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India’s only female lawyer, Perveen Mistry, is compelled to bring justice to the family of a murdered female Parsi student just as Bombay’s streets erupt in riots to protest British colonial rule. Sujata Massey is back with this third installment to the Agatha and Mary Higgins Clark Award-winning series set in 1920s Bombay. November, 1921. Edward VIII, Prince of Wales and f India’s only female lawyer, Perveen Mistry, is compelled to bring justice to the family of a murdered female Parsi student just as Bombay’s streets erupt in riots to protest British colonial rule. Sujata Massey is back with this third installment to the Agatha and Mary Higgins Clark Award-winning series set in 1920s Bombay. November, 1921. Edward VIII, Prince of Wales and future ruler of India, is arriving in Bombay to begin a four-month tour. The Indian subcontinent is chafing under British rule, and Bombay solicitor Perveen Mistry isn’t surprised when local unrest over the royal arrival spirals into riots. But she’s horrified by the death of Freny Cuttingmaster, an eighteen-year-old female Parsi student, who falls from a second-floor gallery just as the prince’s grand procession is passing by her college. Freny had come for a legal consultation just days before her death, and what she confided makes Perveen suspicious that her death was not an accident. Perveen, who strongly identified with Freny—another young Parsi woman fighting hard against the confines of society’s rules and expectations—feels terribly guilty for failing to help her. Perveen steps forward to assist Freny’s family in the fraught dealings of the coroner’s inquest, and when Freny’s death is ruled a murder, Perveen knows she can’t rest until she sees justice done. But Bombay is erupting: as armed British secret service march the streets, rioters attack anyone with perceived British connections and desperate shopkeepers destroy their own wares so they will not be targets of racial violence. Can Perveen help a suffering family when her own is in danger?


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India’s only female lawyer, Perveen Mistry, is compelled to bring justice to the family of a murdered female Parsi student just as Bombay’s streets erupt in riots to protest British colonial rule. Sujata Massey is back with this third installment to the Agatha and Mary Higgins Clark Award-winning series set in 1920s Bombay. November, 1921. Edward VIII, Prince of Wales and f India’s only female lawyer, Perveen Mistry, is compelled to bring justice to the family of a murdered female Parsi student just as Bombay’s streets erupt in riots to protest British colonial rule. Sujata Massey is back with this third installment to the Agatha and Mary Higgins Clark Award-winning series set in 1920s Bombay. November, 1921. Edward VIII, Prince of Wales and future ruler of India, is arriving in Bombay to begin a four-month tour. The Indian subcontinent is chafing under British rule, and Bombay solicitor Perveen Mistry isn’t surprised when local unrest over the royal arrival spirals into riots. But she’s horrified by the death of Freny Cuttingmaster, an eighteen-year-old female Parsi student, who falls from a second-floor gallery just as the prince’s grand procession is passing by her college. Freny had come for a legal consultation just days before her death, and what she confided makes Perveen suspicious that her death was not an accident. Perveen, who strongly identified with Freny—another young Parsi woman fighting hard against the confines of society’s rules and expectations—feels terribly guilty for failing to help her. Perveen steps forward to assist Freny’s family in the fraught dealings of the coroner’s inquest, and when Freny’s death is ruled a murder, Perveen knows she can’t rest until she sees justice done. But Bombay is erupting: as armed British secret service march the streets, rioters attack anyone with perceived British connections and desperate shopkeepers destroy their own wares so they will not be targets of racial violence. Can Perveen help a suffering family when her own is in danger?

30 review for The Bombay Prince

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    Bombay in 1921 was mostly against British rule so when the Prince of Wales, Edward VIII was announced as beginning a four month tour of the country in November, the murmurs of unrest escalated. The day of the Prince’s tour through the streets of Bombay ended in violence with rioting and looting, along with many injuries and a few deaths. One such death was an eighteen-year-old Parsi student who had visited Perveen Mistry a few days prior for advice – Freny Cuttingmaster had fallen to her death a Bombay in 1921 was mostly against British rule so when the Prince of Wales, Edward VIII was announced as beginning a four month tour of the country in November, the murmurs of unrest escalated. The day of the Prince’s tour through the streets of Bombay ended in violence with rioting and looting, along with many injuries and a few deaths. One such death was an eighteen-year-old Parsi student who had visited Perveen Mistry a few days prior for advice – Freny Cuttingmaster had fallen to her death as the Prince’s entourage had passed by Woodburn College. When Freny’s death was ruled a homicide, Perveen was determined to bring closure to her shattered parents. As Perveen and her father, Jamshedji Mistry, did their best to assist Mr and Mrs Cuttingmaster, both with the coroner’s inquest and afterwards, Perveen and her best friend, Alice Hobson-Jones, also a teacher at Woodburn College continued to ask questions, trying to define the answers needed. But danger was continuing around Bombay, both from the anti-royal protesters and closer to home. Would Perveen manage to get to the bottom of Freny’s death even while her own life was in peril? The Bombay Prince is the 3rd in the Perveen Mistry series by Sujata Massey and I thoroughly enjoyed it! Fast paced, energetic and action packed, I love Perveen’s character. She’s an exceptional young woman; first ever female solicitor in Bombay having been educated in England, she’s determined to do her best for her clients, including taking risks, many of which her father disapproves, after the fact. I’m very much looking forward to the next in the series! Highly recommended. With thanks to Allen & Unwin for my ARC to read in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    In 1921, following India’s assistance in the British war effort during WW1, the Indian movement for independence from British rule was once again building popular support. Mohandas Ghandi’s non-cooperation movement was gaining widespread popularity, promoting the wearing of homespun fabrics, boycotting of British institutions and schools and the refusal to pay taxes. So, when King George V announced that the Prince of Wales, Prince Edward would be visiting India on a fourth month tour to thank t In 1921, following India’s assistance in the British war effort during WW1, the Indian movement for independence from British rule was once again building popular support. Mohandas Ghandi’s non-cooperation movement was gaining widespread popularity, promoting the wearing of homespun fabrics, boycotting of British institutions and schools and the refusal to pay taxes. So, when King George V announced that the Prince of Wales, Prince Edward would be visiting India on a fourth month tour to thank the people for their support during the war, his visit became a catalyst for civil demonstrations and unrest leading to outbreaks of rioting and looting. Sujata Massey’s third mystery featuring female solicitor Perveen Mistry is set in Bombay during the Price’s visit. Herself a supporter of the Independence movement, Perveen is reluctantly watching the parade welcoming the Prince into Bombay with her British friend Alice, at Woodburn College where Alice teaches. During the parade, no one notices a female student missing, a young women called Freny Cuttingmaster, who had visited Perveen at her father’s law practice a few days before. It is only after the procession is over that Freny is found, dead in the gardens, apparently falling from the school building, although Perveen is suspicious that her fall was not an accident. This is another excellent addition to Massey’s Perveen Mistry series. Bombay during Prince Edward’s visit makes a very atmospheric background to the murder mystery at it centre. The pages are redolent with the sights and sounds of India, as well as details of the racial and religious divides and customs. As a solicitor educated at Oxford and member of a well off Parsi family, working alongside her father in his law practice, Perveen is able to mingle in British as well as Indian society which allows insights into both worlds. However, as a woman in male dominated India she often struggles to be paid the attention she deserves and must always be on her guard when it comes to how she behaves and who she is seen with, especially men. As well as delivering an intriguing mystery and a fascinating, female protagonist, Massey has captured the culture and political sentiments of the time, bringing to life a vibrant India at the start of its struggle for independence. With thanks to Allen and Unwin Australia for a copy to read. Original review published first in Mystery & Suspense Magazine https://www.mysteryandsuspense.com/th...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Complexity.....thy name is Woman. Sujata Massey presents another outstanding edition to her Perveen Mistry Series. She carves her main female character with high intelligence, craftiness, persistence, and analytical skills that would make ol' Sherlock come up short. The Bombay Prince is a treasure of a read that incorporates the surge of the working class in support of independence from British rule. And, ah, we have the stepping forward of Perveen as the first woman solicitor. The stars are begi Complexity.....thy name is Woman. Sujata Massey presents another outstanding edition to her Perveen Mistry Series. She carves her main female character with high intelligence, craftiness, persistence, and analytical skills that would make ol' Sherlock come up short. The Bombay Prince is a treasure of a read that incorporates the surge of the working class in support of independence from British rule. And, ah, we have the stepping forward of Perveen as the first woman solicitor. The stars are beginning to align. It's November of 1921 and Bombay is anxiously preparing for the arrival of twenty-seven year old Edward, Prince of Wales. His impending presence will represent a gamut of emotions for the people. Some are supportive while others mirror the unrest of religious and political strife. We'll also experience the impact of Mohandas Gandhi, a freedom fighter working through boycotts. India in 1921 is filled with pockets of violence and the rise of terrorists representing their causes. Perveen Mistry works alongside her father in a shared law practice. The Bombay High Court refuses to recognize women lawyers as advocates. Without her renowned father, Perveen would be relegated to menial tasks in the practice of law. It is through his support and her own endeavors that she is creating a name for herself. The lid is lifted off this story when a young eighteen year old college student visits Perveen for advice. Freny Cuttingmaster attends Woolburn College and is an excellent student. She wishes to remain home on the day of Prince Edward's parade as in a silent boycott. But her fear is that the college will retaliate if she doesn't attend. Perhaps she will even be dismissed. The flame within this story will be lit when young Freny's body is discovered near the parade route by Perveen herself. The police believe that it was an accident from falling from the bleachers. Perveen believes otherwise. Sujata Massey is royalty when it comes to developing high-tension storylines set in India. She captures the street scenes and sounds like no other as she elevates the emotions and the heightening tensions of the people. Her character of Perveen is a complicated gem who walks within the needs of the people while trying to adhere to the laws. It's through this fictional female character that we come to know the actual historical events and the escalating trauma of the times. And no one does it better than Massey. The Bombay Prince is a must read. I received a copy of The Bombay Prince through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Soho Press and to Sujata Massey for the opportunity.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Blaine DeSantis

    I really wanted to like this book. I like the setting, 1920's Bombay, India, a good murder mystery and yet this book just dragged. Reading it was like pulling teeth. I could not connect with the characters, and while there were some good scenes, they were few and far between. We are dealing with the 3rd book of the Perveen Mistry series and by now I would have thought our heroine, Perveen, who is the first female lawyer in Bombay would have been more worldly. I found most of her thoughts and acti I really wanted to like this book. I like the setting, 1920's Bombay, India, a good murder mystery and yet this book just dragged. Reading it was like pulling teeth. I could not connect with the characters, and while there were some good scenes, they were few and far between. We are dealing with the 3rd book of the Perveen Mistry series and by now I would have thought our heroine, Perveen, who is the first female lawyer in Bombay would have been more worldly. I found most of her thoughts and actions totally unbelievable even for a young lawyer. I also seemed to recognize the plot from other books I have read (maybe I read too much!) which was disappointing. Some may very well enjoy this book, but for me I think this is the last book in the series I will read. Just a disappointing effort in my opinion.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Arthur (Ms. G's Bookshelf)

    ⭐️3.5 Stars⭐️ The Bombay Prince by Sujata Massey Perveen Mistry is one of India’s first female lawyers, she works as a solicitor at her father’s law practice, Mistry Law. In this story Perveen uses her expertise to solve a murder mystery. 1921 - It was announced the twenty-seven year old Prince of Wales, Edward VIII was beginning a four month tour of the country in November. Thousand of loyalists attend to gain a glimpse of the glamorous royal. However the tour parade is disrupted by protesters, th ⭐️3.5 Stars⭐️ The Bombay Prince by Sujata Massey Perveen Mistry is one of India’s first female lawyers, she works as a solicitor at her father’s law practice, Mistry Law. In this story Perveen uses her expertise to solve a murder mystery. 1921 - It was announced the twenty-seven year old Prince of Wales, Edward VIII was beginning a four month tour of the country in November. Thousand of loyalists attend to gain a glimpse of the glamorous royal. However the tour parade is disrupted by protesters, the Indians are in the midst of a fight for independence and the Prince’s arrival in Bombay triggers rioting. The civil unrest created in Bombay by the Prince of Wales’s visit also culminates in violence and property damage. During the parade Freny an eighteen year old student falls to her death from her college building. Freny is known to Perveen as she had visited Perveen for a consult shortly before her death. Freny had strongly believed in Indian independence and may have been involved in a group who protest against British rule. Perveen is the solicitor advocating for the murder victim’s family at their request. Perveen applies her skills and professional contacts to their best advantage to gather information to assist in her informal investigation into this horrific crime but will she be risking her own life?  I admired the way the story presented many aspects and rituals in Indian culture and the way it showed a woman’s place in Indian society. We see the discrimination in her own career and also in the lives of other women at the time of a male dominated society. A fascinating tale. For those that love the Miss Phyrne Fisher murder mystery series you’ll love this as it felt to have very similar vibes. Publication Date 1 June 2021 Thank you to Allen & Unwin for a copy of the book to read and review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joan Happel

    This is the 3rd installment in this outstanding serious. It is 1921 colonial Bombay, and Perveen Mistry is the cities only female solicitor. Freny Cuttingmaster, a student at Woodburn College, comes to seek advice from Perveen about attending the parade to honor The Prince of Wales as he visits India. Freny represents a student group that want to sit out the parade in protest of Great Britain’s colonial rule of India. During the parade Freny is found dead at the bottom of a tower on the campus a This is the 3rd installment in this outstanding serious. It is 1921 colonial Bombay, and Perveen Mistry is the cities only female solicitor. Freny Cuttingmaster, a student at Woodburn College, comes to seek advice from Perveen about attending the parade to honor The Prince of Wales as he visits India. Freny represents a student group that want to sit out the parade in protest of Great Britain’s colonial rule of India. During the parade Freny is found dead at the bottom of a tower on the campus and Perveen is caught up in the mystery surrounding the young woman’s death. With a growing list of suspects, Perveen’s investigation is hampered by the myriad of complexities of India’s different religions and caste system. This is a wonderful series, showcasing the sights and sounds of 1920’s India, and the struggle for independence of the population as well as the difficulties faced by women due to religious and cultural restrictions. Perveen is a wonderfully written and complex character, and her relationships with the series secondary characters are continued and enhanced in this latest novel. Richly detailed, with an intriguing mystery and authentic dialogue, I can highly recommend this latest historical mystery from Massey. It will enrich, enlighten, and entertain readers. Thank you to Soho Press and NetGalley for the e-ARC.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    The Bombay Prince is the third book in the Perveen Mistry series by award-winning British-born American author, Sujata Massey. It’s November 1921, Edward, Prince of Wales is on a state visit to India, and the citizens of Bombay are expected to line the streets in welcome. Some are happy to; others protest their colonial status by boycotting the welcome parade; and pro-Independence activists mount overt protests. Perveen Mistry joins her friend, Alice on a stand in front of Woodburn College to wa The Bombay Prince is the third book in the Perveen Mistry series by award-winning British-born American author, Sujata Massey. It’s November 1921, Edward, Prince of Wales is on a state visit to India, and the citizens of Bombay are expected to line the streets in welcome. Some are happy to; others protest their colonial status by boycotting the welcome parade; and pro-Independence activists mount overt protests. Perveen Mistry joins her friend, Alice on a stand in front of Woodburn College to watch the parade. She notes the absence of a second-year Parsi student, Freny Cuttingmaster, who had been to see her at Mistry Law some days earlier. Then, in rapid succession, Perveen witnesses the violent arrest of a student who tries to disrupt the parade with a vociferous protest against imperial rule, and is prevented from offering him legal assistance; she is called to where the body of Freny Cuttingmaster, lies in the college garden; she is quite rudely ordered about on five separate occasions by college staff, police and a military attaché; she has to intervene on behalf of grieving parents with an officious municipal employee; and she has a narrow escape when she unwisely confronts a trio of looters alone. From the scene, Perveen believes that Freny must have fallen from the college balcony, but was it an accident (possible), suicide (unlikely), or murder? If the latter, the killer might be found amongst the staff or students o the college, or pro-independence rioters, or even a member of her family. Freny was known to be a member of Student Union with pro-independence sympathies: might this be a factor in her death? Over the next days, Perveen is kept busy, not just with matters generated by damage to various businesses by looters, but is allowed to speak for Freny’s parents at the inquest, visits a prison cell, and spends a night at a fancy hotel, where she bumps into ICE political agent, Colin Sandringham. And while her focus must always be on her career and advancing the cause of women in India’s legal profession, she does find his presence distracting… Once again, Massey gives the reader a tale filled with rich everyday historical minutiae, making the detail of custom and ritual easy to assimilate, while providing a plot that will keep the reader guessing until the final pages. And while it could be read as a stand-alone, familiarity with the regular characters and their backgrounds certainly enhances the reader’s enjoyment. Fascinating historical crime fiction. This unbiased review is from an uncorrected proof copy provided by Allen & Unwin.

  8. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    I love Preveen mysteries! Atmospheric and complex! As always Preveen Mistry, a Parsi separated woman (unheard of), is an energising force as she quietly, yet forcefully, undertakes the various cases she’s given as a solicitor in her father’s law firm. The time in history is interesting. It’s 1921 and Edward, the Prince of Wales is visiting Bombay as part of an extended royal visit. Unrest is in the air. The Independence Activists want changes. The British authorities are concerned about possible at I love Preveen mysteries! Atmospheric and complex! As always Preveen Mistry, a Parsi separated woman (unheard of), is an energising force as she quietly, yet forcefully, undertakes the various cases she’s given as a solicitor in her father’s law firm. The time in history is interesting. It’s 1921 and Edward, the Prince of Wales is visiting Bombay as part of an extended royal visit. Unrest is in the air. The Independence Activists want changes. The British authorities are concerned about possible attacks on the Prince and his entourage. Preveen has been consulted by a young female student, Ferny Cuttingmaster, from the prestigious Woodburn College where her friend Alice Hobson-Jones teaches. Freny seeks legal advice for the College’s Student Union around activism. What she doesn’t foresee is that Freny will be involved in a fatal accident, and the more Preveen delves into the aspects of that, the more likely it appears that it might have been deliberately caused. Edward’s visit sparks off riots. Livings are destroyed, and many jailed. Preveen has her time cut out pursuing the truth behind Freny’s accident, and handling the many cases that come post the riots—from wrongly imprisoned people, to those seeking damages and representation. Into this comes a friend from previous times, Colin Wythe Sandringham, an Indian Civil Service political officer with the British government. Someone Preveen greatly admires but with whom there can never be anything more. Customs, religious factors and honor will not allow that. A very up close and personal look at India at this time, giving this mystery depth the political grounding of the time. Massey is a whiz at combining these historical times with a captivating mystery, peppered with a variety of fascinating characters. A Soho Press ARC via NetGalley

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Bilyeau

    Enthralling The novel hurtles forward, combining emotion with historical detail. Purveen finds herself in the center of a political storm in this tense time in Bombay's history. Excellent writing. Enthralling The novel hurtles forward, combining emotion with historical detail. Purveen finds herself in the center of a political storm in this tense time in Bombay's history. Excellent writing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I have enjoyed each of the three books in this series and look forward to the next. Writing, plotting, characterizations, historical events, populace descriptions, Bombay of the 1920's, trip to Bombay made by Prince Edward III, Ghandi in the background...so much rich detail to enjoy in these books! Perveen has many challenges as she is the first female solicitor of Bombay and there are many examples in this book of the complicated dance she must execute to stay within her given role. A young fema I have enjoyed each of the three books in this series and look forward to the next. Writing, plotting, characterizations, historical events, populace descriptions, Bombay of the 1920's, trip to Bombay made by Prince Edward III, Ghandi in the background...so much rich detail to enjoy in these books! Perveen has many challenges as she is the first female solicitor of Bombay and there are many examples in this book of the complicated dance she must execute to stay within her given role. A young female student comes to visit her with a political problem and before Preveen has much time to investigate conditions at the school the young woman is found dead. This investigation consumes a major part of the book but there are many other interesting cases and problems for Preveen to solve. There are also some interesting developments in Preveen's personal life. Great read, great series!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shelleyrae at Book'd Out

    The Bombay Prince is the third book by Sujata Massey to feature Perveen Massey, India’s first female solicitor, working alongside her father, a respected lawyer. It’s not strictly necessary to have read the previous novels, A Murder on Malabar Hill and The Satapur Moonstone, to enjoy this though I believe the experience is better for it. Taking place in November of 1921, Massey sets the story of The Bombay Prince against the unrest in India between British loyalists and those agitating for India’ The Bombay Prince is the third book by Sujata Massey to feature Perveen Massey, India’s first female solicitor, working alongside her father, a respected lawyer. It’s not strictly necessary to have read the previous novels, A Murder on Malabar Hill and The Satapur Moonstone, to enjoy this though I believe the experience is better for it. Taking place in November of 1921, Massey sets the story of The Bombay Prince against the unrest in India between British loyalists and those agitating for India’s independence as Edward VIII, Prince of Wales arrives to tour the sub-continent. Perveen meets with a young university student worried that if she refuses the school principal’s directive to attend the parade welcoming Prince Edward that she could be expelled. Freny Cuttingmaster is anxious that she not disappoint her parents by jeopardising her education but staunchly opposes British Rule and wants Perveen’s assurance that her future will not be compromised by taking a stand. Perveen isn’t able to provide Freny with a definitive answer, suggesting she return with her college handbook, but she doesn’t see the young woman again until, on the day of the parade, Freny’s body is found in the courtyard of the school. The Bombay Prince offers a well crafted mystery that plays out against the backdrop of protests which divides the city of Bombay along political and religious lines. Perveen is deeply distressed by the young woman’s death, especially when it becomes clear that Freny didn’t simply fall from the gallery as the scene was staged to suggest. Not able to trust that the death will be properly investigated for a number of reasons, including the college’s wish to avoid scandal, general dismissive attitudes towards women, and the escalating violence related to Prince Edward’s visit, Purveen insinuates herself into the case to ensure the killer is brought to justice. The challenge Purveen faces in navigating these issues is fascinating, probably more so than the mystery itself at times, especially when she is noticed by the men looking for collaborators in a plot to assassinate Prince Edward. Purveen is a complex character, presenting an uneasy mix of progressive and conservative traits. Though she has defied societal expectations by becoming a solicitor, and in separating from her abusive husband, she is very conscious of the need to behave in ways that protect both her and her family’s reputation, and tends to be braver when acting on behalf of her clients than she is in than her defence of herself. This is particularly evident in her interactions with men, which makes her continued connection with Colin Sandringham, who was her government liaison in The Satapur Moonstone, an intriguing element of the story. Rich in historical detail and cultural interest, offering a discerning mystery and a hint of romance, The Bombay Prince is an engaging novel, and I hope the series will continue.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ming

    This 3rd in the series was an okay read. I found the pacing to be choppy. This choppiness was exacerbated by the abundance of explaining, e.g., a section that describes a recipe for chai. These explanations occur frequently and broke the flow of the reading experience. I also thought that she created too many strawmen. Of the 4 Perveen books, this one was the most perplexing because it wasn't as engaging or interesting. This 3rd in the series was an okay read. I found the pacing to be choppy. This choppiness was exacerbated by the abundance of explaining, e.g., a section that describes a recipe for chai. These explanations occur frequently and broke the flow of the reading experience. I also thought that she created too many strawmen. Of the 4 Perveen books, this one was the most perplexing because it wasn't as engaging or interesting.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Shindler

    Sujata Massey constructs a well crafted mystery that adds new shadings to the character of Perveen Mistry, the first woman solicitor in Bombay.Additionally, the novel examines the tensions and cultural divides within the Raj and the Indian social order.The author captures the rhythms and sounds of Bombay and its people and transports the reader into the maelstrom of emotions in 1921 India. The plot unfolds as Edward, Prince of Wales begins his four month tour of India in November of 1921. Opposit Sujata Massey constructs a well crafted mystery that adds new shadings to the character of Perveen Mistry, the first woman solicitor in Bombay.Additionally, the novel examines the tensions and cultural divides within the Raj and the Indian social order.The author captures the rhythms and sounds of Bombay and its people and transports the reader into the maelstrom of emotions in 1921 India. The plot unfolds as Edward, Prince of Wales begins his four month tour of India in November of 1921. Opposition to British rule is mounting and Edward’s visit unleashes passionate reactions across all levels of Indian society.Gandhi’s non cooperation movement has been gaining momentum and the British have responded by imposing restrictive ordinances. Opponents and defenders of British rule have come into conflict, sometimes leading to riots and violence.Religious hatreds are exacerbated.Bombay is a cauldron of passion boiling close to the brink of conflagration. Prior to an upcoming celebratory parade for Edward,Perveen is visited by Freny Cuttingmaster, a young female student at Woolburn College.She wishes to boycott Prince Edward’s parade but fears that her actions might result in her dismissal from college.Sadly, the day of the parade Freny’s body is discovered near the parade route.The authorities think it is a tragic accident.Perveen,wracked with remorse, is determined to give Freny’s death a more comprehensive examination. Perveen’s efforts to give a voice to this tragic event reveal both the complexities of her character and the strictures of her stratified world.She must cope with sexual stereotypes and religious biases.In a male dominated society, her professional successes are often best advanced by inference and subtlety.She must be sensitive to innuendo and alert at all times to a highly codified set of social cues, where ambition is not a dirty word for men but a condemnation for women. Sujata Massey has created a multilayered protagonist.Perveen Mistry is a symbol of nascent women’s empowerment in the early decades of twentieth century India.Her journeys illuminate an important time in the movement for Indian independence foreshadowing the events of 1947 and beyond . We are treated to a novel that informs without being pedantic and is engaging as we travel through a pivotal historical period.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sahitya

    CW: attempted assault It’s nice sometimes to take a break from fantasy, but I’m still not ready to tackle the real world so historical fiction it is. And it’s always fun to come back to a series I enjoy and meet familiar characters. This is another interesting installment in the series and one I’m glad to continue further. I’m always impressed by the author’s descriptions of 1920s Bombay because I’m unfamiliar even with the current incarnation of the city, and historical one feels even more fanta CW: attempted assault It’s nice sometimes to take a break from fantasy, but I’m still not ready to tackle the real world so historical fiction it is. And it’s always fun to come back to a series I enjoy and meet familiar characters. This is another interesting installment in the series and one I’m glad to continue further. I’m always impressed by the author’s descriptions of 1920s Bombay because I’m unfamiliar even with the current incarnation of the city, and historical one feels even more fantastical in my head. But the author makes it feel like a living breathing place, one that forms the soul of the story. The tensions in the city, the emergence of a freedom movement that is both nonviolent as well as reactionary, and the rising of the religious divide forms an important backdrop of this story and as always, I’m glad to get to know more about my own country’s history. The writing is evocative and full of emotional depth, making us experience the turbulent atmosphere of the times. The mystery itself was not too predictable, but not too tension inducing either and the resolution was pretty unexpected. I fall in love with Perveen’s character even more as the series go on and it’s due to her resilience and strength in unfavorable circumstances. But I thought the author showed a much more vulnerable side of her this time, encountering situations where is pretty helpless and also in the matters of the heart. However, it’s nice to see that she has the support of her family, especially her father in professional settings and her best friend Alice who is so sweet. But the author lets us see the complex relationship these characters have with colonial India, the British empire and the Indian freedom movement. There is also a hint of romantic entanglements in this one, which is both endearing and bittersweet, and I hope we’ll get to see much more of the couple as the story continues. To conclude, this book was a refreshing respite in the middle of all my intense fantasies, but it was no less interesting and emotional. If you enjoy books set in pre-independence India and would love to see a young woman try to overcome the patriarchal sexist rules in both her personal and professional life, then you can’t go wrong with this series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Baenen

    3.5 stars I really loved the previous two novels in this series, but this one was just okay for me. The plot was quite slow. It felt like most of the story was Perveen thinking about what to do next and asking permission to go out and talk to people. It seemed like her strong will and gumption that were on display in the previous novel was diminished in this one. Also, the supporting characters did not seem really as developed as in the last novel, so I wasn’t really invested in solving the myste 3.5 stars I really loved the previous two novels in this series, but this one was just okay for me. The plot was quite slow. It felt like most of the story was Perveen thinking about what to do next and asking permission to go out and talk to people. It seemed like her strong will and gumption that were on display in the previous novel was diminished in this one. Also, the supporting characters did not seem really as developed as in the last novel, so I wasn’t really invested in solving the mystery. I do look forward to the next novel to see what happens with her personal relationships. ARC from NetGalley

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    I find historical mysteries fascinating: it's that magic of recreating a particular, often pivotal, moment in time, then building a narrative on top of it that illuminates that moment. In the last year or so, I've found myself reading several mysteries set in India during the struggle for independence and the sectarian violence during and after that period. The Perveen Mistry novels are a solid addition to that genre, particularly because the "detective" figure is India's (fictional, as far as I I find historical mysteries fascinating: it's that magic of recreating a particular, often pivotal, moment in time, then building a narrative on top of it that illuminates that moment. In the last year or so, I've found myself reading several mysteries set in India during the struggle for independence and the sectarian violence during and after that period. The Perveen Mistry novels are a solid addition to that genre, particularly because the "detective" figure is India's (fictional, as far as I know) first female solicitor. Mistry studied law at Oxford after completing her education in India, though she couldn't receive a degree, as Oxford had not yet begun granting degrees to women at the time she attended. She then returned home to share a law practice with her father. As with many historical mysteries, the heart of the novel isn't the mystery itself. Mistry is trying to track down the killer of a young Indian woman who was murdered on the day Prince Edward began his royal tour of the country. The author gives readers a reasonable number of suspects, but the plotting isn't all that complex. What's fascinating is the way Mistry navigates the currents of a society in the middle of intense transition: women entering professions, British rule being challenged, many types of new of relationships being built among Indians and Brits, Hindu/Parsi tensions (Mistry is Parsi), the narrow codes for acceptable female behavior, and class difference both across and within nationalities. Read this book knowing that, while the mystery is competent, it's meeting Mistry and sharing the complexity of her thinking and life that are the real reward. I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher via NetGally. The opinions are my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barb in Maryland

    The blurb gives a good idea of the big picture. This was a solid entry in this series. I really felt for Perveen: her confidence shaken by the riots; her guilt over not helping Freny (but what, actually, could she have done differently?); her mixed feelings over involving her family in her troubles. To top things off, Colin Sandringham (from The Satapur Moonstone) is in Bombay because he's been asked to join the Prince's entourage. Perveen is torn between her growing affection for Colin and her ne The blurb gives a good idea of the big picture. This was a solid entry in this series. I really felt for Perveen: her confidence shaken by the riots; her guilt over not helping Freny (but what, actually, could she have done differently?); her mixed feelings over involving her family in her troubles. To top things off, Colin Sandringham (from The Satapur Moonstone) is in Bombay because he's been asked to join the Prince's entourage. Perveen is torn between her growing affection for Colin and her need to appear above reproach to her father (and society in general). A romance with an Englishman just will not do at all! The mystery has some nice twists, the baddie was not really a surprise. I was happy with the resolution of that part of the story. I appreciated the glimpse into the political troubles brewing between the British Empire and its 'jewel' from the Indian POV. I am looking forward to the next entry. I expect another strong mystery and hope for some peace of mind for Perveen.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Linden

    Set in 1920's Bombay with lots of historical detail, particularly regarding the Parsi religion and customs. Set in 1920's Bombay with lots of historical detail, particularly regarding the Parsi religion and customs.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This book features Perveen Mistry, Bombay's first female solicitor and takes place in 1921. The Prince of Wales is visiting Bombay creating controversy for Indian citizens who wish to be independent from Britain. When a college student dies during the Prince's procession through the city, Perveen doesn't think it's an accident and is determined to get justice for Freny. Perveen is limited by the societal restrictions of the times, but is still a strong female character. She is intelligent and tr This book features Perveen Mistry, Bombay's first female solicitor and takes place in 1921. The Prince of Wales is visiting Bombay creating controversy for Indian citizens who wish to be independent from Britain. When a college student dies during the Prince's procession through the city, Perveen doesn't think it's an accident and is determined to get justice for Freny. Perveen is limited by the societal restrictions of the times, but is still a strong female character. She is intelligent and tries to do her best for her clients and to make her father proud. It starts a little slow and took me a while to become engrossed in the story. In spite of some slow parts, the investigation has a dramatic ending and the book has an intriguing ending, making me wonder what will happen in the future between Perveen and Colin Sandringham, a political agent she became friends with during a previous case. Although I didn't enjoy this one as much as the prior two books, it is still an enjoyable historical mystery with a unique setting and premise.  Thank you to NetGalley and Soho Press for providing an advance copy of this ebook. The book was provided to me at no cost, but my review is voluntary and unbiased.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sneha

    The Bombay Prince by Sujata Massey is the third novel in the Perveen Mistry series, and every bit as delightful as the first. Set in pre-independent Bombay, this series features Mistry, who is India's first woman solicitor as she tries to uncover clues and solve cases related to her clients. In The Bombay Prince, a young girl Freny who had visited Perveen a few days back, dies after falling from her college balcony. This happens on the day of Prince Edward's visit to India, which has already beco The Bombay Prince by Sujata Massey is the third novel in the Perveen Mistry series, and every bit as delightful as the first. Set in pre-independent Bombay, this series features Mistry, who is India's first woman solicitor as she tries to uncover clues and solve cases related to her clients. In The Bombay Prince, a young girl Freny who had visited Perveen a few days back, dies after falling from her college balcony. This happens on the day of Prince Edward's visit to India, which has already become the cause of much anger for the people associated with the swadeshi movement. Amidst all this, Perveen tries her best to find the truth of Freny's death. All the books in this series are like a well-made, beautiful braid. One part of the books deals with the mystery at hand, another with Perveen's personal and social life, while the third gives historical perspective. And all of them come together in a well balanced way, so that the result is sheer delight. Massey creates the Bombay of the past, the social scene of the time and the political unrest and the looting that goes on by elements using the unrest as a cover in a nuanced, balanced way. I have fallen in love with Perveen, and I am sure you will too. She and Su-Lin from the Crown Colony Mystery Series are two of my favorite female protagonists. They both belong to different places and circumstances, but I can never get enough of either.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vickie

    Beautifully, yet simply written, this book reads as though it was written when it takes place….1921. Highly evocative, the author paints a vivid picture of time and place and I loved the luscious description of the clothing. I almost felt as though unraveling the mystery was secondary to learning about Bombay society in this era as an independence movement burgeons. Purveen Mistry, the first woman solicitor in Bombay, is a strong, independent character I didn’t realize that this was the third in Beautifully, yet simply written, this book reads as though it was written when it takes place….1921. Highly evocative, the author paints a vivid picture of time and place and I loved the luscious description of the clothing. I almost felt as though unraveling the mystery was secondary to learning about Bombay society in this era as an independence movement burgeons. Purveen Mistry, the first woman solicitor in Bombay, is a strong, independent character I didn’t realize that this was the third in a series; it is, then, the first I have read. It was a delightful introduction this author and her characters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    katayoun Masoodi

    i really like miss mistry and indian historical setting and the tone of the stories. it's nice. i really like miss mistry and indian historical setting and the tone of the stories. it's nice.

  23. 5 out of 5

    OLT

    This is the third in Sujata Massey's series about 1920s Bombay, featuring heroine Perveen Mistry, solicitor at a time the profession was resistant to equal opportunities for women. She's Oxford educated, yet lacking a degree since women were not granted one at the time, and works in her father's law firm, mostly behind the scenes, doing as much as she can within the limits of her gender. Luckily for us and for her, there is always a mystery for her to solve, even if she is forced to do low-key wo This is the third in Sujata Massey's series about 1920s Bombay, featuring heroine Perveen Mistry, solicitor at a time the profession was resistant to equal opportunities for women. She's Oxford educated, yet lacking a degree since women were not granted one at the time, and works in her father's law firm, mostly behind the scenes, doing as much as she can within the limits of her gender. Luckily for us and for her, there is always a mystery for her to solve, even if she is forced to do low-key work in the law firm and isn't allowed to practice as a barrister in the courts. Our mystery this time is the death of Freny Cuttingmaster, 18-year-old student who falls to her death just when the procession with visiting Edward VIII, Prince of Wales, passes by her school. Accidental death or homicide? Perveen wants to know, since Freny had come to her office just days before for a consultation, and was obviously not a fan of British rule. There are lots of characters to meet and suspect. British colonialists, various Indian citizens of varying ethnicities and religions. Perveen and her family, for example, are Parsis, a minority group which practices zoroastrianism and had migrated to India from Iran centuries ago. In addition, of course, there are Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists, etc., making up a diverse and not always unified country. Add to that British colonialism and you have unrest just waiting to happen. Problems do boil up and over during this visit of the Prince of Wales. This visit and the ensuing trouble serve as a backdrop to Freny's murder. And it's up to Perveen to find out just what happened. Along the way, author Massey educates the reader a bit about Indian culture and history. In the case of this particular story, I found the mystery to run a poor second to the general very broad lessons about life in 1920s India. For those who enjoy a bit of romance mixed with their mysteries, Perveen meets up again with Colin Sandringham, a British citizen she worked with in the previous book who, as a classmate of Edward years ago, has been chosen to accompany the Prince of Wales during his visit. This is perhaps a star-crossed love since Perveen's family and their religion are against such a relationship. Poor Perveen. Can she overcome the limitations put on her in both her professional and her personal life? To be continued.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sue Em

    Engrossing mystery featuring Perveen Mistry, India's first female solicitor, set in the 1930's when Prince Edward comes to tour India. Amid the backdrop of political unrest, a young Parsi woman is found dead just as the prince's parade passes nearby. Fascinating details of the protests and everyday life. And Perveen is stalwart character with ambition, intelligence and compassion but limited by the strictures of society. Engrossing mystery featuring Perveen Mistry, India's first female solicitor, set in the 1930's when Prince Edward comes to tour India. Amid the backdrop of political unrest, a young Parsi woman is found dead just as the prince's parade passes nearby. Fascinating details of the protests and everyday life. And Perveen is stalwart character with ambition, intelligence and compassion but limited by the strictures of society.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mjspice

    8/1/2021 So this is the 3rd in the series and while it wasn't the best one, it was still good overall. I see that I was right that (view spoiler)[Colin will be the main love interest for Perveen but I won't be surprised if Jay/Jai shows again later and screws it all up lol (hide spoiler)] . I was also surprised to see Perveen's connection to Mohammad Ali Jinnah but kinda disappointed that the scene where she met him wasn't expanded upon. I can understand why the author did that tho but oh well. Ca 8/1/2021 So this is the 3rd in the series and while it wasn't the best one, it was still good overall. I see that I was right that (view spoiler)[Colin will be the main love interest for Perveen but I won't be surprised if Jay/Jai shows again later and screws it all up lol (hide spoiler)] . I was also surprised to see Perveen's connection to Mohammad Ali Jinnah but kinda disappointed that the scene where she met him wasn't expanded upon. I can understand why the author did that tho but oh well. Can't wait for the next one in the series. ---------------------- 7/27/2021 Finally got around to finishing this RTC. ---------------------- 7/26/2021 I just came across the Australian cover and look how gorgeous it is??

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Caupp

    A great addition to the series! I highly enjoyed this book. I enjoy following Perveen's adventures while learning more about the culture and unrest in Bombay in the 1920's. If you want to learn a little more about a section of Indian culture through an intriguing story, I highly recommend this book! One of my few issues with the book is when Perveen goes after someone she suspects alone. So many times in books, movies, and TV shows the amateur sleuth goes into dangerous situations alone and it ma A great addition to the series! I highly enjoyed this book. I enjoy following Perveen's adventures while learning more about the culture and unrest in Bombay in the 1920's. If you want to learn a little more about a section of Indian culture through an intriguing story, I highly recommend this book! One of my few issues with the book is when Perveen goes after someone she suspects alone. So many times in books, movies, and TV shows the amateur sleuth goes into dangerous situations alone and it makes me cringe.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mal Warwick

    An investigation in the shadow of the Indian independence movement When Britain’s Crown Prince Edward strode through the Gateway of India in Bombay late in 1921, the subcontinent was seething with unrest. Thousands of loyalists turned out to gain a glimpse of the glamorous royal. But the city as a whole was quiet. Civil disobedience championed by Mohandas Gandhi and the Indian independence movement had inspired many thousands more to stay at home. But novelist Sujata Massey imagines instead a wav An investigation in the shadow of the Indian independence movement When Britain’s Crown Prince Edward strode through the Gateway of India in Bombay late in 1921, the subcontinent was seething with unrest. Thousands of loyalists turned out to gain a glimpse of the glamorous royal. But the city as a whole was quiet. Civil disobedience championed by Mohandas Gandhi and the Indian independence movement had inspired many thousands more to stay at home. But novelist Sujata Massey imagines instead a wave of violent protest in the streets in The Bombay Prince. It’s the third book in her series featuring Perveen Mistry, the city’s first female lawyer. A fascinating snapshot of India’s diversity Prince Edward’s tour of India unfolds in the background as Perveen investigates the murder of a promising young college student that took place as the prince’s entourage passed by the campus. If you’re looking for a fast-moving thriller with a splurge of violence and a surprising twist every few pages, you won’t find it here. Instead, as the mystery plays out, you’ll be treated to an intriguing picture of India’s rich ethnic and religious diversity. It’s a snapshot of life in the colony’s largest city as the Indian independence movement from Britain was gaining steam. Who is Perveen Mistry? In two previous books in this series, we learned that Perveen Mistry studied law at Oxford University. She now works with her father in his legal practice. Her brother runs the family’s construction firm and is married to Perveen’s best childhood friend. They’re Parsis, members of a small Zoroastrian sect that has gained wealth and influence far out of proportion to their numbers in India. (The term is pronounced “parsees.”) Perveen was briefly married to a Parsi businessman from Calcutta but left when he turned abusive and unfaithful. Now, under a decision in Parsi religious court, the marriage is over, but she is unable to remarry so long as her ex-husband lives. As a result, Perveen cannot pursue the powerful mutual attraction that developed between her and British official Colin Sandrigham. The two met when Perveen traveled to one of the princely states under his supervision. And the attraction will prove awkward when he turns up in the city in The Bombay Prince. The crown prince who arrived in Bombay then was the future Edward VIII, the man who abdicated and became known as the Duke of Windsor. As he rides along the nearby reception route, the body of young Freny Cuttingmaster turns up on the campus of Woodburn College. Perveen is among the first to find her but is rushed off-campus by college officials fearful that an investigation will reflect poorly on them. Their fear helps prod her to look into the death. In her investigation, the young solicitor must also grapple with the prince’s security escort and anti-British sentiment among the students. She herself even has a close brush with death at the hands of looters she encounters on the street. Perveen sympathizes with the Indian independence movement but is forced to suppress her feelings. Her family’s loyalties lie with the crown. Who are the Parsis? Freny Cuttingmaster is a Parsi like Perveen herself, a descendant of refugees from seventh-century Persia following the Islamic conquest. (Her surname, like those of many Parsis, reflects her family’s traditional livelihood. Freny’s father is a tailor. And my Iranian-American periodontist shares an office with a dermatologist named Dr. Devika Icecreamwala.) Many of the other characters in the novel are Parsis as well. If Massey errs in any way, it is only in that the tight focus on the insular Parsi community gives the impression that the sect might rank with Hinduism and Islam among the country’s principal faiths. In fact, the adherents of Zoroastrianism numbered just 101,000 in 1921 in a nation of 251 million. The Parsi faith centers on the “Triple H” of Humata, Huxta, Huvarshta, which translates as “Good Thoughts, Good Words, Good Deeds.” Perveen and her devout family strive to follow this “threefold path.” In all of India today, just 60,000 Parsis remain. Intermarriage and loss of faith have taken their toll over the past century. But the sect’s influence remains strong, especially in the realm of industry and finance. Five Parsi families are billionaires. Among them are the Tatas, scions of the sprawling Tata industrial empire founded in the nineteenth century by Jamsetji Tata (1839-1904), who is known as the “Father of Indian Industry.” Co-religionists are disproportionately represented in Indian philanthropy as well, following a centuries-long tradition grounded in their faith. And several Parsis figured in the leadership of the Indian independence movement. About the author British-born American mystery author Sujata Massey won wide acclaim and several prestigious awards for the first novel in the Perveen Mistry series. In addition to the three books to date in that series, she has written eleven novels featuring Rei Shimura, an amateur Japanese-American detective in Tokyo. Massey was born in Sussex, England of an Indian father and German mother but emigrated with her family to the USA at the age of five.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sahil Pradhan

    1921. Bombay. India is dressed in its grandeur to welcome Edward VIII ( if you have watched "The Crown" on Netflix, this is the same king who abdicated his throne to marry a divorcee and thus against the royal marriage codes ), while on the other side the Gandhian movement of freedom has slowly started making its way throughout the body of the nation, instilling the nationalistic fervour amongst many. While on one side Bombay dazzles in lights, on the other side it is burning with riots all around 1921. Bombay. India is dressed in its grandeur to welcome Edward VIII ( if you have watched "The Crown" on Netflix, this is the same king who abdicated his throne to marry a divorcee and thus against the royal marriage codes ), while on the other side the Gandhian movement of freedom has slowly started making its way throughout the body of the nation, instilling the nationalistic fervour amongst many. While on one side Bombay dazzles in lights, on the other side it is burning with riots all around. Amidst these stands Perveen Mistry, Bombay's first woman solicitor in an era which were incredibly difficult for a woman to live in, a Parsi aristocrat, of a community that is in minority yet held the highest ranks in British India. Most importantly, a solver of mysteries. One feat that this gem of a novel conquers incredibly is the intermixing of genres, it stands at the fine line where facts of history and fiction of imagination merge to a spectrum of colours. It is at once a thriller: there is a murder disguised as a suicide at the parade that marks the welcome of the Prince and Perveen Mistry has to solve the mystery of this murder, provide closure to the grieving parents of Frenny Cuttingmaster, all while saving her own life from dangerous peril. It is even a historical fiction at it’s best: historical characters mingle and vividly live their lives in here most of which we have just read as a copious amounts of facts and figures of dates and number, each of these historical characters are brought down and made human and made to breathe along with the reader and to ensure that the reader live along with them, so vividly imagined are they. It also has a building and raging arc and angst of a novel: there is so much emotion within the lines and so much apathy and love within the characters each of whom feel alive and breathing.  Massey's writing style plays an important role here. She paints details, minute ones, to the utmost care. She places things, juxtaposes time and plays around with her diaspora of characters to create a historical thriller that is incredible.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karyl

    Let me first say that this is my first Perveen Mistry novel; I am sure this book came across on one of my social media feeds, and it was so enticing I requested it from the library, even though I hadn’t read any of the prior books. I don’t believe you really do need to read the first two books, but I’m sure there were a few things I missed, not having some background on Perveen and her fellow residents of Bombay. I really did enjoy this book. I am fascinated by India, not just the food but also t Let me first say that this is my first Perveen Mistry novel; I am sure this book came across on one of my social media feeds, and it was so enticing I requested it from the library, even though I hadn’t read any of the prior books. I don’t believe you really do need to read the first two books, but I’m sure there were a few things I missed, not having some background on Perveen and her fellow residents of Bombay. I really did enjoy this book. I am fascinated by India, not just the food but also the clothing and the languages and the long and vibrant history. I know I don’t know enough, but hopefully one day I can visit and start to fill in some of the gaps in my knowledge. Interestingly enough, I was surprised by how many different religions exist side by side in various parts of Bombay. We hear so much about the Hindus that we forget that there are also Muslims, Zoroastrians, and even Christians. I really enjoyed how Massey would add a tidbit about why Perveen could do this or that, based on the requirements of her religion. She’s also somewhat between a rock and a hard place quite often, wanting to interview this person or that, but unable to do so without making it look like she’s being inappropriate. I’m not sure what the rules are like now, but in the 1920s women had to be extra careful so as not to give anyone the wrong idea. While I loved this book for the vivid description of 1920s Bombay and the struggle for independence from Britain, I felt that this book occasionally bogged down under its own weight. I was hoping for a much faster read, yet I found myself struggling to keep the pages turning at times. Other reviewers have said this is an issue only with this volume of the Perveen Mistry series, so I would like to read the first two books to compare. If you’re interested in a murder mystery with Indian flair, plus a female lawyer trying to make a good name for herself, this may just be the book for you!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melody Schwarting

    A very enjoyable installment in the Perveen Mistry series. I'd been hoping to see more of her family, and they were great additions the story--especially her father, and the dynamics they faced with her career. Seeing the religious diversity of Bombay (now Mumbai) in the 1920s was really interesting, particularly because this novel is set during the rising years of Mahatma Ghandi. In particular, I loved the closer look at Parsi culture provided in The Bombay Prince. Islam and Hinduism were the f A very enjoyable installment in the Perveen Mistry series. I'd been hoping to see more of her family, and they were great additions the story--especially her father, and the dynamics they faced with her career. Seeing the religious diversity of Bombay (now Mumbai) in the 1920s was really interesting, particularly because this novel is set during the rising years of Mahatma Ghandi. In particular, I loved the closer look at Parsi culture provided in The Bombay Prince. Islam and Hinduism were the foci of the previous two books, and it was good to see Perveen working among people of her own faith. While I appreciated how the murder aspect was handled emotionally and religiously, as far as the mystery goes, it left a little to be desired. Too little information scattered too infrequently. Massey has hit her stride in writing about Perveen's character and career, but the mystery aspect could use a little more refining, in my opinion. Yet, since I'm really here for character and setting and don't care that much about plot, I still thoroughly enjoyed The Bombay Prince.

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