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A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, Really): An Adventure for the Curious Into Bodies, Womanhood, Time, Pain and Purpose--And How to Have a Better Time of the Month

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The average woman has 500 periods in her lifetime. And whether yours are mildly annoying, utterly debilitating or emotionally complicated, most of us have at one time or another asked: Why?! This warm, light-hearted, real, honest and at times surprising book gives a biblical perspective on menstruation, as well as a whole lot more. Beginning with periods, Rachel Jones takes The average woman has 500 periods in her lifetime. And whether yours are mildly annoying, utterly debilitating or emotionally complicated, most of us have at one time or another asked: Why?! This warm, light-hearted, real, honest and at times surprising book gives a biblical perspective on menstruation, as well as a whole lot more. Beginning with periods, Rachel Jones takes readers on an adventure in theology, weaving together wide-ranging reflections on the nature of our bodies, the passing of time, the purpose of pain, and the meaning of life. One thing is for sure: you've never read a Christian book quite like this one. Whether you're in need of hope and help, or are just downright curious, you'll be refreshed and encouraged by this book. As Rachel puts it, "Whoever you are, my aim is that you reach the end of this book celebrating who God has made you, how God has saved you, and the fact that he speaks liberating and positive truth into all of life's experiences (even periods)".


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The average woman has 500 periods in her lifetime. And whether yours are mildly annoying, utterly debilitating or emotionally complicated, most of us have at one time or another asked: Why?! This warm, light-hearted, real, honest and at times surprising book gives a biblical perspective on menstruation, as well as a whole lot more. Beginning with periods, Rachel Jones takes The average woman has 500 periods in her lifetime. And whether yours are mildly annoying, utterly debilitating or emotionally complicated, most of us have at one time or another asked: Why?! This warm, light-hearted, real, honest and at times surprising book gives a biblical perspective on menstruation, as well as a whole lot more. Beginning with periods, Rachel Jones takes readers on an adventure in theology, weaving together wide-ranging reflections on the nature of our bodies, the passing of time, the purpose of pain, and the meaning of life. One thing is for sure: you've never read a Christian book quite like this one. Whether you're in need of hope and help, or are just downright curious, you'll be refreshed and encouraged by this book. As Rachel puts it, "Whoever you are, my aim is that you reach the end of this book celebrating who God has made you, how God has saved you, and the fact that he speaks liberating and positive truth into all of life's experiences (even periods)".

30 review for A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, Really): An Adventure for the Curious Into Bodies, Womanhood, Time, Pain and Purpose--And How to Have a Better Time of the Month

  1. 4 out of 5

    Summer Jaeger

    Christian women everywhere do not need this silly book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Allen

    The biblical truths in this book paired with great writing made this such an enjoyable read! It’s far from silly and actually very helpful and encouraging, especially to those who struggle with a variety of health and emotional issues surrounding their menstrual cycle. Ignore the spiteful one star review. It’s clear she’s not read the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie Gibbs

    I feel a little unfair giving 4 stars, as the main reason is "I'd have liked it to be a little more in-depth" and the title explicitly states that it's a *brief* theology of periods, but I do think it could have stood being a little longer. Still an excellent read and I'd recommend it - a delightful, thoughtful little book which grapples honestly, humorously and carefully with the physicality of being a woman and a Christian. I feel a little unfair giving 4 stars, as the main reason is "I'd have liked it to be a little more in-depth" and the title explicitly states that it's a *brief* theology of periods, but I do think it could have stood being a little longer. Still an excellent read and I'd recommend it - a delightful, thoughtful little book which grapples honestly, humorously and carefully with the physicality of being a woman and a Christian.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I was pretty sure I was going to love this even before I read it. Why? Because periods are such a fundamental, intrinsic, theologically-enmeshed reality, with literally hundreds of day-to-day implications. Menstruation is about creation, curse and the coming of the Messiah. It's about what it means to be an embodied image-bearer. What it means to be female. What it means to be mortal. It's bound up with pain, shame, cleanliness, emotions and lineage. On a practical level, periods affect over half t I was pretty sure I was going to love this even before I read it. Why? Because periods are such a fundamental, intrinsic, theologically-enmeshed reality, with literally hundreds of day-to-day implications. Menstruation is about creation, curse and the coming of the Messiah. It's about what it means to be an embodied image-bearer. What it means to be female. What it means to be mortal. It's bound up with pain, shame, cleanliness, emotions and lineage. On a practical level, periods affect over half the global population for over half their lives. On a spiritual level, you could honestly write an entire book simply about the meaning of blood in the Bible - it's that symbolically freighted. This little volume was so so overdue. And the second reason? Because Rachel Jones is 100% the best person to write a witty, straightforward, honest introduction, with zero cringe. The only thing I'd like now is for hundreds of other writers and preachers (including men) to pick up where she's left off. This book is really only a primer. The points are pretty basic, but at least they're being made. I'd love to see some poetic meditations on wombs and womb-anhood; some systematic theologies of fertility and faith. The door’s wide open.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amber Thiessen

    In this lighthearted book you're going to find an honest look at the struggles we experience with our menstrual cycle. It's not a health book. It's not a medical book. This is about taking a look at the way our body works and how it tells us about God and his work in the world. She points us to gospel truths in our suffering and circumstances to help us depend more on Christ. I'll admit, I hadn't really considered my cycle in light of the gospel, so I found this to be an interesting and insightfu In this lighthearted book you're going to find an honest look at the struggles we experience with our menstrual cycle. It's not a health book. It's not a medical book. This is about taking a look at the way our body works and how it tells us about God and his work in the world. She points us to gospel truths in our suffering and circumstances to help us depend more on Christ. I'll admit, I hadn't really considered my cycle in light of the gospel, so I found this to be an interesting and insightful read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nitoy Gonzales

    The novelty of this book is the selling point for me to get this book. I’ve reviewed books that are quite unique and rarely been discussed. Books on sleeping, sports and poetry plus an unfinished book on writing got my attention. Then this book on menstruation came and could be the most peculiar book that I have encountered. But I got some questions as I read this latest from Rachel Jones: Does this book stands on biblical grounds or it’s just to tease our curiosity? Do we really need a book lik The novelty of this book is the selling point for me to get this book. I’ve reviewed books that are quite unique and rarely been discussed. Books on sleeping, sports and poetry plus an unfinished book on writing got my attention. Then this book on menstruation came and could be the most peculiar book that I have encountered. But I got some questions as I read this latest from Rachel Jones: Does this book stands on biblical grounds or it’s just to tease our curiosity? Do we really need a book like this in the first place? After diving in the book, I found answers to those inquires. A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, Really) started a bit The introduction doesn’t convince me that I should read this book. However when I got pass some chapters it got me hooked. I love the way Jones connects menstruation to the fall is worth noting. As a Christian, these story in Genesis never gets old. The middle part of the book is good and I’m impress how Jones manage to connect periods with suffering. However, it feels sometimes stretching it a bit to fit the biblical framework. So she needs it to bring it back to the “big picture” so the reader wont get lost. That’s a big let down all through out this book. Chapter 4 is enjoyable for me and that one really got me off my feet. The latter part of the gave me reasons to finish it to the end. Jones insight on how menstruation and menopause hinder in the OT the coming of the Messiah brings on the table is good insight. However, I cant shake the thought that was brought all along the book that its a bit stretching the the Scriptures. And because its short I’m thankful Jones didn’t use it as justification for the writing of the book. Another what I find quite annoying is that she keeps on repeating lines that goes like I hope you find book… kind of a filler for me as a reader. A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, Really) is a nice excursion to the woman’s body that is an image bearer of God and how the effects of the fall brought a curse (but also a blessing) to God’s creation. I might give this a pass not because of the novelty or I’m not the target audience. It’s just that Jones is limited on things to back up to make a good case for the topic. Yes, its accessible. Yes, its brief. Yes, it drives the gospel well. It’s an enjoyable adventure to be sure. Then again, that’s not enough to have a solid book. However, I think new believers specially women will appreciate more of this kind book. Also to guys who are definitely clueless on periods but too embarrassed to ask his wife. I think this is a primer that doesn’t need an in-depth book because there is nothing to ground with the topic. My verdict: 4 out of 5 Purchase the book by clicking this link. Read my favorite quotes from the book here. (Review copy of this book was provided by The Good Book Company.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kyleigh Dunn

    I’ve had to think a lot about hormones and reproductive health in the last four years as I’ve researched perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. In that time, I’ve also come face to face with PMS for the first time (making me incredibly grateful that for the first 12 years of this part of my life I didn’t experience it!). And, like most women, I’ve wondered why in the world periods are the way they are. What of it is God’s original design? What beyond pain and PMS is a result of the fall? What was I’ve had to think a lot about hormones and reproductive health in the last four years as I’ve researched perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. In that time, I’ve also come face to face with PMS for the first time (making me incredibly grateful that for the first 12 years of this part of my life I didn’t experience it!). And, like most women, I’ve wondered why in the world periods are the way they are. What of it is God’s original design? What beyond pain and PMS is a result of the fall? What was Eve’s period like? So I was excited for Rachel Jones’s book A Brief Theology of Periods, because I’ve pondered these questions and more a lot. If you’ve already tried to think theologically about periods, there may not be much new in Jones’s book, but she still does a wonderful job of packing a lot into a little book. She considers what periods say to us about our womanhood (even when you’re single), pain and weakness, shame, and uncleanness. My favorite chapter was the one on emotions, especially the tension Jones holds there and throughout of not excusing sin because of hormones but also of making use of practical helps and getting medical care to alleviate suffering. The chapter on menopause was also encouraging, and even though I have years before that, her admonition to groan with longing for the future not the past was welcome. Her appendix was also really good and practical and answered a lot of more random questions (and also talked about why men should care about periods). I’d like more (I’d especially have loved a Jen Wilkin quote, “Every 28 days a woman’s body preaches the shedding of blood for the giving of life,” as I remember it), but it does say “brief” in the title. It is also a mix of theology “of” periods and theology “for” or applied to periods, so sometimes it drifts to more general theology or drawing out metaphors, which is still good, but not quite the same. Still, it’s a great little book and I highly recommend it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    I loved this book. It was funny, encouraging, challenging, informative, helpful, and theologically sound. My only questions for the author are how would she define the word "weak," and how does she practically see women "living out the stereotypes." Highly recommend. I loved this book. It was funny, encouraging, challenging, informative, helpful, and theologically sound. My only questions for the author are how would she define the word "weak," and how does she practically see women "living out the stereotypes." Highly recommend.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Lee

    Why did God give women periods? In A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, really), Rachel Jones takes us on an adventure for the curious into bodies, womanhood, time, pain and purpose—and shares how to have a better time of the month! This book lives up to its title by presenting a brief theology of periods that celebrates the uniqueness of womanhood and the intentional design of God. Fearfully and Wonderfully Made Periods show us how God designed us. Women are fearfully and wonderfully made. While not Why did God give women periods? In A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, really), Rachel Jones takes us on an adventure for the curious into bodies, womanhood, time, pain and purpose—and shares how to have a better time of the month! This book lives up to its title by presenting a brief theology of periods that celebrates the uniqueness of womanhood and the intentional design of God. Fearfully and Wonderfully Made Periods show us how God designed us. Women are fearfully and wonderfully made. While not being overly scientific, Jones explains what is actually happening during the menstrual cycle. It is a display of God’s glory and should cause us to worship and wonder at our Creator. Jones reveals how periods showcase complementarian beauty, looking at 1 Peter 3:7 and explaining what it means that women are a “weaker vessel.” The book of Leviticus presents a problem as the issue of cleanliness is discussed, but Jones puts it in proper perspective by hearing what Jesus has to say in Mark 5:31 to the woman with uncontrolled bleeding. Nothing but the Blood What impressed me the most was how much Jones was able to show that the Bible actually has a lot to say about periods. With feelings and emotions that are constantly shifting, Jones encourages us to differentiate between what we feel and what we say. Our bodies are timepieces in the sense that menopause and the ability to have children remind us of our creatureliness. Jones reminds us that blood stains are difficult to remove, and we are reminded of the blood of Jesus that freely flows to wash away our sins. Biology and Theology A Q&A section is included at the end of the book with excellent questions including “Is it ok for Christians today to have sex while the wife is on her period?” and “Is it ok to use hormonal birth control to regulate my periods or treat pain?” I found her answers to be persuasive. I am especially grateful for this book as it does not seek to separate our biology from our theology. I am glad to have this book to help me live with my wife in an understanding way. Our bodies are created by God to be special, beautiful, and wonderful. I received a media copy of A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, really) and this is my honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    In this short book, Rachel Jones shares insight into the role of periods in women's lives. She acknowledges the widely varying range of experiences that women have based on their ages, life situations, and health issues, and shares anecdotes from her own and others' experiences. She encourages women to develop a strong theology of the body, leave behind unnecessary, destructive shame, and think through the emotional impacts of their time of the month. Jones also writes about historic social stig In this short book, Rachel Jones shares insight into the role of periods in women's lives. She acknowledges the widely varying range of experiences that women have based on their ages, life situations, and health issues, and shares anecdotes from her own and others' experiences. She encourages women to develop a strong theology of the body, leave behind unnecessary, destructive shame, and think through the emotional impacts of their time of the month. Jones also writes about historic social stigma surrounding menstruation, and thoughtfully addresses parts of Leviticus that deal with monthly bleeding. She outlines the honest, unfiltered reactions that Christian women often have to this part of the Bible, but puts these passages in context with an understanding of Israel's ceremonial laws. This book is interesting and unusual, and I appreciate Jones's courage in writing about something that Christians are so often silent about, or don't know how to discuss in a constructive way. She encourages women to encourage and support each other, especially when they are dealing with health issues that make periods complicated, and reminds readers that Jesus is familiar with and understands pain. "Whatever you do or don't feel comfortable sharing in your small-group prayer times, there's nothing you can't share with Jesus in your personal prayer times. He sees. He knows. He's listening." She also encourages women who struggle with irritability and other significant PMS symptoms to find peace in the gospel. She pushes back against secular messages of total self-acceptance, saying that we should feel rightly ashamed of our wrong behavior, but she emphasizes that Christ provides rest for us in his total forgiveness and mercy. Jones covers a variety of issues, and keeps this book accessible and relevant to Christian women of different ages, backgrounds, and life situations. Not all women will be interested in this book or feel represented here, but Jones addresses young women and older women, married and unmarried, with children or childless, and with or without significant pain or emotional upheaval around that time of the month. She also encourages men to read this book to develop a better understanding of this experience and women around them. Not everyone will agree with or connect with everything in this book, but it is a great conversation-starter for Christians, and will hopefully help Christian women develop a stronger bodily theology and become more equipped to have supportive conversations with others about this topic. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linneah

    I enjoyed this more than I thought I would, honestly. I picked it up out of curiosity and was drawn in by Rachel's delightful writing style and the fascinating way she drew parallels between menstruation and theology - things I had never thought about before. Definitely lots to think about and I expect I'll come back to this one a few times. I enjoyed this more than I thought I would, honestly. I picked it up out of curiosity and was drawn in by Rachel's delightful writing style and the fascinating way she drew parallels between menstruation and theology - things I had never thought about before. Definitely lots to think about and I expect I'll come back to this one a few times.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josh Olds

    I am not the target audience for A Brief Theology of Periods. Yet, the title intrigued me and I’m all for destigmatizing and demystifying the cultural taboos that keep us from being healthy, well-educated, confident, and without shame. My hope was to learn something—biologically, theologically, sociologically—that would affect how I as a pastor do ministry. Particularly, I curious as to what sorts of “theological” implications Rachel Jones would make. And maybe it’s my personal detachment and la I am not the target audience for A Brief Theology of Periods. Yet, the title intrigued me and I’m all for destigmatizing and demystifying the cultural taboos that keep us from being healthy, well-educated, confident, and without shame. My hope was to learn something—biologically, theologically, sociologically—that would affect how I as a pastor do ministry. Particularly, I curious as to what sorts of “theological” implications Rachel Jones would make. And maybe it’s my personal detachment and lack of personal experience, but while I liked the idea of the book, the content was not quite where I hoped it would be. However, again, I am admittedly coming at this book from an outsider’s perspective. I could certainly understand how someone who has a period might feel differently and feel seen through virtue of shared experience through this book. The “brief” part of the title is accurate. The main text weighs in at just over 100 pages. Maybe 15k words total. This is fine, as it’s not intended to be academic at all or really to a deep dive, but just get people thinking about menstruation through a different lens that they might normally. There are five chapters that each highlight a different aspect of a period: potential, pain, mess, feelings, and time. My primary criticism with A Brief Theology of Periods is that it doesn’t live up to its title. It’s not so much a brief theology as it is a book that talks about God, women, and the human condition using the periods as an illustrative launching point. For example, in the first chapter, Jones writes that God created women to have periods, so a period is a reminder of God’s creative work. She says that periods should remind us of the original Edenic mandate in Genesis 1 to multiply and care for the earth. Her theology isn’t wrong, but menstruation is only ancillary to the point being made. It’s a not a brief theology of periods, it’s a brief theology using periods. Chapter two discusses the pain of a period with the theological application that periods remind us of sin and human suffering. Chapter four talks about how women must rely on the Spirit to master their emotions which are being affected by hormone fluctuation. Chapter five becomes even more metaphorical, talking about the clockwork nature of menstruation and how each period could become a time of reflection for what the individual had accomplished in the time between periods. None of this is necessarily wrong, but all Jones is really doing is using periods as points of context or illustration. You may find yourself connecting with it if having a period is one of your experiences, but this book—in its theological content and devotional suggestions—could have easily contained much of the same material and not been about periods. The closest Jones gets to actually giving readers a theology of periods is chapter 3, where she actually deals with Biblical references to menstruation. In particular, Jones goes to Leviticus 15 and talk through the texts regarding ritual impurity. Unfortunately, I didn’t feel like Jones did this part of the book justice. There are rich cultural and scriptural implications to be mined here, but Jones’s primary takeaway is that “God wants to show us that we can’t be pure without him.” Which, true, but there’s so much more ritually and culturally that could have been brought to the table. Lastly, in the appendix, Jones becomes unnecessarily controversial when she asks the question “Should we call people who have periods ‘women’?” Recently, there has been conversations surrounding transgender identity, the difference between biological sex and sociological gender, and how to best express certain terms with inclusivity and accuracy. Trans women will not have periods and some trans men may still have periods. It’s beyond the scope of this review to go through all the social/political baggage that comes with this conversation—and it was beyond the scope of this book as well. Jones quotes J.K. Rowling’s insensitive and offensive comments on Twitter about “people who menstruate” and then reasons that nobody complains when COVID-19 deaths are broken down into a binary gender demographic. She then conflates sex with gender, ultimately concluding that because the two pre-fall humans were created male and female, then…well, Jones never actually explicitly states a conclusion. It’s an awkward, unnecessary, and ham-fisted aside to the entire book. Okay then. A Brief Theology of Periods. I appreciate what it was trying to do, but I am not convinced it met its self-stated mark. Nonetheless, just the fact that evangelical Christianity is beginning to have this conversation in any format in any depth is a sign of good cultural change.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren DuPrez

    For years I’ve struggled with hormonal issues of various kinds. I’ve often wondered how to understand the way being an embodied soul is affected by my hormones. Like many women, I’m sure, I’ve struggled to identify whether my experiences are directly tied to my hormones or my heart. Rachel Jones has done an excellent job of showing how the two aren’t at odds with one another in her latest book A Brief Theology of Periods. The book begins with Rachel detailing the different phases of the menstrua For years I’ve struggled with hormonal issues of various kinds. I’ve often wondered how to understand the way being an embodied soul is affected by my hormones. Like many women, I’m sure, I’ve struggled to identify whether my experiences are directly tied to my hormones or my heart. Rachel Jones has done an excellent job of showing how the two aren’t at odds with one another in her latest book A Brief Theology of Periods. The book begins with Rachel detailing the different phases of the menstrual cycle and what happens in a woman’s body during those phases. She explains to readers how a woman’s menstrual cycle is a manifestation of general revelation. It was neat to read Rachel explain how she arrived at that conclusion. I often lament that I have to deal with PMS monthly. Although I have found ways to improve it and nourish my body to ease my symptoms, I had never considered how my cycle points to God as the Creator. In addition to helping women understand how they are fearfully and wonderfully made as image-bearers of God, Rachel offers women counsel and comfort for the hardest hormonal experiences. Having recently experienced a miscarriage, my heart found comfort in Rachel’s words when she said, “. . . Jesus is with you in your suffering. Whatever your hurt—whether it’s the agony of endometriosis, or the grief of miscarriage, or the emotional and physical toll of menopause, or something else—Jesus gets it . . . He’s familiar with pain. And as a Christian, you can know that he’s entered into your suffering and taken up your sin, to guarantee you a future without either—an eternity of peace with God, with a body, mind and soul that are healed and whole,” (pg. 45). Rachel also reminds readers of the beauty of weakness within the Christian and how weakness is a great opportunity for Christ’s power to be made perfect. I found her words in this section to be particularly encouraging in my healing from miscarriage. Regarding weakness she wrote, “God loves to work through weakness. He doesn’t let out a sigh when, yet again, we’re struggling. He’s a patient Father who helps us—not with an eye on his watch but with a smile on his face. Day by day he meets us in our weakness not with derision but with gentleness. Surely that should be how we meet our own weakness and that of others?” (pg. 49). One aspect of A Brief Theology of Periods that I deeply appreciated is how it views hormonal issues through both a physical lens and a spiritual one. With much wisdom, Rachel shared, “Remember that we’re whole creatures, body and soul—caring for one does wonders for the other. Taking sin seriously could look like being upfront with others so that they can pray for us and help us out practically to ease the pressure and minimise temptation. And taking sin seriously will always look like availing ourselves of the gift of the Holy Spirit, making sure we ask him to help us as we head into our day and praying throughout it for his power to be at work in us” (pg. 83). Overall, Rachel did an excellent job of handling a topic that is generally viewed as uncomfortable and inappropriate in church circles and she did so with gentleness and grace. I really enjoyed A Brief Theology of Periods and highly recommend it to women who are seeking encouragement for hormonal issues and to men who want to love their sisters in Christ, including their own wives and family members, well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kasey

    I don't know what exactly I was expecting for this book, but the title alone made me say TELL ME MORE, but it was...disappointing. Basically if you're a Bible believing Christian and your identity in not wrapped up in your period, hormones, menopause, etc., you're fine without this book. It doesn't really add any new or creative insights or perspectives. However if you are someone who does has serious "why is this happening to me God?" issues that are period related, this book may be comforting. P I don't know what exactly I was expecting for this book, but the title alone made me say TELL ME MORE, but it was...disappointing. Basically if you're a Bible believing Christian and your identity in not wrapped up in your period, hormones, menopause, etc., you're fine without this book. It doesn't really add any new or creative insights or perspectives. However if you are someone who does has serious "why is this happening to me God?" issues that are period related, this book may be comforting. Pros: -Periods are talked about! It's not taboo, it's a normal body function! -Biblical support. Mostly this book uses "general revelation" analogies, but where we are traditionally used to seeing them made with trees or the stars, periods are used. -Ms. Jones frequently recommends going to the doctor (science and biology are discussed in a very accessible way, and if anything seems wrong or you are unsure GO TO YOUR DOCTOR!) -encourages men (fathers, spouses, even pastors, etc.) to understand that periods, menopause, or anything that can go wrong can be a major preoccupation for some women. So no matter you role, "be like-minded, be sympathetic, love one another, be compassionate and humble" (1 Peter 3 v 8) Talk to the women in your lives to find out how you can love them as they go through menstruation, pain, menopause, and hormones and don't just relegate it to "women's issues". Be a man and care for the women in your lives, be ready to listen and hear what they have to say, and then act. Cons: -Womanhood is never explicitly discussed. Am I doing womanhood right? Is there a right/wrong way to be a woman? Is it just a fun roller coaster of hormones, pain, and time that should ultimately bring us closer to God? I guess the reader can decide. -It doesn't really add any new or creative insights or perspectives. -If I have my Bible, google, and a few ladies I can talk about periods/menopause with, I have everything this book tried to tell me (maybe I'm just lucky?) Recommendation: -Maybe someone who has a serious hormone/menstruation/menopause health crisis this book may be comforting. -Maybe young girls who are overwhelmed by new period experiences. -Maybe women who are entering menopause and feel like they have "run out of time" or that they have nothing left to give. Maybe. I really wanted to fall in love with this book and share it with small groups but it just kind of fell flat or missed the mark. If you do benefit from this book, great! But heads up, it may not be very insightful or helpful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Clare S-B

    This was certainly worth a read, I was actually surprised at how much it really was written for everyone with a period. It is about the theology of it after all. There was even a chapter on menopause, which I might look back at one day. I liked how she presented a lot of views on topics that we can't really know the answers too. Though some seem a lot more likely than others. There was twice I felt like she missed saying something (perhaps she had never thought of those particular ways to look a This was certainly worth a read, I was actually surprised at how much it really was written for everyone with a period. It is about the theology of it after all. There was even a chapter on menopause, which I might look back at one day. I liked how she presented a lot of views on topics that we can't really know the answers too. Though some seem a lot more likely than others. There was twice I felt like she missed saying something (perhaps she had never thought of those particular ways to look at periods before, but I have and expected it to get a least a passing mention) SO I was a bit disappointed that she never mentioned for example how in the old testament because a woman was unclean on her period she would have 'had to' rest! Theoretically she could not cook or clean because anything she touched would become unclean. And yes she talks about how now it doesn't make us unclean of course. Overall though Rachel had some really cool, biblical thoughts. The only failing being I wanted more, and expected something a little deeper or with more new thoughts. It felt like a bit of a shallower bible study on the topic, than a deep/thought changing theological discussion. So it's worth a read if you have the book on hand.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Don’t go into this book expecting a deep theological discussion. Rather, this book is more of an attempt to start a conversation in the church around the reality of periods and related topics: pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, and medical conditions like endometriosis. It is a reflection on womanhood, the gift of how our bodies work differently than men’s bodies, and why that is not a bad or shameful thing. I hope it will be a launching point for further making this conversation more comfortable Don’t go into this book expecting a deep theological discussion. Rather, this book is more of an attempt to start a conversation in the church around the reality of periods and related topics: pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, and medical conditions like endometriosis. It is a reflection on womanhood, the gift of how our bodies work differently than men’s bodies, and why that is not a bad or shameful thing. I hope it will be a launching point for further making this conversation more comfortable for men and women—though I don’t necessarily need periods worked into every Sunday sermon. That said, men should definitely read this book as well. It offers insight into what women go through on a monthly basis and can encourage compassion and understanding around those topics listed above.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Maybe 3 stars is a bit low, but this wasn't as good as I'd hoped it would be. As an introduction and a conversation starter, it was so helpful, though. I just wish there was more of it! There was so much scope, but each chapter ended just where it was getting interesting! I found Jones' tone a bit patronising, too. Definitely worth a read though, more so for the men (husbands, fathers, pastors, friends etc) than for the women who already know most of this! Maybe 3 stars is a bit low, but this wasn't as good as I'd hoped it would be. As an introduction and a conversation starter, it was so helpful, though. I just wish there was more of it! There was so much scope, but each chapter ended just where it was getting interesting! I found Jones' tone a bit patronising, too. Definitely worth a read though, more so for the men (husbands, fathers, pastors, friends etc) than for the women who already know most of this!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily Zell

    This is a brave topic, and reading this book is a helpful reminder that God can be worshipped in absolutely any aspect of life. But if I'm being honest, this book left me more unsettled and with more questions that I had when I started. I felt like she did the bare minimum of nuancing which is frustrating in a really personal issue. There are great things in here for sure, but I'm left wondering a lot. This is a brave topic, and reading this book is a helpful reminder that God can be worshipped in absolutely any aspect of life. But if I'm being honest, this book left me more unsettled and with more questions that I had when I started. I felt like she did the bare minimum of nuancing which is frustrating in a really personal issue. There are great things in here for sure, but I'm left wondering a lot.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tina Miller

    This book deals with a hushed subject with delightful humor, frankness, and honesty, directing our focus to God's word, his plans for women's bodies, our holiness, and our redemption. You will gain a vision of the glory of God's plan that you can pass on to your girls, your moms, your friends. Highly recommended! This book deals with a hushed subject with delightful humor, frankness, and honesty, directing our focus to God's word, his plans for women's bodies, our holiness, and our redemption. You will gain a vision of the glory of God's plan that you can pass on to your girls, your moms, your friends. Highly recommended!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alecia

    I read this book after I finished In the Flo. Was definitely very “brief” and basic, but was an interesting reminder of how all of life — even periods and the female body — reflect an intentional Creator/Designer. I appreciated how she also addressed the pain of getting a period of those struggling with infertility or otherwise unable to have a child, as well as a chapter on aging/menopause and the reminders of the finitude of this side of eternity.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steve Frederick

    What a great (brief) project. I enjoyed listening to the audio version of the book. Perhaps it is slightly more a theologically pastoral response to the reality of periods and menopause, rather than primarily “a theology” of periods. I found the section on time and menopause really provocative in thinking about how preaching could better take into account women’s embodied experiences.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    The tone is occasionally silly and I have minor quibbles with a few of the author’s OT interpretations, but all in all, well worth reading.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mmar

    I really appreciated the wisdom and honesty of this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eilidh

    Great wee book, very helpful to think through!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Maguire

    I loved this book. It sounds weird but it’s so helpful & has tons of Biblical references in it. It makes being a female a little easier to understand! Haha

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Moore

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emery Lambert

  28. 4 out of 5

    Séphora

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Christie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Baker

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