web site hit counter Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue: A Life's Work Fighting for a More Perfect Union - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue: A Life's Work Fighting for a More Perfect Union

Availability: Ready to download

Tracing the long history of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work for gender equality and a “more perfect Union” In the fall of 2019, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the University of California, Berkeley School of Law to deliver the first annual Herma Hill Kay Memorial Lecture in honor of her friend, the late Herma Hill Kay, with whom Ginsburg had coauthored the very first caseb Tracing the long history of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work for gender equality and a “more perfect Union” In the fall of 2019, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the University of California, Berkeley School of Law to deliver the first annual Herma Hill Kay Memorial Lecture in honor of her friend, the late Herma Hill Kay, with whom Ginsburg had coauthored the very first casebook on sex-based discrimination in 1974. Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue is the result of a period of collaboration between Ginsburg and Amanda L. Tyler, a Berkeley Law professor and former Ginsburg law clerk. During Justice Ginsburg's visit to Berkeley, she told her life story in conversation with Tyler. In this collection, the two bring together that conversation and other materials—many previously unpublished—that share details from Justice Ginsburg's family life and long career. These include notable briefs and oral arguments, some of Ginsburg's last speeches, and her favorite opinions that she wrote as a Supreme Court Justice (many in dissent), along with the statements that she read from the bench in those important cases. Each document was chosen by Ginsburg and Tyler to tell the story of the litigation strategy and optimistic vision that were at the heart of Ginsburg's unwavering commitment to the achievement of "a more perfect Union."   In a decades-long career, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an advocate and jurist for gender equality and for ensuring that the United States Constitution leaves no person behind. Her work transformed not just the American legal landscape, but American society more generally. Ginsburg labored tirelessly to promote a Constitution that is ever more inclusive and that allows every individual to achieve their full human potential. As revealed in these pages, in the area of gender rights, Ginsburg dismantled long-entrenched systems of discrimination based on outdated stereotypes by showing how such laws hold back both genders. And as also shown in the materials brought together here, Justice Ginsburg had a special ability to appreciate how the decisions of the high court impact the lived experiences of everyday Americans. The passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in September 2020 as this book was heading into production was met with a public outpouring of grief. With her death, the country lost a hero and national treasure whose incredible life and legacy made the United States a more just society and one in which “We the People,” for whom the Constitution is written, includes everyone.


Compare

Tracing the long history of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work for gender equality and a “more perfect Union” In the fall of 2019, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the University of California, Berkeley School of Law to deliver the first annual Herma Hill Kay Memorial Lecture in honor of her friend, the late Herma Hill Kay, with whom Ginsburg had coauthored the very first caseb Tracing the long history of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work for gender equality and a “more perfect Union” In the fall of 2019, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the University of California, Berkeley School of Law to deliver the first annual Herma Hill Kay Memorial Lecture in honor of her friend, the late Herma Hill Kay, with whom Ginsburg had coauthored the very first casebook on sex-based discrimination in 1974. Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue is the result of a period of collaboration between Ginsburg and Amanda L. Tyler, a Berkeley Law professor and former Ginsburg law clerk. During Justice Ginsburg's visit to Berkeley, she told her life story in conversation with Tyler. In this collection, the two bring together that conversation and other materials—many previously unpublished—that share details from Justice Ginsburg's family life and long career. These include notable briefs and oral arguments, some of Ginsburg's last speeches, and her favorite opinions that she wrote as a Supreme Court Justice (many in dissent), along with the statements that she read from the bench in those important cases. Each document was chosen by Ginsburg and Tyler to tell the story of the litigation strategy and optimistic vision that were at the heart of Ginsburg's unwavering commitment to the achievement of "a more perfect Union."   In a decades-long career, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an advocate and jurist for gender equality and for ensuring that the United States Constitution leaves no person behind. Her work transformed not just the American legal landscape, but American society more generally. Ginsburg labored tirelessly to promote a Constitution that is ever more inclusive and that allows every individual to achieve their full human potential. As revealed in these pages, in the area of gender rights, Ginsburg dismantled long-entrenched systems of discrimination based on outdated stereotypes by showing how such laws hold back both genders. And as also shown in the materials brought together here, Justice Ginsburg had a special ability to appreciate how the decisions of the high court impact the lived experiences of everyday Americans. The passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in September 2020 as this book was heading into production was met with a public outpouring of grief. With her death, the country lost a hero and national treasure whose incredible life and legacy made the United States a more just society and one in which “We the People,” for whom the Constitution is written, includes everyone.

30 review for Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue: A Life's Work Fighting for a More Perfect Union

  1. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    It looks like I'm the first person to add this to my Goodreads, so I just came here to say thank you so much to Justice Ginsburg for a life's work of fighting and bringing others to join her along the way. I'm about to graduate law school this year from Justice Ginsburg's alma mater and I'm eager to follow in her tiny and big footsteps by trying to make the union just a little more perfect. Looking forward to reading this book once it comes out (or if anyone wants to send me an advanced copy . . It looks like I'm the first person to add this to my Goodreads, so I just came here to say thank you so much to Justice Ginsburg for a life's work of fighting and bringing others to join her along the way. I'm about to graduate law school this year from Justice Ginsburg's alma mater and I'm eager to follow in her tiny and big footsteps by trying to make the union just a little more perfect. Looking forward to reading this book once it comes out (or if anyone wants to send me an advanced copy . . . I would be thrilled to provide a real review!)

  2. 4 out of 5

    La Crosse County Library

    [Happy Women's History Month!] 2020 was quite the year (a huge understatement). It seemed like our lives were in upheaval from many directions all at once—from COVID-19 shutting everything down (and when “essential” organizations reopened, changing their way of operation) to whole continents and states literally being on fire. Amidst all this societal upheaval, the legal world was rocked by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in September from complications of cancer, a figure who seemed inv [Happy Women's History Month!] 2020 was quite the year (a huge understatement). It seemed like our lives were in upheaval from many directions all at once—from COVID-19 shutting everything down (and when “essential” organizations reopened, changing their way of operation) to whole continents and states literally being on fire. Amidst all this societal upheaval, the legal world was rocked by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in September from complications of cancer, a figure who seemed invincible, having survived many previous encounters with cancer before and returning to work as soon as she could each time. This perceived invincibility and relentless pursuit of justice for the many is a central part of both her life and legal career as surveyed in Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue: A Life’s Work Fighting for a More Perfect Union (2021), a joint project by Ginsburg and her former law clerk, Amanda Tyler. While focusing primarily on Justice Ginsburg’s progressive legal philosophy informed by her upbringing, education, and previous role as a women’s rights advocate where she had to fight an uphill battle against seemingly insurmountable systemically-embedded gender discrimination, this book gives readers a more comprehensive view of Ruth Bader Ginsburg the person as well. While reading around the many legal citations in Ginsburg’s written opinions (with some of the more notable ones being her dissents) was a bit challenging at times, the persistent reader is rewarded with not only an appreciation of Ginsburg’s formidable intellect, but also her effectiveness at making her case with the prescient marshalling of evidence of the real-world consequences of laws and the legal philosophies and precedents at hand that informed them, that the justices and legal scholars tended to discuss in the abstract. This approach led to groundbreaking changes to address gendered discrimination in many aspects of the law by revealing how this kind of discrimination is detrimental to both women and men. The results of these legal decisions laid the groundwork for the greater freedoms women are gaining in the public sphere and which those of my generation can take for granted. I was fortunate not to grow up knowing a world in which women had to fight tooth-and-nail to merely get their feet in the door. Not that gendered or racial discrimination are dead. That work continues to this day to combat pernicious and more subtle forms of the latter systemic evils by working to open that door further for women and people of color. That’s the message I think Ginsburg was trying to convey here. I can’t help but feel she is handing me (and many others) the baton, that she is saying, “It’s your turn now.” RIP Justice Ginsburg. You will be missed. -Cora See also: My Own Words (2016) by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg (2015), and Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law (2020). Find this book and other titles within our catalog.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ellensue Spicer-Jacobson

    By Ellen Sue Spicer-Jacobson, www.menpause.info If you want to know where Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) gets her straight-shooter mentality concerning court cases, you can read her three chosen cases in the new book Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue. If you want to know who inspired her to be the best she could be as a lawyer and human being, you can read about her role models (ex. Justice Brandeis) in this same book, Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue. Finally, if you want to look at RBG’s life in p By Ellen Sue Spicer-Jacobson, www.menpause.info If you want to know where Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) gets her straight-shooter mentality concerning court cases, you can read her three chosen cases in the new book Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue. If you want to know who inspired her to be the best she could be as a lawyer and human being, you can read about her role models (ex. Justice Brandeis) in this same book, Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue. Finally, if you want to look at RBG’s life in photos, you can browse through Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue for beautiful color plates and clear black and white photos of RBG, her husband Marty, her children, and the many other photos demonstrating that Justice Ginsburg was a human being who lived with passion and pursued justice until her last breath on September 18, 2020. (The number 18 is a special number in Judaism because it is the numerical counterpart to the word for LIFE in Hebrew [chai], pronounced Khai). She also died on Rosh Hoshana, the Jewish New Year, and as quoted in USA Today, here is why her death date is so memorable. NPR reporter Nina Totenberg explained this Jewish tradition on Twitter: "A Jewish teaching says those who die just before the Jewish new year are the ones God has held back until the last moment because they were needed most & were the most righteous." Helping RBG put so much effort into this last written piece by Justice Ginsburg is one of her clerks (1999-2000), Amanda L. Tyler. She is a Professor of Law at University of California, Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches and writes about the Supreme Court, federal courts, constitutional law, and civil procedure. (Her writing is excellent in this book.) Tyler’s voice is heard throughout the book, but none more poignantly than her Afterword in October 2002, soon after RBG’s death from cancer. As Tyler writes: “It is impossible to put into words how devastating her loss is for those of us who were lucky enough to know her….Justice Ginsburg was a national treasure—someone who through her life and work made ours a better, more just society.” Tyler notes that on the wall in RBG’s chambers is the passage from Deuteronomy: “Justice, Justice thou shalt pursue,” which became the title of the book:.” As Tyler notes: “This calling drove Justice Ginsburg in all she did.” On my own writing “chamber” above my computer is a photo of RBG in her robe and favorite white collar around her neck with this quote by her: “Fight for the things you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.” She has inspired me to become a more compassionate, concerned human being and I will treasure this book with her life’s work explained in a way that is “contagious.” She is truly an American hero, avid feminist, conscientious lawyer and loving daughter, wife, mother, and mentor — a legend in her own time. I believe her passion was derived in large part from her own personal and professional issues in finding a job after college (shared first place in her Columbia University class with another student) because she was: 1. A woman when few women were lawyers. 2. A Jew in a world that is still anti-Semitic. 3. A mother, when having a child and being a (new) lawyer was considered an impossible combination. Ruth Bader Ginsburg gave her very best years in the pursuit of justice for others, and inspired many to be the best of who they are, no matter their color, creed, or social-economic status. This book is a great addition to anyone’s reading list, to every private and public library, and to every high school and college, not only for lawyers-to-be, but for all students who pursue a career and a life to make this country a more perfect union. JUSTICE, JUSTICE THOU SHALL PURSUE is published by University of California Press in Oakland, California and costs $26.95. It is a Naomi Schneider book. The authors note that they “share the compassion, commitment, and creativity of Executive Director Naomi Schneider.” And Naomi sent me this comment about her part in the book: "I'm so honored to be associated with a book co-authored by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Her lifelong battle to secure more equitable gender rights provides a model of indefatigable activism and commitment to social justice that inspires us all."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sharron

    I wanted to love this. I did not. I loved how her dissents demolished the reasoning(?) behind the mjority's opinion. The introduction to the book is so repetitive I almost stopped there. Briefs and legal opinions are rather dry to read, but it was made more painful because each section had an introduction too. The co-author would redundantly quote what you were about to read...and that was made worse when there was both a bench statement and the dissent. The last section of a few recent speeches I wanted to love this. I did not. I loved how her dissents demolished the reasoning(?) behind the mjority's opinion. The introduction to the book is so repetitive I almost stopped there. Briefs and legal opinions are rather dry to read, but it was made more painful because each section had an introduction too. The co-author would redundantly quote what you were about to read...and that was made worse when there was both a bench statement and the dissent. The last section of a few recent speeches was wonderful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Judy G

    Judge Ginsberg was a gift to this country. She was always very clear about her priorities all about justice for men and for women. Also a special focus on discrimination and mindsets about peoples that obstruct Justice Here we can read her statements about her major cases of interest before she was on the Court and during. Her dissents and warnings about what path the Court majority was treading... She always spoke with clarity brilliance eloquence Judy g

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paige Mueller

    Enjoyed reading RBG's speeches and learning more about some of her landmark cases. The middle section of the book was devoted to the text of some of those cases which was a little overwhelming to read with all of the case references in the footnotes. (Definitely interesting, but not easy reading) Enjoyed reading RBG's speeches and learning more about some of her landmark cases. The middle section of the book was devoted to the text of some of those cases which was a little overwhelming to read with all of the case references in the footnotes. (Definitely interesting, but not easy reading)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mary Yram

    The stories are very imaginative and original. I suggest you join NovelStar’s writing competition this April.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Megan L (Iwanttoreadallthebooks)

    4 stars. RTC.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pam S

    Many thanks to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Professor Amanda L. Tyler for sharing their conversation and collaborating to write this inspiring, just published book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nora

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rj Risueno

  12. 4 out of 5

    David

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jacquelyn

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kady

  15. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Wood

  18. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kylie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Havlicek

  22. 5 out of 5

    Noel Johnson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Beckford

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schorr

  25. 4 out of 5

    Paul Racine

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  27. 4 out of 5

    G. Gvn

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ann Rabin

  29. 4 out of 5

    Charon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Curran

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.