worked a lot of weddings together. Somewhere along the way, Quinn became a skeptic of the whole love thing, while **4.5-stars rounded up** Yet again you've succeeded sweeping me off my feet, Rachel Lynn Solomon. I see you and it's like you see me too. Quinn Berkowitz is the harpist for her parent's thriving wedding planning business. Tarek Monsour is a cater-waiter, and aspiring baker, whose family's catering business is frequently hired on by the Berkowitzs for events. Over the years, the two have worked a lot of weddings together. Somewhere along the way, Quinn became a skeptic of the whole love thing, while Tarek went in the other direction. He's now over-the-top romantic; full of positivity with regards to love. Last summer, Quinn became fed up with watching Tarek's grand gestures for other girls. Perhaps she had secretly grown to like him more than she admitted. When Quinn called him out on it though, her ire seemed to ruin everything. Tarek left for college and the two didn't have any contact for a year. As summer returns, so too does Tarek, home from college and working with his parents. The first wedding Quinn sees him at is uncomfortable as heck, but this is a romantic comedy, so y'all know what's coming. We Can't Keep Meeting Like This is exactly as adorable as its synopsis makes it sound. Solomon always knows how to bring the cute, as well as relatable substance. This book is full of incredible OCD-rep, sex positivity and exploration of other issues a lot of young adults go through; like, what the heck do I want to do with the rest of my life? Solomon is always able to handle serious topics well and seamlessly incorporates them into otherwise light-hearted narratives. This is a YA Summer Romance that should be on everyone's reading list. I highly, highly recommend it!! Thank you so much to the publisher, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, for providing me with a copy to read and review. Rachel Lynn Solomon is an autobuy author for me and I can't wait to see what cutesy-creation she dreams up next!!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emma Lord

    Still feeling extremely lucky to have read this book prior to its release. It pushes so many of my happy buttons: honest depictions of teens struggling with personal issues, sex positivity, friendship, finding yourself, glorious descriptions of dessert, the urge to yell "I SHIP IT!!" from the very beginning that carries you through the whole story. Very few Rachel Lynn Solomon fans will be surprised that she has Delivered (TM) yet again. But even knowing I'd enjoy it, it was a freaking delight t Still feeling extremely lucky to have read this book prior to its release. It pushes so many of my happy buttons: honest depictions of teens struggling with personal issues, sex positivity, friendship, finding yourself, glorious descriptions of dessert, the urge to yell "I SHIP IT!!" from the very beginning that carries you through the whole story. Very few Rachel Lynn Solomon fans will be surprised that she has Delivered (TM) yet again. But even knowing I'd enjoy it, it was a freaking delight to read, with sweet surprises and heartfelt moments from start to finish. So excited for it to be out in the world soon!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sydney | sydneys.books

    "Sometimes the world is terrible, and love stories... they make it feel less heavy." After the incredible love for Today Tonight Tomorrow, I couldn't wait to see Rachel Lynn Solomon deliver another sex positive, Jewish centered contemporary novel, but this time with a flood of eager readers who have finally discovered her pure talent. Being an OG fan of an author means seeing them reach new readers is as joyful for you as it is for them. Although this is too heavy to be a romcom, the trademar "Sometimes the world is terrible, and love stories... they make it feel less heavy." After the incredible love for Today Tonight Tomorrow, I couldn't wait to see Rachel Lynn Solomon deliver another sex positive, Jewish centered contemporary novel, but this time with a flood of eager readers who have finally discovered her pure talent. Being an OG fan of an author means seeing them reach new readers is as joyful for you as it is for them. Although this is too heavy to be a romcom, the trademark humor and second-hand embarrassment are all present. CW: divorce/separation, OCD, anxiety, depression WE CAN'T KEEP MEETING LIKE THIS is like the fluffy white frosting artfully piped on a delicious wedding cake that you sneak extra pieces of in your purse as you leave. Quinn is an anxious wedding harpist with high family expectations, OCD, and my exact personality. I screen shotted half the book to send to my best friend, exclaiming "IS THIS NOT ME" and then freaking out because Quinn's best friend is just like that best friend. The way 👏🏼 that I 👏🏼 saw 👏🏼myself in 👏🏼 this 👏🏼 book 👏🏼!! Down to the mental illness, the high expectations of her from adults everywhere, and the business-oriented parents. Seeing her open and honest struggle with OCD, her coping methods, her frustration and her good days and her bad days... it was raw. It was my experience on a glistening, glowing page on my phone. And then we have Tarek. "We're all hurting, Quinn. In different ways, some that we can treat with medication and therapy and some with only time. And some in ways that might never heal. Sometimes the good outweighs the bad. Sometimes those great times are so f-cking great that they make the bad times a little easier to handle." Tarek is Muslim, the son of the staple wedding caterers, a college boy returned for the summer, and a Soft Boi™️. He also has the unique struggle of eczema, something I struggled with in middle school. I have literally never read a book with that representation in it before. Unlike Quinn, he believes in love, passionate love that stems from grand gestures. We have a lovely mutual pining/secret romance trope going through this story, as well as some second chance romance vibes. Tarek also struggled with depression at college in an authentic, heartbreaking way, and I love love love reading books with two main characters both working through their own mental illnesses and learning to allow others to love them. Seeing them discuss therapy and medication? In a YA novel? Indescribable. It feels like a warm hug. Also, for other RLS fans who have read her backlist, there's a glorious cameo that you will not miss. IT IS FLAWLESS. 4.5 stars rounded up due to overall enjoyment and the pleasure of seeing myself in such a beautiful story 🥺I rarely add books to my "I see myself" shelf because I only want the most similar experiences to mine to live there, and this one just signed a lifetime lease. Thank you to Simon Teen for gifting me the early copy. All opinions are my own and the quotes included are from an early copy and may not reflect a finished copy. ------ I have seen the cover... and Y'ALL ARE NOT READY FOR THIS!! ----- If she published her old college essays I’d still mark them as to-read and refresh Netgalley until I get an ARC.

  6. 5 out of 5

    jenna (jennajustreads)

    **4.5 stars This book was such a bundle of joy to read. I felt like each of the characters were so easy to relate to and the story sort of jumped off the pages. I can always count on Rachel Lynn Solomon to deliver incredible stories! Overall, I really enjoyed this book, though some parts felt repetitive. But then again, that sense of repetitiveness made the story feel real, so I think it is allowed in this case. I found myself really wanting the main characters to get together, which made me not **4.5 stars This book was such a bundle of joy to read. I felt like each of the characters were so easy to relate to and the story sort of jumped off the pages. I can always count on Rachel Lynn Solomon to deliver incredible stories! Overall, I really enjoyed this book, though some parts felt repetitive. But then again, that sense of repetitiveness made the story feel real, so I think it is allowed in this case. I found myself really wanting the main characters to get together, which made me not want to stop reading. Although this book was incredible, I think it missed that wow factor that came with Solomon’s book, “Today Tonight Tomorrow”. Therefore, this book was a solid 4.5 star book. :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Claude's Bookzone

    3.5 Stars rounded up to 4! CW: (view spoiler)[OCD, anxiety, depression,sexual content (hide spoiler)] Well that was adorable and I really liked the relatable characters! I liked that the story had a bit of depth to it without feeling too laboured, if you know what I mean. Both Quinn and Tarek are trying to work out what their futures looked like away from the pressures of working in their family businesses. I was relieved there wasn't too much of the miscommunication trope as that can get wearisome 3.5 Stars rounded up to 4! CW: (view spoiler)[OCD, anxiety, depression,sexual content (hide spoiler)] Well that was adorable and I really liked the relatable characters! I liked that the story had a bit of depth to it without feeling too laboured, if you know what I mean. Both Quinn and Tarek are trying to work out what their futures looked like away from the pressures of working in their family businesses. I was relieved there wasn't too much of the miscommunication trope as that can get wearisome. All in all a quick and enjoyable romance!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Canette

    Would "woke" non-Muslim Americans just stop fucking praising the Muslim representation in this book? Because as a Muslim I think it's trash. Thank you. "My parents aren't nearly as religious as their parents were," he says. "But some things have just sort of stuck? Like we work with a halal butcher, but not everything we eat or serve is halal. My mom drinks, but my dad doesn't, and, well, you saw me do it at the beach. And I've had sex before marriage." Why is it that every time there's Musli Would "woke" non-Muslim Americans just stop fucking praising the Muslim representation in this book? Because as a Muslim I think it's trash. Thank you. "My parents aren't nearly as religious as their parents were," he says. "But some things have just sort of stuck? Like we work with a halal butcher, but not everything we eat or serve is halal. My mom drinks, but my dad doesn't, and, well, you saw me do it at the beach. And I've had sex before marriage." Why is it that every time there's Muslim rep in a romance book, the Muslim character needs to be non-practicing or "not that religious"? Is it because you find practicing Muslims too inconvenient in a western romantic setting what with their abstinence? Because refraining from drinking and eating pork and not having sex or kissing before marriage ruins your romantic aesthetic? Because romance books rely heavily on physical intimacy and being a religious Muslim is simply ruled out because your story cannot accommodate a character who will likely violate one of the pillars of a romance book, especially one with a Eurocentric take on romance? Because you just cannot imagine a different way of conducting romantic relationships other than yours? Because having them be non-practicing is far easier than integrating their Muslim faith into their everyday lives? Which is it? And oh, don't tell me you care about representing secular Muslims in your work when there's barely any proper representation of practicing Muslims in western literature. This is at worst Islamophobia, because it suggests that Muslims living in the West cannot have interfaith romances unless it's the western way, and at best a cop-out to avoid bothering with/researching what being a practicing Muslim entails. I would've felt better if this was coming from a Muslim author, which is not the case. I had the same issue with Take a Hint, Dani Brown. This is superficial representation: When you believe the work stops at labeling your character as a member of a particular minority without incorporating the implications of this membership into their character.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ;3

    no cos like WHY is this author so good at providing me with the messy romantic escapism i’m always craving

  10. 4 out of 5

    cossette

    We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This is many things; it’s funny, it’s charming, it’s a love letter to rom coms and wedding season and Seattle, but what truly makes it shine — and what has cemented it on my favorites list — is its exploration of breaking away from predetermined paths, standing up for yourself, and its honest mental health representation. full review here We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This is many things; it’s funny, it’s charming, it’s a love letter to rom coms and wedding season and Seattle, but what truly makes it shine — and what has cemented it on my favorites list — is its exploration of breaking away from predetermined paths, standing up for yourself, and its honest mental health representation. full review here

  11. 5 out of 5

    Avani ✨

    It's all about Cakes, Music and Love. All three things I absolutely adore and when bought together would do wonders in a romance novel. Both the characters as an individual are a great development, but the chemistry between the two was totally missing. I would have loved to see some more deeper connection between Quinn and Tarek. It's all about Cakes, Music and Love. All three things I absolutely adore and when bought together would do wonders in a romance novel. Both the characters as an individual are a great development, but the chemistry between the two was totally missing. I would have loved to see some more deeper connection between Quinn and Tarek.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Larry H

    The newest YA rom-com by Rachel Lynn Solomon, We Can't Keep Meeting Like This is a funny, sweet, and emotional look at love, friendship, family, romance, and trying to find your way. Quinn can’t escape weddings—her family runs a successful wedding planning business and her parents have already planned her future, which includes her course of study in college and eventually joining the company full-time. How does Quinn tell them this isn’t what she wants without destroying her family? And how The newest YA rom-com by Rachel Lynn Solomon, We Can't Keep Meeting Like This is a funny, sweet, and emotional look at love, friendship, family, romance, and trying to find your way. Quinn can’t escape weddings—her family runs a successful wedding planning business and her parents have already planned her future, which includes her course of study in college and eventually joining the company full-time. How does Quinn tell them this isn’t what she wants without destroying her family? And how does she figure out what she does want? If there’s been a plus side to being part of the family business all these years, it’s been working alongside Tarek, whose family runs the catering company they partner with. She and Tarek have been friends for years, they’ve even flirted a bit, but just before Tarek went to college Quinn sent him an email letting him know that she actually liked him—and he never responded. Now Tarek is back for the summer and looks cuter than ever. And as angry and hurt as she was by him, Quinn can’t stop the resurgence of her feelings. He is a romantic, a fan of the grand gesture, and she hates all of that, believing love is ultimately doomed to fail. But as they grow closer and learn just how vulnerable the other is, Quinn needs to make sense of all of it—her feelings, her future plans, and her fears. I really enjoyed We Can't Keep Meeting Like This , as I have some of Solomon's other books, including Today Tonight Tomorrow and The Ex-Talk . I love the Jewish representation she always includes and I loved the conversations around mental health, which are so important. It’s funny and emotional and these characters are really complex—sometimes Quinn is annoying, but that’s just like life! I’m a huge fan of Solomon’s writing and can’t wait to see what’s next for her! Check out my list of the best books I read in 2020 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2021/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2020.html. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  13. 5 out of 5

    ⛅ Saniya (sunnysidereviews) ⛅

    4.5 stars! Incredibly poignant and heart-wrenching, Rachel Lynn Solomon delivers a young adult contemporary unlike any other. To start off, the book wasn’t predictable at all, which is quite rare for me in terms of YA romance. Furthermore, the initial plot of We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This had me thinking this would just be a romantic comedy, and boy was I wrong! This was such a rich novel, whose characters laid bare on the page. Speaking of characters, despite not throwing in a gazillion referen 4.5 stars! Incredibly poignant and heart-wrenching, Rachel Lynn Solomon delivers a young adult contemporary unlike any other. To start off, the book wasn’t predictable at all, which is quite rare for me in terms of YA romance. Furthermore, the initial plot of We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This had me thinking this would just be a romantic comedy, and boy was I wrong! This was such a rich novel, whose characters laid bare on the page. Speaking of characters, despite not throwing in a gazillion references to pop cultures, the book’s characters are immensely relatable. Seventeen year old Quinn Berkowitz hates grand gestures. Eighteen year old Tarek Mansour on the other hand? It’s all he knows romance to be. The story essentially follows Quinn’s life as she navigates love (it wouldn’t be a Rachel Solomon book without it), family life, and the future. I must say, the experiences Quinn goes through really had me all over the place. Despite disliking Quinn, (I found her to be extremely infuriating), she feels so real as a character. Moreover, Tarek was the absolute sweetest! His character was so endearing. Tarek loves baking, and of course, rom-coms. What I found to be quite refreshing is that despite being a guy, he loves romance. His infatuation in it is something I have strictly only seen in female protagonists, so it was definitely a nice change of pace. Unfortunately though, I could never really understand what Tarek saw in Quinn. When he was basically head over heels for Quinn, she didn’t reciprocate even 50% of that energy despite having a huge crush on him. Admittedly, this made me dislike her a lot more. On a more positive note, an aspect of We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This that I absolutely adored was the representation. Quinn is Jewish, and lives with OCD. Tarek is Muslim, and lives with eczema, and depression. I can’t speak on how accurate the OCD, Jewish, or depression representation was. However, I am someone that lives with eczema and is Muslim. In terms of eczema rep, I think it was represented quite accurately. As for the Muslim rep, I didn’t feel represented in it at all. So if you're looking for good Muslim representation, you won't find it here. But that’s okay! No two people are the same. In addition, the dialogue is where it really hit me. It was just too good! The interactions Quinn and Tarek have are so genuine. They fight, they grieve, they love, and here I am tearing up, witnessing their whirlwind of emotions. The story is told through Quinn’s point of view, and is written very smoothly. There aren’t any clunky paragraphs, and no typos either. Although, I will say that some chapter transitions seemed as though they had cut off mid scene. Moreover, Tarek and Quinn had a very on and off relationship. At times, it felt much too repetitive. Nevertheless, the writing style was very charming, which is always a plus! The overall enjoyment level of We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This is, is very high. It explores various aspects such as mental health, relationships, consent, and so much more! We rarely get to see these topics compiled into a single novel, and that my friends is what makes this book a must read for all. --Overall-- Age Rating: 15 and up TW: OCD, Depression, Anxiety, some use of alcohol Final Rating: 9/10 or 4.5 stars For more reviews like this visit https://sunnysidereviews.wordpress.com/! Thank you Netgalley and Simon and Schuster for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice Masaluñga

    I discovered We Can't Keep Meeting Like This thru Inah @ Fueled by Chapters and the premise caught my attention. The story is lighthearted, sweet and angst-y. It's been a long time I found a great young adult novel that transitioned to new adult. I'll say this one is a gem. Quinn works on their family's wedding planning business and she's a harpist. Her family works with Tarek's family wherein they have a catering business. Tarek is a baker and she has a crush on him whenever he bakes those beaut I discovered We Can't Keep Meeting Like This thru Inah @ Fueled by Chapters and the premise caught my attention. The story is lighthearted, sweet and angst-y. It's been a long time I found a great young adult novel that transitioned to new adult. I'll say this one is a gem. Quinn works on their family's wedding planning business and she's a harpist. Her family works with Tarek's family wherein they have a catering business. Tarek is a baker and she has a crush on him whenever he bakes those beautiful cakes, I can't help craving. Our protagonists are passionate on what they're doing and I love seeing them enjoy it in spite of dealing with mental illness. It never stopped them and I love they openly talk about them. (view spoiler)[Quinn has OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) while Tarek has depression (hide spoiler)] The thing I love the most about this novel, the characters are unapologetically honest and relatable in every way. I love Quinn and Tarek talk about their sex lives. Most of the YA books I've read, they are not entirely detailed and I find this unexpectedly steamy and romantic. Plus, I love the teenage angst and the flaws shaped them to learn from their mistakes. I appreciate it a lot. Aside from these, it also talks about religion. I'm not familiar with Judaism and it's nice to see it here. If you are looking for a lighthearted, crush to lovers, friends to lovers romance. I recommend this book. When you have chance, listen to the audiobook version. It's wonderfully narrated.

  15. 5 out of 5

    sam

    “Sometimes the world is terrible, and love stories . . . they make it feel less heavy.” ★★★★☆ I received an early copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This is the most recent novel by Rachel Lynn Solomon, which deals heavily with mental health representation, majorly anxiety, but also depression. It follows Quinn, who deals with generalised anxiety on a daily basis. She has a crush on a boy (whose “Sometimes the world is terrible, and love stories . . . they make it feel less heavy.” ★★★★☆ I received an early copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This is the most recent novel by Rachel Lynn Solomon, which deals heavily with mental health representation, majorly anxiety, but also depression. It follows Quinn, who deals with generalised anxiety on a daily basis. She has a crush on a boy (whose family has worked with her’s in the wedding planning business for years), and she decides to tell him via email. Except he never responds. Now he’s back and things are as awkward as ever. I’m going to start off by saying I was very surprised by this book. I was super excited to read it but because it does deal primarily with anxiety, I knew I was going to have to be a little more critical, in terms how I review it because as someone who does have anxiety – I wanted the representation to be as accurate as possible. Personally, I think the way the author handled it in this book was very well done. Mental health isn’t easy to incorporate into books and even harder to do well if only because it adds a certain depth to the character that most people don’t generally explore. I love the way Quinn’s character evolved in this book and she definitely had that depth I was looking for. Another thing I loved was that nothing in this book was too convenient. There was also a lot of things going on in the background like misunderstanding parents, strained relationship with her sibling and a complicated love interest. It was pretty obvious going in that there was definitely a miscommunication trope at play here, which had me pretty concerned. Miscommunication is not one of my favourite tropes to read about because it can get pretty melodramatic or dragged out at times, which eventually leads it to overshadowing the actual plot. I was so relieved when that didn’t happen in this book. I also loved the display of culture here. The protagonist is from a Jewish family and the love interest, Tarek, is Egyptian-American. However, I wish it was talked about a little more. I feel like his Muslim heritage wasn’t really delved into much in the book, even though it was mentioned a few times that he was non practising. I would have loved to have seen a little more of his cultural background. The reason I cut down my rating even though I really liked this book A LOT was because I wanted a little more insight into Tarek’s character. I mean yes, we did explore a little bit but I feel like his character lacked the depth that Quinn’s character had. It could probably be because I relate more Quinn than Tarek, but I couldn’t really connect with him on an emotional level as much. Either way, I definitely recommend adding this to your tbr because it has great anxiety representation that I think you will definitely really enjoy reading about. Also a side note, this book is not a light hearted rom com. So incase you were expecting that going in, just know that it deals with pretty heavy themes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Gonzales

    Rachel Lynn Solomon has done it again! For the hopeless romantics, and for the ones who wish they could be, We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This will keep you well fed. The sort of book that leaves you feeling better about the world than you did before you began, you’ll want to pick this one up for the lovable characters, Solomon’s trademark tender focus on family, and the heartfelt exploration of what it means to be truly vulnerable.

  17. 5 out of 5

    nick (the infinite limits of love)

    Find more of my reviews at The Infinite Limits of Love I have genuinely loved every single book by Rachel Lynn Solomon and she keeps impressing me with every release. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This, with the author’s signature charm and sweet love stories, totally wowed me. It’s a book that left my heart full and truly, what more can you ask of a good read? THE HISTORY OF QUINN AND TAREK Quinn is the protagonist of the novel and she works with her parents at their wedding planning business. Throug Find more of my reviews at The Infinite Limits of Love I have genuinely loved every single book by Rachel Lynn Solomon and she keeps impressing me with every release. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This, with the author’s signature charm and sweet love stories, totally wowed me. It’s a book that left my heart full and truly, what more can you ask of a good read? THE HISTORY OF QUINN AND TAREK Quinn is the protagonist of the novel and she works with her parents at their wedding planning business. Throughout the years, her family has formed a partnership with Tarek, her love interest, and his family’s catering company. The two have known each other for a while and have maintained a friendship. However, this ends up turning into a crush for Quinn. The summer before Tarek leaves for college, she reveals her feelings to him in a letter only to have him not respond. Now, he is back for the summer and things are tense and awkward between them as they are forced into proximity at the weddings. YA CHARACTERS THAT ANYONE CAN RELATE TO I’m always impressed with how thoughtfully Rachel Lynn Solomon crafts her characters. She nails their subtleties and their depths, making the characters truly stand out. As I’ve grown older and aged out of the YA target, it’s been hard for me to completely enjoy characters who are much younger than me. I don’t seem to have that issue with Rachel’s characters though and a lot of it has to do with how she writes them. Quinn is a young Jewish woman who has been struggling with OCD. Because of her OCD, she has developed intrusive, bordering on obsessive, thoughts. As a result, she is quite flaky when it comes to relationships and tends to break them off before they can get too serious. In a lot of ways, she’s jaded in the romance department. Her parents’ shaky relationship a few years back is also to blame for her bleak outlook on romance. FINDING ONE’S PASSION Quinn, though not perfect, is a character I immediately bonded with. Her story will grip you no matter how old you are. I think anyone can relate to stories of characters seemingly unsure about their place in life. For Quinn, that’s intensified by her parents forcing her to take over this wedding planning business that’s clearly not her passion. To highlight that, there’s a line in this book where she says something about wanting to work hard for something so that it could feel hers and that felt very powerful. Quinn discovers her true passion in her harp throughout the book. She goes on a journey of self-discovery and learns to stand up for herself. You will cheer on her as a reader! A SWEET BAKER WITH A LOVE OF ROMANTIC GRAND GESTURES Alongside her on this journey is Tarek, her friend, and crush. Tarek is dealing with his own mental health illnesses. He struggles with anxiety and eczema, to the point of him failing his first semester of college. Unlike Quinn, he already knew what his passions were. His love for baking and cooking was a very prominent part of this book. Everyone knows how much I love my bakers so I automatically had a soft spot for this guy. A FRIENDS-TO-LOVERS ROMANCE I really really loved Quinn and Tarek’s romance. It’s one of those books where you can just tell the characters genuinely like each other’s companies and that comfort level comes through the text. They’ve always had a friendly dynamic. They care deeply for each other and constantly look out for each other. For instance, Tarek saves Quinn desserts! I don’t know about you, but that’s about the best way to woo me so I don’t blame Quinn for falling for him one bit. It was also nice to see two people who have different views on what a romantic gesture is trying to satisfy each other in the relationship. Quinn is very much against grand romantic gestures while they are part of Tarek’s love language. Therefore, they needed to communicate and we see a lot of healthy communication in We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This. Also, this book is very sex-positive, like all of Rachel’s books. There are on-page discussions about orgasms and even a conversation about how sex is often defined in a heteronormative way. CONCLUSION: A MUST-READ FEEL GOOD ROMANCE This review has gotten quite long now. To sum up, I loved We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This and if you’re a contemporary romance fan, I definitely recommend it. CWs: mental health illnesses (anxiety and OCD) Relationship disclosure: Rachel Lynn Solomon and I are mutuals on social media Find more of my reviews at The Infinite Limits of Love

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Griffin

    I was lucky enough to read an early version of this book, and OH MY GOSH. This book is SO clever and kept me laughing out loud the whole time. It's so funny while also being incredibly genuine, and that pairing made it an easy 5-star read for me. Quinn is a fantastic main character who I was rooting for from the very first page, and Tarek is the perfect love interest for her: thoughtful, kind, and oh-so-swoony. I absolutely LOVED this book and cannot wait to put it on the shelf with the rest of I was lucky enough to read an early version of this book, and OH MY GOSH. This book is SO clever and kept me laughing out loud the whole time. It's so funny while also being incredibly genuine, and that pairing made it an easy 5-star read for me. Quinn is a fantastic main character who I was rooting for from the very first page, and Tarek is the perfect love interest for her: thoughtful, kind, and oh-so-swoony. I absolutely LOVED this book and cannot wait to put it on the shelf with the rest of my Rachel Lynn Solomon collection.

  19. 4 out of 5

    kimberly ☆

    4/5 stars from meeeeee i love a good rachel lynn solomon book she always involves real life situations and still gives us a happy ending. the ocd & depression rep in this book is very important, and I like the way that she does not shy away from shining light on these topics. quinn being jewish and tarek being muslim it’s also very important, but i like that it doesn’t take away from the main point of the story! tarek is a dream come true and i wish i could meet my own tarek! he’s also egyptian w 4/5 stars from meeeeee i love a good rachel lynn solomon book she always involves real life situations and still gives us a happy ending. the ocd & depression rep in this book is very important, and I like the way that she does not shy away from shining light on these topics. quinn being jewish and tarek being muslim it’s also very important, but i like that it doesn’t take away from the main point of the story! tarek is a dream come true and i wish i could meet my own tarek! he’s also egyptian which i don’t see much characters written as such, so i liked that diverse element as well! all in all i really liked this story and for that it gets 4/5 stars!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay (pawsomereads)

    Rachel Lynn Solomon is quickly becoming one of my new favorite authors! This is the third book of hers that I’ve read and I really enjoyed it. Her characters complex yet so easy to relate to and her plots are always super engaging. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This follows Quinn Berkowitz, a Jewish high school grad & harpist disillusioned with love, who isn’t sure she wants to be part of her family’s wedding planning business but doesn’t know how to them. Tarek Mansour, a Muslim college student, i Rachel Lynn Solomon is quickly becoming one of my new favorite authors! This is the third book of hers that I’ve read and I really enjoyed it. Her characters complex yet so easy to relate to and her plots are always super engaging. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This follows Quinn Berkowitz, a Jewish high school grad & harpist disillusioned with love, who isn’t sure she wants to be part of her family’s wedding planning business but doesn’t know how to them. Tarek Mansour, a Muslim college student, is a hopeless romantic and the son of the wedding caterers Quinn’s family frequently works with. They haven’t talked since last summer, when Quinn confessed via email that she had a crush on Tarek right before he left for college — a confession that went unanswered. Now it’s summer again and they can’t seem to stop running into each other while working weddings. This story has own voices Jewish rep as well as mental illness rep (anxiety, depression and OCD). This was a super cute read! It was a great friends to lovers relationship mixed with a second chance romance. The representation was so great and I loved that it took a deep look at happiness and family relationships and expectations. I could definitely relate to the sister relationship discussed throughout the story as Quinn’s older sister, Asher, is seven years older than her. I have a sister who’s seven years younger than me and it’s comforting to see that kind of sibling age gap play out positively in this book. There was also a special guest appearance from some Today Tonight Tomorrow characters that was such a fun surprise! This book had all the best things: weddings, desserts, music and corgis. It was the perfect summer read!

  21. 5 out of 5

    jenn

    “and sometimes the world is terrible, and love stories... they make it feel less heavy.” it’s been forever since i’ve read this perfect of a young adult book. until now, i hadn’t ever read any rachel lynn solomon books, but by the time i’m writing this review, i’ve already read another one as well. i’m not even kidding when i say i’m in love with her writing. wckmlt is the ultimate grumpy/sunshine friends to lovers, which are literally my two favorite tropes. following quinn, jewish and the daugh “and sometimes the world is terrible, and love stories... they make it feel less heavy.” it’s been forever since i’ve read this perfect of a young adult book. until now, i hadn’t ever read any rachel lynn solomon books, but by the time i’m writing this review, i’ve already read another one as well. i’m not even kidding when i say i’m in love with her writing. wckmlt is the ultimate grumpy/sunshine friends to lovers, which are literally my two favorite tropes. following quinn, jewish and the daughter of wedding planners and a harpist who is lost in life, and tarek, our egyptian american love interest who wants to be a pastry chef and has a knack for grand gestures. needless to say, this romance was adorable!!! 👏🏻 friends to lovers is the superior trope. there, i said it. but quinn and tarek have so much history and so much chemistry that is developed before we even meet them. and yet, there is still so much pining!! so! much! mutual! pining!! besides the romance, i really appreciated how we got to see quinn’s struggles. between her disbelief in love and her uncertainty about life after high school, her character development was so honest, and also, she plays the harp!! like a teen harpist ?? i love her finally, the highlight of this book for me was honestly the mental health rep. quinn has OCD and anxiety, and though it’s not the main plot point of the book, it’s written to show just how it affects her daily life. i really appreciated how gently this book handled mental health, it was an aspect i wasn’t really expecting, but mental health rep in young adult books is so important!! i haven’t loved a book this much in a while, between the beautiful writing and honest themes and the romance and literally being set at different weddings, it’s perfect. 🔻content warnings: death of a grandparent, discussions about mental health (OCD, anxiety, and depression)🔺

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    We Can't Keep Meeting like this is my third book by this author. I've read this author's YA book (Today Tonight Tomorrow) and her adult rom-com (The Ex Talk). The genre of this new book actually seems like like a mix of these two books. We Can't Keep Meeting Like this is teen fiction/romance. But it is also part rom-com. The characters are 18-19 and are learning who they are going to be as adults. But they are dealing with real problems. So it is a bit of realistic fiction. The book takes place i We Can't Keep Meeting like this is my third book by this author. I've read this author's YA book (Today Tonight Tomorrow) and her adult rom-com (The Ex Talk). The genre of this new book actually seems like like a mix of these two books. We Can't Keep Meeting Like this is teen fiction/romance. But it is also part rom-com. The characters are 18-19 and are learning who they are going to be as adults. But they are dealing with real problems. So it is a bit of realistic fiction. The book takes place in Seattle. The narrator is 18 year old college-bound Quinn (1st person POV). Her family runs a wedding planning business. And she and her sister Asher work there/help out. The story takes place the Summer between when Quinn finishes high school and starts college. The book does have some funny aspects, but it is also quite serious. The author shows us interfaith romance, LGBTQ+ supporting characters, mental illness, OCD, and characters in therapy. Quinn's family works closely with the Mansour family (caterers). I really loved this aspect of the story. I also really enjoyed seeing all of the weddings. I liked the dynamics/drama between Quinn and her family. I loved her best friend Julia. And I loved everything to do with the harp. Quinn was a really unique heroine. She had OCD. She was so cynical that she didn't believe in romance. How she acted did affect the romance part of the story a lot. I did like the romance. However Quinn's attitude made me like it a bit less. Overall this book was cute and fun. Although it did deal with some serious topics. But I definitely enjoyed it. Thanks to netgalley and Simon & Schuster Canada for allowing me to read this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenna | JennaStopReading

    Solomon knocked it out of the park with this one per usual. The diverse cast, mental health representation, and Seattle setting captured my heart. And her little Easter egg with characters from her last YA book? LOVED IT. So glad to catch up with those characters a bit. 4.5 ⭐️ from me and so many feels

  24. 5 out of 5

    michelle (magical reads)

    3.5 stars read on my blog rep: Jewish protagonist with OCD, Egyptian-American love interest with depression, Jewish side characters, Jewish wlw side character, Black wlw side character **I received an ARC from the publisher through Edelweiss. These are my honest opinions, and in no way was I compensated for this review.** A wedding planner who doesn’t believe in love–that’s what I’d be if I joined the family business. I loved this author’s last two releases, so I was so excited for her next b 3.5 stars read on my blog rep: Jewish protagonist with OCD, Egyptian-American love interest with depression, Jewish side characters, Jewish wlw side character, Black wlw side character **I received an ARC from the publisher through Edelweiss. These are my honest opinions, and in no way was I compensated for this review.** A wedding planner who doesn’t believe in love–that’s what I’d be if I joined the family business. I loved this author’s last two releases, so I was so excited for her next book! I’m also always a fan of a “cynical pessimist” and “hopeless romantic” couple, and I was intrigued by the premise. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This explores what happens when you’re constantly surrounded by love stories despite not believing in them. Quinn has worked dozens of wedding with her wedding planner parents and sister; she’s constantly surrounded by happy endings, but she’s too cynical to believe in the joy of them. Meanwhile, Tarek, her former crush and friend, is back in town. She tries to avoid him because she hasn’t seen him in a year after she confessed her feelings for him in an email, but they’re quickly thrown together during the numerous summer weddings since his parents work closely with her family. I really liked the characters in this book! Quinn’s character arc is particularly interesting, as she doesn’t know what she wants to do in the future other than not working for her parents’ business. However, she’s unwilling to break this to them because she knows how upset they’ll be with her. Tarek is in an opposite boat where he wants to work more with his parents’ catering business, but they’re only slowly giving him responsibility. The side characters were great as well, including Quinn’s best friend, who’s having romantic troubles of her own, and Quinn’s sister. Both are a great source of support for her throughout the book. The romance was cute; Quinn and Tarek are opposites, in that Quinn doesn’t believe in love yet Tarek is constantly planning some grand gesture. She doesn’t understand how he can be so open with his feelings, and he doesn’t see why she can’t allow someone to get close to her. They have a lot to work out, and I liked their talks as they get to know each other again. I liked how open Quinn and Tarek were about their mental illnesses with each other. Quinn has OCD, and she explains what it feels like to her when she is doing something repetitively. Tarek has clinical depression, which he is still coming to terms with. Neither illnesses are their entire character or plot line, but rather, simply a part of themselves. Quinn and her family are Jewish, as is her best friend, Julia. Julia is also sapphic and crushing on another girl, Noelle, who is Black. Tarek and his parents are Egyptian American. The interests in this book were very specific, and I liked reading about them. Quinn is a harpist but the joy of playing long faded after her parents constantly make her play at weddings. She meets a fellow harpist who also makes them, and she invites Quinn to help her learn more about the instrument. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This was a cute story about opening yourself up to the love around you. The characters were great, and I liked the writing. If you’re in the mood for a contemporary with a cute romance, you should check out We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This! original review: a good 3.5! I was just a little bored at some points but overall enjoyed this book!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    Trigger warnings: (view spoiler)[divorce, separation, anxiety, OCD, depression. (hide spoiler)] I love everything Rachel Lynn Solomon writes. I really do. This one made me SO happy, I loved the romance, the family relationships, the friendships, the siblings relationships, I don't know, I had such a great time with this one. Definitely recommending it. Full review coming soon! A million thanks to the publisher for sending me an e-ARC through NetGalley. This did not, in any way, influence my thought Trigger warnings: (view spoiler)[divorce, separation, anxiety, OCD, depression. (hide spoiler)] I love everything Rachel Lynn Solomon writes. I really do. This one made me SO happy, I loved the romance, the family relationships, the friendships, the siblings relationships, I don't know, I had such a great time with this one. Definitely recommending it. Full review coming soon! A million thanks to the publisher for sending me an e-ARC through NetGalley. This did not, in any way, influence my thoughts and rating. My Blog - Drizzle & Hurricane Books - Twitter - Bookstagram - Bloglovin'

  26. 4 out of 5

    jesse📚

    I expected this to be a cute rom-com like Today, Tonight, Tomorrow. So I went into this books with exactly that mindset. The thing is, the last time I read a YA book about weddings, it was Save the Date and it was hilarious. What can we get? The bride falling into a fountain? A mismatched suit? The possibilities are endless. So I was bummed that this book didn’t exactly deliver that but it is what it is. I’m not saying this book is bad. It’s not. I think it’s okay; not a total disaster or something I expected this to be a cute rom-com like Today, Tonight, Tomorrow. So I went into this books with exactly that mindset. The thing is, the last time I read a YA book about weddings, it was Save the Date and it was hilarious. What can we get? The bride falling into a fountain? A mismatched suit? The possibilities are endless. So I was bummed that this book didn’t exactly deliver that but it is what it is. I’m not saying this book is bad. It’s not. I think it’s okay; not a total disaster or something. But… mostly I didn’t like it. The good? This book is quite cute but I didn’t think it was that cute. It’s not a book that is unforgettable, or even in my case, gives me a boost of serotonin. For a good half of the book, I don’t even think this book has a clear plot. That’s the problem: this book is all over the place. It’s giving me the impression that the author didn’t know what to write about before the climax. It’s just a bunch of random stuff and a slice-of-life kind of thing and then the climax comes out of nowhere. I do understand that maybe this is what the author had in mind? But I didn’t like it and this is such a contrast from what happened in Today, Tonight, Tomorrow, which I love very much. There’s also the matter of the main character. Quinn is not likable, at all. I can’t relate or connect to her and she sounds most of the time like a child to me, despite being 18 years of age. For lots of things that she did, she has a reason, but I found myself not getting any of her reasonings or simply not understanding how those reasonings work, the way the author puts it on paper. What I like though, is the diversity. Many books would only include diversity for brownie points, but I like what Rachel Lynn Solomon did with this book and Today, Tonight, Tomorrow. I think she did her research and even though the religions (Jewish and Muslim), race, etc are not the things that the story revolves around, it is an essential part of who the characters are. I also like the representation on the mental health issues (depression and OCD) and though I can’t say exactly how accurate these representations are, I appreciate how these issues are not treated as something to be shunned of. Both characters who have these issues go to therapy, and I also like how they discuss sex openly, both of which are mostly treated as ‘taboo’ in most YA books. This book is not at all what I was expecting and not really in a good way. I felt bored through parts of it and I had to force myself to pick it back up and finish it. I’m disappointed because Today, Tonight, Tomorrow is quite possibly one of the most memorable YA rom-com I’ve ever read but like I said, it’s not bad or anything; I was just expecting more. I was about to give this two stars but rounded it up to three because the ending felt kind of nice for me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

    Full Review on The Candid Cover We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This by Rachel Lynn Solomon is the wedding planning rom-com I have been waiting for. Following a harpist and a caterer, this one contains the perfect amount of awkwardness and two complex main characters. The book also normalizes casual mental health representation, and I enjoyed the open conversations the characters have about it. This is the perfect summer contemporary, balancing fluff with thoughtful discussions. Working for her family’ Full Review on The Candid Cover We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This by Rachel Lynn Solomon is the wedding planning rom-com I have been waiting for. Following a harpist and a caterer, this one contains the perfect amount of awkwardness and two complex main characters. The book also normalizes casual mental health representation, and I enjoyed the open conversations the characters have about it. This is the perfect summer contemporary, balancing fluff with thoughtful discussions. Working for her family’s wedding planning business over the summer, the last person Quinn expects to find working alongside her is the boy who ghosted her after she poured her heart out to him via email. Quinn is prepared for an awkward summer, but she and Tarek slowly realize that there is still a spark between them. However, the two of them have different outlooks on romance. What follows is an earnest friends to lovers story that I’m sure many will identify with. ❀ REALISTIC CHARACTERS Rachel Lynn Solomon always writes such realistic characters, and I loved Quinn’s voice. She’s a little cynical when it comes to love because of her parents’ separation, and working as a harpist in the wedding business she wants no part of creates some tension. Throughout the book, Quinn learns to trust again, while figuring out who she is. Tarek, the caterer, is also well-written, and he provides an interesting contrast to Quinn since he is a hopeless romantic who loves grand gestures. There is great communication between the two characters, and I admired their maturity. ❀ MENTAL ILLNESS PORTRAYED REALISTICALLY Another aspect I enjoyed is the way mental illness and insecurities are portrayed. Quinn has OCD and Tarek has depression, and both characters openly discuss it. Tarek’s depression is an especially important element since mental illness in men isn’t as common in YA. As well, mental illness isn’t presented as a big deal or even a major part of the plot, which I enjoyed, but these struggles also don’t disappear because of love. I loved this casual representation, and I hope to see more books follow suit. ❀ A ROM-COM WITH HEAVY TOPICS We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This by Rachel Lynn Solomon is a story of self-discovery and second chances. I loved the wedding backdrop, and the main characters are realistic. The casual mental health representation makes the book even more dynamic. Those looking for a rom-com that also touches on heavier topics will enjoy this one.

  28. 4 out of 5

    rania | rania’s rambling reads

    4.5 stars A big thank you to Simon and Schuster for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This did not affect my opinions in any way. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This is a fluffy, laugh-out-loud, feel good young adult contemporary that deals with heavy topics in the right way and shows tremendous character growth. Quinn comes from a family of wedding planners. She’s grown up looking at bridal gowns and extravagant cakes. But she doesn’t believe in true love. Dealin 4.5 stars A big thank you to Simon and Schuster for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This did not affect my opinions in any way. We Can’t Keep Meeting Like This is a fluffy, laugh-out-loud, feel good young adult contemporary that deals with heavy topics in the right way and shows tremendous character growth. Quinn comes from a family of wedding planners. She’s grown up looking at bridal gowns and extravagant cakes. But she doesn’t believe in true love. Dealing with anxiety and OCD, along with high expectations from her parents, she’s one of the most relatable characters I’ve ever seen and that just makes me root for her even more. She’s so caught up in her family business that playing the harp, the one thing she used to love, now no longer seems appealing to her. Then we have Tarek. He’s the son of the caterers Quinn’s parents work with and her best friend. That is, until he ghosts her for an entire year as he goes off to college after she sends him an email confessing her feelings for him. He’s dealing with depression and eczema (which I have to be honest, was a first for me in terms of representation). Unlike Quinn, he’s a big romantic and a sucker for grand gestures. They cross paths again and as expected, it leads to a lot of mutual pining and unexpected revelations. Both of them are working through their own hardships and seeing them come together and help each other was just so heartwarming. They talk about therapy and medication which I feel like are left out in so many novels even though they’re such a big part of dealing with anxiety and depression. Speaking of which, the representation was done splendidly and I loved how it played a huge part in Quinn’s self discovery. She’s feeling the pressure of going to college next year and the responsibility of handling her sister’s wedding and getting the idea of her experience with everything made the book so raw and enlightening. ”How do you convince yourself that it’s worth it?” I ask, voice shaking. “Even knowing it might end in disaster someday?” “You take a chance,” she says simply, like it really is that easy to close your eyes and leap. “And you hope the other person takes the same one.” And for readers who’ve read Rachel Lynn Solomon’s other books, there’s an amazing cameo that I just can’t stop gushing over! I was literally squealing from delight when I realised that two of my favourite characters made an appearance in this book. Overall, I’ve fallen in love with Rachel Lynn Solomon’s writing and this novel was everything I could have asked for in a light, fun contemporary!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah B.

    ✨You need to hear me out and they said speak now✨ The beginning of this book was exactly what I wanted and expected from a Rachel Lynn Solomon book. It was a warm summer’s night wrapped in fairy lights kind of comfort; a long walk down a perfect spiral staircase in your best dress kind of setting. But by the end, the string of lights seemed to flicker out and I tripped three steps up from the landing. I wanted so desperately to love it but I finished the last page with lackluster thoughts and no ✨You need to hear me out and they said speak now✨ The beginning of this book was exactly what I wanted and expected from a Rachel Lynn Solomon book. It was a warm summer’s night wrapped in fairy lights kind of comfort; a long walk down a perfect spiral staircase in your best dress kind of setting. But by the end, the string of lights seemed to flicker out and I tripped three steps up from the landing. I wanted so desperately to love it but I finished the last page with lackluster thoughts and no real urge to reread. Unlike Quinn, this book made me want a meet cute of epic proportions born from grand gestures and dramatic monologues. I’m such a hopeless romantic. I sit in coffee shops looking ~enigmatic~ and hoping a tall, dark, handsome Clark Kent will walk through the door, spill his latte on me, and propose marriage for the inconvenience. Therefore, I really had a hard time connecting with Quinn. I couldn’t reconcile her thinking her parents love was fake so then, by using the transitive property, all public gestures of love were fake. I also couldn’t handle her slander of rom-coms and Sleepless in Seattle. So help me if it had been You’ve Got Mail that she was shredding apart like a paper mache streamer I’d have had to wack her with my rolled up copy of the movie poster. I think talking to Tarek about her reasons behind hating grand gestures sooner would have made the most sense, since he would literally never understand her hatred and reluctance. Obviously, I think he needs to take a hint and not be a plane writing cursive in the sky at every turn. He also needs to not drop $800 on her to win her affection; that was just plain wacky. I think it’s a give and take not an all or nothing. She can’t discount his love for grand gestures and he can’t ignore her reservations and discomfort. I just honestly don’t think they should have ended up together because I didn’t feel like either (especially Quinn) compromised or really changed mindsets. To an extent, their differences were more core beliefs than mindsets and it ending up being like “maybe they aren’t right fundamentally for each other.” Quinn also just kept and I mean KEPT putting off important conversations. “I like it too much to think about it right now.” “I like it too much to ponder what it means right now.” “I figured I’d deal with it later.” It was April scheduling everything for the “nonexistent” yet completely existent March 31st. You just know it’s going to be a bitch when she has to think about it “right now.” Indeed, karma had its kiss for her. I also disliked how Quinn treated Tarek at the end. She was so wishy washy and after literally telling him she never even wants to try to make it work between them, she has the audacity to ask him to stay with her. I knew she’d have to be the one to make a romantic gesture in the end but honestly? It made my head hurt. Her big revelation at the end was just too late and too sudden. I am not convinced that her opinions have actually changed. It was a pretty ingrained way of thinking that she didn’t even try to shake for 95% of the book. Further, Quinn’s maid of honor speech was weird and very insightful for someone who just had the revelation. I get it’s ~the~ Hallmark grand gesture but as a rule grand gestures shouldn’t happen at other people’s weddings unless you’re in 27 Dresses and said grand gesture is directed at James Marsden. Or you’re Taylor Swift and your ex is getting married to a bride in a dress shaped like a pastry. I did enjoy how some confessions came a lot sooner than a typical YA book so you got to see their relationship and friendship progress without lies inevitabley dimming the sparkle. There’s more than one kiss, more than one many things really. I also loved the wedding venues and atmosphere, as I was a wedding caterer for two years. I really REALLY related to Quinn having bangs during wedding season. They truly become a sticky sweaty forehead mess in that post-matrimonial glow. I wrote a lot about Quinn and Tarek because this is a romance and they were the romance. While I didn’t feel a connection to either of them on that spectrum, I loved what they each represented. I loved the diversity and inclusivity that spanned more than just skin color. Sexuality, religion, ethnicity, mental health (depression, anxiety, OCD), physical traits, and family pressures/expectations to name the majority. I learned a lot and found each character to be complex and genuine. Rachel’s writing was clever as ever and remarkably unique. Overall, this was a very bittersweet review. I was prepared to roll around in a sugar bomb while sampling about five different wedding cakes and drinking cotton candy champagne. It was such a shock to my system when I was counting down the pages because I wanted to be done, not because I wanted to prolong the experience. I feel icky just knowing I have these thoughts about a Rachel Lynn Solomon book. Somebody get the iodine! I love weddings and love and catering but this one just wasn’t as sparkly as I was anticipating. It had some great moments, great messages, and a beautiful cover but ultimately we’re just not a match. ⭐️⭐️⭐️.25/5 __________ Initial reaction: 3.25? 3.5? Idk and I’m not used to feeling this way about a Rachel Solomon book so I need either a mourning period or a bottle of wine or probably just some sleep. I loved the first half (60%) and barely tolerated the second half (40%). Full review to come after I’ve tamped down this identity crisis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katarina

    a regular complaint for me with rachel lynn solomon's books is that i just... Don't Care i don't mean i don't care about anything - tend to like and be invested in the main characters and their love story for the most part - i just can't bring myself to care about any of the stakes she puts into the plot. i didn't care that quinn had to find a way to tell her parents she wanted out of the family business. i didn't care that she was for some reason so bothered by tarek's romantic nature and grand a regular complaint for me with rachel lynn solomon's books is that i just... Don't Care i don't mean i don't care about anything - tend to like and be invested in the main characters and their love story for the most part - i just can't bring myself to care about any of the stakes she puts into the plot. i didn't care that quinn had to find a way to tell her parents she wanted out of the family business. i didn't care that she was for some reason so bothered by tarek's romantic nature and grand gestures. i just saw no plausible reason for them to not be together, and it drove me up the wall because it was boring to see them drag along for no apparent reason. though it was refreshing to see a character in YA that had no idea what they wanted to do in the future and are in the end given the space to figure it out, i found myself not really caring about that journey. i did, however, care about the sidelined friends who i assume were just there to fill some space, tick some boxes and only tell the protagonist she was in love whenever they weren't being ignored by her, and i think those characters deserved better. now, i have to make it clear that i completely understand that the lead character has obsessive compulsive disorder and anxiety. the author describes her struggles well and i'm not completely un-educated on the subject. i understand how, at a level, these story decisions could tie in to the character's mental illness, and i don't want to come off as if i'm invalidating said illness or deeming it trivial. however, having read two other books by this author previously, i consider that this is a PATTERN in her work that i have noticed and that bothers me, and personally don't see it as a character-based decision connecting to the lead's ocd. i could be wrong, as this is an interpretation/personal opinion, but i hope whoever reads this understands where i'm coming from. on another note, i find it disappointing that a majority of books i read that focus on a religious aspect largely depict the characters as non-practicing. obviously, everything is on a spectrum and each person's journey is different, but when this is an overwhelming depiction in media is when it can get problematic. if anyone has books they can suggest that feature practicing muslim and jewish characters, please feel free to do so!

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